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6

This is a common turn of phrase to mean that the Supreme Court, comprised of 9 judges, reached the decision with 7 judges voting for it and 2 against. You can see it, for example, in the New York Times' review of the US Supreme Court's 2015 decisions, with each decision's yay/nay ratio expressed as X-Y: ...


1

"Spoken disclaimer" or "oral disclaimer" would differentiate radio disclaimers from written disclaimers. You could replace "disclaimer" with similar words, i.e., "spoken disclosures," "spoken fine print," or "spoken boilerplate" if those terms are more appropriate. (Maybe also "exclusions" or "representations?") But I don't know of any term for this that is ...


1

You're talking about a disclaimer. From Wikipedia-- A disclaimer is generally any statement intended to specify or delimit the scope of rights and obligations that may be exercised and enforced by parties in a legally recognized relationship. In contrast to other terms for legally operative language, the term disclaimer usually implies situations that ...


2

Not exactly, but without further context it's impossible to say definitively. Strictly speaking, a trade-off involves actually exchanging one thing to gain another. It's used metaphorically, too, and usually in the guise of a "win-win" for both parties. In this context, a legal balance probably means that the courts will ensure that interests never ...


0

In 'balance', there would be a balance between the rights and interests. In 'trade-off', may get whats asked for, but importantly, also had to give something up, make concession, make a compromise in order to get an agreement.


-1

It seems that the office of the president refers to the president's immediate staff - e.g. the assistants to the president, arising from Roosevelt's reorganization act. The office of president refers to the specific role of presidency. This difference is highlighted by the restriction that no person who has held the office of President ... [under ...


0

Since there is only one elected (titular) 'President' at a time, the definite article is not needed. I would have omitted it everywhere, lest anyone think that the 'office' was merely referring to the room that he sits in, although that is where he goes when elected, and he certainly can't hold it in his hands.



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