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1

The distinction you are looking for does not exist, however, if you include both terms within the same context, your readers may intuit your meaning. If you want to be completely sure no misunderstandings occur, fight the urge to put it so succinctly. Simply write it out: The right handle on the front side vs. the front handle on the left side. or ...


1

I would say that the phrase 'front-left' in that situation is completely ambiguous. The reason is that a box does not have hands. An observer will have no option but to relate to their own point of view. If I am standing at the back of the box and facing it, front-left means E. If I stand at the front of the box and face it, front-left means F. The same ...


1

I know of no unambiguous way in English to refer to any single handle out of the eight you’ve indicated on your ASCII box without resorting to circumlocutions. Front-left and left-front are both inherently ambiguous, and I am not aware of anyone distinguishing them in any meaningful way. The simplest and least invasive rephrasing I can think of would be to ...


0

right-rear and left-rear are far more common than rear-right and rear-left. The same is true with right-front and left-front. P.S. The other handles are unnecessary :)


0

A general remark on hyphens from Longman English Grammar by Aleander 1 There are no precise rules. 2 When short nouns are joined together, they form one word without a hyphen (a teacup). But this may lead to problems of recognition, therefore bus stop, not busstop. 3 Hyphens are often used for verb + particle combinations as in make-up. 4 When a ...


0

When I google "derivative timestep," I get many entries for "time step," but I don't get any with "timestep" on the first page. I do get "time-step," once. Googling "derivative timestamp" gives a different set of pages, which are not about calculus but about web forum management and such (checking timestamps on posts that are "derivative"). This confirms ...


0

Slashes cause problems with word wrapping. Also, when over-used, can be incredibly irritating. But this is your boss we're talking about.


0

I am by now means an English major so I don't know the right terms. I will do my best to explain what I see. In the first sentence, "20 meters" adds to the the existing adjective which is "thick" and all of that together characterizes the "It". And you can remove it. It's thick Same exact meaning (but with less detail). In the second example ...


3

That's correct General Principle 5 When two or more compound modifiers have a common base, this base is sometimes omitted in all except the last modifier, but the hyphens are retained. Examples: Long- and short-term memory 2-, 3-, and 10-min trials. apastyle.org


-1

I think the answer should be "three half-day". For Ex: I have taken three half-day leaves. We cant't use plural nouns with compound adjectives.


0

Whilst I believe that the usage in this example is appropriate, I would also like to play devil's advocate in questioning whether the usage is even required. In this example, the variations of acceleration direction could be restated as follows Our system uses four triaxial accelerometers, so each outputs a 3-dimensional vector in Cartesian coordinate ...


0

null space This is what I have always seen, and I did a quick check on google scholar just now, and verified that this is more common than the other two.


1

What is wrong with using something about the frequency detuning of the qubit from a resonator mode ? I'm afraid that no matter how you hyphenate qubit–resonator-mode frequency detuning, it's not going to be comprehensible. It's a noun pile-up, like air bag malfunction safety recall follow-up notice, and those should be avoided.


1

You can avoid the number clumping by reframing the sentence in this way: A waiting period of 15 to 30 minutes is required after each injection is given. If you want to retain the structure as given by the client, I would endorse FumbleFingers's recommendation: A 15- to 30-minute waiting period is required after each injection is given. Phrases ...


0

You are right on both counts and I like your version of the sentence the best. There is no need for "30-minute" but it is acceptable and "15- to 30-minutes" is a fine suggestion by @FumbleFingers. I used thepunctuationguide.com as my reference.


2

The sample phrases you included look good to me except the last one: my guess is non-zero energy mode is more common. Others have given you the things to think about when deciding whether to use a hyphen or not. Keep in mind, though, that in your field, certain combinations of words become commonplace, and the hyphen sometimes gets dropped. There are two ...



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