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You might consider internalized oppression (def: the process by which a member of an oppressed and usually minority group comes to accept and live out the inaccurate myths and stereotypes applied to the group). One manifestation of this is the belief that one's accent is ugly or otherwise inferior to the "norm," and results in some people taking diction ...


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These may describe the condition, rather than the person who might feel anxiety that they're being judged; that their accent is seen as a "qualifier" of social status: Sociolinguistic discrimination; Linguistic profiling; Ethnocentrism; Linguicism; Classism; Cultural bias; Socioeconomic stereotyping; Dialectical stigmatism; Patois prejudice; class ...


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A bit of canoodling around on the intertubes with the google leads me to believe that the answer is SWEET NESS : SUFFIX :: BOAT SWAIN : STEM The second syllable of "sweetness" modifies the first syllable, turning the adjective into a noun, but it's the first syllable of "boatswain" that modifies the second, turning "swain" (a young man) into a ...


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I believe the correct term is a bound root. This refers to the part of a compound word that is not (or is no longer) an independent word. According to SIL: A bound root is a root which cannot occur as a separate word apart from any other morpheme.


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Perhaps the imposed norm hypothesis? Here's a quote: Previous work suggests that standard dialects assume their prestige over other language varieties not because they are linguistically or aesthetically superior, but because of historical, cultural norms. An empirical investigation lends this view support etc. From ...


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You know the saying: "Birds of a feather flock together." So, if you sing 'different' and are self-conscious about it, you might think of yourself as "a sing-ular bird of a feather"! The phrase does not exist… yet, of course!


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(Similar to the answer on identity which is closest so far.) There is also the term: "Acts of Identity," which is essentially which is essentially convergence-type behaviour, discussed by LePlage & Tabouret-Keller, 1985 here.


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Are you looking for Communication accomodation theory? Specifically: convergence - Convergence refers to the process through which an individual shifts his or her speech patterns in interaction so that they more closely resemble the speech patterns of speech partners. ... People use convergence based on their perceptions of others, as well as ...


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"Peta-" and "tera-" are prefixes in the International System of Unites. The former comes from the Greek word "πέντε," meaning five because "peta" means 10005 or 1015. Tera comes from the Greek word for monster, "τέρας," and it means 10004 or 1012, also known as a trillion. So a petabyte is 1015 bytes or 1000 trillion bytes.


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Two possibilities spring to mind: Diglossia A situation in which two languages (or two varieties of the same language) are used under different conditions within a community, often by the same speakers. The term is usually applied to languages with distinct ‘high’ and ‘low’ (colloquial) varieties [...]. [Oxford & Wikipedia (for the socioluingistic ...


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A person who is shibboleth conscious? A shibboleth is a word from the Hebrew Bible, and it means "torrent of water." This word was used by one tribe to distinguish their tribe who pronounced the word šibbōlet, from another tribe who pronounced the same word sibbōlet (see Judges 12:4-6).


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He/she felt linguistically discriminated or to be precise accentually discriminated. The condition is called accentism. Linguistic discrimination is the unfair treatment of an individual based solely on their use of language. This use of language may include the individual's native language or other characteristics of the person's speech, such as an ...


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Self conscious: Defined by Merriam Webster as: "uncomfortably nervous about or embarrassed by what other people think about you..." I've used the phrase in a sentence to make the phrase clearer. "She rarely spoke up in meetings because she was self-conscious about her accent."


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The copular verb/linking verb is "were" (to be), the linking verb number 1. It is followed by "known", the predicative complement. Here "known" is used as an adjective. "known" is followed by "as brocade pictures". Here I think the terms for this part will diverge. I would say this word group is a complement to the adjective "known". I don't think that ...



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