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1

It is an expression used mainly by women. Swept off my feet refers to the time when they are hugged by a taller man and spun around, their feet not touching the ground. Hence, 'swept off my feet'.


0

You might call it a byzantine analogy. While the word itself doesn't have any particular connotations of inadvertent obfuscation, it would be understood to mean "an overly-complicated analogy". From wiktionary: Byzantine adj. 1. Overly complex or intricate.


1

The idiom or something like it is attested in writing as early as 1620 The pot calls the pan burnt-arse (1639). I am from the US and I learned the expression from my mother at the age of 8--10 therebouts.


1

WiseGeek, the source of Benyamin Hamidekhoo's answer, rightly notes that both the pot and the kettle "turn black with use." That is, they start out a silvery or grayish or coppery color and gradually turn black through exposure to the heat and smoke of the fires or heating elements that they are set above. However, I disagree with WiseGeek's contention that ...


0

Is "blushing violet" an actual phrase, and does it really mean a publicity hound? If so, how or why? No, it is not an actual phrase. All usages I found by searching the internet referred to specific products or usernames. Unless you can source where you originally found this phrase, there is little more we can do to dig up information about this.


1

From wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teach_fish_how_to_swim Teach fish how to swim is an idiomatic expression derived from the Latin proverb piscem natare docem. The phrase focuses attention on the self-sufficient perception of those who know how to do every thing better than the experts. Those who would attempt to do so are thought to exhibit a ...


0

The commonly used term for this is to "purify" the water; other options are: sanitize, disinfect or decontaminate.


1

"Preaching to the choir" is quite popular.


5

Similar expressions included "Carrying coals to Newcastle" (where a lot of coal is produced), or "Taking owls to Athens" (Athena was the goddess wisdom).


3

The semicolon strikes me as grammatically incorrect, but people like to do some strange things with semicolons around here, so who am I to say. However, your question seems moot since the "but not only" part is completely redundant and can be removed. Saying "Every possible accessory... including X" already implies that there are other things you're not ...


3

And by sterilizing you are making the water Potable. fit or suitable for drinking: potable water.


1

The most common idiom for that action is "make water safe to drink." Most residential coffee makers are not capable of maintaining high temperatures for a long enough period of time to make the water safe to drink. Both steps are necessary to remove or kill all bacteria, viruses and parasites and make the water safe to drink. How can you make the water ...


6

When you boil it to kill the microbes, you are sterilizing the water through Sterilization. Dictionary.com meaning: ster·i·lize [ster-uh-lahyz] verb (used with object), ster·i·lized, ster·i·liz·ing. to destroy microorganisms in or on, usually by bringing to a high temperature with steam, dry heat, or boiling liquid. to destroy the ...


13

Apparently my stack exchange reputation doesn't carry over between sites, so I can't comment on previous answers. I just wanted to add that "preaching to the choir" is more about not needing to convince someone of something, because the proverbial choir is already on "team jesus". Also, "teaching [one's grandmother] to suck eggs" strikes me as very ...


14

Teaching grandma to suck eggs, or teaching your grandmother to suck eggs is the unequivocal idiom which means giving advice to someone who is already an expert in the subject or field. There's also the implication that the "teacher" in question is less-experienced than their pupil. Teaching fish to swim, although easily understood and to my ears, more ...


0

I think 'teach fish to swim' has very negative connotations about yourself. I really only know the phrase from 'He would try to teach fish to swim' meaning someone who believes they are so knowledgeable they can improve on anyone's learning, even to the point of improving an innate behaviour, implying a high degree of arrogance. I see a similarity between ...


4

Yes it is proper to use teaching fish how to swim in your situation. I know that explaining (topic) to you guys is like teaching fish how to swim... Another phrase that comes to mind: I know that I'm preaching to the choir, but today I would like to discuss (topic)...


1

Another saying that comes to my mind is: you know the long and short of it


9

Yes, teaching 'fish how to swim' is indicating you understand their proficiency on the topic.


1

According to Wikipedia, double whammy can be applied to multiple things as well. An English expression meaning multiple (or a combination of) negative circumstances, events, or effects. Sometimes hyphenated. Though triple whammy is used in the sense you want also and Wiktionary has a definition: a threefold blow or setback (popularized in the ...


0

Something like balls of steel (if we are talking about informal speech).


1

Almost all of the suggestions given above are pretty good. You could also tell the person they were barking up the wrong tree or that they had {got hold of / grabbed} the wrong end of the stick if you were primarily trying to indicate that they had misunderstood your position (as opposed to directly disagreeing with it).


0

Can it be positive? Yes. Where is it from? There are various theories (and this is not an answer). But these are common here in Australia: A few 'roos loose in the top paddock. A sandwich short of a picnic. A brick short of a load. Lights on, nobody home. Driveway doesn't meet the road. Some more can seen at Not too bright.


3

Even though marbles is a a children's game, 'losing one's marbles' was not related to the game nor the word 'marble' but a corruption of the word furniture (meubles). Look up marbles at Dictionary.com children's game, from plural of marble (n.); first recorded by that name in 1709 but probably older (it was known in 13c. German as tribekugeln) and ...


