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6

Your intuition regarding the two expressions is roughly correct. There is no definition of "mute" that isn't in some way related to silence or speechlessness. Confusion may arise from "moot", however, as the American and British usage of the adjective differs. The American "moot" indicates that something has no practical significance. This is more or less ...


5

Personally, I've always used "homogeneous" (the pronunciation of which sounds strange to you.) Homogenous is an option, but several sources find its use problematic (including the guide you mentioned.) Homogeneous: Of the same or similar nature or kind Uniform in structure or composition throughout (AHD) A usage note from the same source: ...


4

Interesting. I'm not sure whether this usage arises as a sort of "mixed metaphors" misusage or what, but the meaning is obvious, to my thinking. It would seem, I would think, to have evolved from "early in the game". In this usage, though, if I am right, it is using "piece" to replace "game" to describe some event. "Piece" can be used to refer to a musical ...


3

The suffix -ous is a fairly common one, so it may just a mistake made by people unfamiliar with the correct spelling of the term. The term ingenious may also be responsible for the mistake. Genius is the correct spelling that comes directly from Latin: word-forming element making adjectives from nouns, meaning "having, full of, having to do with,...


3

The verb is to fare: When you send your daughter off to camp, you hope she’ll fare well. That’s why you bid her a fond farewell. When you want to see how something will work out, you want to see how it fares. “Fair” as a verb is a rare word meaning “to smooth a surface to prepare it for being joined to another.” Fare: The word fare in ...


2

As an Australian, early/late in the piece does not sound strange to me. I would say it probably is the same as early/late in the game, which does sound strange, but understandable, to me. The piece is a series of events and could describe just about anything, such as a negotiation. The U.S. came to the table late in the piece and proceeded to throw its ...


2

Different brains work in different ways, but perhaps explaining how I avoid it will work for you. I would never make the know/no mistake because I know (hehe) the roots of the word. The 'kn' in 'know' is a sound that is absolutely everywhere in Indo-European languages. My prognosis is that you are agnostic of, or perhaps even ignorant of, and most certainly ...


1

These two links might help you: http://www.suburgian.com/homophone-checker-microsoft-word/ http://www.techrepublic.com/article/macro-trick-how-to-highlight-multiple-search-strings-in-a-word-document/ The first uses Microsoft Word's index feature, and the second uses a macro, both to indicate instances of words from a list that you specify. You could find ...


1

They're different for me as well. The pronunciation of duel, cruel, gruel, fuel, jewel etc. with /u:l/ is a simplification of historical /-u:əl/. This is not a feature of all accents, but I believe it's reasonably common. Wikipedia describes it under the broader category of "vile-vial merger," but I'm not sure if this is really a unified phenomenon. ...


1

I'd call it a malapropism, the use of an incorrect word in place of a word with a similar sound resulting in a nonsensical utterance. In a strict sense, a malapropism occurs in spoken language. Also, we tend to think of them as humorous as in these written and spoken examples provided by Melissa Bowersock. Still, it's the aptest term of which I know for ...



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