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17

Ball as in 'sphere' comes from Norse 'bǫllr' /bɔlːr/, while ball as in 'dance party' comes from Latin 'ballare', which in turn became 'bal' (French for 'a dance'). Totally different roots, it's just one of those quirks of English having absorbed bits of so many different languages. Edit as requested to provide a bit more detail: 'Ball' meaning 'sphere' ...


5

This wikipedia entry has a table like yours::


3

The verb is to fare: When you send your daughter off to camp, you hope she’ll fare well. That’s why you bid her a fond farewell. When you want to see how something will work out, you want to see how it fares. “Fair” as a verb is a rare word meaning “to smooth a surface to prepare it for being joined to another.” Fare: The word fare in ...


3

Personally, I've always used "homogeneous" (the pronunciation of which sounds strange to you.) Homogenous is an option, but several sources find its use problematic (including the guide you mentioned.) Homogeneous: Of the same or similar nature or kind Uniform in structure or composition throughout (AHD) A usage note from the same source: ...


3

The suffix -ous is a fairly common one, so it may just a mistake made by people unfamiliar with the correct spelling of the term. The term ingenious may also be responsible for the mistake. Genius is the correct spelling that comes directly from Latin: word-forming element making adjectives from nouns, meaning "having, full of, having to do ...



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