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0

Given your example of 12-9=3, 7-4=3, it appears that the expression (and it has been my understanding) is indicating that regardless of path the result is the same. Similarly, brasshat uses what appears to be two different results, but if looked at as the paths taken to a result, the speaker is indicating that the result (be it happy or sad) is the same.


11

Same difference is an idiomatic oxymoron. It effectively means Whether these two choices are the same or different is immaterial to me.


7

The expression is used to indicate that objections or differences between alternatives are of no or little importance or consequence. Compare it to the use of "Whatever" to dismiss an objection.


1

"Same difference" is an idiomatic expression used by someone to indicate the equivalence of two different options. For example, if someone is asked "Do you want to go to the movies or to the beach", and has no particular preference one way or another, the one queried might respond "same difference".


2

It actually means the opposite (no difference or not much difference). A good example can be found here: http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/same-difference?q=same+difference Please note that this is only an informal expression.


1

This is not an English idiom, but a literal translation of a Biblical Hebrew expression. Yamin means, primarily, the right hand in its aspect as the instrument of power and dexterity; the "right hand of God" might be better translated as the "strong arm of God". Attributive use of the word in construct case (= 'of the right hand') to designate direction is ...


0

The right hand of God, has symbolic meanings of omnipotence and justice: (dextera Domini "right hand of the Lord" in Latin) or God's right hand may refer to the hand of God often referred to in the Bible and common speech as a metaphor for the omnipotence of God and as a motif in art. The Archangel Michael is also often referred to as "the Right Hand ...


2

It can have a positive or negative connotation based on the context. Let us take a couple of examples. One involves people and the other involves inanimate things (on the side being compared to sow's ears). Assume that you're the manager of a team of athletes. You're targeting a big championship but your team is mediocre. If you win, you could say, "I ...


2

As long as we're consulting the nGram oracle, this one suggests that even though the phrase took a beating in the two World Wars and Great Depression, good as gold continues to reflect a popular preference for precious metals over fiat currencies.


1

Another phrase that comes to mind is rock solid. Here are its definitions from Collins English Dictionary. adjective very hard ⇒ "Freeze it until firm but not rock solid." extremely reliable ⇒ "a man of rock-solid integrity" ⇒ "The firm is rock-solid financially." This appears to be a new phrase. Looking at its use at Google Ngram, tt's taken on ...


2

Sound as a pound: if something is as sound as a pound, it is very good or reliable. Ngram shows that the expression sound as a pound was popular in the 40s and 50s, but it is less common now. The expression sound as a dollar, which has always been more popular in US, seems to be the most common expression nowadays. sound as a dollar: see Ngram ...


0

To me, this character seems to want to fix the first part of her poem, but refers to the poem's main idea or theme casually and/or a little vaguely. I think she is implying the first part of the poem is its main idea or main message.


0

I always took this to mean "that's the gist of it". That is, "the first part is not very good, but the idea is there all the same." or "I should fix the first part, but overall the poem says what I want it to"


1

Superficially, a real coating and a real hiding may both seem related to outer coverings. However, noun hiding (“A beating or spanking”) apparently derives from verb hide (“To beat with a whip made from hide”), as distinct from the noun's sense, “One's own life or personal safety, especially when in peril”, where hide is like skin. Note, ngrams shows a ...


0

This isn't really ambiguous because the word "but" tells you that the correct interpretation is 1, where the second clause is a contrast to the first. If the word "but" was omitted, the preferred reading would shift to 2.


2

I thought this use of coating was rather common, but looking in a selection of online dictionaries, I have only been able to find it documented in Collins, who define it (sense 3) as: (English Midlands, dialect) a severe rebuke; ticking-off So the sense is here that the author of the book writes some angry, nasty, negative, or at least critical things ...


-3

"need of the hour" refers to the most recent need or the most pressing need.


2

is my vote. Reworded one might say, "I should fix the first part, but you've got the right idea."


