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5

Its not an idiom. The "the" here is not synonymous with "any". "The" is the definite article. It refers to a specific military. Which one in particular will have to be determined by context. Generally it would be the military of the country you are in, but it may also be the military of the country you are talking about. For instance Americans in ...


3

Perhaps this from the OED Online 'fire' definition: P2. With a verb. .... g. to play (also mess) with fire: to take unnecessary or foolish risks; to invite trouble. Often paired with to get burned, expressing inevitability that trouble will result from a particular action.


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Consider tempt fate or tempt the devil. Also, "tempt the fates": Take a severe risk, as in It's tempting fate to start up that mountain so late in the day, or Patrice thought driving that old car was tempting the fates; it was sure to break down. This expression uses tempt in the sense of “test in a way that involves risk or danger.” ...


2

flirt with danger/disaster To do something that you know you should not do and that may cause you serious trouble. McMillan Dictionary walk on eggshells (idiomatic) To be overly careful in dealing with a person or situation because they get angry or offended very easily; to try very hard not to upset someone or something. (idiomatic) To ...


2

Fly too close to the sun, (and you'll burn) Fly too close to the ocean, (and you'll drown) These are quotes borrowed and changed accordingly from the story of Icarus. The day they were to leave, Daedalus lectured Icarus one last time, “Now son, remember, you must be cautious when we fly. Fly too close to the ocean and your wings will become too heavy ...


2

Consider, chink [in the armor] : a weak spot that may leave one vulnerable. M-W fly in the ointment A detrimental circumstance or detail; a drawback. American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language wrench in the works a spanner (or North American monkey wrench) in the works A person or thing that prevents the ...


2

Perhaps Achilles' heel (with or without the apostrophe) An Achilles heel is a weakness in spite of overall strength, which can actually or potentially lead to downfall. While the mythological origin refers to a physical vulnerability, idiomatic references to other attributes or qualities that can lead to downfall are common. Wikipedia


1

The expression "upset the apple cart" is very common in the UK. Basically it means "overturning the status quo". In some ways "Don't upset the apple-cart" is a little (I stress a little) like "Let sleeping dogs lie".


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Another idea is "swimming through porridge"


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The term "totally on" is lingo commonly used by magazines such as Seventeen, Redbook, or Tiger beat. It means that the two people are still dating, or still "an item". In this case it is referring to rappers Meek Mill and Nicki Minaj. Meek and Nicki are still dating now.


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Discombobulate To throw into a state of confusion. Quote from Sherlock Holmes(film): Sherlock Holmes: [voice-over] This mustn't register on an emotional level... [in slow motion] Sherlock Holmes: First, distract target... [Holmes flicks a handerchief in front of his opponent's face] Sherlock Holmes: Then block his blind jab, ...


1

Consider, put one off [one's] stride Also, put one off one's stroke (chiefly BrEng) Interfere with one's progress, distract or disturb one, as in The interruption put her off her stride for a moment, and she took several seconds to resume her train of thought, or The noise of the airplanes overhead put her off her stroke, and she missed the ...


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I'd strongly suggest that you stick to the word ''exploiter'' but there are other terms used or accepted in several situations suggested below. The word phony means a person who pretends to be someone else or to have feelings or abilities that he or she does not really have and it would fit your description only because nobody would go through the effort ...



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