Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

You are right in saying that the responses to the question "What does What price X? mean" do not answer your own question. It seems clear to me that in the context of the conversation between the lieutenant and the anthropologist, "Well, what price Goebbels, eh?" is a rhetorical question which means in effect "If that's the price that had to be ...


-2

Can't find the exact, definitive origin, but the one that makes the most sense is that it was an expression that jazz musicians used and was already in use before the popular Bill Haley (originally by and written by Bobby Charles) song.


0

The import term 'savoir faire' refers to emotional composure in a difficult social situation: Knowledge of the correct course of action in a particular situation, know-how. Now usually: spec. the ability to act or speak appropriately in social situations.


0

The meaning in both cases would be "keep doing what you're doing". Party on Garth! - I approve of what you're doing, keep doing it! Classes don't usually have data, but if they do, rock on Wayne. - If you do find a class with data, don't worry about it, do what you'd do with a data-less class!


1

The expression is an idiom of the form, What price [fame/success/victory etc.]?: something that you say which means it is possible that the fame, success etc. that has been achieved was not worth all the suffering it has caused e.g. "What price victory when so many people have died to make it possible?" It is used in 49th Parallel to denigrate ...


1

A slightly more tricky example of wrong grammar becoming acceptable is usage of who vs. whom. Whom is the object case of who, but nowadays who is also fully acceptable for this purpose. As a consequence, some people are using whom in novel ways. They are already so numerous that it can't be called wrong any more. In traditional grammar, who(m) when used as ...


0

You could look to to old meanings of words and check the time period it changed. An example would be prove, like "The exception that proves the rule." as prove today means to demonstrate as true by evidence. Today that sentence means "The exception provides evidence for the existence of the rule." However, the old meaning of prove was to test the rule. ...


3

I don't think it's about the figure of speech. That is secondary, as I believe the figure is an elaboration on the formula. Usually, "What price X?" is used to imply that something desired was bought too dear. "What price glory?" calls up the specter of all the soldiers killed to satisfy someone's quest for that quality. It asks the listener to consider ...


1

What price freedom spiked in the late 1930s (ngram). It was used to ask the rhetorical question, What is the true price of freedom? It could be used to exhort people to pay that price, or to suggest that people are paying a disproportionate price: What is the value of freedom if we're not willing to sacrifice to preserve it? vs What was the value of ...


1

It's likely that it refers to a popular haircut style found in military and police forces. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_and_tight As a metaphor, it probably means the mission is to be carried out neatly, quickly, no fuss and no complications.


3

"Go big" is a colloquialism in American English. It means to do something on a grand scale, or to do something with great ambition. The phrase developed (as in came about) as part of an advertising design for Porker Pipes, according to Rose Foster, who says she was part of the design team. So, when one "goes big," they do something in an elaborate, flashy, ...


1

It's possible it's an idiom from the time. Remember that the phrase is over 400 years old. Looking in a dictionary today may not show the implied meaning as understood by people from that time. But there are lots of things like that in English, and we use them without thinking. Referring to something as being "cool" as an example. A really "cool" car. ...


2

I think “A” means: Well just look how much the world is paying (suffering/sacrificing) for (because of) Goebbels. and mentions it here (as well as his reference to Hitler) just to remind “B,” who apparently hadn’t recognized anything familiar on “A’s” list, that what he’d just described was currently happening in Europe. Because I feel that “A” was ...


1

Don't forget that trading doesn't come with a guarantee of bouyant business and swelling profits, and so many companies founder within their first years, and are dissolved. Their fate relies on getting enough draft payments to offset their costs, shore up their annual expenditure and copper-fasten their business. These terms are more maritime than fluid or ...


3

For me the apparent meaning is much closer to the answer given by F'x in your linked question, from the New Oxford American Dictionary: what price ——? used to ask what has become of something or to suggest that something has or would become worthless: what price justice if he were allowed to go free? In this case, the meaning that I see is "How much is ...


1

And more specifically for the second part of OP's question: but in what sense is the hide in hiding contributing the meaning of the idiom? Here, "hiding" is a noun used as a colloquial near synonym for "a beating". According to the OED, it goes back to activities involved in tanning a hide, related to the verb hide2, "2. To beat the hide or skin of; ...


1

Of course they can both support the main issue. For instance: The Holocaust is one of the best documented events in human history, supported on the one hand by numerous eyewitness testimonies of survivors and liberators, and on the other by German records, written and photographic. —Nicholls, Christian Antisemitism, 1993, p. 391 And consider this ...


