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0

missed the boat means when you lost a chance to get on that boat or you dont understand something so you missed the information boat


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"Yesterday night" is standard usage in British English. It means "the evening of yesterday". Example from BBC News: BONFIRE NIGHT DEMO 0820: Eleven people have been arrested after scuffles broke out after protests by the Anonymous movement at Buckingham Palace and Parliament yesterday night. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-24831851 From ...


1

"I'm chief cook and bottle washer" meaning: I do everything from A-Z; one man show; especially self employed. Chief cook is the top job in a kitchen; bottle washing is endless, mindless work that anyone can do. If you're doing both, it implies you're also doing everything in between. can also be used sarcastically: "He's chief cook and bottle washer ...


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As you can imagine, an idiom in one language doesn't necessarily translate literally into an idiom in another language. So the French idiom "half fig, half raisin" might be guessed to mean something like the English idiom "six of one, half a dozen of the other", in actual usage, it does not. Checking with some French language enthusiasts ...


1

Having looked in Petit Robert, I think "mi figue, mi raisin" has an element of personal demeanour about it which none of the suggestions above captures. "An ambiguous appearance of satisfaction and discontent, or serious and joking". I saw it used to describe the behaviour of Inspector Maigret (surly and mercurial by turns...). I don't think there is a ...


0

He thinks he's the last word on grammar. He runs a tight ship where grammar is concerned. He operates a zero-tolerance regime on grammar. He takes no prisoners where grammar is concerned. He brooks no dissent on grammar.


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Nope. I know what you mean, but you can't use 'proxy' that way. I'd go with "on behalf of". Or if you want to sound legalistic/pedantic then you could say "acting with authority delegated from".


1

It wasn't merely a sexual reference; more of a play on words since there used to be (and still are in a few places) Christmas clubs, in which everyone paid a small amount each week and received a hamper at Christmas, and bottle clubs, in which the reward for your subscription was a bottle of whisky. So presumably the lady in question had received a package ...


1

In the 1828 AMERICAN DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE you can read definitions for pudding: "what bulges out, a paunch." So a pregnant woman had a "bulge" for her tummy same as a "paunch." I was just watching "Last Tango in Halifax," a British sitcom, and the phrase "he put her in the pudding club" was used as it if was commonly understood.


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I know a line like this from Isaac Asimov's novel Foundation. The line occurs in the first section of the novel, in this exchange from the trial of the character Hari Seldon. Q: Is it not obvious to anyone that the Empire is as strong as it ever was? A: The appearance of strength is all about you. It would seem to last forever. However, Mr. Advocate, ...


-1

I just saw it in the supermarket recently, a much-belated pc-brutalized product tie-in for Seinfeld's "The Soup Nazi". The child-safe version is ...


-1

"As far as vehicles are concerned, gears are switched to change speed, not direction" You are completely 100% correct. People are dense, so you often hear this idiom used badly. Of course, obviously, it should be used regarding "the speed of activity", "our pace" (whether slow down or speed up). As you point out, people sometimes use it to mean "change ...


1

Don't be so Dogmatic as well as: Pedant /Pedantic ("Don't be pedantic about grammar") Stickler ("Don't be such a stickler about grammar")


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When you change gears in a manual transmission, you are connecting an entirely different gear to the drive shaft to provide drive. The idiom refers to this switch to a different, discrete mechanism, not the change of speed that can result. After all, it's quite possible to drive the same speed in different gears.


3

I couldn't find anything on the etymology of the idiom, but in common parlance let's switch gears or 'change gears' usually means changing the subject. I think this has less to do with the way a transmission works (changing gears changes speed) and more to do with feeling the change of gears. You can really feel gears switch, especially with a bad driver! ...


0

I have heard that idiom in two places recently. Here is one example: A world that sends you reeling from decimated dreams Your misery and hate will kill us all So paint it black and take it back Let's shout it loud and clear Defiant to the end we hear the call What does it mean?


1

How about: "I divided by zero and got nothin'"


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You could say It turned out A and B were orthogonal. (Of variates) statistically independent.


1

Debunk, as in I debunked the idea of a correlation between A and B. Defined by Google as: expose the falseness or hollowness of (a myth, idea, or belief)


-2

It really depends if you are looking for easy to understand English, or if your looking for a translation that is closest to what the author wrote. If you are looking for the best translation for understanding what God said, then the bottom two in your list are probably best.


1

There is a tension between Dynamic and Formal equivalence. Dynamic equivalence attempts to be more faithful to the target language (here, English) at the risk of playing fast-and-loose with the source language (Greek, Hebrew). In order to be closer to English syntax and rhythm, you are looking for extensive use dynamic equivalence or a paraphrase. The ...


3

Bible translations are controversial. The AV has been so influential in English culture that its presence in our language seems ineradicable. The same is true with Shakespeare. Almost every line of Julius Caesar seems familiar to us, because it is so widely quoted. 'The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones.' ...


3

All those versions you mention will be well edited to purposefully follow a particular language pattern, so they will all be 'grammatical' with a particular stylistic bent. The The King James Version (KJV) is a classic of Early Modern English, intentionally artistic prose. Many of its phrasings have become idioms of current English. It is a good model for ...


0

Since this term was used in a Tatort (sunday evening tv show in Germany) episode this year, it is now perfectly fine to use this term in germany!


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The Message Bible. This one is by far the easiest to digest for a modern English speaker. The Message Bible does take a lot of liberties on translation of idioms and figures of speech (while often times adding some of its own), but it is still technically a bible translation and it is by far the easiest to read. It's almost like reading a children's book. ...


