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32

You were right and your editor was wrong. Your question was Can anyone tell me X? and you properly expressed X as a free relative clause, which always acts as a nominal constituent. You asked, in effect, if anyone could tell you an answer. Your editor inverted the auxiliary verb and the subject of the free relative clause, transforming it into a ...


13

With respect to information structure, this word order pattern seems to be equal to fronted adverbials, as in: Into the room walked a man The new information / focus follows the finite verb. Similarly, in "So do I", "so" refers to the proposition in the previous utterance, "do" is a dummy verb, and "I", the new information, comes last.


11

You are right. The correct sentence would be Now let's see how we can do this. The incorrect form you've read demonstrates a fairly common English mistake among non-native speakers, especially those whose native language allows for omission of the subject pronoun (such as the Romance languages). The confusion arises from three points: In a question, ...


11

Embedded questions normally don't allow Subject-Auxiliary inversion, though it's required for normal questions: How can we do this? (Aux can and Su we are inverted) *How we can do this? (No inversion; ungrammatical) However, in spoken English (which is similar to the chatty, informal style used in many computer books), an embedded question complement ...


11

I posted a question somewhere that said: 1.) Can anyone tell me how I can solve this? but someone edited it to: 2.) Can anyone tell me how can I solve this? and it was accepted. That's wrong isn't it? Can someone explain how that's wrong? The difference between the two versions is that the subordinate interrogative ...


10

It's grammatical. Subject-verb inversion is required when preposing a negative adverbial of time, place, or circumstance. At no time did he say that. ~ *At no time he said that. Under no circumstances may she enter. ~ *Under no circumstances she may enter. It is not allowed, however, when preposing other adverbials. *With no hesitation did he speak ...


9

Switching around the normal word order is called inversion, and this specific type is called subject-auxiliary inversion. Wikipedia has a list of usages of subject-auxiliary inversion, including interrogative constructions (e.g. Did you eat?), but the following is the declarative section: Declarative sentences with negative elements (i.e. never or not) ...


9

Neither of your two questions makes sense as written, and I do not know what the intent is. For one thing, I don’t understand why they are questions; they do not look like such to me. For another, the formulaic “be they X or Y ”, using present subjunctive and inversion as it does, is of a somewhat elevated register which may not be appropriate for all ...


8

To agree with a positive statement: We use so + auxiliary/modal verb + pronoun: "I like tea without sugar.' 'So do I.' To agree with a negative statement: We use nor/neither + auxiliary/modal verb + pronoun: "I don't like tea with sugar.' 'Nor do I.' or 'Neither do I.' To disagree with a positive statement: We use pronoun + auxiliary/modal verb + not ...


7

First, note that "x is y" is not always logically equivalent to "y is x". For example, "Fools are my friends" is different from "My friends are fools" (because the first allows wise men to be my friends too, whereas the second does not); "All men are mortals" is very different from "Mortals are all men" :-) That said, sometimes there is an equivalence, and ...


7

The general answer is that you only move the verb ahead of the subject within a main clause. All of your examples have WH-movement within an embedded clause. What have you been doing today? (main clause) I asked [what you have been doing today]. (embedded clause) I am annoyed because of [what you have been doing today]. (embedded clause) Can ...


7

All three versions occur, though they don't falute the same. (c) is the canonic source, with simple Wh-fronting, leaving is at the end of the sentence: does anyone know [the task for the afternoon is what]? ==> does anyone know [what the task for the afternoon is]? (b) is a further variation on (c), with the prepositional phrase for the ...


6

"Do I love you?" is the proper form. In spoken English, though, you can, and in suitable situations you would, use the form "I love you?" To put this into an example (spoken): Situation A: Person A: "This guy came in and asked whether he can borrow my cell phone. Do I know him?" Person B: "Yes, he's one of our former employees, we've worked together ...


5

Not sure if this helps, but original has the following senses. Preceding all others in time; first. Being the source from which a copy, reproduction, or translation is made. You say original comes with the notion of "designed similarity", but perhaps we can call a post "original" if it simply precedes the newer one in time.


