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1

I don't know of any particular connection to Indian English. The idea that lower-case "i" is somehow more humble did appear in a New York Times essay by Caroline Winter about the English first-person singular pronoun, "Me, Myself and I" (hat tip to Neil Fein for locating the article in his answer to the question "Is it alright to use lowercase 'i' or should ...


2

Grammatically you cannot use to receiving as one unit. But "receiving" can be preceded by by the preposition "to" like: I'm looking forward to receiving a letter from my penpal. - in this case, to is not a marker of an infinitive but part of the combination "to look forward to".


0

Act naturally. On the off chance that some man calls you 'dear', please illuminate them that the word isn't ordinarily utilized like that. Instruct them to call you brother or buddy or something else you're OK with. Not just will it bail them out, it will likewise decrease the quantity of unexpectedly dreadful Indians on the planet, for which I'd like to ...


1

The sense of "take birth" in English in the 19th century was that of arise, or take hold. From a book of songs published in 1822, the following oh-so-British celebration of pleasure: From prudence let my joys take birth, Let me not be passion's slave, Approv'd by reason, sweet's the mirth, Vice of pleasure is the grave. Another example from ...


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No, a Western English speaker would say She gave birth to a healthy baby boy. He was born with a full head of hair.


2

Indian here. Aren't you being a little paranoid about this? Just ask. Whenever I get such a response and I'm unsure, I immediately pounce on the person concerned: "What exactly do I need to do? I'm not clear on the actions I'm supposed to take." If they do clarify, great! If not, then ask them if you could either work on it together and plan something out, ...


1

From one Andy to another. :P First of all, I'm Indian. I've had to deal with several books by Indian editors so I know where you're coming from (note: not Indian authors; even if their language is unclear, I blame just editors. They sucked at the one job they had). No, it simply cannot mean "1.2m or more". No way. Your first interpretation is correct and ...


4

Indian here. So I've been called 'dear' in some situations where it felt weird. And in all of them, the speaker was mostly trying to communicate familiarity and affection. See, when we speak in Hindi, we generally add a word like 'bhai' (brother) or 'sahab' (sir). So the 'dear' is probably an attempt to showcase their affection for you. They just don't know ...


4

A snappy response (I don't know if this would be a polite phrase in Indian English): And the needful being...? A constructive, slightly longer response: [First, restate the problem to be solved] Did I get that right? [Hopefully this gets a nod.] I want to make sure we're on the same page about how to solve this [OR how to proceed]. My idea here ...


0

I've never heard "do the needful" in the wild, but it sounds kind of British. With that in mind, if all that is desired is a snappy comeback, perhaps this line from the BBC comedy Yes, Minister will serve: We must do something. This is something. Therefore we must do it. An internet search indicates that this line has achieved something of a life of ...


2

You have several grammatical errors in your message. Moving some things around and correcting your grammar would look like: I have been working as a freelance writer for the last five years. I am really interesting in writing and submitting articles for your site. Is there a Guest Post option or some other way for me to contribute?


2

Speech is of time, silence is of eternity. - Thomas Carlyle, Sartor Resartus It is the wise head that makes the still tongue. - W. J. Lucas


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Let not thy tongue run away with your brains I'm not sure whether it is of English origin, but it has been around for a while, since it can be found in: Gnomologia: Adagies and Proverbs; Wise Sentences and Witty Sayings, Ancient and Modern, Foreign and British collected by Thomas Fuller; B. Barker ... and A. Bettesworth and C. Hitch, 1732 A modern ...


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Our mamas always told us: If you don't have anything nice to say, don't say, anything at all!


3

There's a proverb: "Speech is silver, silence is golden".


10

There's this fairly famous saying: "Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and remove all doubt." A quick internet search indicates that this saying has been attributed to Mark Twain, Abraham Lincoln, and Confucius, among others.


1

If there is a clear break in a sentence, it is sometimes worth reordering it to make more sense of it. In this case the sentence has a single comma which allows you to switch the last part of the sentence to the front (changing "such" to "because"), so try reading it as... "A reading on the basis of political unity would be inaccurate BECAUSE such groups ...


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The phrase such a means it's referring back to something described earlier in the passage. Specifically, it refers to the topic of the first sentence: It will be too easy to read major political intent into an Iftar meeting ... In this context read means interpret. So the sentence you quoted starts the explanation of why this interpretation is not ...


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(I am not a professional in your field, and thus I will answer based on my own understanding) The groups involved have different definitions/approaches towards something. Therefore, it makes no sense for them to talk about political unity. Just like in a debate contest, if the two sides cannot even agree on the definition of the topic, it doesn't make any ...



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