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13

Stage direction — as mentioned in The Free Dictionary. When the play is actually staged, as StoneyB says: The action itself is called business in The Profession, unless it involves movement from one location to another, when it is called a cross, verb to cross. All business and crosses together constitute blocking; the director (producer in GB) blocks ...


12

In formal contexts, I would go with "e.g." and "i.e.", with two periods and without a whitespace. The spellings without periods are quite popular, but informal. For example, Merriam-Webster does not have an entry for either "eg" or "ie". Wiktionary marks "eg." and "eg" as informal, and offers the following usage notes: Opinion is mixed about whether ...


11

The Wikipedia page on Italic type gives a pretty good overview, along with some examples. Emphasis: "Smith wasn't the only guilty party, it's true". The titles of works that stand by themselves, such as books (including those within a larger series), albums, plays, or periodicals: "He wrote his thesis on The Scarlet Letter". Works that appear within larger ...


7

According to the Associated Press Stylebook, you should use quotation marks around the titles of books, songs, television shows, computer games, poems, lectures, speeches and works of art. You don't need to use quotations around the names of magazine, newspapers, the Bible or books that are catalogues of reference materials. None of them are required to be ...


6

Yes, this is perfectly fine. For example. Jack thinks it is impossibly difficult, but I think it only implausibly so.


6

Any of those options will work, but if you refer to words more than once you should take care to use the same convention in each place. Italics seem the best option if you can use styled text, but styles aren't always available. In American English, it's conventional to place punctuation marks inside quotes instead of outside. There are a lot of situations ...


6

That is an interesting question. I think there is a spectrum between two parallel and identical things at one end, and two things completely different but with the same name at the other. The former is like: "I saw and conquered Gaul" This is common and regular ellipsis; you leave out the common part in two parallel phrases, which is called syllepsis, ...


5

The Chicago Manual of Style (14th Ed.) has this to say about it: 5.4: The typographic treatment of punctuation adjacent to a variant font (italic or boldface within roman text, for instance) should be governed by both appearance and meaning. Generally, punctuation marks are printed in the same style of font of type as the word, letter, character, or ...


5

I would, instead, say/write one of the following: the book, Of Mice and Men, and the movie based on it the book, Of Mice and Men, and the movie with the same title the book, Of Mice and Men, and the movie, Of Mice and Men, the movie, Of Mice and Men, and the book on which it is based the movie and the book both titled Of Mice and Men both ...


5

I would say no. Here is a quick guide on the correct usage of italics. To summarize: Don't use it for the proper noun. They example they give for a restaurant: if you write about a certain dish you ate that might not be commonly known, italicize it, but do not italicize the restaurant name.


5

It depends on what you're talking about, and how formal you're being. I would normally use Wh-questions when talking about any phenomenon that applied to all such questions, not just Why. By the same token, if there were something specific to Why-questions (e.g, embedded Why-questions don't allow reduction with relative infinitives, the way how ...


4

No, you should not italicise the 's. The reason behind that is that italicisation is part of giving importance or a style to a title, now if you italicize the 's it will become part of the name itself. But if you don't continue the italicisation it will mean that you have added it on purpose. Chinatown's means the movie name is "Chinatown's". Chinatown's ...


4

Bill's right that libraries and (most) bookshops don't worry about stylization within titles; and that the 'house style' for the place your writing is published is the most important factor. But if you do want to retain the emphasis on one word, the usual convention is to take out of italics the part that would normally be italicized: 'Choose the Red Pill ...


4

Reverse the italics to roman as you've done in the first example.


4

In some traditional typesetting contexts, you would never italicise parentheses even within italic text (and I'd recommend doing this yourself if you have the luxury). I must highly recommend not to only italicise one of the parentheses! (As in your example ‘(or fluff)’.) Otherwise I agree with the other comments on ‘it depends’, according to aesthetics and ...


4

It depends on the style guide you're following. Wikipedia says yes: Italic type (text like this) is generally used for the following categories of titles: ... Works of art and artifice Computer and video games (but not other software) The Guardian says no: Use roman for titles of books, films, etc ... Use italics for ...


4

In the examples you cited, both the quotes and the italics are being used for emphasis-- they're drawing attention to a specific term that you want the reader to distinguish. In that case, both are fairly interchangeable, though each will read better in a different situation. Italics are generally used for emphasis, or to draw attention to a special term ...


4

Neither holy scripture nor federal law dictates which to use. If your publisher/editor etc has told you which to adopt, do whatever they have asked. If your publisher/editor etc has told you to adhere to a particular style guide, do whatever that style recommends. If nobody is compelling you to adopt either choice, which do you prefer?


3

Aka doesn't need italicising. It can be written and will be understood both with and without periods, although I see it usually written without. Style guides will differ on the periods. As a counter-example to the somewhat heavyweight CMOS, the Guardian recommend to use aka without periods. Unusually, the guide also shows it in capitals, but a quick look in ...


3

Logically, it depends on whether the punctuation belongs to the italicized text or to the rest of the sentence. He asked, "Why?". He asked, "Why! Because it is not obvious to me why." (And yes, we can debate the presence of the full stop in the first example - where 'full stop' gets translated to 'period' in American English.) If you are going for ...


3

From my Organic Chemistry days, I remember that the isomers (compounds with the same chemical formula but different structures), for cis and trans, were italicized. If you look on the Wikipedia page for cis-trans isomerism, it follows this convention, as every cis and every trans is italicized. Cis is Latin for same side. A cis bond is one where the the ...


2

Off the top of my head, italics are used for: book titles foreign words Latin names of species In the first and second case, you could just as well enclose the word(s) in quotes (without using italics). The third one seems to be set in stone.


2

There are two ways I have seen to solve the exaggerated compound descriptor issue. If the description is in the form of something you might utter as an admonition, you can use quotes: This is one of those "everyone shut up and go way" kind of days. But if it is not in itself a statement someone might make, stick with hyphens. This is one of those ...


2

I have never seen this usage that I recall. If it's done, it's surely not common, and so would at best be unclear to the reader. I HAVE seen people put the compound in quotes, like: This is one of those "everyone shut up and go away" kind of days. I presume the goal of either technique -- italics or quotes -- is to eliminate the long hyphenated ...


2

eg & ie should be: e.g., and i.e., Don't forget the comma.


2

It's better to rewrite the possessive of something inanimate (like a movie). Chinatown's plot... => The plot of Chinatown... This becomes even more evident when the movie ends in an s. The Silence of the Lambs's protagonist... => The protagonist of Silence of the Lambs... While this sidesteps your question, if one must choose how to italicize, ...



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