6

Just FTR, I guess "perfectionist" is the completely straightforward, straight, non-offensive, alternate that is, precisely, the "exact" meaning Lukas E. is after. Grammar Perfectionist Soup Perfectionist etc. IMO "stickler" is the best "fun" way to say it. Again, that precisely implies "spends time correcting mistakes, is offended by slight ...


46

As @Araucaria says in the comments, Grammar Police is an excellent alternative that conveys the fascistic tendencies of a police state without the genocidal implications.


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A word with an interesting history that conveys a similar meaning is Zealot. Merriam-Webster tells of the Jewish origins of the word whose current definition is: a person who has very strong feelings about something (such as religion or politics) and who wants other people to have those feelings


1

I'll leave my other answer because I agree that it implies interest rather than authority. I'll go with Grammar Overlord.


25

Fascist (in its informal sense of someone who believes in authoritarian, dictatorial control) is a slightly less-charged term, although it's still fairly charged. Stickler ("a person who insists on something unyieldingly") is a good uncharged term that still carries a solid meaning. Being uncharged, it lacks the ... impact ... of the other terms, but this ...


1

Bloody-minded--describes someone who makes difficulties for other people by opposing their actions or ideas for no good reason. (the Free Dictionary)


15

Go with "freak". A person who is obsessed with a particular activity or interest Examples: Grammar-freak, gym-freak, movie-freak. "Nerd" would be another option. Grammar-nerd; although this implies more of an academic or otherwise studious interest.


31

Pedant comes to mind A pedant is a person who is excessively concerned with formalism, accuracy & precision, or who makes an ostentatious and arrogant show of learning. Wikipedia


-1

Neither choice is correct. 'Meander' already contains the notion of 'wandering', so 'meander in' is the best choice.


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It is worth noting that the verb meander is formed from a noun, meander, from the name of the Meandros River in Asia Minor. The design known as the Greek Key is called Μαίανδρος (Meandros) in Greek. Because meandered around suggests walking the perimeter, I would choose meandered about.


1

Priscilla is a name from the New Testament. Priscilla and her husband Aquila were among the first generation of Christians. They hosted Christian worship services in their home in Pontus, which is on the Black Sea in what is now Turkey. Priscilla has a connotation of "homebody", one who offers generous hospitality. Reference: 1 Corinthians 16:19 King James ...


0

The environmental protection dept of my state says that I should build my house beyond 75 ft from the river. (For a resource critical river the minimum clearance is 200 ft.) It also stipulates that I can maintain a "meandering path" at the river. The code enforcement officer clarified that meandering means not moving in a straight path, but varying between ...


0

According to Longman dictionary, we should not use "assist sb to do sth" or "assist to". Instead we can use assist SB in doing sth/assist sb with doing sth.


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When two people can't get along because their personalities are too similar, that's also a personality clash or perhaps a power struggle. It is common to say, they are too much alike, with the implication that the similarity causes the clash. It is a familiar dynamic within families, when a child's personality is remarkably like a parent's, causing ...


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One morning, the mother and father had unwrapped the youngster and laid him on his back. They were just about to coo at him again when the baby suddenly — and surprising even himself — released a fountain that drenched both his parents.


2

Right of way, as in “You've got the right of way”, may work. From en.wiktionary, right of way has a sense “The right to proceed first in traffic”. Such a sentence may be used figuratively to tell someone to go ahead. Also consider the phrase clear sailing. From idioms.thefreedictionary.com, clear sailing means “a situation where progress is made ...


-1

You can't see the fallen oaks for the reeds.


4

The Oak and the Reed, is a fable by Aesop about two trees in a storm. They deal with the contrasting behaviour of the oak, which trusts in its strength to withstand the storm and is blown over, and the reed that 'bends with the wind' and so survives. Hence the saying: A reed before the wind lives on, while mighty oaks do fall. {McGraw-Hill Dictionary ...


1

If you call customer care in India, you would definitely hear them using their "fine and ok" interchangeably. So I have heard the InE speakers say, (a heavily accented): Will that be fine/ok for you? Is that ok for you? That's ok with me. and the prepositional usage varies too ... It's ok with me but ok for you .


7

Yes, that would be perfectly fine. The two phrasings mean basically the same thing, but with a difference in what you’re talking about. When you say as it is, the subject it is a generic ‘it’ that refers vaguely to ‘the current situation’ or something like that. It could be rephrased to “the way things currently stand” or “in the current state of things”. ...


5

The UN needs to keep it as simple as possible for a global audience. They also need to remove all connotations that have become associated with other uses of the word girl, and to clarify the intended meaning. Many uses of the word "girl" have lost the implications of youth that they once carried. "Daughter" means progeny, and implies a relationship ...


2

The actual story about "beg the question" is far more complicated than virtually all authorities suppose. In its logician's use, it is always used absolutely, that is, "That just begs the question" (full stop: there's no further "question"). In that sense, it means "Assume the very thing you're trying to prove." That is, of course, a bizarre construction, ...


0

English and Scottish Sayings About Marrying Looking at older English and Scottish proverbs, I’m struck by two things: the vast disproportion between the many that offer advice to prospective husbands and the few that offer advice to prospective wives; and the importance of the dowry in considerations of marriage. Both factors reduce the likelihood of ...


0

Come hell or high water indicates that something will be done regardless of difficult circumstances or problems. Lord willing and the creek don't rise indicates that a positive outcome depends on God's intervention or blessing.


1

As an adjective, Shakespearean could refer to a specialization or a style of writing. If you where were a scholar and specialized in the writing of Shakespeare, you would be a Shakespearean scholar. The fragment how Shakespearean, depending on additional context, would be used to describe the writing of a work that resembled Shakespeare's style. Within in ...



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