Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

"The Conscience of the Court" is a short story originally published in The Saturday Evening Post on March 18, 1950. It is set in Jacksonville, Florida, at the trial of fictional character named Laura Lee Kimble, an uneducated black woman from Savannah, Georgia, now living with her (temporarily absent) employer in Jacksonville. Here is the relevant excerpt: ...


0

""account for" can mean "take into account", which is a synonym for "consider". So yes the sentence id correct. However, it might be more accurate to say "allow for" rather than "account for".


1

Many grammar guides, such as grammarbook.com and Grammar Girl, do advise writers to use a hyphen when compound adjectives come before the noun they modify, but as John Lawler commented, it's not a definitive rule. It's pretty much like the Oxford comma; there are people who'll complain if you use it and there are people who'll complain if you don't. The ...


1

I'd agree with both comments: the statement is easily understandable, but the image is overdone. You might instead try something like "My heart sank when I heard..." Or, of course, you can use it anyways, and if enough people imitate you it will become accepted.


-2

"too equally" does not work. Things are either equal or they are not, there is no gradation of equality. If you want gradation (i.e. the use of the word "too") then you would have to replace "equal" with "similar". Your sentence would then be: "They are too similar in attractiveness to choose which to pick up."


0

"Paddling upstream" "Going against the grain" I considered "Playing devils advocate," and it sort of fits in that you are presenting an unpopular opinion for the sake of discussion. But in that case it is an opinion you may not actually believe or be passionate about.


0

I found "’tis seeking a needle in a bottle of hay" in the book, The Armourer's Prentices, by Charlotte Mary Yonge, Chapter III, Published October 1883-August 1884, serialized in The English Illustrated Magazine. 1884, published by Macmillan. I found this at http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext06/arpn10h.htm Sarah Meisner Texas


1

can-do adjective: informal characterized by or exhibiting a determination or willingness to take action and achieve results. • "I like his can-do attitude" See, google.com “can-do” Link


0

WHen I was about ten (i.e. about 1970) I used this expression. My father took me aside and explained that it was not a proper one to use in polite company, as the "hissing" referred to is actually the sound produced by involuntary voiding of liquified bowel contents and urine. In other words, the person throwing the fit has become so distraught as to cause ...


2

I would suggest "ups the ante". That is, it will cost hackers more (effort) to get into the game.


1

Christine Ammer, The Facts on File Dictionary of Clichés, second edition (2006) has this entry for the phrase "not until the cows come home": not until the cows come home Not for a long time. Presumably the time referred to is when cows return to the barn for milking. Th term has been around since the late sixteenth century. Beaumont and Fletcher's play ...


0

We always said Right church, wrong pew


1

In the commercial a young boy says that he "will never get cooties", this is illustrated with a scene where a young boy is kissed on the cheek by a girl. The literal meaning of cooties is lice but the scene in the commercial is decidedly not about lice. Instead, the expression "getting cooties" as used here derives from a childish expression of fear of the ...


0

end-all and be-all, or alternatively, be-all and end-all 1: (idiomatic) something considered to be of the utmost importance; something essential or ultimate. • “He thought that cars were the be-all and end-all of life.” • “Profit is the be-all and end-all of business.” or perhaps, raison d'être (plural raisons d'être or raison d'être ...


0

Should I say I run every morning The toothache hurts My dog eats cheese or should I say I like running every morning Toothaches can be hurting My dog may be eating cheese ?


0

They don't mean the same thing, because in the second one you have introduced can be, which allows for doubt. But the truth is deceptive, would be the same as saying the truth is deceiving.


3

How about: " she danced her life away"? OR "danced lifelong"; she is a lifelong dancer.


3

"Throw guns into a hot stove" isn't a common phrase, idiomatically or metaphorically, in U.S. English. However, I did find one real-life report involving a gun thrust into a hot stove. From the [Salt Lake City, Utah] Deseret News (May 6, 1876): ——When will people learn to handle fire-arms with care? James Cunningham, 15 years old, of Pennsgrove, Salem ...


0

"day in, day out", or just "never stop dancing"


3

It is a metaphor that is used to render an effective image of an act that might give rise to a dangerous escalation of further violence. To answer your question, you can define it as a one-off figurative expression. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action that it does ...


-1

Twenty-four, seven Meaning 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.


0

If you have a look at Collins and typ fingertip you get a result. Longman DCE online has the complete expression under fingertip. http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/fingertip


2

Although "having the world at your fingertips" can mean having the world at your command, it can also mean having ready access to the world—in many instances, specifically, through technology or through other sources of information. A Google Books search finds an example of the phrase used in this sense in the title of an article about short-wave radio that ...


1

looks good but can't sell This makes me think of a polished turd. Summarizing: So you've got the job of producing, managing, or marketing something. It could be [...] anything but whatever it is, it's bad, or at least mediocre. The concept is fundamentally flawed, the execution so rushed and so badly thought out, that no one in their right mind ...


1

Having the world at your fingertips means you control it; you can do with it what you want. Having the world at your feet means the world adores you; you can control the world based on their adoration. The effect can be, and often is, the same. But the meaning is slightly different.


3

The phrase "ahead of its time" comes to mind.


1

I have grown up and lived most of my life in the US northeast, in particular New England, more specifically Massachusetts. The phrase "all set" has many meanings which can vary based upon the context. The subtleties are easily lost on most folks, many of whom may be seeing it as a written, not spoken, expression. It can very well mean you are "ready" ...


