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Probably the single word you are looking for, which may be "more fit" than ignore, is: disregard transitive verb: (M-W) to pay no attention to, treat as unworthy of notice (or regard) (D) leave out of consideration; ignore: (TFD) to show no evidence of attention concerning (something): Please disregard what I said before. He disregarded his father's ...


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You might say not given due consideration. Longman's dictionary suggests the following sample usage: After due consideration, I have decided to tender my resignation. In many contexts "due consideration" would be a formal version of "take seriously"


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Following Catija's advice, I nominate "not being addressed". It is the perfect register for this kind of writing, i.e., social-workerese, aka hot air.


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I'd argue that you see "not take seriously" in enough important news sources to think it's not completely informal. If you want something different, how about: not heeded Heed: to pay careful attention to somebody’s advice or warning


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One common expression is to be entitled: qualified for by right according to law; "we are all entitled to equal protection under the law" The free Dictionary


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When a court orders for taking control of a property or real estate by the government in exchange of money, what is the best word for the court action? I'm assuming you are looking for the term that describes the action of the government. The action of a court would be to "order" in the case of property taken to resolve a debt, or "find", "review" ...


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If your court case is in Scotland, the estate might be poinded:- poind (Law) to take (property of a debtor) in execution or by way of distress; distrain (Law) to impound (stray cattle, etc) [Collins English Dictionary via the Free Dictionary]


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Expropriate is also used, especially if the property is taken for public use: (Law) to deprive (an owner) of (property), esp by taking it for public use. The Free Dictionary


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If the property is being seized in order to pay a debt, then the property is sequestrated. Sequestration is the placing of property into the control of a trustee who will distribute it amongst creditors.


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The term, in the UK at least, is Compulsory Purchase noun 1. purchase of a house or other property by a local authority or government department for public use or to make way for development, regardless of whether or not the owner wishes to sell www.dictionary.com This leads to the somewhat clumsy-sounding, but accurate: The court ...


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Confiscate take or seize (someone's property) with authority. Oxford Dictionaries


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Language can't be squashed into boolean logic. Nor are the meanings of phrases dependent on their fulfilment in the real world. There are lots of cases where and can be used with essentially the same meaning as or, such as Our dinner choices are pizza or curry. Our dinner choices are pizza and curry. This is because neither and nor or have the same ...


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Does the word “and” always mean a logical (boolean) operation? Certainly not, a quick glance at the dictionary demonstrates that the use of and is not limited to a boolean operation: conjunction 1.0 Used to connect words of the same part of speech, clauses, or sentences, that are to be taken jointly: bread and butter they can read and write ...


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I have to weigh in here. I can't stand by while others butcher logic. According to me, and based on the examples posted here, in the cases English AND is used logically, Boolean AND and English AND are IDENTICAL. I'll be ready to believe otherwise when I see some solid proof. Debunking Prem's examples: (2B) Most cases against this criminal gang were ...


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You ask whether "AND" is always a "Boolean-Operation" meaning both should occur. You also think that, as more words are added to the phrases on the two sides of AND, the meaning changes to OR. Well, here are some cases which can be taken as counter-examples : Short Forms : (1) Drinking AND Driving will be punished : Both are required ; It is an offence ...


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"Withheld" means that an amount of money that would otherwise be due the employee is kept by the employer, to (partially) pay for the insurance. In the US employers "withhold" tax money on behalf of the government, and also may "withhold" money to pay an employee's medical insurance. One may also have money voluntarily "withheld" to deposit into a savings ...


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It means that the insurance [premium] is paid for jointly by the company and the employee. This is often done for ease of processing, and streamlining payments to the insurance company keeping this in mind.. and coming to answer your question... the employee's insurance will be covered by employer,:: Partially[ why else is it withholding "employee's portion ...


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Some literatures (French and Farsi have been instanced on this site) applaud and even demand such employment of synonyms; but in English this is deprecated and mocked as 'elegant variation'. Moreover, in some disciplines it is regarded as a grave vice to stray from the most neutral term available in introducing a quotation. Any more colorful term, such as ...



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