5

It's dangerous to generalize that supply is the inverse (or opposite) of apply. It might sound that way when speaking of functions, or possibly other things, but there are many nuances to the usage of supply and apply that would make most reversals sound strange or contrived. In fact, there would be many cases where they are used nearly as synonyms not ...


5

Actually, whether the "not once" construct means "never" or "several times" might depend on the rest of the sentence – not just the order of "he would" or "would he". For example, there's nothing wrong with: Not once would he strike out, but three times that game.


5

If you start with a certain kind of negative, you have to invert the auxiliary: Not often does he come this way. Never would we call them after eight o’clock. Seldom do the bells ring so long as they did that day. Hardly had he put on his boots when his seat gave way. Never shall I pass this way again. Rarely do we see the likes of them in these parts. ...


4

The non-inverted question is used in one specific case: when the first speaker has expressed as fact something the second speaker doubts. @RiMMER's example demonstrates that. Or, to use your sentence: Person A: Since you love me and I love you, we should get married. Person B: I love you? If B had said "Do I love you?", it would be an expression of ...


4

Your intuition is correct; the sentence should be: Now, let's see how we can do this. I share your suspicion that the page in question was written by a non-native speaker. In my experience, non-natives have a very hard time distinguishing between the grammar of questions, which trigger inversion, and relative clauses, which do not trigger inversion. ...


4

Your sentence is right. A simple way of looking at the rule of inversion is thinking about question and sentence patterns in English. The question pattern is: Verb (V) + Subject (S) Some learners actually misunderstand the meaning of "v." In the same way that these questions are wrong and unacceptable: Went he to school? Like you ...


4

No, they aren't interchangeable. A tag question is a device used to turn a statement into a question. It nearly always consists of a pronoun, a helping verb, and sometimes the word not. Although it begins as a statement, the tag question prevails when it comes to the end-mark: use a question mark. Notice that when the statement is positive, the tag question ...


4

Subject-Auxiliary Inversion with Adverb-Fronting is simply a Negative Polarity Item (NPI). ‘NPI’ is a term applied to lexical items, fixed phrases, or syntactic construction types that demonstrate unusual behavior around negation. NPIs might be words or phrases that occur only in negative-polarity contexts (fathom, in weeks) or have an idiomatic sense ...


4

The Object clause how strong ..., since it starts with a Wh-word, is an Embedded Question Object Complement clause. Embedded Wh-Questions differ from real Wh-Questions in that they don't undergo Subject-Auxiliary Inversion. So that's what lets out the third example, which has undergone Subject-Auxiliary Inversion. Both of the first two examples are fine, ...


4

While it may appear that the subject is "dropped" (also called "understood"), this is an example of inversion. You could think of the sentence as simply: "Perched on a mountain was a castle," akin to the example sentence: "Lost among the old tables and chairs was the priceless Victorian desk," which is one of the 18 kinds of sentence inversions, called ...


4

If you don't know where you are, you ask, "Where am I?" The only legitimate use for "Where I am?" is in response to a question about the location of something that you think might be occupying the same general space you are. For example, Questioner: Do you know where your clothes are? You: Where I am? Questioner: Wrong. We found you running ...


4

This is called subject–verb inversion, and is done for a variety of reasons. The referenced article mentions four sorts: Locative inversion Directive inversion Copular inversion Quotation inversion This one is locative inversion, because the sentences starts with a location specification, a “where” phrase. This is completely common in English. At the ...


4

I am assuming that you are French. :) I would definitely suggest that you not include the silent s, as English speakers will find this confusing. Even though the idiomatic placement of the word extraordinaire after the noun is derived from french, I don’t think the silent s would be as well.


4

I assume you mean this site for your examples. There are a number of ways to structure the sentences, each with different degrees of inversion. I'm not sure which one you're looking for, but hopefully this will help. The lady ran into the room. (subject-verb-phrase) STANDARD FORM Into the room ran the lady. (phrase-verb-subject) Into the ...


3

The negative no sooner is placed at the front of the clause for emphasis. This construction requires inversion, in which the auxiliary verb, in this case had, is placed before the subject. The unmarked version would be He had no sooner sat down than he fell asleep, and it means that he fell asleep immediately after sitting down. Examples of other negative ...



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