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Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) indicate the range of actions that tote can apply to: tote vt {prob fr. an English-based creole; akin to Gullah & Krio tot to carry, of Bantu origin; akin to Kikongo -tota to pick up, Kimbundu -tuta to carry} (1677) 1 : to carry by hand : bear on the person : LUG, PACK : HAUL, CONVEY The ...


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Mules would pull barges down a canal. Maybe (shudder) people were also used to pull barges along a canal.


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I'm not sure I have an answer for your question, but I do know my heart stopped a little when I read it. To me, part of the richness of the English language comes from the way it has historically absorbed words from other languages, which of course has led to unusual spellings. To think about changing that seems to me to be negating the language's history ...


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English is a rather unique world language in that it does not have official (state-sponsored) bodies existing solely as language authorities. Sure, you have the Modern Language Association in the USA, and there were famous attempts at phonological prescriptions over the pond (Received Pronunciation), but still nothing anywhere comparable to the Cervantes ...


0

Nevermind the fact that it's not pronounced ko-ran, or kor-an. It's said just like we spell it. If you need pronunciation spelling, it would be closest to kur-on. It's the name of a holy book. Use the accurate title and learn the correct way to pronounce it. It's not difficult.


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The Wall Street Journal has a good article on the subject, and cites the military and a 1904 article on baseball: In “John Bumpkin Upon Drill,” a comic theatrical song that the Oxford English Dictionary dates to the 1780s, the title character says, “it were enough to make a cat laugh, to see sarjeant drilling me—‘Heads up! Higher! Still higher!’ ” At the ...


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One needs to understand that a lot of this has to do with the advancing tide of universal public education in the US. Some public schools were developed in the mid to late 1700s (Benjamin Franklin had a hand in starting one), but the movement really gained steam in the early 1800s. (Horace Mann was a well-known advocate, and, as a result, has nearly as ...


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Oesophagus has always been spelt that way in Britain. If spelt correctly, Tyre and tire are two entirely different words, as has already been pointed out. I have never seen foetus spelt as fetus in the UK. Paralysed is always the correct spelling here and aluminium is always aluminium. I am a bit puzzled about where some of the data on 'British English' is ...


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Robert Chapman & Barbara Kipfer, Dictionary of American Slang, third edition (1995) has this entry for whatever: whatever adv by 1900 Perhaps, possibly[.] Often a reply to an unanswerable question, with the force of "Could be" or "We'll see": Well, whatever. The point was, he was dead... —Carsten Stroud [Lizardskin (1992)]/ Which I can do on my own, ...


3

Wikipedia traces the expression to two 1965 US television sitcoms, Bewitched and My Mother the Car. Its popularity probably peaked with the 1995 film Clueless, and fifteen years after that, the word had topped the Marist poll two years running for the most annoying word.


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My father was born in 1898, was well-educated and was on the route to Oxbridge until World War 1 intervened. He was not given to swearing very much but he sometimes used the adjectives "damned", "blasted" and - a milder expletive - "dashed". Because he served in the trenches in WW I, I can presume that he knew others of a more sexual nature but did not use ...


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My father, who was born in 1898, was not given to swearing very much but he sometimes used the adjectives "damned", "blasted" and - a milder expletive - "dashed". Because he served in the trenches in WW I, I can presume that he knew others of a more sexual nature but did not use them within his young son's hearing.


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(TL;DR) The short answer is yes, from an evaluation of US presidents' inaugural addresses and state of the union addresses, by University of Pennsylvania Professor of Linguistics Mark Liberman. Beware that the following only extracts the summary of his evaluation, and omits the many helpful images in the original source. To improve ease of readability, I ...


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English is classified as a West Germanic language and descended from the languages of tribes in northern Germany and southern Denmark around the 5th century AD. However, it borrows a lot from Latin, French, Spanish, and other languages.


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This term originates from the dice game craps. Each round of craps begins with the shooter (the player handling the dice) tossing the dice until either he rolls 2, 3, or 12, in which he case he "craps out," and a new round with a new shooter begins, or he rolls 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10. That number is called "the point," and the shooter tries to roll his point ...



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