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I reject the deontic "be willing to" because it doesn't comply with the subject. While the perp may have to understand that he/she is willing to comply, the subject of the sentence is "anything," which doesn't have a will. The matter is one of logic, not one of grammar. The authority issuing the rights does not have the right/ability to say what "will" (a ...


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I did a search on Google Scholar for several of your terms in opinions issued by U.S. federal courts. All of the terms are routinely set in lowercase except in titles. Clearly, the federal court system does not believe they should be capitalized. Leave them in lowercase. People tend to be too eager to capitalize technical terms, for little reason other than ...


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As a Canadian court reporter, I have no clue about your first question. However, I capitalize all of your suggested queries.


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"Due diligence" is a legal term to describe when one has exercised an appropriate level of caution or investigation prior to acting or making a decision. To "do due diligence" is an attempt to use the legal term in a grammatically inappropriate way. A more appropriate ways to express oneself, if one really must force the legal term into one's sentence, ...


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Not so much a grammar rule but people have analysed the frequency of all the letter combinations of various lengths in samples of English text. They then used this to randomly generate a kind of pseudo English. I'm not sure where I originally saw this, I think it was a little more scholarly, but here's an example of someone's generated pseudo-English: ...


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This question is not really about grammar, but about phonotactics. According to Wikipedia (quoting from Haspelmath, Martin; Sims, Andrea, English Words: A Linguistic Introduction) there are fourteen constraints on English words: All syllables have a nucleus No geminates No onset /ŋ/ or /ʒ/ No /h/ in the syllable coda No affricates in complex onsets The ...



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