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1

You could says that it's a Trojan Horse - TFD definition In my language there is even a better phrase, but I found out it doesn't directly translate into English / isn't well known. It's something like "fear the Danaans, even if bearing gifts!" More info here on wiki: Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes


3

An example might help. Here is a scene from the popular comedy Family Guy where Brian, the family dog, fears he is longer wanted as a pet. He with talking to his owner Peter, as Stewie (Peter's infant son and Brian's best friend) comments acerbically: PETER Hey, Brian, I thought maybe we could spend an afternoon together? BRIAN ...


0

Sweet as poisoned honey. Stack exchange requires 30 characters.


0

The other definition of "on the nose" is when something smells fishy, pungent or otherwise off, either metaphorically or literally. Someone describing art as "too on the nose" would make me think they were likening it to a cheap perfume too liberally applied.


1

so what I would say this is the canonical phrase. Also: And...? (the ellipses indicating a pause before the question mark)


0

The phrase can mean something else that hasn't been covered in other answers. It can mean that the speaker doesn't believe that the data in question is a spontaneous utterance, or believes that the "question" was written around the answer. What is the human population of Earth? 7.2 billion That is a bit too on the nose for it not to have come from Google. ...


2

I believe you're thinking of the word "peccadillo". From Google: pec·ca·dil·lo ˌpekəˈdilō noun a small, relatively unimportant offense or sin. Synonyms: misdemeanor, petty offense, indiscretion, lapse, misdeed I'm sure we can overlook a few peccadilloes.


5

In the acting/script/play/film world, "too on the nose" is a pretty common phrase which means lacking in sub-text, too obvious, having neither subtlety nor sophistication. In life, people can't usually say what they mean for one reason or another; when they do in film or theater it comes across as unrealistic.


1

Although one can legitimately rationalize the OP expression, the disparity between on the nose and too creates significant semantic confusion. Examples of how on the nose would normally be applied: Not too high; not too low; just the right height--on the nose. Not too far left; not too far right; in just the right location--on the nose. Not too ...


2

I would suggest that an unfortunate turn of events accurately conveys what you're trying express to here. In an unfortunate turn of events, the car service that Dr John Nash had hired did not turn up. He hired a taxi cab which was involved in a crash, and both Dr Nash and his wife were killed.


1

As Tushar Raj's answer notes, one traditional way to describe a bad result that at first looks like a blessing is in connection with the warning "Be careful what you wish for" (sometimes completed with the phrase "because it might come true"). A familiar instance of this warning is in the cautionary fable from Aesop of "The Frogs Who Wished for a King." The ...


6

The example of the OP seems to be the "opposite" of a blessing in disguise in the sense that a setback had disastrous as opposed to beneficial consequences. We might call such a setback a disaster in the making: in the process of happening It became clear that this was a disaster in the making and we had no way of coping with it. Cambridge ...


1

Possibly "the devil's in the details" or "there's no such thing as a free lunch" — though you'd need a more realistic example to see if they'd be appropriate in your case. Both convey the idea of a thing that's good at first sight but may come with a catch (though the second doesn't necessarily mean it was bad on the whole). "Every silver lining has its ...


8

There's another reasonably common usage which relates as much to the audience as the work itself. A work which is "too on the nose" is one which gives an accurate view of the world that people won't like hearing, reading or talking about, and so will be unpopular. An author who was beheaded for writing a political play which criticized the King of ...


6

Assume "on the nose" means perfect - a positive connotation, as you've stated. Too "on the nose" means too perfect. Which, as you've noted, connotes a negative. Take a subjective matter such as painting. If you're going for freedom, expression of movement, light, etc., rendering something in too much detail can ruin the effect, in essence, the rendering is ...


10

In certain contexts, a poisoned chalice works. An assignment, award, or honour which is likely to prove a disadvantage or source of problems to the recipient: "many thought the new minister had been handed a poisoned chalice" (http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/poisoned-chalice) When something is a curse in disguise (in the disguise ...


