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I believe it would depend on the intent of the author. If the intent is to be clever or to confuse the audience for some effect then they may do something like your first example. I have two bats in my gym bag. Would you grab one please? [Other guy opens the bag and a vampire bat flies out. He falls on his behind. Audience laughs] If the intent ...


-3

Can't help, but you got me thinking, is the e.g. 'U.S. army' not the same as your notebooks, meaning that usually Navy, Army and Air Force are treated as one incorrectly in sake of 'convenience'! One would think that Navy and Air Force didn't take part in D-DAY if you read this excerpt from an American web-site: The U.S. Army remembers June 6, 1944: The ...


2

To replace 'to' with 'and' here would not be grammatically incorrect, but you would lose the rhythmic and rhetorical impact of the "from... to... to..." format of your sentence. Personally, I'd leave it as it is. Regarding another stylistic issue, I would replace ...gave me the conviction that this is the place for me. with the more elegant ...


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User MrHen's superlative answer above decomposes and then anatomises the sentence, so I just focus on the question When can a singular verb be used for multiple subjects separated with 'and' ? I find Brian A. Kelms's answer herein supernal, so thought to excerpt it here: This kind of thing used to trip me up, too, as a subject with multiple nouns in it ...


0

Simply put, i.e. should be used when you want to say 'in other words.' E.g. is used when you want to say 'for example.' I love casino gambling (i.e., poker, slots and roulette.) In this case, the distinction is being made between specific gambling activities as found in casinos to gambling of other sorts, such as horse- and dog-racing, betting on ...


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In my reading of the Chicago Manual of Style (but I do not have a copy with me) and from my legal writing experience, the best answer to your question may be to almost entirely avoid answering your question. First, my training says to only use e.g. when you need to save space, which is almost exclusively in footnotes and endnotes. In the body of the text, ...


0

It's almost correctly puctuated. One could add a comma after "etc." but that looks like a lot of commas. I suggest using parentheses thus: " . . . folders you wish to export (e.g., Inbox, Sent, etc.) and. . ." Then take out the "e.g."—it is superfluous. The use of two examples is fine; you did use the plural "folders", and it is uncommon to follow a ...



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