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What you're talking about here is a compound adjective. The rules regarding hyphens in compound adjectives are these: If the compound adjective is right before the noun, use a hyphen: Built-in types A well-educated student The fast-moving river If the compound adjective directly follows a linking verb, don't use a hyphen: The types are built in. The ...


-1

Normally I see built-in as an adjective, whereas built in is used as a verb. ie: "the car has built-in air conditioning", and "the shelves are built into the wall"


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The word "righthand" is perhaps used somewhere, but it is not recognized by the Oxford Dictionary 12th edition Concise. It's up to you which authoritative reference you wish to adhere to. The important thing is to be consistent throughout, so your readers will know what terms you are using and why. If you stick to the Oxford Dictionary as reference, then the ...


2

Do whatever you please; all three of right hand right-hand righthand are readily encountered in the wild. It’s possible that right-hand is the variant currently the most used, but your environment may not share this predilection. But I have a better suggestion: omit hand altogether.


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The generic name is placeholder name. However, in computer science, the term is metasyntactic variable, and through the wide spread of modern "hacker" and computer cultures, metasyntactic variable has taken on the role of placeholder name in some corners of the Internet.


2

According to the Canadian Style Guide, there should be no space before or after an em dash. This is the rulebook I usually stick to for class work. Having said this, I have seen people add a space before and after the em dash with the justification that it makes the text appear less clumped. I can't argue with that. Just to be safe, however, I wouldn't use ...


1

Actually, the rules are fairly set on spaces before or after an "em-dash" -- you don't use them. If your style guide calls for spaces around a dash, you use a different character altogether, the "en-dash." Wikipedia has a descent overview on dashes, especially noting the differnet ways to reflect either and em-dash or an en-dash. An em-dash can be ...


1

Such words are obviously new and therefore subject to fairly rapid evolution, but in this case "webdesigner" has long been written as two words and would seem odd as one. From the Oxford English Dictionary, Draft Partial Entry 2001    Originally written with a capital initial, web compounds are now increasingly written with a lower-case w. Since it ...


-1

Yes that's an em dash. You don't need a space. Let a dash precede the reference (author, title of work, or both) following a direct quotation.


3

The word "checkup" is certainly far more common. The use of "check-up" appears to be valid, however. See: http://grammarist.com/spelling/check-up-checkup/ http://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=check%20up for more information.


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I'd omit the commas after "wind" and "rain". Whether it is correct or not depends on the expert asked, it seems.


1

Many word combinations go a progress from open (separate words) through hyphenated (one finds to-day in older texts) to closed (written as a single word, like nevertheless). Ngram shows the hyphenated spelling still five times as popular as the closed one among authors and editors of books as of 2008.


1

Both Merriam Webster (American), and Oxford (British) say it should be hyphenated. Isn't that a question for a dictionary?


2

No, you are stuck in an infinite loop of Microsoft Word - and an infinite loop of correct English (it is not about grammar). Both are correct, which is another way of saying that each enjoys widespread use. (Turn off your Word spelling helper, to get out of the loop.)


1

Your example would never be correct. If "predatory patenting versus excessive process" is being used as an adjective to describe argument, it should be "predatory-patenting-versus-excessive-process" in the strictest sense. When you hyphenate as you have, you are explicitly separating the concept into three groups: "predatory", "patenting versus ...


2

There should be a space between the value and the unit. Source: NIST - Rules and Style Conventions for Expressing Values of Quantities Edit: Hyphens should only be used if the symbol for the unit is not used. Occasionally, a value is used in a descriptive or literary manner and it is fitting to use the spelledout name of the unit rather than its ...


3

Only the hyphen is correct. The two (or more) words combined form a compound adjective to describe one aspect of the video. Note the singular form of the full word (five-minute video - not five minutes video) despite the plural number: this is the clue a hyphen is needed, although the rule applies of all compound adjectives. Consider: 14-year-old boy ...


5

It is Stock Market or equity market: (from Wikipedia) is the aggregation of buyers and sellers (a loose network of economic transactions, not a physical facility or discrete entity) of stocks (also called shares); these may include securities listed on a stock exchange as well as those only traded privately. Definition of 'Stock market': (from ...



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