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0

Since it is a purely technical - indeed I believe medical! - issue, the only possible correct way to write this is: Define first-generation 5-HT6 receptor antagonists, and define second-generation 5-HT6 receptor antagonists. Anything else is wrong. Ask anyone who's ever worked at Sudler & Hennessey. Personally I would really spell it out: "This ...


0

Many style manuals discuss this question, but they don't reach a unanimous conclusion about a best approach. The Chicago Manual of Style, fifteenth edition (2003) favors your second option: 5.92 Phrasal adjectives. ... (4) If two phrasal adjectives end in a common element, the ending element should appear only with the second phrase, and a suspension ...


15

"almost-finished" is a compound adjective. It is the correct way to say "I am attaching an almost-finished version of the report". "almost finished" is not correct in this case. Here's a sentence where you would use "almost finished" without the hyphen: "I am almost finished with the work."


22

BEFORE a noun, "almost-finished' is better, since it emphasizes that 'almost' is qualifying 'finished', not 'report'. Not important in this case, but compare 'longest living animal' with 'longest-living animal'.


2

I have never actually seen either of those usages; what I normally see is either thirty-one-month-old [child] or, if less precision is needed, two-and-a-half-year-old [child] You could also say [S/he] is two years and seven months old or [S/he] is thirty-one months old


1

A mystically-inclined friend frequently mentions the opposite condition to being self-aware. He calls it "sleepwalking". But underlying this is the mystic's idea of what self-awareness is, which might not relate to what the OP had in mind.


1

It depends on the context. If you are using it as an adjective, you want to hyphenate it. He is a self-employed gardener. On the other hand, if you use it as a two-word noun, you do not hyphenate. He is self employed, and works as a gardener.


-1

According to the Chicago Manual of Style's guide to hyphen use, it should be self-employed. The guide says to hyphenate after the prefix self unless it is preceded by un or followed by a suffix.


1

The three most likely ways to express your example sentence are in the following word orders: Your loan has been approved in principle. Your loan, in principle, has been approved. In principle, your loan has been approved. In none of these cases would you hyphenate "in principle" because in each case it operates as a simple (two-word) ...


2

Launch a first strike "first strike" here is a noun phrase --> no hyphen Damage first-strike capabilities Here, "first strike" is a compound adjective, used attributively --> hyphen



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