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Say one has written a novel: I'm going to "say" that one is you. Is that right? certain sentences are supposed to split multiple ways In the ordinary understanding, English sentences can do many things, but "split" isn't one of them. Do you mean can be split, i.e., divided into parts? The words 'to too' could split as 'too far' or 'also too far' The ...


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I'd call it a malapropism, the use of an incorrect word in place of a word with a similar sound resulting in a nonsensical utterance. In a strict sense, a malapropism occurs in spoken language. Also, we tend to think of them as humorous as in these written and spoken examples provided by Melissa Bowersock. Still, it's the aptest term of which I know for ...


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Phrase "rendered moot," idiom: At some point, this whole debate may be rendered moot. (ODO, moot, adj, 2 - open 'More example sentences') Phrase "rendered mute," literal/ metaphorical. Some are deprived of the ability to reason and some made blind and others rendered mute. When Jesus had cast out the demon, the mute man spoke. The crowd ...


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Your intuition regarding the two expressions is roughly correct. There is no definition of "mute" that isn't in some way related to silence or speechlessness. Confusion may arise from "moot", however, as the American and British usage of the adjective differs. The American "moot" indicates that something has no practical significance. This is more or less ...



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