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6

It means to purposefully play slower. This would be a disadvantage to a team that plays quickly, as it interrupts their natural flow and frustrates them. If a game has a high pace, then it's likely that both teams are looking to attack and/or counter-attack quickly, as opposed to patiently gaining ground and concentrating on keeping the ball.


4

In the years following the success of the 1979 play (and then the 1984 movie) Amadeus, it became common to refer to a composer—and especially a baroque composer—of unexceptional talent as a Salieri. But that's not to say that the real Salieri wasn't prominent in his day—he was (at least in Vienna). But after Amadeus, his name became synonymous with "court ...


4

Probably not a perfect fit, but close in meaning is: It's no skin off my nose. (British, American & Australian informal) also It's no skin off my (back) teeth. (American informal) something that you say which means you do not care about something because it will not affect you. (Cambridge Idioms Dictionary)


2

You might say that such a person has gotten too big for his/her britches or gotten too big for his/her boots: Conceited, self-important, as in Ever since he won that tournament he's gotten too big for his britches, or There's no talking to Jill anymore—she's just too big for her boots. This metaphoric idiom alludes to becoming so “swollen” with conceit ...


2

As k1eran says, "journeyman" is correct. But for more informal use, you might be thinking of "workaday", which is somewhat more disparaging. workaday 1. of or befitting working days; characteristic of a workday and its occupations. 2. ordinary; commonplace; everyday; prosaic. "Hack" is even worse.


2

Perhaps journeyman composers, since the journey in late Middle English meant a ‘day's work’. From etymonline.com : journeyman (n.) "qualified worker at a craft or trade who works for wages for another" (a position between apprentice and master), early 15c., from journey (n.), preserving the etymological sense of the word ("a day"), + man (n.). ...


2

It's not my dog — TFD It’s not my problem. "So what! It doesn’t matter! Not my dog." "Not my circus, not my monkeys", literal translation of a Polish idiom, would be interesting too.


1

couldn't care less seems like the most widely used phrase for this type of context: The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms Be completely indifferent. "The viewers couldn't care less about the disasters on television"


1

The closest figurative expression I can think of is: - None of their business None of their business. Not of their concern. As the explanation you have quoted states: - "[The issue has] ...nothing to do with" the individual or party concerned. While Josh's suggestion: - It's no skin off my nose Conveys a sense that the party in question is ...


1

It's a perfectly acceptable idiom. I can see why it sounds odd. It is not quite the same usage as in a sentence like, "What kind of dog is that?" If it was used like the dog example, answers to "What kind of starting pay...?" might be "Pitiful" or "Executive fat-cat level", ie genuinely different kinds of pay. But as you say, it is really another way of ...


1

If the insinuation is that they are purposefully ignoring the chasm: the elephant in the room "Elephant in the room" is an English metaphorical idiom for an obvious truth that is going unaddressed. The idiomatic expression also applies to an obvious problem or risk no one wants to discuss.[2] It is based on the idea/thought that an elephant in a room ...


1

I think you may consider: not see further than one's (or the end of one's) nose Fail to consider different possibilities or to foresee the consequences of one’s actions. (ODO)


1

Two things are crucial to sorting this out, first the meaning of the expression and second, its idiomatic as opposed to everyday usage. The Oxford English dictionary give the following: bells and whistles n. [as on a fairground organ] colloq. attractive additional features or trimmings, esp. in Computing. 1977 Byte July 122/2 This simple ...



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