New answers tagged

-1

I have been a licensed court reporter for 27 years. In my career, I have to know how to accurately spell words and use the proper grammar and punctuation. A vital resource tool for this has been the reference book called "One Word, Two Words, Hyphenated?" book written by Mary Louise Gilman, published in 1998 by the National Court Reporters Association. It ...


-1

"No-one" is incorrect. "No one" is two words. I wouldn't call it a typo, so much as an incorrect spelling. Originally, it was one word, spelt "noöne", and many other English words, such as "coöperate" and "reälity" were also spelt with a diaeresis (an exclusively English diacritic, and not the same thing as the German umlaut) to indicate that both vowels ...


5

It's not a typo, it's a deliberate decision to use a hyphen. "no-one" is sometimes used with a hyphen - some people believe that this avoids confusion with the other usage of "no one" meaning "no single", as in "No one man should have this much power." So, really it's a matter of preference. "no one" is more formally correct, but since there's a valid ...


2

Bryan Garner, Garner's Modern American Usage (2003) has a useful discussion of this problem in his lengthy coverage of phrasal adjectives: E. The Compound Conundrum. When the first or last element in a phrasal adjective is part of a compound noun, it too needs to be hyphenated: post-cold-war norms, not post-cold war norms. Otherwise, as in that example, ...


1

The former is correct. Compound nouns within compound adjectives are not themselves hyphenated; only the other word boundaries are.


2

The hyphenation depends on the pronunciation. /ˈproʊsɛs/: pro-cess. /ˈprɑsɛs/: proc-ess. Why? Because you never1 hyphenate after a "short vowel" in an accented syllable, and "o" counts as a "short vowel" when pronounced /ɑ/ (although "a" counts as a "long vowel" when it's pronounced exactly the same way in father). So which is the preferred American ...


0

In many English words, especially those derived from Latin roots, c is "soft" or pronounced like s if followed by e or i. (Celtic is the most notable exception and there are a few others) I think process is one of these. So you really need to keep the c and e together. Otherwise there is temptation to internally pronounce it as a "hard" c. Thus, it ...


0

Well, that is strange. It does seem that the AmE version of the Oxford dictionary has an unusual hyphenation. The BrE entry for process matches the Merriam-Webster version. The introduction to my Concise Oxford Dictionary states "There is a great variety in the use of the hyphen in English, especially between British and American rules...": maybe they are ...


1

Answer This phrase is ambiguous and it is not possible to use hyphens to rescue it. It should be rewritten. If you insist on retaining this phrase as it stands then use three hyphens (computer-crime-targeted) or none (1). However, the hyphens in the resulting phrase will no longer fullfill their original purpose, which was to remove the ambiguity in a ...


0

I would imagine that both are equally viable in that context and that it comes down to which you prefer using, either visually or in terms of what you believe to be correct. If you find different dictonary/definition websites with each using or referring to a different spelling, then that would suggest that you could use either. Hope this helps.


1

Reorder. With re- words, you should use ‘re-’ (with a hyphen) if the next word begins with an ‘e’ or a ‘u’ (when not pronounced like ‘you’). Otherwise, don’t hyphenate. It’s therefore re-examine, re-urge, re-entry and re-elect, and reuse, reunion, reorder, reinforce and redevelop. Source: ...


-2

No, you shouldn't. "Pedestrian" is an attributive, and so is "detection", and two attributives are 'complementary'. It is not a question of how smoothly it reads - it's about grammar. In order to avoid confusion, my suggestion would be to somehow highlight (underline or make bold) "pedestrian detection", if you are trying to say that the algorithm is ...


-1

Your hypothesis is right - all the three words should be hyphenated. Since "crime" is a noun that describes "targetted", a participle (adjective), and a noun and a participle aren't complementary (one cannot describe another through a verb - "the laws are targetted very crime" doesn't really make sense), the two words should be hyphenated. The word ...


1

I agree with the lengthy reply provided by @dodgethesteamroller that ended with "Thus "in situ visualization" is unambiguous because "in situ" cannot be mistaken for two separate adjectives; there is no such thing as "situ visualization." It's fine to put the hyphen in, but it may be perceived as old-fashioned by some copyeditors." However, I would take it ...


-4

It would be grammatically correct like this: First computer crime-targeted laws Computer and crime are two separate words. Take this other example: First hacking-targeted laws It is one word plus targeted. In conclusion, put a space between the two words and a hyphen between the two words and targeted.


0

Neither hyphens nor suspended hyphens are necessary here. Since the elements 'x', 'y' and 'z' are all adjectives describing 'acceleration' - and an adjective and a noun are complementary - no hyphens should be used.


0

Using a hyphen is the wrongest thing to do here. Ideally, the sentence would sound something like this: "You can use the types built into the library". However, if the author meant that the types are somehow built TO the library, which is already grammatically wrong, he should at least have written, "types built in to the library", as a verb and a ...


1

We use a hyphen to separate the hour from the minutes, as in four-thirty, but not if the expression of minutes requires a hyphen, as in four thirty-five. Authority: The Gregg Reference Manual by William A. Sabin. 9th Edition. McGraw-Hill: New York. 2001. Used with the consent of Glencoe/McGraw-Hill. p. 124.Authority: The Gregg Reference Manual by ...


1

I have been a newspaper editor for 47 years in Houston. Try thinking of it this way. "On-line" and "online" are just short for "on the line," the line being your connection to the World Wide Web. So we really have three choices. As we say in advertising, "Pick the one that's best for you." Now, after I initially posted this, I had this thought: Consider "on ...


1

When you wish to mention it a second time, you will use CRE-containing gene Therefore, on first mention, you want to use what will lead you to that, which is your second choice: cAMP response element (CRE)-containing gene In the first choice, you have separated the abbreviation from its meaning with a hyphen and neglected to include a hyphen ...



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