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Latin influenced an already existing language: English. Therefore, all the most basic words already existed. Things like pronouns, articles, particles, basic (versions) of verbs such as to talk and to eat, and basic nouns such as the seasons, earth, food, etc, meaning they didn't "need" a romantic word. They needed words for things that were being introduced ...


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Many years ago, when I was working at Wave Hill, a New York cultural property consisting of several acres, gardens and two manor houses, we referred to the walled in courtyard outside the kitchen of Glyndor House as the "dooryard." It was just off the driveway, and clearly would serve for an informal visit -- not necessarily in the dooryard, but by way of ...


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"Shiver my timbers" was a genuine historical nautical phrase. The 1811 The Monthly Review refers to: the nautical phrase, “shiver my timbers,” Here, "shiver" means to break into splinters. It only makes sense to say with respect to a wooden boat. In the 1794 play Rule Britannia: a loyal sketch, in two acts, at page 31, Thomas tells Captain Anchor: ...


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all future generations Source: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/posterity


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In Madame Bovary (1856), Flaubert has a passage in Chapter five, Part two: But the more Emma recognized her love, the more she crushed it down that it might not be evident, that she might make it less. She would have liked Leon to guess it, and she imagined chances, catastrophes that should facilitate this. That could be a likely candidate for the ...


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Your friend sounds like one who was once described by Josh Billings: "It ain't ignorance causes so much trouble; it's folks knowing so much that ain't so." While it may be argued that demonyms reflect the time, place and culture of the people who coined them, most such words have been formed by tacking a suffix, whose origin is typically Greek or ...


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This is my kind of question! I used to be interested in different kinds of weapons and wanted words for warriors wielding each type. Bow and arrow - archer or bowman. Sword - swordsman. Axe - axeman. Club - I'm not aware of a special word for this, but you could try simply club wielder. Dagger - knifeman or knife fighter. Flail - I never managed to find a ...


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the term cool your jets came from the P2 Neptune aircraft use after World War II as a sub Hunter it had to radial engines and two outboard jet engines after takeoff they would turn the jet engines off the cool your jets that's where it came from


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Historically, the first use of Native American as a proper name may have been in connection with a U.S. political party of the 1840s and 1850s that called itself (starting in the 1840s) the American Republican Party or the Native American Party and then (in 1855) the American Party—but which is more widely recognized today by its secret society name, the ...


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I don't think it would be accurate to call yourself a Native American. The capital on "Native" indicates that "Native American" is a proper name and that name is already in use by somebody else. I think it's accurate, but liable to generate confusion and conflict, to refer to yourself as a native American.


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ate 14c., "natural, hereditary, connected with something in a natural way," from Old French natif "native, born in; raw, unspoiled" Native. It becomes more complicated to say you are a native of a certain place if racial features from another place are more noticeable; for if you considere the word signifying something unspoiled, blended with hereditary, ...


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"Native Americans" (both words capped) is reserved for the ancestors of the pre-Columbian Americans, also called indigenous peoples. Of course, Native Americans are themselves immigrants, as human life originated in Africa. Still, if you have no "Indian" blood, you are not Native American. You could say you are "native American" or "a native of America," ...


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"Native" has more than one meaning. One meaning is "born in that country", another meaning is "The first people to be born in that country". eg http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/native Obviously you fit the first definition and not the second. It's quite possible that the tribes of people who call themselves "Native" because they've ...


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Yes, a dressing gown is just what you wear over your pyjamas or nightie to keep warm, and to be more modest in the house. It is not the least bit "snooty". English and Australian people are very familiar with dressing gowns. A bath robe is an American term, but probably for the same kind of thing. I have had dressing gowns that do up with a tie, and ones ...


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One of the grim tenets of the stand-up comic's vernacular is that you either kill (reduce the audience to a state of helpless mirth) or die (stand at the microphone surrounded by a crushing silence, your jokes withering and expiring as you bring them out for the cruel audience to inspect). A similar vocabulary rules other forms of popular entertainment, with ...


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I would suggest and concur that it has a less specific meaning than 'back and forth' however this is likely the most common application. As in the example given about the sheep, I would further suggest (and I have not looked it up) that 'to' means 'near' or 'close' and 'fro' means 'far' or 'away/yonder'. Closer to 'here and there'.



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