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I believe the linguistic term the OP is looking for is asymmetries (with minor corrections) Language and Sex Differences Serap Yelkenaç ... Moreover, another lexical fields that are taken into account as errors resulting in discrimination in language are marital status, asymmetries ( in other words, marked and unmarked forms), jobs and ...


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Thumb through any thesaurus, and follow the synonyms around and back; you will find many sets of words that share more than one synonym with each other. I don't know a name for this phenomenon, but it is quite common.


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There are two relevant terms because this concept is involved in communication and in creative thinking. Both terms continue to be used even though perfection, 1:1, (should that be 3:3) may never be achieved in either field. Translation; not only into foreign languages, but also patois, dialect, tenor for each audience. Analogy; where choice of a word, ...


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Is there a word for this concept? No. Also, how common does this happen? I am not even aware of a single example. And I just ran through a few homonyms to check. The different meanings are usually so different that finding a synonym of one of them that also has 1. multiple meanings and 2. multiple meanings that match homonyms of the first word ...


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The term dysphemism is appropriate: noun A derogatory or unpleasant term used instead of a pleasant or neutral one. The opposite of euphemism. ODO, emphasis mine Brands are designed to generate pleasant feelings in the marketplace, but these monikers are proffered to defame the brand with a sense of contempt, as the specific meanings of the ...


3

Spelling a word depends on hearing it, and in your list, with the exception of 'vanguard', the "simpler" words employ largely conventional phonetic orthography. Consequently, even upon hearing them for the first time, someone can intuit their spelling using knowledge of phonetic orthographic conventions; the more "difficult" words, OTOH, have uncommon or ...


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Actually, this is an interesting question, and I think I may have an answer. I am writing a book called Shakespeare's Numbers that explores the nature of Shakespeare's "iambic pentameter" and you are not amiss in questioning the "natural iambicity" of English. English is no more iambic than it is trochaic. The idea that its rhythms are iambic probably ...


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Salutation A gesture or utterance made as a greeting or acknowledgment of another’s arrival or departure



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