1

Probably a Trojan horse may convey the idea of something apparently good or positive but that in reality is dangerous: (Classical Mythology. a gigantic hollow wooden horse, left by the Greeks upon their pretended abandonment of the siege of Troy. The Trojans took it into Troy and Greek soldiers concealed in the horse opened the gates to the Greek army at ...


1

The example given is not the opposite of a blessing in disguise, it's going from bad to worse. So you could say, in Nash's case, that "Murphy's law" applies: Anything that can possibly go wrong, will or you could say that he jumped out of the frying pan into the fire


0

The opposite of "blessing in disguise" which, as you have correctly pointed out, means a perceived misfortune unexpectedly turning into a fortunate event, would be a seemingly fortunate event turning out to be quite unfortunate. In this case we could say "even roses have thorns", or "not everything is as it seems", or maybe something else, depending on the ...


7

A 'curse in disguise' is the literal opposite, and isn't unheard-of. As in: King Midas' gift of turning everything he touched to gold was a curse in disguise. The phrase be careful what you wish for also comes to mind (Usingenglish.com) If you get things that you desire, there may be unforeseen and unpleasant consequences. ('Be careful what you ...


2

It's verb definition #3 of mill in ODO: [NO OBJECT] (mill about/around) (Of people or animals) move around in a confused mass Usually it's used with about or around, but this writer chose to leave this out, perhaps because it sounds clunky when used after a gerund. aimless is used with its usual meaning, not having a purpose.


0

1)perhaps the course of habit is when a person makes a conscious decision to do something and that action is then repeated until it is exercised without thought or remorse... 2)un-conscientiously doing something that is not an automatic until it has first been done out of willfulness. the force of habit is that urge that pulls a person in after the person ...


1

I believe the difference is in the implication. The way I see it. Putting in one's papers implies that person is leaving their job but they are going to finish up the last of their duties and get things in order properly before they leave for good. Putting down one's papers implies that they are leaving the job, possibly disgruntled, and getting out of ...


3

Not exactly surprised and amused, but there is a word for puzzled and amused: bemused (M-W) bemuse: to cause (someone) to be confused and often also somewhat amused Does that work for you? If the habit is bad or sad, you could be shocked I suspected Dexter killed people, but I was shocked/appalled/horrified/scandalized when I actually saw it. ...


6

Biting down or clenching the teeth is a common involuntary reaction to pain. Modern day mouth guards are designed around the same principles. The lead bullet would prevent the patient from: Breaking his own teeth during constriction of the jaw muscles Damaging the jaw muscles from cramping or spasming Biting off his own tongue if it got between the teeth ...


3

Not a direct replacement, but something you might say to your Dad when he comes in: "Were your ears burning?" See Origin of burning ears if you are not familiar with the expression.


1

Two others expressions come to mind: 1) rearranging deck chairs on the Titanic and 2) polishing a turd both convey the sense of naively doing ineffectual work which ultimately doesn't fix a looming problem. The first one is more polite, of course.


3

Commonly, this is said to be "treating the symptoms and not the cause", though I cannot find any good sources to cite on this one.


-2

In etymology not every word or saying can be followed back to its origin with certainty of a hundred percent. The article of Prasefinder mentions the possibility of a transformation from billet to bullet. But then the author is astonished that he could not find any incidents for such a change. I wouldn't be astonished. The cases where transformations can be ...


10

From etymonline.com: To bite the bullet is said to be 1700s military slang, from old medical custom of having the patient bite a lead bullet during an operation to divert attention from pain and reduce screaming. Figurative use from 1891; the custom itself attested from 1840s.


13

From the book Anesthesia in Cosmetic Surgery, edited by Barry Friedberg (Publisher: Cambridge University Press): Prior to the late 1800s, one could get drunk or literally bite the bullet, neither of which had any effect on pain. An interesting article appeared about a .50 caliber bullet found at the site of the Battle of Ox Hill. The 21st Massachusetts ...


