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6

Fans of the Dr. Seuss classic children's story Yertle the Turtle may appreciate the idiomatic use of "the turtle at the bottom" or "the turtle at the bottom of the stack" as an alternative to "low man on the totem pole." In Yertle the Turtle, King Yertle demands that the turtles in his pond stack themselves up to form a throne befitting his high and mighty ...


5

As I was writing the question, it occurred to me that "low in the pecking order" could be a suitable substitute.


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the bottom of the heap (idiom): people who are at the bottom of the heap are poor and unsuccessful and have the lowest position in society Source: CDO


3

"Folding in" means incorporating the change. It is used when the speaker wants the idea integrated into the existing product, rather than simply being tacked on. There are many potential etymologies, but the one which makes the most sense t me is one from cooking. When making a dessert such as a mousse, you often rely on beaten egg whites to provide the ...


2

I think COBUILD is misleading you. The constructs are the same for "more" and for "less". "No more/less than ..." does indeed have the connotation of " ... and look how small/big it is". So far, so good. The connotation is much weaker in the case of "not more/less than ..." which focusses more on the literal meaning and the stated measures of age, size or ...


2

I do think there is a difference between 'in the name' and 'under the name'. For instance, the secretary calls the hotel and asks to make a reservation in the name of her boss Mr.Cullen. On the other hand, let's imagine I go to the conference and I make my reservation or get registered under the name of my company MTC. That's how I see it.


2

As in the Urban Dictionary: Green means Money. I want to eat, but I need some green. and yes, it's acceptable in AE. As an example: Spend some green at local stores and restaurants to help keep Houston green.


1

The former is common. I have never heard the latter and it sounds as if it had been coined by an unskilled amateur epigrammist. However, even if the latter of your two were a common idiom, you would be weakening the effect of the former by conflating them. Among the defining characteristics of a good idiom are concision and pithiness. Fortune favors the ...


1

How about peon? MW defines it as: : a person who does hard or boring work for very little money : a person who is not very important in a society or organization A grunt may also work. : a person who does ordinary and boring work


1

I like the greek lettering system: Alpha (alpha dog, top man, etc.), Beta (2nd in command)... Omega the last/least of the set.


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About question 2: Take another example [1] This restaurant is no less expensive than that restaurant. This sentence is interpreted as "this restaurant is expensive, just as that one is expensive". Why is the expensiveness of this restaurant regarded as the same level of the expensiveness of that restaurant? Suppose that the reason is that the ...


1

I think this "no" before a comparative is a habit: no longer, no more, no less, no better than etc. I assume the original formula was "in no way better than". But actually there is no reason that would prevent the negation "not" and occasionally you find "not" instead of "no+comparative". The meaning is the same. It would be interesting to know where the ...


1

I've never heard it in the UK. It might have been influenced by an advertising campaign such as this.



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