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82

The standard English expression for solving a problem that has already been solved is... Reinventing the wheel duplicate a basic method that has already previously been created or optimized by others The idiomatic push at an open door has a completely different meaning... to achieve what you want easily because a lot of people agree with you ...


17

To pass peach seeds is a more polite version of a country expression, to shit peach pits. Since peach pits are large, hard, and sharp at each end, passing them through one's anus would be exceedingly painful and would likely cause some damage requiring surgical repair. The expression means something painful, and feared because it is painful. I have heard ...


14

The meaning is 'to eliminate a peach seed from one's system by defecating it' (or, to put it more vulgarly but concisely, 'to shit a peach seed'). Here, the verb 'to pass' is a euphemism for 'to expel from the anus', which is probably familiar to many English speakers from the expression 'to pass gas', i.e. to fart. The implication of this allusion is that ...


7

Like a duck takes to water is a well known idiom, and has references in appropriate reference materials (e.g. books on idioms). Here, that and more duck idioms are discussed. As you've stated, it means easily. However, googling like a fish takes to water gets many hits, where it's used exactly like like a duck takes to water. However, they are blog sites; ...


6

Pass: to discharge (body waste, for example); to be voided: Luckily the kidney stone passed before she had to be hospitalized. (TFD) It's a polite was of saying to "evacuate" (in these cases, from the gastrointestinal tract.) If you've ever seen a peach pit (the seed of the peach), you might imagine the discomfort associated with passing one, let ...


6

You can consider flogging a dead horse (and its alternative forms) also. It is used in situations where you waste effort on something that is settled, discarded or insoluble. It is mainly British. Flogging a dead horse (alternatively beating a dead horse, or beating a dead dog in some parts of the Anglophone world) is an idiom that means a particular ...


5

A phrase that would apply to a person who is arguing a point that everyone already agrees with: preaching to the choir: To commend an opinion to those who already accept it. The phrase comes from an earlier one, preaching to the converted (1867). The idea has also been expressed in another phrase that refers to an unnecessary act, that is, kicking ...


4

Nigel Rees, A Word in Your Shell-like (2004) suggests that the phrase “put up or shut up” may mean different things in the United States and in the UK: put up or shut up! 'Either make good your argument or stop talking about it'. In America, this translates as 'put up your money (as though for a bet)' but in Britain, 'put up your fists (as though for a ...


3

Like a fish takes to water is valid, but not quite right. The "took to water" part suggests they weren't always in the water. Better (I believe) is: "He took to [his new job / skiing / living in Spain / other activity] like a duck to water." However, your particular example is essentially the only place your phrase is used - when that activity is ...


3

It probably comes from the old style of 'slot machines' Usually the biggest prize on a slot machine was the cherry, as each cherry on its wheel stopped in the winning position, a small bell sound was heard, if all 3 cherries were aligned another bell slightly louder and longer would sound. Bells equals alarms, so it can be read as 'rang alarm bells'. Its ...


3

'Duck and Dive' is a common British Bingo game expression to indicate the number 25. Supposedly the 2 looks like a duck profile and 5 rhymes with 'dive'.


2

Canadian perspective...we've been metric since before I was born, however my parents were using imperial prior. Gives us this weird hybrid system...I know my personal weight in pounds, not kilo's...but I do buy my fruit and veggies by kg. I use the term mileage and know my fuel consumption in miles per galleon, but I purchase fuel in litres. Ya, it's a ...


2

It is not a common English expression. It means to make a match or to find the answer, similar to "Bingo!" It comes from old-fashioned slot machines (gambling devices something like the Japanese pachinko machines). For those machines, a winning play showed a horizontal line picturing three cherries and at the same time, rang bells. You are correct in ...


2

Sven Yargs introduces some interesting possible ideas, but the OED is far more concise in its examples and does not go into any speculation as to an origin which might involve 'putting up money' or 'fists'. Though it refers to 'putting one's money where one's mouth is'. b. intr. in same sense. to put up or shut up (colloq.): to take action, ‘come up ...


2

The phrase comes from boxing, when one fighter would challenge another and require him to put up a stake for a match, or stop his fighting words. 1858 The OED's earliest quotation is: 1858 Marysville (Ohio) Tribune (Electronic text) 21 July, Now, if he means business, let him put up, or shut up, for this is the last communication that will come from me ...


2

The correct idiom is "Take to something like a duck to water": (from TFD) to learn how to do something very quickly and to enjoy doing it     Sue just took to motherhood like a duck to water.     He's taken to his new school like a duck to water. Like a fish takes to water appears to be a variant of the original saying.


1

I am a non-native speaker and I frequently hear such idiomatic constructions. Probably, the writer assumed that since both duck and fish take to water equally, they could be interchanged.


1

Blue Canoe is an aircraft as well. — From 1958-1971 the "Blue Canoes" were operated by the MATS and MAC as light transport aircraft.


1

"To come off" has multiple meanings, most dictionaries list more than ten different meanings depending on the area in which it is used. When speaking of theatre you can say "The play came (well) off, meaning it was a success. Sometimes it is a bit difficult to explain a semantic development, then it is only possible to use associations. Well, to come off in ...


1

In the UK if team A consistently beats team B, though team B is clearly the more successful invariably finishing higher up the league table, we can say that A are their bogey team.


1

If you're expending effort to solve a problem which has already been solved (as commented, not to be confused with verifying test results), or did not exist in the first place, one would be said to be doing make-work. E.g., observe how I am adding and have edited my low vote post on a question that already has a highly up-voted and accepted answer. This is ...


1

Some engineering cultures have Not Invented Here Syndrome; (NIH) ...the tendency towards reinventing the wheel (reimplementing something that is already available) based on the belief that in-house developments are inherently better suited, more secure or more controlled than existing implementations. NIH can cause considerable delay in an engineering ...



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