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2

I have found that [knowing how to effectively manage and organize paperwork, requests, and deadlines] is the only way in which to get the job done effectively. It's fine with singular "is". The reason is that non-finite clause subjects take singular verb agreement. Here, the large subordinate that- clause (in bold) functioning as complement to the verb "...


1

I have two comments. There is no need for a comma after 'e.g.' (in i and I), but there is a need for a space. I don't like the 'and' in the list as it seems to finalize something that is only an example, but leaving it out seems ungrammatical. I would suggest a fifth option that overcomes this: (x, y, z etc.) This also seems to me better for a ...


2

The reason for using ‘;’ rather than ‘,’ is to avoid ambiguity if the item/phrase includes a comma. Whether to use small Roman numerals or Arabic numerals is a matter of style and whether you are using numerals elsewhere in your hierarchy. I think small Romans here are OK as they are somewhat less obtrusive (you are just using the x-height) than Arabic ...


0

No comma. Consider the two options: If John goes to the party, Mary will bake a cake and Bob will be unhappy. If John goes to the party, Mary will bake a cake, and Bob will be unhappy. Option 2 looks like a list of three items: on first glance, it looks like you're telling us that the three things are going to happen. Option 1 is more obviously a ...



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