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1. Are there any examples of dogs actually being named "Tiger", let alone a shortened version of "Tiger"? The earliest example I could find of a dog named Tiger is from "Select Poetry, Ancient and Modern, for April, 1791," in The Gentleman's Magazine (1791): The inclosed Occasional Epilogue ["Occasional Epilogue, For Mr. Stanton's Great Dog Tiger"] was ...


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I believe "Tige" is indeed a shortening of Tiger, and would be pronounced like tide with a hard g in place of the d. From a story in the Atlantic Monthly published in 1860, apparently by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr (father of the famous American jurist by the same name): Tiger, or more briefly, Tige, the property of Abner Briggs, Junior, belonged to a ...


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The name is an anglicisation of the Irish name Tadhg, meaning poet or philosopher. Other common spellings are Tighe, Teague.


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English verse is qualitative, not quantitative: it runs stress-to-stress rather than syllable-to-syllable, so an extra reduced syllable here or there is negligible. Moreover, English poets have great freedom to play against strict "meter" for local rhythmic effect. The pentameter line in the English tradition is predominantly iambic, but variation is ...


2

Crayfish, crawfish, and crawdad: are interchangeable terms for a large group of freshwater crustaceans (not fish) resembling small lobsters and living in many regions throughout the world. Crayfish and crawfish are renderings of regional pronunciations of the same word, descended from the Middle English crevise (-vise became –fish), which in turn has ...


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When did a ‘silk hat’ become a Top Hat? I found no evidence that the name top hat existed prior 1875. Even the British Chambers' Encyclopaedia: A Dictionary of Universal Knowledge for the People, printed in 1874, didn't mention top hat in its “hat” entry but spoke extensively about beaver and silk hats. Numerous websites and books cite the Hatter's ...


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The origin of the term might have derived from an earlier fashion trend set forth in the early 1600s by way of the capotain, or sugarloaf hat. This has was also known as the pilgrim hat and the flat topped hat. The hat is famously associated with the Pilgrims that traveled to the Americas 1. Although it is difficult to find a direct association, the ...


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According to the book Studies in English, Written and Spoken: For the Use of Continental Students. 1st. series, Volume 1 Author Cornelis Stoffel Publisher W.J. Thieme, 1894 on page 247, Top Hat is just a familiar way of saying High hat or Tall hat (self explanatory). It may have been influenced by the French "Haut-de-forme" (name for a top ...


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In the U.S., doughnut (first OED citation 1809) replaced the Dutch-origin word olykoek (first OED citation 1795). For olykoek, a 1740 calque [translation] oily cake is cited, so the word olykoek may have been in use well before doughnut. This first OED citation for doughnut is D. Knickerbocker, Hist. N.Y. An enormous dish of balls of sweetened dough, ...


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I found this conversation while searching for the origin of "Human Being" to gain a deeper understanding of the peoples my father credited with the origin. My answer or insight on the true origin of Human Being is based on personal experience. Research into anything my father told me has always proven his answer to be correct. The subjects were always ...


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Haar is a sea mist. If visibility is poor due mist, or hair, then it is a bit risky or hairy to sail. From Wikipedia: In meteorology, haar is a cold sea fog. It usually occurs on the east coast of England or Scotland between April and September, when warm air passes over the cold North Sea.


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The history of the Golliwog began during the British occupation of Egypt in the late 1800's .. Egyptian workers wore the letters W.O.G.S. Signifying that the were working on government projects.. These workers were named Ghuls ( the Arabic name for Desert Ghosts) by the British Troops ..


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I always believed it was a "harried" situation, and the pronunciation degraded had to "hairy". har·ried ˈharēd/ adjective feeling strained as a result of having demands persistently made on one; harassed.


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I think it has come from the Dutch ' De Paal' meaning 'the pole' where the pole might have signified a post office. A pole can also be called as a 'post' in english, so they must have meant similar things in Dutch. Murali


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Just came across this as I was watching an old film and saw "to-day" used in a newspaper on the screen. Got curious and wound up here. Since language is a very fluid, constantly evolving thing, my belief is that the use of a hyphen simply became unnecessary in daily use, just as slang and jargon change from generation to generation,spelling of terms changes ...


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This is a case where Ngram has to be used very judiciously. Looking at the results for "rend", there appears to be a very steep drop in usage beginning right around 1959. However, the vast majority of actual results for the period immediately preceding this drop are not for the verb but for the abbreviation "rend." which is part of the abbreviation for ...



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