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6

As jwpat7 pointed out, it depends on circumstances. Here is how you might use each tense, with examples for each tense: Fred: 1.) "Hey, Jim, did Jack tell you he eats your chocolate?" In this example, Fred is really informing Jim that Jack eats Jim's chocolate, even though Fred is asking a question. We might call the questioner (Fred) a snitch, ...


6

The direct speech in your example is a question which asks if there was a chair there at some time in the past. When you report it, you place the question further back in time, so that it becomes Somebody asked if there had been a chair there at the last lesson.


5

Meaning This is Valley girl slang used to introduce quoted speech, also known as a quotative. It's a way of quoting a speaker by describing them according to their statement. It's similar to saying "he's like: [quote]", or "he goes: [quote]". "He's all: [quote]" can be read as "he was all like this: [quote]". Here's an example from Do you speak American? ...


5

The first reports the speech ‘Words fail me.’ The second reports the speech ‘Words failed me.’


5

It's more to the point that you cannot use must in the past tense: it's had to. In the original sentence, ordered is in the past tense, so what is ordered must either be entirely uninflected ("subjunctive") or expressed as "future-of-the-past"1. A. My boss ordered that the legal documents be sent to him before lunch. B. My boss ordered that the legal ...


4

'I am a teacher', when reported becomes 'He said he was a teacher'. 'I was a teacher' becomes 'He said he had been a teacher'. 'I have been a teacher' equally becomes 'He said he had been a teacher'. 'I had been a teacher before I joined the army' when reported becomes 'he said he had been a teacher before he had joined the army'.


3

This is correct: “You Bi would like to swim.” = “You Bi wants to swim.” → “You Bi said she wanted to swim.” You can also use would unchanged: “I would like to swim.” → “You Bi said she would like to swim.” Here, you can analyse would as conditional—if You Bi went swimming, she would like it. Would is also (morphologically) the past form of ...


3

I would like and I want are different ways of expressing volition. For that reason, it would be inaccurate to report I would like to swim as She said she wanted to swim. It has to be She said she would like to swim. This use of would is sometimes described as having ‘unreal meaning’, but in cases such as this it is perhaps better seen as expressing a ...


3

Both are correct. Melissa said she WAS going to the mall. This implies that at some point she had informed you that she was going to the mall. Whether she went there is ambiguous. Melissa said she IS going to the mall. This implies that she is on her way to the mall. Depending on the situation, either could be right. For example, you're in ...


3

I believe it's in that tense because he is referring what the plans were at that time, not the actual future events that will be occurring tomorrow night. If your plans change you don't say "We are going to the game next week but it's too expensive so we are watching at home instead." you say "We were going to the game next week but it's too expensive so ...


3

"Did she even ask you what you were doing tomorrow night? If you were busy?" Your example is about indirect reported speech that is using the backshift preterite (that is, a past-tense verb) for the subordinate clauses that are expressing what had been asked by her. She had asked something like: "What are you doing tomorrow night? Are you busy?" ...


2

NB: I find it nicer to put "to say" before "that", though why I find that nicer is probably a subject for another post. I've done that here. If the class was in the past then the first example is fine. Lucy expected you in the class on Thursday. Where were you? Didn't she get the message? I sent her an email to say that I wouldn't come to the class. ...


2

John told Sean to let him help him. I realise that creates ambiguity as to who was going to help who, but the context would probably sort it out.


2

Strict sequence-of-tenses gets muddy when Speech time, Event time and Reference time overlap, as in your instance. When I got home yesterday, John called and said he will arrive next week. Here, the Event time (next week, the time of the event ‘I’ am speaking about in this clause) happens to lie in the future with respect to both the time when John ...


2

The parentheses are part of the speech; if there could be any doubt, the context makes it unquestionable: —Еh bien, mon prince. Genes et Lucques ne sont plus que des apanages, des поместья, de la famille Buonaparte. Non, je vous previens, que si vous ne me dites pas, que nous avons la guerre, si vous vous permettez encore de pallier toutes les infamies, ...


2

Having looked at the site that @bigbadonk420 referred to in his answer, I disagree with that answer and interpretation of the quoted site. On my reading of that site, the two options for reported speech are (using the OP's quotation): with backshift: He said that his name was Harry without backshift: He says that his name is Harry There is no ...


2

1: Mom asked Gramma why she hasn't been answering 2: Mom asked Gramma why she hadn't been answering 3: Mom asked Gramma why she didn't answer In both #1 and #2, the implication is that Gramma has repeatedly failed to answer. But #1 further implies she was still ignoring the phone right up until when Mom asked why (or, noting StoneyB's comments ...


2

Your instincts are completely correct. Your "grammatically correct" versions are clunky, awkward, and no fun to read. Your simplified versions are completely idiomatic, smooth, easy, and enjoyable to read. Throw away the rules. Go by your ear. Keep it simple and idiomatic. And keep up the good work! You're a good writer.


2

The sentence She asked the teacher what should she do. Is not written or spoken by a native speaker I assume. I would guess what is meant is: She asked the teacher what she should do. And that sentence does indeed mean: She asked the teacher: "What should I do?"


1

So.. People told me it is romantic. => Means that people told you about that in the past, you heard it in the past. It was and still is romantic. People told me it was romantic. => Means that people told you about that in the past, you heard it in the past. And it was romantic, we don't know whether it is or it is not now. The only absolute ...


1

As this forum question states, which sites Palmer's The English Verb, This depends on whether the statement being reported is still true for him. If it is, he may (but is not required to) retain the present tense. Taken out of context, it is hard to be sure but it is (probably) still true, for the speaker, that we need to stop littering in order to ...


1

As so often in this type of multiple-choice question, there is not enough information to be clear of the context, resulting in more than one possible answer: If it means that on some occasion in the past the boss ordered you to send him documents before lunch, then A. be sent is the best answer, but C. were to be sent is also possible if the order no ...


1

To have. One should definitely use the infinitive. "He seemed to walk straight", "she was told to listen carefully".


1

A better choice is to use the verb as it is: "You Bi said she would like to swim."


1

It is not correct to say that the tense of the verb in a reported time clause never changes. It depends on whether the action or state in the time-clause is still true at the time of reporting. As an example of no tense change, imagine that Person A, three months ago, said to person B: "I will go to Italy when I finish school". If Person A is still at ...


1

The reporting has no influence on the tense. Imagine this conversation: "She went to Spain when she finished school." "Did she say that herself?" "Yes. She said she went to Spain when she finished school." Perfectly natural. Now let me amplify a bit: When thinking about this situation, one might think of "reported speech" as if a reporter ...


1

The default rule in English is indeed to backshift when you use past tense for reported speech. For example, see this Google Ngram, which shows that "He said his name was" is around 20 times as common as "He said his name is". On the other hand, if you want to emphasize the fact that the statement is still true, then you can indeed use the present tense ...


1

3 and 6 (and maybe 5, and just feasibly 4) are correct/valid. The other two are simply incorrect. I'd rather use shorter (but equivalent) examples, and separate the two sets, so let's consider... 1: I'll say "I have been hiding" 3: I'll say I had been hiding 5: I'll say I have been hiding 7: I'll say I will have been hiding 3 is definitely ...


1

I consider (5) and (6) to be the correct options. As seen in how do the tenses in English correspond temporally to one another, the use of "had been" implies that the action took place prior to some other also-completed action of interest. So if you say (4) I will pronounce him dead and tell him he had been pronounced dead. then the most logical ...



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