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Most scientific organizations have a style guide. The American Medical Association has one, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers has one, the Council of Science Editors has one, most scientific journals have one or recommend the use of a particular one. There is no right or wrong here--it is a matter of choice, but that choice is often dictated by ...


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Or, why not use full sentences? These paradigms are grouped into three categories. Wisdom consists of right view and right thought. Ethical conduct is composed of right speech, right action, and right livelihood. Lastly, Mental discipline contains right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration.


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You could possibly use brackets like so: These paradigms are grouped into three categories: wisdom (consisting of right view and right thought); ethical conduct composed of (right speech, right action, and right livelihood)... This is probably how I would go about it. Or, you can use dashes: These paradigms are grouped into three categories: ...


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That is indeed the correct usage of respectively, though there should be a comma before it. For ease of understanding, I'd also recommend listing the types of evaluations before listing the corresponding percentages: 40% of the score was based on the client evaluations; the manager, peer, and self-evaluations made up 30%, 20%, and 10% of the score, ...


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It's a stylistic choice. I was taught to use semicolons for complicated lists, especially when some elements of the list contain commas. In your case, the list is clear either way. This reference from Bristol University spells it out: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/exercises/grammar/grammar_tutorial/page_05.htm



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