New answers tagged

1

The first option is correct. How much truer and kinder an act of giving is when one gives away what you need. To paraphrase, "giving is kind and true, but it is much truer and kinder when giving away something you need." I'm not sure what the construct is called, but it's turning the question "how much kinder is it to do X instead of Y?" into a ...


1

The word instance here appears to mean request (FULL definition of instance in Merriam-Webster Dictionary). Example: am writing to you at the instance of my client


1

Some countries use inked stamps on the passport page to insert a visa, but the US does not. Nonetheless, there is much material on the internet concerning US visa "stamps," and the "stamping" of US visas (that is, the insertion of a visa foil into a passport). At one time US visa was actual ink stamps, the sticker and the foil are relatively new trend and ...


0

Not sure whether or how this is related, but I've noticed, while watching British TV -- and perhaps it's just a regionalism -- the use of "only" as seemingly an equivalent of "you see," or "it's just that." For example, "Only, I was wondering if you had a spanner I could borrow." Not in the sense of "I need a spanner, and only a spanner."


4

The word "only" is often used by many Indians as a replacement for a certain kind of emphasis that is found in a lot of Indian languages. Let's say you are describing somebody who's a habitual liar. A lot of Indians might say, "So, he lied to you ? Of course, he is like that only ". Indian languages usually have suffixes or separate words to emphasize this ...


9

To add to the theories in OP and the answer of @Malvolio, there's another interesting clue here. As @NeilW noted in the comments, the British actually used to use the word "only" after the amounts on cheques, receipts, bills, etc. (Apparently to prevent tampering, thanks @MattBishop .) This is still practiced in India today. For example, here's one of my ...


4

The expression is from the late '70s, probably on the notion of cooling down the eyes from the hot sun. I can't find any evidence that the expression was originally a BrE or AmE one, I think it is an original Indian English one. Cooling glasses, also Coolers (noun - sunglasses INDIA) I bought a pair of cooling glasses today–the sun was so bright. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included