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Realistically, both options are acceptable - hyphens or no hyphens. However, I opt for the hyphenated version because it has a clear meaning and makes it an adjective, which presumably is what it is intended to be. See sumelic's link, as that has a very good explanation.


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The basic mnemonic rule, which is called the Eleven-Year-Old Boy Rule, is one-word modifiers precede the noun they modify modifiers of more than one word follow the noun they modify. One way of making a modifier of more than one word into a one-word modifier is to hyphenate it. Like an eleven-year-old boy versus a boy eleven years old. Of course, that's ...


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General rule of thumb with compound adjectives like this is to hyphenate them if they are made up of words which modify the base adjective and couldn't be used independently. The best way to gauge this is to write the sentence out with each word making up the adjective individually and see if they all still make sense: My 13 God daughter Obviously ...


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Some U.S. style guides recommend hyphenating a "more [adjective]" phrase when the writer's intention is to express more in its qualitative (rather than quantitative) sense. The first step in enforcing this distinction is to see whether the phrase without hyphenation could be read as using more in a quantitative sense. In the poster's example, the phrase ...


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The hyphen is not appropriate. "More" in the sentence is functioning as an adverb which describes the word immediately following it, "realistic." If "more" were intended to describe the number of scenes, then it would function as an adjective. If it were an adjective, then it would need to be separated from the other adjectives preceding the noun by ...


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I don't think hyphenation of more and realistic would be as much a solution as putting a comma or and between the two if you want more to modify scenes. Viewers can watch more, (or and) realistic 3D scenes and interact... There could ambiguity in your sentence where more could be seen modifying either realistic or scenes if you don't pay close ...


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"viewers can watch a more realistic 3D scene and interact..." "a more realistic" –Google, +20 million hits


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It appears that in the British English corpus the hyphenated version, non-stop music (blue line), is much preferred. Whereas in American English, the spelling nonstop music (red line) is overwhelmingly preferred, and has been since the 1980s. Dictionary.com informs that nonstop (without a space) was first used between 1900 and 1905. Choose whichever ...


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The Oxford Guide to Style (2002) does a nice job of identifying where mainstream UK and U.S. style preferences tend to diverge on the issue of how to handle prefixes such as non-: 5.10.2 Prefixes and combining forms Words with prefixes are often set as one word, but use a hyphen to avoid confusion or mispronunciation, particularly where there is a ...


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One has to differentiate between English in the traditional Oxford form or the Webster interpretation which is much more accepting of colloquialism. The correct Oxford English would be: non-stop


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There is no such thing as proper spelling, only what is popular at the moment or idiomatic to a country or region. Consider that the taste of food is spelled either "flavor" or "flavour" and that "tomorrow" used to be spelled "to-morrow" (as was to-day) and I think you'll see that. Personally, I would opt for "non-stop" however I am sure there are many ...


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Non is a prefix, so using non stop (two words) is incorrect. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/non- Both forms are used, but a Google search of non-stop yields 347,000,000 results, and a Google search on nonstop yields 83,800,000 results. So as far as usage, non-stop is used four times more often than nonstop.


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"The software is open source. Open-source software is distributed with few restrictions." While I agree with you that "The software is open source" doesn't look quite right yet, opensource.org uses it exactly as you have above: "Introduction: Open source doesn't just mean access to the source code. The distribution terms of open-source software must ...


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The hyphen means that the two words are acting as a unit. In other words, it is a choice between whether or not well is describing the word posed. If it is, then don't use a hyphen. Otherwise, put the hyphen. There is no reason to use a hyphen because it is clear that well is describing posed--how is the problem posed? Well. Therefore, you should not use a ...


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The correct spelling is Wi-Fi even if wifi is most used. Google Trends clearly shows this: If it's technical document, I would use Wi-Fi. But, if SEO is very important, I would use wifi (+other keywords to create a long tail keyword). Valeria (anyway, on the Tanaza website we use only Wi-Fi)



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