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8

"Stands for" is normally used when you are explaining an acronym or initialism, and may also be used for other forms of abbreviation: USA stands for "United States of America" Laser stands for "Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation" CENTPACCOM stands for "Central Pacific Command". "Is short for" is more normally used for ...


7

The classic idiom for taking a lot of stuff is "everything but the kitchen sink"1. There is an implication that a lot of the stuff will not be needed, i.e. the idiom is a bit derogatory. If you want to say that someone is using a lot of stuff but without the implication of packing/travel, there's also "everything from soup to nuts". 1 When we go camping ...


4

My first inclination was to quote the Bible which has the phrase "You hypocrite, first take the plank out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother's eye." -Matthew 7:5, but there's also the lyric from Elvis' hit, Clean Up Your Own Backyard.


4

See the answers to Origin of “one man's trash is another man's treasure”: One man's meat is another man's poison One man's ceiling is another man's floor One's man's pleasure is another's pain A thing which is a sin to one is a blessing to another One man's loss is another man's profit One man's fault is another man's lesson Et al


3

The mean in meantime and meanwhile does, as you suspect, come from the same root as the word meaning mathematical average. The original meaning of this mean is middle, and, with respect to meantime, it branches off to meaning intermediate and then further off to mean1: Intermediate in time; coming or occurring between two points of time or two events; ...


3

It is quite common to use "as for me" in English. However, using it at the beginning of a sentence would only make sense if it is a follow-up, alternative, or response to something someone else has said (usually, to mark contrast with another person's opinion). "He prefers hiking and surfing. As for me, I would rather just stay at home and relax"


3

A very close mid-western US equivalent--- not common but most people would get it immediately--- would be "getting someone else to piss on the fence." We have electric fencing all over out here (Missouri) and urinating on one... well. Much of the region is long stretches of road and short on amenities. If you really have to go by the side of the road, there ...


2

Idioms for bringing lots of stuff: Particularly with subtle verbal cues and body language, these phrases could all imply: My, you've gone overboard! The whole kit and caboodle The whole shooting match The whole shebang Lock Stock and Barrel The whole ball of wax The whole enchilada The whole nine yards The works ...


2

If you are looking for an idiomatic phrase which refers to the differences in likings that people may have you can say: One man's meat is another man's poison: You may not like something that I like. The phrase, which was first written by the Roman poet Lucretius, was appropriated to refer to any situation where two people disagree over something. ...


2

A simple translation is "I don't have an answer right now and I will let you know as soon as I do have an answer."


2

contributions to refers to contributions that affected the field of medicine. This is what you would normally use to describe medical researchers. contributions in refers to contributions that involve medicine, but didn't affect the field itself significantly. For instance, a doctor treating their patients, but not making any new discoveries, makes ...


2

Well, there’s a venerable English proverb that warns, “The Devil is in the detail.” The idiom "the devil is in the detail" refers to a catch or mysterious element hidden in the details, and derives from the earlier phrase "God is in the detail" expressing the idea that whatever one does should be done thoroughly; i.e. details are important. ...


2

It is an allusion to Psalm 127: Behold, children are a heritage from the Lord, the fruit of the womb a reward. 4 Like arrows in the hand of a warrior are the children[a] of one's youth. 5 Blessed is the man who fills his quiver with them! Children are considered a blessing, and are compared to a quiver of arrows. Note, the ...


2

Without the context it is difficult to reply, but it seems as if someone/thing died as a result of a seizure, e.g., an epileptic fit


2

"Short for" implies that its shorter. "Stands for" just means that A stands in place for B as a verbal alias. Because these uses go beyond acronyms, sometimes in conversation you will hear things like "Cookie"? That's short for "the team cook". or: "The silver chicken"? That stands for "colonel". or even, sarcastically (especially in the ...


1

These are equivalent expressions, but the concept is easily understood (at least in the U.S.) and more usually appears as, "the United States (hereafter, U.S.)..."


1

Not only is it not an idiom, it is archaic both in the words and the expression. Perish is a literary word for die; but though we use die of (a cause), perish of is rare: the British National Corpus has 204 instances of perished, but only two of perished of. The OED says of fit: " A sudden seizure of any malady attended with loss of consciousness and ...


1

To give a buck about is either a typo or a minced oath for to give a fuck about.


1

The best choice is 3. It means that the fund will carry someone a considerable distance toward achieving a goal. Number 2 is grammatically correct, but the meaning becomes potentially ambiguous because to has many definitions in addition to toward. Some readers or listeners might at least initially interpret to as meaning in order to, suggesting that, in ...


1

If you are feeling the anger and the hilarity simultaneously, you actually are feeling ambivalent ADJECTIVE Having mixed feelings or contradictory ideas about something or someone: The strength of your anger, and the strength of your amusement are both at play in your mind: "simultaneous conflicting feelings," 1924 (1912 as ambivalency), ...


1

When I used to work as a florist, by the end of a busy holiday there would be only mismatched dregs to make arrangements out of. So, we had a little game: Someone would make the ugliest flower arrangement possible, and we'd put a giant mismatched bow in the middle of it, and we'd watch to see who bought it. Invariably, a customer would pick it up, deem it ...


1

Sarcasm works well here. Is that all you're taking? Packing light?


1

Martin Manser, The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs (2002) has this entry for the saying "Physician heal thyself": physician, heal thyself Do not reproach another person for something that you are equally guilty of; also used to imply that you should solve your own problems before you try to deal with those of other people: [citations omitted.] The ...


1

There really ought to be a simple idiom along the lines of "packing for a six-week picnic" or "bundling up in April for next winter" but I'm not aware of any existing English idiom that expresses precisely the right sense of excessive or premature preparation. Marthaª's suggestion of "bringing everything but the kitchen sink" comes closest, I think. ...


1

I found one somewhat earlier instance—from early 1892—in a newspaper archived in the Library of Congress's Chronicling America database of old newspapers. From "Lee Hing's Girl," in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer (February 14, 1892), attributed to the New York Sun but with no date for the occurrence in that newspaper (which further searches in the database ...



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