New answers tagged

1

English is English. Not mathmatics or logic. However, some people allow mathmatics and logic to inform the way they use English. Others do not. English is all about usage. Adding negators (be they not or otherwise) can invert the meaning of and and or. In logic this is called Demorgan's law and can be expressed as: The negation of a conjunction is ...


0

I had have the same Doubt and my conclusions were : (1) It Depends on the context (2) When somebody says "AND mean this, and OR means that", you should take it as "AND mean this for me in this context, and OR means that for me in this context". Consider Police warnings in Bangalore : "Do not Drink AND Drive". Here, for them, it means you should not do both ...


1

Those are not negations. If you mean that there are no bacteria and no viruses then you use and (your first choice). If you mean that there are no bacteria or there are no viruses (and it is possible that there are neither) then you use or (your second choice. Likewise for your kicking and/or punching examples. And means both (both are prohibited, in this ...


2

From Wikipedia... An autological word (also called homological word or autonym) is a word that expresses a property that it also possesses (e.g. the word "short" is short, "noun" is a noun, "English" is English, "pentasyllabic" has five syllables, "word" is a word, "sesquipedalian" is a long word. The logical negating prefix should be an-, leading to ...


1

The linguistic or grammatical principle that likely provokes your concern is termed coordination. Here's Wikipedia's article on the subject. There often needs to be some kind of match between the elements that are coordinated in a sentence. But many of us poorly understand which kinds of matches and mismatches are grammatically felicitous, questionable, or ...



Top 50 recent answers are included