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1

Institutional context is important in the meaning of words. Since crime has a legal basis, only judicial institutions can decide what is or isn't proof of guilt in the violation of a statute. Morality aside, does committing a crime make you guilty of violating a statute, or does getting prosecuted? From a legal standpoint, the latter holds, as guilt is the ...


1

If proving Robert’s guilt would require a trial (and I think it would), perhaps you could come at this from a different angle and dance around this issue by instead saying: #3-Lucy realized she found the evidence which/that refuted Robert’s {claim of} innocence. Refute: verb-/-to prove that (something) is not true. (Merriam-Webster) Irrefutable ...


4

I think your question doesn't match your context. Lucy realized she had the proof to _________ Robert. The blank here is not a verb meaning "to prove his guilt". Lucy had proof to prove-the-guilt-of Robert. That doesn't really make sense. A better way: Lucy realized she could prove Robert's guilt. Alternately, Lucy realized she could ...


0

When I really ponder over the sentence after picking my word, the sentence shrinks. My word is "Blameworthy" which means responsible for wrongdoing (and deserving of censure or blame). The first sentence that I made from your given template was - "Lucy realized she could prove that Robert is blameworthy." But even better sentence is Lucy realized ...


2

A somewhat old fashioned expression for this would be bring home the crime to. Your sentence would then read Lucy realized she had the proof to bring home the crime to Robert Examples of this usage can be found here:- Mr. Depping turns out to have been an American criminal, and Gideon Fell must penetrate the secrets of his American associates as ...


0

"Convict," "commit," or "prove" would all seem to be appropriate, depending on what you want to say. "Convict" is right if you want to refer to him being found guilty in court (regardless of objective guilt, this is a finding of legal guilt). He could be convicted if framed, really did it, or didn't. "Commit" refers to if the person objectively did the ...


11

I am tempted to propose the following: Lucy realized she had the proof to establish Robert's guilt. Per Merriam-Webster: establish verb : to cause (someone or something) to be widely known and accepted : to put (someone or something) in a position, role, etc., that will last for a long time : to begin or create (something that is ...


19

Convict is the correct word here. It's the strongest and most succinct, though legally speaking, Lucy would not do the convicting: that would be filled by the role of judge, jury, or relevant prosecuting attorney for the government. Indict and implicate are too weak: especially in modern, western legal systems, the accused benefits from the presumption of ...


18

I agree that the verb convict pretty much means found someone is guilty of a crime. The proving part is the prosecution process itself. If you are looking for a more direct way to apply the proof in your sample sentence, I would use committed: Lucy realized she had proof that Robert committed the murders.


2

I disagree with some of your premises. Proof that frames is an oxymoron, unless you qualify proof somehow to show it is not legitimate and doesn't actually prove guilt, as in seeming proof that frames. Consider other qualifiers such as faked-up, false, circumstantial, misleading, misinterpreted. (Note: misinterpreted was added in an edit, and at least one ...


2

What about prosecuted? In the past tense the process has completed and a successful outcome would indicate proven.


18

Lucy realized she finally had enough evidence to indict Robert on the charge of murder. Indict in·dict /inˈdīt/ verb, North American –Google past tense: indicted; past participle: indicted formally accuse of or charge with a serious crime. Because of double jeopardy, one had best be sure you have all your ducks in a row before you indict a ...


0

I looked up the opposite of exonerate: (especially of an official body) absolve (someone) from blame for a fault or wrongdoing, especially after due consideration of the case. And I found these: blame condemn convict damn burden accuse incriminate


25

You already have the most common phrase: the evidence to prove [ or that would prove] Robert guilty. If the word proof is important, simply the proof that Robert was guilty would work well.


47

According to Merriam-Webster: implicate: (3a) to bring into intimate or incriminating connection evidence that implicates him in the bombing So I would write this: Lucy realized she found the proof that implicated Robert in the murders. You can omit "in the murders" if it is implied by context.


7

Sentence 1 (with nail) sounds a bit colloquial to my non-native ears. Furthermore, I think that “nailed Robert to the murders” links Robert to the murders but is ambiguous as to whether he was the murderer, an accomplice, or perhaps even merely involved in some way (e.g. he drove the murderer to the place where the crime took place but did not know of the ...


4

Edited. I would suggest "Lucy realized she had found the evidence which would convict Robert of murder. convict - (vb tr/intr:) Law - To find or prove (someone) guilty of an offense or crime, especially by the verdict of a court. "The jury convicted the defendant of manslaughter." "There is sufficient evidence to convict him." "His son ...


0

~~~ Lucy realized that she had the smoking gun that would nail Robert for the murders. This conveys that Lucy had the evidence in hand, by whatever means she procured it, to convict Robert. ~~~ Lucy was responsible for finding the smoking gun that nailed Robert. This identifies Lucy specifically as the 'finder' not creator of the evidence. The examples I ...


2

Nouveau Petit Larousse: p.1125 (English paraphrase) Beati possidentes happy are those who possess A phrase made fashionable by the prince de Bismark; it means if you want to claim ownership of a country you must take possession of it first.


0

"Possession is nine-tenths of the law." The definitive exposition may be found in the archives of this site.


9

The expression that comes to mind is Possession is nine-tenths of the law. From the Free Dictionary: possession is nine-tenths of the law: Custody presumes ownership. The basis of this legal maxim that comes down from the 17th-century is the commonsense observation that if you have control of something, chances are better than average that ...



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