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144

Eureka! Ok, so it's not a single word, but it's what I was trying to think of: Semantic Satiation Edit: Found a languagehat discussion on this topic.


69

The answer to this is.... complicated. The letter J is, as you mentioned, relatively recent, and originated as a variant of the letter I. Why that happens is a little complicated, and requires unpacking some assumptions in your question. In the original languages (Latin, Greek, Hebrew) which provide us with the names Jesus, Joseph, Justinian, etc., the ...


46

A "native speaker of English" refers to someone who has learned and used English from early childhood. It does not necessarily mean that it is the speaker's only language, but it means it is and has been the primary means of concept formation and communication. It means having lived in a truly English-speaking culture during one's formative years, so that ...


45

Short answer:It's a contraction. These are modified in pronunciation beyond the more normal form's simple truncation, but they are the same thing, fundamentally. Essentially, it's a form of contraction that has been informally promoted to a word. (yes, that's a neologism as mentioned in the comments) Support: Oxford calls it contraction. ...


30

In the spoken language, these examples are strings of words where the realisation of the strings in speech is quite different from the citation forms of the individual words. A citation form is the phonetic form of the word when we mention the word without using it in its normal sense. So for example we might say: This is the word "can". Here the item ...


29

Based on this NGram... ...I'm tempted to suggest semantic satiation is a 'failed coinage'. Personally I think it's misleading to imply the phenomenon is restricted to the issue of semantics in the first place. In my experience it's not so much that the word 'loses its meaning'. It's more a matter of saying that almost any word tends to become 'unusual' if ...


22

The language you speak is English; the dialect is American English (or rather, American English is a group of dialects, one of which you speak). Similarly, British English is also a dialect of English, even though it can be thought of as the "original" dialect. Dialects are defined precisely because languages vary in different regions, be they small or ...


22

"Prisencolinensinainciusol" is a song by the Italian singer/comedian Adriano Celentano with nonsense lyrics that are intended to sound like American-accented English. As it happens, I played it for my wife two nights ago and asked her to guess what language it was sung in; she eventually guessed English, though she couldn't understand the words. So if it's ...


21

The article on semantic satiation led me to the French term jamais vu, which I think I like better for a couple reasons. It seems to apply better to the written form as described in the original question, and also I find it more fun to say.


20

Based on Martha's accepted answer, I offer: Orthographic Incredulity


19

In addition to the all the good reasons cited in the previous answers, I'd like to emphasise the role of the Catholic Church. When (ca. 496) Clovis, then young king of the Franks, resolved to convert to Catholicism, allegedly under the influence of his wife and Saint Remigius but more probably because he understood what a fruitful collaboration he would ...


19

Cohesion describes the way in which a text is tied together by linguistic devices, such as And so we see . . . , Additonally . . . , Therefore . . . , However . . . and On the other hand . . . A text has coherence if its constituent sentences follow on one from the other in an orderly fashion so that the reader can make sense of the entire text.


17

Rhotic English is a term to describes varieties of English in which orthographic R is usually pronounced, even at the end of a syllable. In non-rhotic varieties of English - such as Southern Standard British English - orthographic R is only pronounced if followed by a vowel. It doesn't matter if there is a double R or not in the orthography: car / ka: car ...


16

It's apparent that different people have different notions of what a "native speaker" is. To a linguist, the term generally implies that a speaker has "internalised" the language through "natural acquisition", rather than through deliberate instruction/learning. A "native speaker", as opposed to an extremely proficient second language speaker, can often ...


16

Disclaimer 1: I do morphology, not syntax. Disclaimer 2: The theoretical stuff is Chomskyan syntax, not proven fact. In any case, the need for do in English is commonly known informally as "do-support". In Chomskyan syntax, the need for do arises from the fact that there is no movement from the head of the Verb Phrase (VP) to the Tense or Inflection Phrase ...


15

That's a cataphor. A cataphor is a phrase that is explained by text that comes after the phrase. Example: "Although he loved fishing, Paul went skating with his girlfriend." Here he is a cataphoric reference to Paul.


14

Yiddish: 'nik', as in "beatnik", no-goodnik, peacenik.


14

1. What is this phenomenon called, exactly? The phonological phenomenon by which /k/ (as in kirk) is changed in /tʃ/ (as in "church") is termed Palatalisation. It applies to many languages (Romance, Slavic, Germanic...) and it is quite easy to understand where it takes its name from: When you pronounce "kirk", your tongue does not touch your palate. ...


14

They are eye-dialect spellings designed to make the ordinary way these phrases are spoken appear careless or substandard.


13

In light of Auracaria's and your comments below, consider calling these linguistic reductions. Linguistic reductions are lost sounds in words. This happens in spoken English. For instance, "going to" changes to "gonna". The most widely known reductions are contractions. Most contractions are reductions of 'not'. For instance, "cannot" becomes ...


13

The question of H-dropping in English is a frequently revisited one and the succession of theories put forward could be a topic in its own right. Without going too far back in time one of the most authoritative sources on the subject is James Milroy who, in a paper titled "On the sociolinguistic history of /h/-dropping in English", published in 1983 ...


13

I expect the strained rhymes in Dante are merely from the fact that it's translated. If you're writing original poetry, you have much more freedom to change things around to make them rhyme than you do if you're translating poetry, and care about keeping it moderately faithful to the original. Anyway, Dante's terza rima scheme is pretty much iambic ...


13

Short answer: The transition from /t/ to glottal stop does not require intermediate steps. Explanation: There are three main factors involved in the production of a consonant: place of articulation, manner of articulation, and voicing. The glottalization of /t/ is essentially a loss of place. /t/ is a voiceless alveolar stop. These three words in the ...


13

My compact version of The Oxford English Dictionary lists it as "An infantile word expressing thanks," and dates its first reference from 1772, unless my eyes deceive me (I am momentarily unable to locate the magnifying glass that came with the tome). Edit: Thank god for Eric Partridge. He quotes the same OED reference, only in larger type. Here is the ...


13

It's a Spoonerism.


13

These ones are the ones I could find. The link brings you to a more in depth description. Between parentheses, you'll see the origin. The main page that I found at the beginning is "English Morphemes ". I tried to order them in a matching order to fit your question. If you see something that doesn't fit, feel free to let me know. ...


13

First, if you're actually teaching English to non-native speakers, you must learn and use at least those IPA symbols that represent English phonemes. Get yourself a copy of Kenyon and Knott and use it; or borrow one of your students' bilingual dictionaries. If you help them, your students can understand the pronunciations as they appear in their bilingual ...


12

I think you can get a rough idea by grouping affixes according to their rough function and assuming that people wouldn't tend to form words with two affixes of a similar function (e.g. it would be rare to make a word with both "bi-" and "tri-", because they both denote conflicting numbers). Crystal (Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language) suggests ...


12

Online Etymology Dictionary says: ta: 1772, "natural infantile sound of gratitude" [Weekley]. So it is most probably the imitative of baby talk. American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language says: ta: Chiefly British Used to express thanks. ETYMOLOGY: Baby-talk alteration of "thank you".



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