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0

No, it's actually rich, and the author was maybe bragging about his knowledge of latin as the right of say is simply the literal for jurisdiction (see also this): Middle English: from Old French jurediction, from Latin jurisdictio(n-), from jus, jur- 'law' + dictio 'saying' (from dicere 'say'). early 14c. "administration of justice" (attested ...


2

(Could be from the French "droit de parole," which could mean "[no] right/authority to speak [for/over] Area C." – Papa Poule 2 hours ago) Thinking more about this I went from "right/authority to speak for/over" to "power of attorney for/over," which brought me back to another French word, "mandat," which led me to "mandate:" "[no] mandate over Area C," ...


0

Commute definition 4: "to pay (an annuity) at one time, esp. with a discount". In other words, the taxpayer has made an agreement to pay one large instalment, and in return be free of all seigniorial dues in the future. Such agreements are not uncommon; many modern travellers commute their daily fares into one large annual fee, and are called commuters.


4

This appears to be a document transferring a piece of land, or some rights in a piece of land. As the whole now subsists is a formal way of saying “In its entire current state, in the entire condition it now presents”. With all its rights members and appurtenances (in ordinary non-legal writing there would be a comma after rights) specifies that current ...


1

As the whole (of the document) now remains in force (subsists) with all its rights, members and anything belonging/related to the subject of the document (Appurtenances) without any objections or anticipation of future needs (exception or reserve) of any kind on the part of the seller (vendor). You can double check what I've said here; ...


0

Eugene, as quoted, is misleading at best: the root is dispose, not dispose of. The noun from the latter is disposal; from the former we get (and still use) disposition, meaning 'arrangement', from which the legal meaning (as well as 'temperament' and the others your dictionary gives) derives by extension.


0

OED confirms Eugene is correct: Etymology: In Caxton < French dispositif, -ive (13th cent. in Hatzfeld & Darmesteter), < Latin type *dispositīvus , < dispositus , past participle of dispōnĕre to dispose v.: see -ive suffix. In later use probably immed. from Latin or on Latin analogies. Having the quality or function of directing, ...


1

I would take it to have a meaning in keeping with 5. Specifically, I take his comment about "no such long-continued action" to mean that the cause of action (i.e., the specific kind of breach of contract) that was relied on in the present case had not been brought before the courts, or relied on in court, in the recent past. Given that it had not been ...


0

http://www.yourdictionary.com/suit gives this definition: 6.a. an act of suing, pleading, or requesting. This seems to fit.


1

In short, no. It's just a section symbol; it's not even used that much outside of the US even for that purpose.


3

This would be inappropriate: the symbol simply means a section, and is used in many contexts outside of the law. I don't think there is any common symbol for legal matters. The closest would be a balance scales. Do you need a symbol? Why not just write 'Legal'?


1

I associate the section symbol with statutes and legal codes because it's commonly used (in connection with a numbering system, as in §1.1.1) to identify specific sections or subsections of a law or code—but I'm not sure I would have recognized it as such before I attended law school. For most people in the United States, the two most immediately ...


-2

I don't think I am knowledgeable about it all that much. This may be relevant, though: Red legal citation symbol (shows § in graphic) Relevant keywords for this picture: articles, citation, clause, clauses, close, close-ups, closeup, closeups, cut, cut-out, cutout, cutouts, inboard, indoor, indoors, interior, internal, justice, law, laws, ...


0

It is not a common term (Ngram - sponsor vs sponsee ) but it is increasingly used (Ngram - sponsee) since the 80's. Sponsee: (from www.yourdictionary.com) Noun(plural sponsees) One who is sponsored. If you don't feel comfortable with this term you can use, 'the sponsored team'.



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