1

I think bad refers to the (risky) reason why you are throwing (investing) money which is likely to make you lose it. Don't throw good money after bad: To spend more and more money on something that will never be successful Investors in the project began to pull out as they realised they were simply throwing good money after bad. The idiom to ...


0

First I think we can establish with some certainty that Gertrude Stein's use was not the beginning of this metaphor. Consider the similarities between Stein's "As a Wife Has a Cow: A Love Story" and the Greek fable of IO, who was loved by Zeus and turned into a cow when Zeus's wife, Hera, discovered them. Hera later sent a gadfly to infect IO in cow form, ...


1

In American usage, the "powder room" is a euphemism for the ladies lavatory, and the phrase "to powder one's nose" indicates the immediate exit of a lady toward this room. Thus, it is to leave, rather quickly, but with discretion, and without further comment. It appeared in movie and gangster novel lingo in the 1920's, meaning to depart hastily, in the ...


0

An American equivalent would be "no such luck." That is, "we haven't been so lucky" (and it's not going to happen otherwise).


0

Weirdly enough, I have a vivid memory of seeing an LP cover in record stores many years ago that adopted this particular use of "nice." It was for an album called "Get a Whiff a This," released in 1971 by a British rock band called Juicy Lucy. On the cover, a horned, shirtless, vaguely ogreish cartoon figure in checked pants says "GET A WHIFF A THIS _" and ...


0

In the military I was trained to refrain from cornering an enemy because a cornered enemy has nothing to lose and they become more dangerous than they would be otherwise. This should help to show that the idea of attacking when in a corner is not limited to animals and is also quite common, even if the wording may change from place to place.


0

There is some dispute about the underlying sense of the phrase "straight from the horse's mouth." John Ayto, The Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms, Third Edition (2009) agrees with Stan Gipple's assertion (above) that the term comes from horse racing: (straight) from the horse's mouth from the person directly concerned or another authoritative source. ...


0

This source dates it from the 1500s and says: Fly in the face of The first version, from the 1550s, was to fly in a person’s face and its literal meaning was of a dog that attacked by springing at a person. Very early on, it acquired the figurative sense of verbally attacking someone who disagreed with your opinions or your actions, decidedly ...


5

According to the following source, the expression fly in the face of comes from falconry: go against accepted wisdom, knowledge or common practice An expression in use from the 19th century and probably even earlier, from falconry, where the allusion is to a falcon or other bird of prey flying at the face of its master instead of settling on the ...


0

I'd say it'd be good to look at is as a conceptual metaphor. You can think of the resume as a whole paper and then she rips parts of it, separating pieces of the pages from each other. When she does this she gets rid of major chunks. Editors also do this during corrections. I assume she is helping you edit your resume before you send it out. It is my ...


6

tear something apart: 2. to criticize something mercilessly.


1

Considering how she ends the message, I think she means looking at it very carefully: like breaking it into small pieces and analyzing each one of it, and every sentence.


0

The context is "for good and all" time. Which means "forever."


-1

"Teeth" is a person's final fighting weapon. (After one's arms, legs, etc. have been injured, tied up, or otherwise put out of action.) To survive by the skin of one's teeth" (which have no skin), means that a person's last weapon was not broken or put out of action, and that there was still some "fight" left in the person when the enemy or danger somehow ...


-1

It is "wrapped around his/her little finger" because the little finger is the smallest in terms of diameter compared with all other fingers. It is a fact that it is harder to wrap a stiffish object around a narrow cylinder than a thicker cylinder. Thus, if she can wrap you around her little finger, her effect must be more powerful.


11

The most common theory I can find seems to be that the phrase came about from medieval falconry, along with "under her thumb". Both seem to refer to practices people used to keep the birds from flying off. When a bird lands on your hand, simply put your thumb over their claws to keep them from flying away. (You've got them 'under your thumb') In some cases ...


2

From The Phrase Finder they suggest that other usages of suck-egg may be at the origin of the saying: go suck an egg: In addition, we have the noun "suck-egg", with the following senses: "a. An animal that is reputed to suck eggs, e.g. a weasel, cuckoo; fig. an avaricious person. "b. A young fellow; slang. a silly person (Barr re & ...