1

Both your links seem to support your assessment (and mine) that it doesn't make sense to use the two to support the same thing. On the other hand = however. On the other hand ≠ furthermore.


0

The financial jargon abounds in metaphors, and water metaphors are just a part of the whole set. Water metaphors, as such, are not right or wrong but rather they are more or less frequently used depending on a number of factors. Some of those used in your extract are common, others are less, but they are all acceptable and easily understandable. New ...


1

ChrisW’s answer referring to pixels is quite good and frequently used (waste of pixels especially). If we compare them as directly as possible, though, the pixels are what is used to make the visual representation of the contents, which in a print analogy would really be closer to ink than paper. There is a related idiom, “mere ink on paper”, which luckily ...


2

The idiom is still valid and still in use. I and many people I know will say an email is not worth the paper it is written on. This the fact that there is no paper just emphasizes the worthlessness. The obsolescence of the terms of an idiom don't render the idiom itself obsolete. For example, being hoist on your own petard doesn't happen literally often ...


-1

The correct answer comes from the great Casey Stangle when he charged home pate in a series game when he managed the Yankees Stangle with 2 out and his batter having a full count did not swing on pitch number 7 The umpire yelled strike. 3 Casey was furious as we're most of the Yankee fans. He charged the home plate umpire got in his face screaming as ...


0

I think most answers strayed far off topic. It was settlers who originally called the shamen "medicine man" since one of his functions was as healer. Since most of his functions were associated with spiritual magic the word medicine became associated with spirits and magic. I have most often among the Navajo heard the term "bad magic" associated with things ...


0

I have always thought that hoist on one's own petard was a corruption of the original Dutch phrase meaning much the same thing. I cannot remember where I read this explanation, but it stuck in my memory. All contemporary sources reference it back to Shakespeare's Hamlet, but could he have heard it somewhere else?


3

"Not worth the pixels it's painted with" could be a direct translation. A "waste of pixels" is an entry in the Urban Dictionary. Or "it's garbage" for people who use GIGO as jargon. Or "that's pretty random" -- because "random" implies that the signal-to-noise ratio is low (however, the Urban Dictionary claims that in teen-speak, "random" is the new ...


1

Well, the way odds are described in English, Three to one means one in four (a 25% chance) Two to one means one in three (a 33.3% chance) Evens (in other words, one to one, although the latter is not something I have ever seen used) means one in two (a 50% chance) So strictly speaking, a million to one would mean one in a million-plus-one, which is a ...


0

Both usages are correct. Rusty Tuba is also correct that "one in a million" has a special meaning. However, these are definitely not equivalent statements mathematically. "a million to one" is expressed in terms of odds, while "one in a million" is a direct ratio (1/1,000,000). So these two phrases imply different underlying probabilities. Let's use ...


0

He is correct. Both one in a million and a million to one are two different ways of expressing a ratio. Mathematically, one in a million would appear as 1/1,000,000 and a million to one would appear as 1,000,000:1. Both are correctly written, correctly spoken and they mean the same thing.


2

a # to one is a common way of expressing odds or probability. Another common way is to say there is a # in a # chance that something will happen. For example: The odds of winning that contest are a million to one. You have a one in a million chance of winning that contest. They are both correct and common. However, what complicates the matter ...


4

As others have noted, the quoted phrase plays on a reversal of the sense associated with a similar-sounding or similarly phrased cliché. There is a small industry of such reversals in English (as, probably, there are in other languages as well). Here are some other examples of this rhetorical tactic in operation (all of them adapted from Saul Gorn's ...


9

The phrase "There's less to the deal than meets the eye" is a reversal of the popular idiom "There's more (to something) than meets the eye." Basically, "There's less to the deal than meets the eye" is trying to say: The deal appears better at first glance of the readily available facts than it does if you actually read all the details. A different ...


3

More (to something) than meets the eye : (idiomatic expression) Fig. [there are] hidden values or facts regarding something. There is more to that problem than meets the eye. What makes you think that there is more than meets the eye? Usage notes: also used in the form less than meets the eye (not as interesting or complicated as it ...


8

"There's more than meets the eye" is a common phrase that means there is more going on than is immediately apparent. Less than meets the eye is a play on that phrase, meaning the opposite.


