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2

Generally speaking there's little difference between British and American use of dashes, at least as compared to hyphens. The use of a hyphen character (or technically hyphen-minus) made sense in legacy (pre-unicode) systems as the dashes weren't always available and were encoded at different code points in different systems. That hasn't been a good excuse ...


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Are you asking whether it is acceptable in America? I believe most reputable style guides (for example, Elements of Style (Strunk&White) and Chicago Manual of Style)) will tell you it is not. The example in the question calls for em-dashes (without spaces).


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Like many institutions in the UK, the BBC has published its entire style guide online. The style guide is massive and detailed and is the result of hundreds of combined years of writing and editorial experience. Like other major style guides, we can assume that each rule is well-considered, and since all style guides change, we know that rules are often ...


1

This has been covered here before. No, it is not typographically acceptable to use a hyphen for a dash, but you have mischaracterized the issue. Those are spaced en dashes, which is just fine. If you have only a typewriter, things get confused, but in properly typeset books, there is a world of difference. You have to judge these things based on what ...


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A hyphen is one way of specifying or clarifying that it is the bang and not the theory that is being called big. Capitalization, italicization, or enclosure within quotation marks can all effect the requisite grouping without hyphen. As the title of a television show, however, the phrase should simply be rendered as it is on the title cards (eccentric ...


3

You shouldn't use a hyphen. In your 'hyphenate or not' link, pedestrian-detection is hyphenated in order to indicate that the noun pedestrian (which is what is being detected) is here being linked to detection. It is NOT being used in its adjectival sense, ie it is not a detection algorithm which is slow moving or plodding. The hyphen helps clarify this. ...


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Just hyphenate it normally. "pedestrian-detection algorithm" since pedestrian-detection is the name of the algorithm.


1

Yes, you should. There is no real risk of introducing confusion or annoyance in the reader by including it, and some significant risk of leaving confusion if you leave it out. "Pedestrian-detection" sounds and reads smoothly enough. I don't have Chicago Manual of Style on hand, but an answer to a more general question suggests that 6.39 applies, which would ...


0

When referring to it as a noun, is it "lay off", "layoff", or "lay-off"? All three are found and are correct. Layoff seems to be the most popular if we compare plurals to help restrict the cases to noun uses. What about when using it as a verb in both present and past tense? A space would be much more common here. In particular the phrase is ...


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If you're creating a hyphenated compound and one of the elements is already an hyphenated or open compound (that is, one with spaces between the words) use an en-dash for the wider compound: node–to–rigid flat surface node–to–rigid-flat-surface (An exception being if you're hyphenating with a prefix (rather than an independent word) onto a ...


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Hyphens are used to connect words which are linked to form adjectives placed before nouns. The report is up to date (no hyphens) BUT This is an up-to-date report. So in your sentence it would depend on which elements you thought were comprising the multi-word adjective in front of the noun. They are used to distinguish elements which might otherwise ...


2

If possible avoid hyphenating a surname at all, that is tolerate more spacing in the line than you would generally. This is particularly so if the name is first introduced with this piece and not repeated shortly afterwards. Since you are introducing the name you'd want to be clear that this was a hyphenation due to the end of the line, rather than a ...


3

I constantly see variations in the hyphenization of words containing SI prefixes You shouldn't if they are actually used as SI prefixes. In the names of SI units you should never hyphenate between a prefix and a base unit. (It used to be that one might use "micro-microfarad" when doubling prefixes, but this doubling has itself been proscribed with SI ...


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To think that adjectives like 'self-aware' must remain intact when one is expressing the opposite meaning is a form of grammatical un-sanity or non-sanity, by which I mean insanity. Those who are aware of themselves are said to be self-aware. Those who are not are said to be lacking self-awareness.


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In my view, un-self-aware is the best choice here. It respects the form of the standard spelling of 'self-aware', while avoiding the creation of the puzzling and potentially ambiguous entity, 'unself'. Some people might regard a word with two hyphens as a monstrosity, but I can think of very few situations in which the author of a piece of non-fiction ...


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Perhaps something along the lines of "oblivious"? "Words" with two hyphens are monstrosities, in my opinion.


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I would use a suspended en-dash: I was an advisor to the 14– and 15–year-olds. The choice of open (year old), closed (yearold) or hyphenated (year-old) compounds is often a difficult one. The first guide is to see what others do and whether the compound exists in a dictionary. This is not foolproof, not least because some exist in all three forms ...



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