0

I'd be much more inclined to consider the similarity between Priscilla (often shortened to Prissy) and prissy "fussy and excessively respectable".


0

I have seen off you go being used in two ways: As a casual dismissal message. 'OK, we're all done. Off you go.' As a way of saying one can start something (like a speech or a presentation). 'Are you ready to start?' 'Yes.' 'Okay, off you go!'


0

I heard this idiom being used by one of the judges in Britain's Got Talent. It signalled the candidate to start his performance.


4

I should've checked the OED first. Deficiency in an appropriate or desired quality; inferiority, paltriness, meanness; = poorness n. 3. Formerly also as a count noun. So it's the same usage as in poverty of imagination (which is something of a journalistic stock phrase, if not rising quite to the level of idiom), or (to give a silly example) I ...


0

I live in Vietnam, so I understand this sentence means, but my English is not well so cannot describe to help you understand more. But I will say briefly. Ex: She/He get a trouble but they are as totall lost, they don't know what to do, they don't know who to ask, To solve the problem. That is some means of that sentence. Cá nằm trên thớt


1

I believe that the term comes from vaudeville. It was used to describe an act that was related to or would appeal to the upper classes, such as opera, classical singing or other refined entertainment. A manager might say, "That routine is a class act" as opposed to quirky odd or low brow stuff. So it then came to be used to describe someone acting in a ...


4

Mawkish, adj.: 1660s, "sickly, nauseated," from Middle English mawke "maggot". Sense of "sickly sentimental" is first recorded 1702. Soppy: showing or feeling too much of emotions such as love or sympathy, rather than being reasonable or practical. (cambridge.org/etymonline.com)


1

I would go for one of (definitions from dictionary.com): mushy Informal. overly emotional or sentimental: mushy love letters. soppy British Slang. excessively sentimental; mawkish. saccharine cloyingly agreeable or ingratiating: a saccharine personality. exaggeratedly sweet or sentimental: a saccharine smile; a saccharine song of ...


1

"slushy" comes to mind. slushy - (adj) "affectedly or extravagantly emotional" TFD


0

Perhaps Opportunistic is what you are looking for: exploiting chances offered by immediate circumstances without reference to a general plan or moral principle Although, according to the definition above, the word describes the person who is ready to break the rules before or after achieving the goal; it still covers those who break the rules when ...


0

1997 Turns up in twice in Disney's animated film Hurcules. Used sarcastically when spoken by the character Meg, but used sincerely when written in the end credits.


1

To be expressive as possible in English, do not use clichés. "Like a fish on a cutting board" is comprehensible in English without borrowing some antique colloquialism.


0

Variants of like ants under a magnifying glass may carry the meaning.


0

It seems to me that "test pilot" would be pretty apt.


0

In the technical fields they are humorously called crash test dummies.


-1

In many cases, 'early adopter' might be appropriate.


1

The expression comes from the Bible, the Letter of St. Paul to the Roman Christians, chapter 4, verse 18. Here are some of the ways the expression could be translated. Each of the following has been altered slightly, but if you are interested in the exact wording, look here. Even when there is no logical reason to hope, hope anyway. Beyond hope, ...


2

It's not restricted to pitchers; every player has a meat hand and a glove hand, and my impression is that it's used most often of catchers. The earliest use I've found is from 1911, in a short story by Charles Van Loan, “The Crab” in The Big League, 1911, where a first baseman praises his colleague: “There ain’t a third baseman in the country who has ...


2

First, steroids aren't "that" bad, in popular opinion. Medically, steroids are used to treatment ailments like arthritis. Chemically, steroids are very common, e.g. choloesterol (though that isn't an anabolic steroid). Possession or sale of anabolic steroids without a presecription in the U.S. is illegal, but a lot of people don't really care. Probably the ...



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