3

Spruce Goose A very well designed and well-built aircraft that just never became a commercial success.


-1

On Shark Tank they often refer to these types of products as tchotchkes.


2

While it doesn't imply any degree of quality on its own, a prototype or proof-of-concept might fit the bill: it's an early version of a product which is typically unfit for selling or mass producing, but serves the purpose of demonstrating the design that might be approved for a final product. Because they're often produced for pitching an idea to an ...


3

I love Edwin's 'Betamax' reference, but I believe a better term would be critic's darling. It's widely used in the artistic fields and sometimes in technology to describe a thing that dazzles the press and the cognoscenti but fails to find a broader market/audience. (Cf. Segway, Jim Jarmusch films....)


11

Concept As in Concept Car or "This energy neutral house was built from natural materials as a concept." Companies often build such "concept products" as a marketing excercise and many are very well engineered, though not economically viable and the company has no intention of selling it, at least not in the immediate future. If they built it with the ...


2

I think Marv Mills' suggestions come pretty close to the best answer. The word folly http://www.thesaurus.com/browse/folly is used for architecture that is well-designed, but pretty much pointless, but could equally applied to any item that is costly but frivolous. If the item is simply an unnecessary purchase then frippery comes to mind. Perhaps the OP ...


8

I'm not sure if it needs padding out as a simile or can be used just as 'It's a Betamax'. From Wikipedia: Betamax Developed by Sony Home movies, Home video Betamax (also called Beta, and referred to as such in the logo) is a consumer-level analog videocassette magnetic tape recording format developed by Sony, released in Japan on May 10, ...


3

I'd call it simply a curiosity. An unusual or interesting object or fact : he showed them some of the curiosities of the house (oxforddictionaries.com) Curiosities are by their nature valuable to their owners or curators, but not to the world at large, because of their peculiarity.


3

Commonly used in the entertainment industry is "Turkey" - And I think, although this is not supported in that Dictionary link, that its use can be extended to other things: "You remember that thing we made? Brilliantly designed but turned into a bit of a turkey in the end" Another related term is "White elephant" - Again this dictionary definition does not ...


2

According to Otto Santa Ana (Brown Tide Rising: Metaphors of Latinos in Contemporary American Public ...) For alternative views of nation, the FABRIC metaphor, such as 'the intricate weave of American peoples into the national fabric', may be considered. Textile invokes often complex warps and weaves which can be associated with patterns of ...


1

The British National Corpus has 31 instances for "First things first" and none for "First thing's first". I guess the full formula is/was "Let's do first things first" and not: First thing is first, which is as illogical as "Second thing is second"- or you could call it a tautology expressing the same idea twice. ...


1

To my mind, the opposite of dying with monstrous spaghetti-like strands of tubing inserted in one's trachea and attached to one's arms and chest in an effort to prolong one's life to the farthest limit scientifically possible is to die naturally. A Google Books search for die naturally returns "about 19,300 matches," encompassing a wide range of ideas about ...


-1

To die, looking out the window into my garden while fondling the ears of my dog. I think someone wrote that once in a book, and that is my ideal.


2

Gum is a verb: Chew (something) with toothless gums: Gum the spoon refers to chewing on the spoon with toothless gums. OED


2

Babies are orally fixated, as well they should be. They also have few or no teeth, and to aid the eruption of their milk teeth they chew, or gum, hard objects. This allows the buried teeth to cut their way through the gun tissue. This process is known as "cutting" their teeth. Since they are using the gum tissue to chew, the process is known as "gumming" ...


-1

' to die on a tatami mat' as far as I know doesn't mean to die at home or peacefully. It means to fight and persist until the last breath. It means not giving up until last moment of life. It means preferring dying in battlefield rather than being alive but defeated.


0

"Reliable," comes to mind... good for a plan, strategy, or appliance. "Addictive," is another way of looking at it - if the need is compelling. "Tried and true," is what old people say... but it's still useful. You could also use a word to personify an object (that may project a somewhat unnatural attachment): "A loyal, old car." "My faithful ...


7

Taking a guess from the context of the chapter, the scoobies are in a dark escape-proof cellar prison, hearing Hermonie being tortured by Bellatrix. Luna and the others have been there for a while, and we have been told/implied that Luna has also been tortured. Dean had been bloodied. Add to that, the dark room was just lit up by tiny suns. This leads to a ...


2

Is this a usual phrasal, not politically correct? "Anyone who is married" is not a stock phrase or idiom, but I very much doubt this author was the first ever to use it. It's a joke, that married life inevitably produces examples of irrationality. Really what the author intends to insinuate here, I think, is that actually everyone knows, and Keynes ...


1

Its about experience. Its possible to posses quite a bit of judgement, intelligence and wisdom yet still believe something foolish because one has not had the correct personal experience to show one the folly of said believe. For example if you grew up in the Southern USA and were raised to call people Sir and Mam then you might not now that many people hate ...


8

Simply put. As any "logical" married person (i.e. a man) will tell you, it's difficult to settle disputes (i.e causes) using facts and logic with a person who does not (i.e. a woman). It's quite a sexist comment. There is no dispute as to the meaning of the following as anyone who is married... as any married person... it refers to any ...



Top 50 recent answers are included