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It should be either "endogenously and exogenously derived acetaldehyde" or, less elegantly but still intelligibly, "endogenously- and exogenously-derived acetaldehyde". Without the hyphens the adverbs both unambiguously modify the (past-participial) adjective, while with only one hyphen the adverb without a hyphen is left dangling.


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One does not hyphenate -ly adverbs that precede adjectives.


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Using hyphenation is typically a question of style preference, and some well know style guides can be checked to determine what is appropriate. However, a few guidelines are worth knowing. The guidelines below come from an answer to another question about a specific use of hyphenation. But the guidelines are very general. Let's start with the British ...


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"One in ten people hate ..." is correct. But if you use the phrase as an adjective ("A one-in-ten chance") hyphens are a good idea.


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hyphen "The short one" Its diminutive size helps the reader to read the two words as a single word. Ideally, this would be visually invisible and the two words would be directly joined, but grammar rules don't agree. en-dash "The mid-sized one" The difference in appearance is important in order to signal to the reader that it should not be interpreted as a ...


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You need to figure out the structure of the phrase (or word), then put a hyphen between the most closely connected elements, which will be those that make a unit with each other but with no other element. I think the structure is: [[human [skin tissue]] emulating] gel and if that's right, the two most closely connected elements are "skin" and ...


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You need a hyphen between the words tissue and emulating, but nowhere else. The reason is that skin is simply an attributive noun to tissue (it functions as a adjective), and human is also an attributive noun. Thus human and skin are just cascading "adjectives" that do not combine into a single unit with tissue, and therefore do not require multiple ...


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Many grammar guides, such as grammarbook.com and Grammar Girl, do advise writers to use a hyphen when compound adjectives come before the noun they modify, but as John Lawler commented, it's not a definitive rule. It's pretty much like the Oxford comma; there are people who'll complain if you use it and there are people who'll complain if you don't. The ...



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