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A quick look through the Amazon listings shows "At-A-Glance" is a trademark for a line of calendars and other efficiency tools. All other uses omit the hyphens completely and capitalize neither at nor a.


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You can either capitalize every word or leave out articles ('a') and prepositions ('at'), so forming: Module At A Glance OR Module at a Glance While "at a glance" is an accepted idiom, it's not typically hyphenated in usage.


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According to a reddit.com post, this usage “originates as a navy term for flag signalling”: A tackline is a length of halyard approximately 6 feet long; the exact length depends upon the size of flags in use. The tackline is transmitted and spoken as tack and is written as a dash (hyphen) "-". It is used to avoid ambiguity. It separates signals or groups ...


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Great question! (A coincidence of http://english.stackexchange.com/a/190692/8286 ) Just FWIW, I say "minus" like you ("l s minus a l") or often just don't say the minus. So, in the example I'd read "n c l p 1234" IMO very few people say hyphen. i guess "dash" is comma, but I'd guess "minus" is more common than "dash". (Again it's a great question.) ...


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According to NGrams, "sq. ft." or "sq ft" is vastly preferred over "sqft". The use of a hyphen is a stylistic choice but due to the nature of "sq. ft." being two words the options are rather limited: 1000 sq. ft. 1000 square-foot The specific example of "1000-sqft" is non-standard.


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Use whatever style guide is appropriate for your organization or audience. If there is no appropriate style guide, then here is a general guideline (and it is only a general guideline): Use a hyphen if the term is used as an adjective: XYZ is a decision-maker tool. Do not use a hyphen if the term is used as a noun phrase: She is a decision maker. Beyond ...


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The general tendency (which is not the same as "an accepted approach") that I've observed in publishing over the past 30 years is toward less hyphenation of stacked adjectives, especially when one of the adjectives essentially modifies another. If two words possess equal force as modifiers (as is the case with blue-gray in the phrase "blue-gray ...


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Names of languages are always capitalized in English, unlike in some other languages. This is true whether the name of the language is part of a compound or not.



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