0

Self depreciation was exactly the pianist's meaning. His use of the word sorry was unnecessary and, in general, is overused in the US. The person in your second example is expressing his opinion that a preference for new tile is not a sufficient reason to buy new tile or to replace the tile with something else. My observation is that warrant is commonly ...


0

I think in the first question, about the use of Sorry, it's an expression of incredulity used in the sense of "Pardon? I didn't quite catch that. Would you repeat it please? I could have sworn you said I 'played it expertly'." That is, because the pianist is still only an apprentice, he doesn't believe his performance was expert at all. Normally, Sorry in ...


2

The term for his comment is self-deprecating Tending to undervalue oneself and one's abilities. [American Heritage Dictionary] The comment is a mild apology for lack of skill and may reflect actual or false modesty.


2

The eldest reference that I could find was from a book about American Women and Flight Since 1940, saying In 1992 NASA administrator Daniel Goldin declared that the agency was too "pale, male and stale." But I also stumbled about some uses of "male, pale and stale" while looking for that.


2

I'm American from south Louisiana and for me, "to be used of" means "to be used to." It used to annoy my ex when I said, "I'm used of annoying people." "I'm used of it" because I've become acclimated to and it no longer bothers me. Maybe I'm just weird, but I didn't see what he got so worked up about.


1

Hammock: a type of bed used especially outside , consisting of a net or long piece of strong cloth that you tie between two trees or poles so that it swings (= moves sideways through the air ) The phrase 'to get off the hammock' means to be productive and stop wasting time. On the contrary "to hit the hammock" means to get some rest and chill.


0

“To be possessed of” in the sense “to be in possession of” is listed in the OED, art. “possess” 9, with a fair number of citations ranging from 1440 to 2002. It is thus certainly not incorrect, perhaps no longer idiomatic, quite possibly (in a modern context) ironic.


0

You could quote from the Red Queen, of Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass, when she expresses the the idea that you have to run fast, just to keep in the same place: "Well, in our country," said Alice, still panting a little, "you'd generally get to somewhere else—if you run very fast for a long time, as we've been doing." "A slow sort of ...


1

I usually hear this with the imagery of a rowboat: Like rowing a boat upstream, if you stop moving forward you fall back. (searching for that phrase in google tells me that's a chinese idiom; I did not until just now know that!) The more general phrase is: Standing still means falling behind. (or similar variations like: If you're standing still, you're ...


0

use it or lose it Here's an example of usage: Psychology Today For several decades, people have used the term "use it or lose it" to aptly describe the best way to off-set the problems that come with aging. In other words: use your brain, or lose your brain.


-2

One step forward, two steps back, may convey the idea: something that you say which means every time you make progress, something bad happens which causes you to be in a worse situation than you were to begin with Every solution we come up with seems to create more problems than it solves, so it's one step forward, two steps back.


0

Since south is always below your map point, that's why people likes to use this phrase as a lower or below direction, so using north is the opposite way. If you use south of a number you mean, the number you're referring to is lower/smaller than/ below of the number you mentioned. North is the bigger or above side. Ex: North of 100 is just above the 100, ...


3

The Governor is running through a bombastic tirade about things that make him unhappy. His Harrumph fits both definitions. He is surrounded by yes-men, lackeys of no particular viewpoint or individual strength. He expects each and every one of them to be echoing his every expression, including his every harrumph.


2

The earliest example I can find is from a 1976 journal article that, judging from the snippets I can see, appears to involve homeless people with mental disorders. In our field research we observed those who were perceptibly disorganized for some prolonged period of time: those who were called "space cases" on the street. The "space case" is an individual ...


2

I think you are referring to the expression space case meaning: (slang) An insane person who has little grip on reality. It appears it is a AmE expression used from the mid 70s even though Ngram. shows very little evidence of it. Source: http://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/space_case It's origin is hard to detect but it presumably comes from the ...



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