0

Paint it black is means : Burn the people with napalm , bombing them from sky - That it means. Paint it black = Kill them , put them under funerals colors . If was coming from Romania ,my home country , then should be Painted red ...by Dracula ...ha ha


4

I don't think it's "how about". A relevant reference from the answer you linked to would be: What price? Said when the value of the thing referred to is being diminished or ignored. The comment may be a bit jarring to modern sensibilities. Since this is a wartime (well, pre-war for the U.S.) propaganda film, I think it's intended to be denigrating towards ...


1

This seems to be the same use as the first example you have. "Install" is being linked to "there are no obstacles in the optical path." That there are no obstacles would be the purpose of install.


0

Having read theregister.co.uk enough, I see pear-shaped and tits up meaning the same thing: bad things have happened. Some sources say pear-shaped means "broken" where tits up means "dead". However, I'm likely to assume these were more directly related than urban definitions propose. tits up has an analog in belly up in AmE (think dead fish).


-1

This is a good question (and I think Talia Ford above answers it well). I only wanted to add that “enough” is one of those words that seems often used as rhythm more than providing any real meaning or service to the point. Like when people say “actually” or “well” whenever he or she speaks, regardless of the applicability. It also seems (in my ...


0

From Merriam Webster Online: integrity (noun) \in-ˈte-grə-tē\ firm adherence to a code of especially moral or artistic values : incorruptibility So, "He has integrity." is a good way of saying ""He is true to himself". But in your context, "being true to himself" means he is fearless or he is not intimidated.


0

I can find no reputable sources substantiating the phrase "the blood of the covenant is thicker than the water of the womb" as the root of "blood is thicker than water". Jbeldock mentioned an article that references the Troy Book (c. 1420), but the reproduction I found here doesn't seem to mention anything remotely like "blood is thicker than water". In ...


0

The only word that springs to mind is panoramic, which means any wide-angle view or representation of a physical space, whether in painting, drawing, photography, film/video, or a three-dimensional model. To have a panoramic view, therefore, is to see any number of things at the same time. Digital cameras now allow the amateur photographer to capture ...


5

Plain as day ( can also be used with the physical reference you are hinting at): very obvious, quite clear. The secret to our success is as plain as day - make a good plan and stick to it. easy to see or understand: I looked at the list and there, plain as day, was my name on the list of winners. also, plain as the ...


3

"crystal clear" "perfectly clear : able to be seen through completely" "The police officer gave me crystal clear directions." "Is that clear, sargeant?" "Crystal, sir." It can also be used for its literal meaning: Absolutely clear; pellucid: a crystal clear sky


1

Noble of us in this case isn't idiomatic. When I Google it, the second definition is: having or showing fine personal qualities or high moral principles and ideals. "the promotion of human rights was a noble aspiration" So, the sentence is saying that we will show fine personal qualities by not 'revel[ing] in it'.


3

This is an old joke based on the idiomatic phrase "get-up-and-go" (which is typically defined as you have found). The most notable variant is probably from the well-known humorous poem "My Get Up and Go Has Got Up and Went" (later set to music by Pete Seeger) but I imagine the witticism precedes it. It's not unlikely that the women you overheard intended ...


3

I would just say they laughed at the clever word-play; to me, the sentence basically means "He likely doesn't have the energy he used to have when he was younger any more". Just like this paraphrase, and just like the words energetic or virile, it could, but does not have to, carry a sexual undertone. Got-up-and-gone is not an idiom, it is just a past tense ...


2

The way my Dad, a Navy vet, used to say it, it was "Chief, Cook, & Bottlewasher" (3 professions, not 2) and the meaning was that not only were you in charge, but you had to do all the middle management and menial responsibilities too...you did it all. Its not so much a derogatory term but it usually implies that everything is your responsibility, but ...


0

"On a tear" means doing a lot of something or doing something with unusual intensity or frequency. Also never say "IN a tear." Only ON. IN A TEAR is not colloquial.


0

The first few results from https://www.google.com/search?q=show+for+it suggest that the "it" in the phrase "show for it" is usually "work" or "effort" or something like that: I worked hard and have nothing to show for it. In the referenced sentence you might want to use "them" instead of "it", because "them" would be referring to the (plural) months: ...


3

It's wrong in standard English. It's used regionally in the U.S.; see this webpage. The webpage says it's used in Eastern New England (it also appears in DeKalb county, Illinois, which was settled by New Englanders). it means "so did I".



Top 50 recent answers are included