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5

The first word that comes to mind is serendipity. Merriam-Webster says: luck that takes the form of finding valuable or pleasant things that are not looked for But as Robusto correctly points out, that word is mostly used for discoveries. A thesaurus points from there to fluke, defined by macmillan as: something that happens unexpectedly because of ...


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The phrase is referring to RHEL (Red Hat Enterprise Linux) 6. It is saying that RHEL 6 is somewhat old (and doesn't include the e2fsprogs package). http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/long-in-the-tooth.html explains the meaning and origins of the phrase "long in the tooth": Meaning Old, especially of horses or people. Origin Horses's ...


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If you're going for subtlety, try He began to cross the line, committing illegal acts instead of upholding the law... Other phrases you could substitute here for the bold text would be: turn to crime cross over cross into the dark side (pop culture reference) Edit: if the character was also homosexual you could make a double entendre with the ...


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thick-skinned is absolutely appropriate here. Google definition: thick-skinned adj. insensitive to criticism or insults. You can come talk to me about anything, I'm quite thick-skinned it won't take anything you say personally. He's quite thick-skinned, last week Julie told him that his jokes weren't funny, and that didn't stop him ...


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There are any number of ways to characterize succinct expressions of commonsense wisdom—including such terms as proverbs, sayings, adages, aphorisms, apothegms, saws, and homilies—and they are constantly being supplemented by new expressions that have caught on and achieved some degree of cultural resonance. Evidence of the ever-emerging nature of such ...


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Additional corroboration for the "horse's teeth" origin that Avon's answer identifies: From John Ayto, Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms, third edition (2009): long in the tooth rather old This phrase was originally used of horses, referring to the way their gums receded with age. From Christine Ammer, The Facts on File Dictionary of Clichés, ...


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Godsend (noun): an unexpected thing or event that is particularly welcome and timely, as if sent by God Dictionary.com something good that happens unexpectedly, especially at a time when it is needed CDO 'The grant was a real godsend, especially considering the theatre was due to close next month.'


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Equable http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/equable Definition of equable in English: adjective 1Not easily disturbed or angered; calm and even-tempered: ::::he could look sterner than his equable temperament would suggest and here are synonyms for equable from Collins: = even-tempered, calm, composed, agreeable, serene, ...


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Not a saying or proverb, but you would sound original saying "to play chess with Thanatos". In Greek mythology, Thanatos /ˈθænətɒs/ was the daemon personification of death. He was a minor figure in Greek mythology, often referred to, but rarely appearing in person. Thanatos as a winged and sword-girt youth. Sculptured marble column drum from the ...


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"Screaming at the top of your lungs" - I believe you can only scream aloud, when your lungs are filled to capacity or "to the brim", and hence "at the top of your lungs". The 'soundness' of our voice is directly related to the 'power of our lungs'. As the air inside the lungs depletes, the pitch (of the sound) goes down. Although there could be no ...


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This is probably due to difficulty with prepositions, for which it is harder to learn by rules than by experience! The preposition "by" is used in "X by X" where "X" is a noun to adverbially specify that the main verb is performed to each "X" in the context one at a time. Some examples are: one by one (one at a time) line by line (one line at a ...


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There's nothing wrong with "every once in a while." However, you don't say "your thoughtfulness to come and visit," say "your thoughtfulness in coming and visiting." If you want to use "thoughtful" and "to come," you say "It's thoughtful of you to come and visit every once in a while. I appreciate it" (which sounds a little awkward to me, but that's a ...


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I'd suggest saying this instead: I appreciate the thoughtfulness in your occasional visits. Edit: As GetzelR said, the usage of every once in a while ends up sounding like it may be sarcastic and the replacement of it with occasional helps clarify that the speaker means occasional only in the most literal sense, without a hostile intent behind it. ...


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Become crooked adjective 4. not straightforward; dishonest. (dictionary.reference.com) Almost always meant in a criminal way. (i.e. a crook.)



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