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This is Indian English. See Vishy's Indian English Dictionary. July 12, 2006Vishy's Indian English Dictionary: doubt doubt. /DOWT/. A question asking for clarification. In standard English and American, the noun doubt is uncountable and refers to a lack of complete trust in something. Doubt may be expressed as simply as doubting ...


28

Regarding "do the needful" wikipedia has an article on the subject. It indicates that it was more common in English in the past. I don't think it is grammatically wrong, it is just more a matter of idiom in US/UK English. There we would more likely say "do what is necessary" or "do whatever it takes". The same is true with pluck the flowers. It is ...


27

Yes and no. Reading around on the internet, it seems that this was originally just an error (and still is one for most native English speakers), but in some non-native-speaker speech communities it has become established as a common usage. From Paul Brians’ Common Errors in English Usage The most common meaning of “revert” is “to return to an earlier ...


24

The meaning of kindly is hopefully clear: "kindly help me" means "please be kind and help me" (or "please help me out of kindness"), etc. It's a word used for polite requests; a bare "help me" is impolite relative to "kindly help me". If you're asking why kindly is more common in Indian English than elsewhere, it's just one of the hundreds of things that ...


19

Most people will have no problem with calling her proprietor. Actually some people will reject the idea that you need a female form of the word anyway. Why would the word proprietor only be applicable to a man, and not simply to a person? So actually, calling her a proprietor is the safer and better option. Don't use an -ess or -ix version. Legally it ...


18

A native English speaker does not recognize "doubt" as a synonym for "question". The examples given (like "Doubt about TinyMCE content css"), no matter how prevalent, are awkward. Even if it can be justified by picking a fitting definition entry, it's not something we would ever say. We understand it, but we also understand when a French person says "Let me ...


18

From Wikipedia's Glossary of cricket terms: Doosra a relatively new off spin delivery developed by Saqlain Mushtaq; the finger spin equivalent of the googly, in that it turns the "wrong way". From the Hindi or Urdu for second or other. First coined by Pakistani wicket keeper Moin Khan. Mankad the running-out of a non-striking batsman who ...


16

There is exactly one incidence for prepone in the Corpus of Contemporary American English, from this Christian Science Monitor article, which reads: IN India, people created the word “prepone” as the obvious opposite of postpone. On the Internet, a form of cyber-English has sprouted with such words as “net-surfing.” (I hope it surprises no one that ...


15

How to understand "losing theirs and blaming it on you" in the first stanza? In particular, what do the pronouns "theirs" and "it" respectively stand for? To "keep your head" means to remain calm, which is sometimes hard to do when the people around you ("about you") are in "panic mode." To remain calm in spite of their panic is therefore a virtue. ...


14

If you are speaking to English speakers from India, these will perfectly normal and familiar words. In other English-speaking cultures, people probably aren't as familiar with the word, but I doubt they would have much trouble understanding what it means. So I would say it is okay to go ahead and use the word in any context. In India, a larger portion of ...


13

While I have never spent any time in India, 'Today Morning' is common in Singapore, another Asian country once colonised by the British Empire and now claiming English as their Official/First language. Also of interest: I teach English as a foreign language in Indonesia. Here I teach many people whose first languages are either Mandarin, Indonesian or ...


12

In most cases when this happens the person is really a non-native English speaker as you said. In some languages that grew from Latin the word that is used for doubt can also be used for question. Dúvida is the Portuguese for doubt, but it can also be used as question. For example, when kids at school say to the teacher Eu tenho uma dúvida (which ...


12

I am from India.. and here , the word "revert" is used interchangeably with "reply". Like you say.. your indian colleague means that wants a status update. I have experienced a similar situation when a european colleague misunderstands the statement : " we shall revert with the status" as.. "undoing a change made previously" and there was a lot of confusion ...


12

The other answers here are generally good and correct analyses of the history of these particular phrases. I just wanted to underline that there isn't anything wrong per se with these phrases; they are just not idiomatic in American and British English. They are not things that native speakers of American and British English would say, so if you say them in ...


11

‘Please don't pluck the flowers’ and ‘Please do the needful’ are both grammatical in British Standard English. However, ‘pluck’ usually describes pulling off hair, feathers or fruit, rather than flowers, and British native speakers would normally say ‘Please do whatever is necessary’ instead of ‘Please do the needful’ (although ‘needful’ has been used as a ...


