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harrumph /həˈrʌmf/ verb; gerund or present participle: harrumphing clear the throat noisily grumpily express dissatisfaction or disapproval. "skeptics tend to harrumph at case histories like this" He harrumphed and said, ‘I am deeply obliged’. (from Google)


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Cambridge Dictionaries Online defines "your heart sinks" as an idiom meaning "you feel disappointed or discouraged," and gives this example sentence: My heart sank when I opened the letter and realized I had not been accepted into graduate school. "Sink" as a verb means "to move downward, usually through water." For example, the Titanic sank in the ...


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Yes, it's generally true. Other forms of therapist are normally more beholden to include their type: physical therapist, speech therapist, etc. In fact, the use of "therapist" is far more common than the use of "psychotherapist". Unfortunately for some medical doctors, "therapist" also tends to refer to a psychiatrist despite a difference in education ...


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The negative "vice" has its roots here: Middle English, from Old French, from Latin vitium fault, blemish, crime, vice while the prefix "vice-" has its roots in the Latin vice in place of [Merriam-Webster Unabridged Dictionary]


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I would use swagger. However, I also think stride is a good one, as FumbleFingers say. Strut may also work. You can also say walking with aplomb


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Saunter does not indicate confidence but does indicate lack of anger/frustration/hurry. (M-W)


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Use either "not so much" or "not", but not "not so". With A, the goal is not so much X as it is Y. With A, the goal is not X but Y. The first means that the goal is more Y than X. The second means that the goal is not at all X; it is instead Y.


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I suspect that the idiomatic sense in English of "patch up holes" is strongly influenced by the fact that, in the terminology of street repairs, a filled-in, smoothed-out pothole is called a patch. (Something similar is at work in software programming, where a correction for a coding bug, glitch, or security vulnerability is likewise called a patch.) ...


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I don't know that it's especially common as an idiom in English language, but I think the meaning is clear enough, and I can't really think of a better way to say it. I like the phrase because it invokes a journey. It sounds like you are saying that if you tell the whole story, the reader won't be confused or have a lot of questions. The concept of a "hole" ...


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The best way I know to search for an idiom is: go to Google Books reduce the idiom to a minimal number of characteristic words search for it this say: "heart sink" idiom and you'll find many idiom dictionaries, such as this one, quoting it: 99 Essential Business Idioms and Phrasal Verbs: Succeed in ... Zhanna Hamilton Business Idiom: Have ...


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I would call it adaptation: [MASS NOUN] 1 The action or process of adapting or being adapted: oxforddictionaries.com Eskimos might prefer an adaptation to igloo sweet igloo.


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Perhaps you can say that he is in awe of, intimidated by, cowed by or daunted by his superior.


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Oxford Dictionary of English - Page 1185 Angus Stevenson - 2010 near preposition 3 close to (a state); verging on: she gave a tiny smile, brave but near tears | she was near to death. 2a small amount below (another amount): temperatures near 2 million degrees.


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"Therapist" increasingly refers to a physical therapist - (although it is still more common to assume "head-shrinker" in conversation) to remove the ambiguity, the term "analyst" is also common, and more precise. (US)


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In the UK, it is often referred to as a "Paddington stare". This refers to the character Paddington Bear who found fame in the books of Michael Bond, which have been adapted for TV and movie. “Paddington had a very persistent stare when he cared to use it. It was a very powerful stare. One which his Aunt Lucy had taught him and which he kept for ...


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An old saying for a demanding look is, to look at someone with "daggers in your eyes." If you are being patronizing, you would give someone a "withering look". (To cause them to "shrivel up")(US)


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Since I don't have the rep to comment, and nobody has made it their main answer, let me chime in with Stride. It has more meaning than just long steps. The usage that immediately comes to mind is: in stride 1 without interference with regular activities 2 without emotional reaction also: Stride 1b the most effective natural pace : maximum competence ...


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To me, to walk "purposefully" connotes a vision of someone looking straight ahead, in control and with a purpose.


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Sometimes when a grumpy old man gets annoyed, he makes noises like clearing his throat. Does grumbling or grunting define that action? Grumble: definitely not. That consists of complaining words, it is not a sound. Grunt: close, but that isn't it. Grunt doesn't include throat-clearing, and it is an inhalation. Is there a more appropriate ...


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The heart actually feels heavy due to a nervous system response to sadness, so it is not just a mental illusion. Heavier objects tend to sink (fall downward through the surroundings), hence the heart is said to sink on receiving bad news. Some synonymous phrases for "made my heart sink" are "made me disappointed/dejected/depressed".


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I think that "to start a story at the beginning" is fairly idiomatic; it's certainly a familiar construct. For something slightly more dynamic, you could emulate Lewis Carroll and use "Begin at the beginning."


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No frame of graft; no deliberate intention ( scheme) to have sex with you! A long process where one persistently flirts and talks with a girl via text, msn, facebook etc. until you (eventually/rarely) have sex with her. "Joe is a grafting machine! Everytime I see him he's texting some female..." ( Urban Dictionary)


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The use of any plural noun as an adjective, adverb, adjective clause, or adverbial clause does not affect the count of the verb. The verb only cares about the subject of the sentence. What is the subject of this particular sentence? If it were "cats and dogs", then you would be correct to believe the sentence would be "there are cats and dogs" or ...


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As ryan suggests in an earlier answer, Eric Partridge, A Dictionary of Catch Phrases, second edition (2003) has this entry for "don't spend it all ...": here's a ha'penny (or a penny): don't spend it all at one shop (or all at once) is a jocularity accompanying the munificent gift to a young child: late C19–20; by 1960, ob.; by 1970, virtually [defunct]. ...



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