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Wikipedia has an entry called "Universal History", to quote (emphasis mine): "Universal history is the representation of general facts both of entire nations and of individuals. Its uses are manifold. It teaches human nature and the experience of all centuries. Universal history is commonly divided into three parts, viz. ancient, medieval, and ...


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This is also true of Portugal and Brazil. With the overwhelming majority of the world's Portuguese speakers being Brazilian, Portugal finally capitulated and decreed that the Brazilian form would be the accepted standard. It did not make much sense to let the tail wag the dog. There is more variation in Spanish as spoken in various countries, than the ...


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"Mummy" and "Daddy" seem extremely common in books from the period, just as they are in the UK today. (Mummy as a word for mother is all but unknown in American English, which prefers mommy, so it's probably safe to assume that most of the results from that search are British.)


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In my view "How come + that-clause?" derives from "How does/did/has it come?". 1 How come you know so much about computers? 2 Why do you know so much about computers? It seems there is no difference in meaning between 1 and 2. And yet there is a difference. But how to explain it? That's the question! I wish I could explain it, but I see I get into ...


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I believe that it is called practicing because the laws are constantly changing, technology is changing, and new medicines are being introduced. Thus, lawyers and doctors are always practicing.


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I would like to say that Chaucer is a marker and significant contributor to the gradual shifts towards the more intelligible Shakespearean English. Chaucer and his compatriots, and Chaucer himself in no small measures, had contributed to the solidification of the English dialect in London. Chaucer himself contributed to the importing of continental European ...


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As a noun meaning "native or citizen of the island of Lesbos," Lesbian has been used in English as a noun since the earliest translations of Herodotus and Thucydides. As a result, the notion of using lesbian as a noun when the later meaning of "a woman who is a homosexual" (Merriam-Webster's current definition) arose, around 1890, would not have struck many ...


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Adjective: In 1890, the term lesbian was used in a medical dictionary as an adjective to describe tribadism (as "lesbian love"). Lesbianism, to describe erotic relationships between women, had been documented in 1870. The terms lesbian, invert and homosexual were interchangeable with sapphist and sapphism around the turn of the 20th century. Noun: The ...


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A little side note to add... It might be like the word "colonel" (the common pronunciation of which bothers me immensely), where the modern English term is pronounced "CUR-nul", taking from old French versions "coronel" and "coronella", but where the word in writing takes after the earlier Italian form "colonella". "Gage" also derives from French. Like ...


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In Elizabethan times, hoist was a past participle of hoise, or "to be lifted" In modern usage, hoist is only transitive, as in "Please hoist the flag." In Eliz. usage, it could be used intransitively, as in "The wind blew and the manuscript page was hoist." In any case, the phrase means to be blown up (literally) by one's own bomb, or step on one's own ...


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The word withershins is rarely used anymore, it is the same as counter-clockwise or anti-clockwise, both with Latinate origin, both still English words.


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So yes, in Shakespeare's First Folio, you'll see the spelling "Gloster"... ...but I just figured that if you organize the letters into syllables differently, then each word is indeed spelled just as it is pronounced. Leice|ster Glouce|ster Worce|ster|shire I might even speculate that "Manchester" is actually being pronounced Manche|ster, because if you ...


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Momentarily does not mean soon. If it did, why not ditch "soon"? It means for a short while, e.g. "he stayed looking at the house momentarily, before moving on."


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NEWFOUNDLAND ENGLISH According to Margery Fee, Department of English, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Candada, "The English language as used in the island and province of Newfoundland for almost 500 years is the oldest variety in the Americas. It derives primarily from the speech of early settlers from the English West Country and ...



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