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15

The hair-color called red, ginger, orange, etc. According to the citations provided by the OED for the hair-color sense of ginger, it first came into use during the 19th century. Using red for a hair-color is many centuries older, almost six of them in fact depending on how you count things. That makes ginger a newcomer compared with calling a person with ...


11

Why spell it connoisseur? You’ve basically answered your own question here. The French word has been spelt connaître for close to two centuries. Connoisseur was borrowed into the English language some time around three centuries ago, when it was spelt that way in French. The fact that French has changed the spelling of the French since does not mean that ...


9

Etymonline, otherwise known as Etymology Online Dictionary, has this to say on the origins of red, and redhead. red (adj.1) Old English read "red," from Proto-Germanic rauthaz (cognates: Old Norse rauðr, Danish rød, Old Saxon rod, Old Frisian rad, Middle Dutch root, Dutch rood, German rot, Gothic rauþs). As a noun from mid-13c. The ...


7

According to the following sources: Ain't was originally the proper contraction for am not. The contraction became popular as a generic one in the 19th century and started to be considered nonstandard ( not slang) English since then: 1706, originally a contraction of am not, and in proper use with that sense until it began to be used as a ...


7

There has been research done on this subject. The Qualls Concise English Grammar claims that: "The Appalachian dialect is the oldest of English dialects in British North America..." This source focuses on populations exceeding 2 million so it includes groups from the USA, Canada, and Jamaica. It is also interesting to note that Qualls believes that ...


6

There is! It's the Glasgow Historical Thesaurus of English, the world's only historical thesaurus. We published it through OUP in 2009 as the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary, and is also freely available online at http://www.glasgow.ac.uk/thesaurus - we also provide a whole bunch of additional information and visualisations there, too. ...


3

1879... Checking Wikipedia's Quantified groups of defendants, the oldest is the Blue Eyed Six from 1879, but they were coincidentally all blue-eyed. Here's a contemporary newspaper report. 1931? There's the Scottsboro Nine from 1931, but it seems that was a later label and they were called the Scottsboro Boys at the time. 1948? The Groveland Four from ...


3

I grew up in the Seattle area, 1960s-1970s, and we always called the rubber sandals thongs. I moved to Boston in 1987, and they were called flip-flops, there. When I returned to Seattle in '92, I started hearing flip-flop, and now I never say thong other than around family members who know what I'm talking about.


2

I don't think anyone has addressed the part of the poster's question that asks, "What are its origins?" so I'll focus on answering that. J. A. Simpson, The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Proverbs (1982) offers this lineage for the proverb: All's fair in love and war [1578 LYLY Euphues I. 236 Anye impietie may lawfully be committed in loue, which is ...


1

There is an excellent web resource at www.surnamedb.com. It says about the surname Gray: Recorded as Gray, Graye, Grey, Greye, de Grey, MacGray, McGray, McGrah, McGreay, McGrey, and possibly others, this ancient Anglo-Scottish surname has at least two possible origins. The first was Old English and a nickname or personal name for a man with grey ...


1

People with reddish/orange hair have been called red-heads since the Middle Ages because the colour was like that of a carrot. Orange as a colour was used only later, around 1540. Red-head: mid-13c., from red (adj.1) + head (n.). Red (adj.), of persons, "having red hair" is from late Old English. The Carrot pate be sure you hate, for she'l ...


1

In the 1970 movie "Patton", George C. Scott's title character said the quote & cited Mr. Shaw by name as the source in a speech during wartime England. While I admit it isn't 100% irrefutable. I'm willing to bet the screenwriters were probably old enough to have heard or read about it first hand to make it work in the script. The fact that they used Shaw ...


1

How about these: Harbinger Obsequious Restive Garble Pabulum Beldam Prude Quantum Sycophant Meticulous Some of these may not be exactly what you are looking for.


1

indige, aborigine, native -- all refer to original inhabitants of a region (or those first present there). [But all such terms also apply to anyone born locally. Taken in its pre-1980 (or so) meaning, a native American is anyone born in America.] However, you are likely to find someone who will be offended, whatever term you choose. If you do not want to ...


1

Try aboriginal (as in the title of your question): ADJECTIVE 1 (Of human races, animals, and plants) inhabiting or existing in a land from the earliest times or from before the arrival of colonists; indigenous. MORE EXAMPLE SENTENCES Around the world, 70 percent of uranium deposits are located on aboriginal land. As a ...


1

From an older Jamaican, now a UK resident: (1). Thong because it looks like a strip of leather (a thong) from the sole and up between the toes before splitting into the 'V' shape. Likewise the lower half of a bikini looks like just a thin piece of 'material' (thong-like) and not an all embracing fabric to co cover the female 'frontage' and nowhere near ...



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