11

According to Some Aspects of the History of Modern Hindi "Nahîn" "No", "Not" by L. A. Schwarzschild, the Hindi interjection nahîn (and Marathi nahi, Gujerati nahi(m), etc.): is used as an equivalent of "no" (though it may serve also as a negative adverb), and it represents an enlargement of the old Indo-European negative particile, Sanskrit na. The ...


10

Affixes (prefixes, suffixes, and the like) can be characterized by what linguists call “productivity”. A productive affix is one that can freely be applied to most any word of the class it applies to. For example the prefix pro- can be added to most any noun, common or proper: pro-choice, pro-Clinton, even whole noun phrases, as in pro-meat-eating. On the ...


10

I was able to find it in the Collins English Dictionary, which marks it as Indian: weightage chiefly (Indian) another name for weighting The British National Corpus has 259 cites for weighting, but not a single one for weightage.


10

This is a really interesting question. It's hard to give you a really concrete example, but it sounds like you've had issues when someone was trying to be polite, so I will address that. As others have mentioned, people in America sometimes have trouble being told what to do. It sounds like whoever was speaking to you was trying to politely suggest that you ...


10

It's purely a matter of established idiomatic usage. In standard English the normal injunction is Don't pick the flowers, but that's as much an accident of fate as because the word pick is more suitable in this context. In India a lot of people speak and hear a reasonable amount of English, even though it's not their mother tongue. They sometimes come up ...


10

This is so called "legalese". A dialect used only in contracts, law documents and other court and law related sources. Not only it's valid English, it's written in such a way as to not leave any ambiguities, or room for interpretation, using phrases that don't occur in everyday English, but have specific properties of describing places, moments, locations ...


9

Personally I have trouble with the concept of a "legal" word. Remember: the dictionary has finite space in it and can only fit in words that A) were known at the time it was printed, and B) were deemed important enough to include, and C) were not deemed too inappropriate for the audience of the dictionary. That being said, I can imagine several definitions ...


9

This sounds more like a cultural difference that is reflected in the usage of the language. You have probably noticed that the US culture is overall very individualistic. Americans typically do not like to be told what to do, and they also tend to respect the other person's right to different views or opinions. That is one reason why instead of "You ...


8

It is difficult to answer the general version of this question because often neither side is aware that there can be any misinterpretation until it has happened. I'm a Briton living in the USA, but working a lot of the time with a team in India. I am aware that there are occasionally problems, but I gave up making a list of specific examples a (long) while ...


8

It is hardly ever possible to find strong reasons for why a language is used in a particular way. Why do British speakers use "Autumn" much more than Americans? I (UK speaker) find Indian English very full of words and phrases which sound polite, and sometimes old-fashioned, and it may be that this reflects some cultural habits in India. I suspect that ...


8

Dutchmen sometimes make the same mistake, because the construction * he would do x, if y would be true is correct in Dutch, besides he would do x, if y were true, which is also correct in Dutch. This might apply to some other European languages as well. In addition, I recently read that some English style guides warn(ed) against this usage too, which makes ...


8

Hobson-Jobson says TAPPAUL , s. The word used in S. India for 'post,' in all the senses in which dawk (q.v.) is used in Northern India. Its origin is obscure. C. P. Brown suggests connection with the Fr. étape (which is the same originally as the Eng. staple). It is sometimes found in the end of the 18th century written tappa or tappy. But this seems to ...


8

A "disembodied" voice would be one that comes from no apparent person or source. This phenomena is also used to describe "ghostly" encounters as described in this blog from Micah Hanks on MysteriousUniverse.org excerpt: "On occasion, strange phenomenon such as this does tend to occur, particularly as one awakes from a sleep state, where disembodied ...


7

I've thought about your question for a while, and it seems a bit open-ended. If it were more narrowly defined, it would be easier to answer. What I can do, however, is explain why someone might use might in place of should. People use the "you might want to" construction when they are trying to be polite. Telling people — especially strangers — they ...


7

Awesome. What language are you translating it to, and have you checked if it hasn't already been translated to that language? It's a well-known and famous poem, after all. That being said... "losing theirs" harks back to the first line, where you are keeping your head (i.e. "staying calm") and others are losing their heads (i.e. "panicking"). "Theirs" ...



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