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Here is a good alternative: It won't be long before my sister graduates. In any regard, to address the problems in your sentence, you should use "her" instead of "their" because "sister" is explicitly feminine. Also, you want to use a different word in place of "when" such as "until"/"till" or "before". You also need to clarify your intended ...


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Um, no. It is not very long until/till my sister finishes her graduation. or better yet, as Jim said: "It won't be too long until my sister graduates" I don't know why you used their. The usage of sister identifies the gender and there's no need for the gender-neutral pronoun. The way you phrased it is wrong, and InE speakers do not phrase it ...


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I believe the difference is in the implication. The way I see it. Putting in one's papers implies that person is leaving their job but they are going to finish up the last of their duties and get things in order properly before they leave for good. Putting down one's papers implies that they are leaving the job, possibly disgruntled, and getting out of ...


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Being used to the Indian dialect, I am certain that the person meant that both of you will indeed meet again within the next 2-3 years.


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"nothing like that" means: "that's really impossible, forget about that!"


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I have a hunch that the InEng (IE/IndE) usage is derived from the polite valediction, Best wishes, i.e. “I hope everything goes well for you”, and the phrase “send her/him my best wishes”. In both expressions two objects are not required, it is understood that the speaker is saying ‘I would like to send you the best of luck today.’ The InEng usage of ...


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Do native speakers use wish like this? I haven't heard this use before (British English). The way you are using wish - preferring not to specify the wished-for thing - sounds very like the way I would use the word 'bless' (which I don't use often). Does this sound right to them? It's unfamiliar but not off-puttingly so, and certainly thought-provoking! ...


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I'm a native, and I don't use this expression. It sounds quaint to me, but not downright wrong; I know educated Indians who use expressions that are substandard in British English, but Indian English is it own idiom. For example, indians will talk about a famous drunk politician 'quaffing' wine, or will go 'thrice' to the shop in one day, or say that they ...


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This depends on whether the person is above or below you in seniority (I'm assuming it's a workplace issue?". If the person is below you, I would say "Let's meet to discuss" is good. If the person is above you, I don't find it to be polite enough. In that situation, I would say, "Would you like to schedule a meeting?" or, "May we meet to discuss this?".


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I'm almost 100 percent sure the meaning has to do with formality. Quick answer: it means the assets weren't restricted or hindered like the others were. First, the literal aspect: Wearing shoes in the formal business world is something you're expected to do. It's how you're following the dress code and you're staying inline with everyone else. Now for the ...


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As a native speaker of American English, I have never heard the phrase "putting down one's papers". The other, "putting in one's papers", means more or less as you said - to give notice of resignation.


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Given enough time, I believe it's likely that the English word "you" will increasingly be superseded by lowercase "u" for the simple fact that it sounds identical, it intuitively and immediately carries the identical meaning, and does the work with 2/3 fewer letters. Glance through the etymology of the word "I," which historically "cost" the scribe at least ...



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