1

A honky-tonk was an old American term for a bar that played music, usually country music. Playing the honky-tonk probably refers to a honky-tonk piano, which is a piano that has been modified to alter the sound it produces, making it sound more tinny or percussive. It might also refer to the style of music being played. Play the honky-tonk like anything just ...


0

The connotations of slick in US usage are broader than in British usage. In the USA, slick can mean both physically slippery ("Be careful! The roads are very slick this morning!") and metaphorically slippery ("His answer was too slick for her liking") or metaphorically polished ("She delivered a very slick presentation at the conference"); British usage does ...


1

Dixie is a form of American music, blowing dixie is probably also a pun on Whistling Dixie Double four time is four-four time, a musical time signature - somebody with more musical knowledge could probably explain this better but I suppose it's very fast or hard to blow!


-1

Keeping a cool head means this and keeps the idea of 'head'.


0

While it is obvious Turpin wore a mask to avoid being recognised, the buyer is suggesting a seller has a 'bare faced' cheek to ask a hefty price and is guilty of such blatant 'highway robbery' that Dick himself would be embarrassed to attempt it in person. It doesn't really work well in the written form.


0

“Yesterday night” is less common than “last night”, but it does occur. The Oxford English dictionary has a quotation from 1654–5: in C. H. Firth Clarke Papers (1899) III. 26, “Yesterday night came letters from Collonell (sic) Hacker”.


0

if the shoe were on the other foot


1

In my place you would have done the same thing.


8

You can say: If you were in my shoes, would you do the same thing?


0

The author is likening minds to faces by introducing the word complexion. He is saying that faces of finer complexion of his own lost their natural colour ( became whiter), like when you get frightened, trying to name the identity of the author of those murderers.


0

Morning, afternoon and evening are the different phases or 'time frames' of the day, so yesterday morning, yesterday afternoon and yesterday evening are quite but natural. However, when night arrives, the day is gone or when the day is gone, we call it night. Hence, YESTERDAY NIGHT is not logical. This is my reason, but I may be wrong. :)


0

If you note the quotations with time-related adverbial phrases attached, the phrase makes more sense (from Origin of "More X than you can shake a stick at"): - (1833) There are more rules than you could shake a stick at before your arm would ache - (1833) ...then run into a great picture room and see more fine pictures than you could ...


0

I like the "Vaudeville" theory from Theatre Superstitions". Steppenwolf Theatre Company. Retrieved 2012-06-30. that uses the "leg line" as its basis: In the days of Vaudeville, companies would book more performers than could possibly make it onstage, but would only pay those who performed.[19] Since the Renaissance, legs have been used as part of the masking ...


0

Possibly, depending on the context, "whistling past the graveyard" or "he whistled as he walked past the graveyard", implying that even though he was afraid to walk past it, he put on a brave face and walked on anyway, not only to look fearless to others, but to try to convince himself that he isn't afraid. It's sort of an old-fashioned phrase though, so ...


1

I think "preaching to the choir" is like selling eggs to a chicken; fitting a square peg in a round hole; raking leaves on a windy day. The OP could say something like "selling Chinese products in Nigeria" - every average Nigerian home boasts of not less than 10 made-in-China products, including phones, radios, TVs, fans, DVDs, fancy lights, kids' toys, ...


5

The apt translation to English is dead man walking. Like the Japanese expression, this phrase has a literal meaning from which the figurative meaning derives. Literal meaning Traditionally, a prison warden would call this out while leading a man to the place of execution. The English expression connotes a similar poise or self-control as of the carp in the ...


0

Surprised no one has mentioned: Unflinching - "Not showing fear or hesitation in the face of danger or difficulty." Which can also be combined with courage and composure: He showed unflinching courage.


0

Boogeyman for everyone , here means , coming across as a bad person. Someone who is misunderstood.


0

Need of the hour has implication that it needs to be high priority.


1

Wire-pulling is associated with trickery: Wire-pulling is defined as political manipulation in The American slang dictionary 1891 and Wire-puller in the political sense is 1848, American English, on the image of pulling the wires that work a puppet. but a good magician needs to be artful in 'picking your pocket', as well as, adding items to your person, and ...


3

There is also "face the music" which basically means to own up to the inevitable. Perhaps more applicable, "bite the bullet", the origin of which is perhaps that a soldier when being whipped would have a bullet (lead ball at the time) in their mouth and bite on that to bear the pain so they could show no outward emotion.


0

Consider "tear loose" and "break away," used figuratively, as in: I see you finally got to tear loose/break away from your room (World of Warcraft, etc.). Welcome back to society/Planet Earth!


6

Surprised nobody mentioned stoic, since its OED definition is "a person who can endure pain or hardship without showing their feelings or complaining." Other things not mentioned: put on a brave face grin and bear it


4

In sports, we use the word "clutch." A player is clutch if they can perform in a high risk/stress situation, like hitting a last second shot to win a playoff game. Players that are not clutch break down in those situations. Edit: this is a much more slang type of term as well.



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