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I've assumed that the question mark is a typo and intended to be an exclamation point, as other commenters suggest. "Well played!" would be the boys shouting that the Don Bosco Public School played well. In indirect speech something like The boys shouted that Don Bosco Public School had played well would convey a similar meaning. In the image you ...


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The key to direct vs indirect speech is that it's speech, which in the direct form is enclosed by quotation marks and needs to be converted to an unquoted (indirect) statement. Thus, she said "I am hungry" (direct) becomes she said that she was hungry (indirect). It doesn't matter how the speech occurs, e.g. said, asked, screamed, whispered, demanded, ...


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Ask is a transitive verb: it takes a Direct Object (DO), in its simplest form a noun phrase: Anne asked me [DO a question]. If we want to represent Anne's exact words, we use the question she actually asked, followed by a question mark and enclosed in quotes, in that DO position: Anne asked me "Who is your favorite actor?" The quotes mark this ...


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Affirmative: that man was Negative: that man wasn't Interrogative: Was that man...? Affirmative statement: Tell me who that man was. Interrogative: (only 1 interrogative form at the beginning) Can you tell me who that man was? Interrogative: Who was that man? Affirmative: Anne asked me who my favourite actor was. (There's no question mark.) Question ...



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