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10

What Franklin didn't say Like FumbleFingers, I can't find any attribution of the quoted language to Franklin before about the turn of the twenty-first century. (A Google Books search finds one instance from the year 2000, in 2001 Librarian's Engagement Calendar and Almanac.) On the other hand I did find the following quotation attributed to another popular ...


8

"Man is born ignorant; he is not born a fool; and it is not even without labour that he is made one.... ~ Claude Adrien Helvétius (1715-1771) On Man From Man a Revelation of God by George Everett Ackerman, Phillips & Hunt, 1888


4

At one point, a common conjugation of to have was: I have Thou hast He hath She hath It hath One hath We han Ye has They han Now I say "a common conjugation" because there were plenty of variations, and you might find someone using "we have" while still using "they han", or "we han" with "they hast" or "they ...


3

Was this standard usage a century ago, either in the U.S. or in Britain? No. The vast majority of books of the period that don't follow that convention. Is this the sort of authorial quirk (like the use of “sha’n’t” in Winnie the Pooh) which should be preserved in a reprinting? Apparently not. Some writers have had general opinions on apostrophes ...


2

Comes from the latin word "nuntiare" what translates to announce


2

The difference between the final lines of the OP's quotation ("This, with God’s help, I have done/All this is what it means/To be an Entrepreneur.”) and the quotation from Dean Alfange cited in Andrew Leach's answer ("this I have done. All this is what it means to be an American") greatly intrigued me. So I ran a couple of Google Books searches for those ...


2

Here is the discussion of island and isle in John Ayto, Arcade Dictionary of Word Origins (1990): island [OE] Despite their similarity, island has no etymological connection with isle (their resemblance is due to a 16th-century change in the spelling of island under the influence of its semantic neighbour isle). Island comes ultimately from a prehistoric ...


2

There is wide disagreement as to what "acceptable" and "correct" mean. One measure is whether a definition or usage shows up in the OED. Up until recently, revisions in the OED were exceedingly slow and so lagged far behind popular usage. Toward the other end of the spectrum is the pure "ghits" approach, which figures that as soon as the number of Google ...


1

Perhaps the romanticisation of the Old West. A Guardian chat article includes; The hard core love of guns came with the romanticisation of the "Old West" which was more legend and hype than fact.


1

Listening to the relevant lecture again, the term he uses is "imaginary", but contextually it qualifies as jargon for literary criticism. He is not using it as an adjective, however, but as a noun. There is a "Wild West imaginary" and a "Medieval imaginary."


1

The Fox used as a metaphor has a long history, the following extract explains why: The fox has a long history of magic and cunning associated with it. The Indians of central California regarded the silver fox as a culture-hero while in Siberia the crafty messenger from Hell, who lured the legendary hero underground, was often depicted in the shape ...


1

I am curious to know if 'hance' was ever used as 'hannes or hanes' in English literature. If so, where can this source be found? c1400(1375) Canticum Creat.(Trin-O 57) It's not a verb there, but I understand you to be looking merely for a possible relationship?


1

It was by Dean Alfange, attested by the Library of Congress in the book Respectfully Quoted: A Dictionary of Quotations on page 16. It appears that the quotation appeared at the end of his entry in Who's Who in America for several years. Respectfully Quoted: A Dictionary of Quotations ed Library of Congress (James H Billington), pub Courier ...


1

Most serious slang dictionaries put considerably more effort into identifying when a term arose than in trying to identify when it fell out of widespread or well-informed use. In part this is because documenting usage generally involves finding published instances of it—and noting that published instances of a term have declined or vanished is not an ...


1

Hoist isn't especially sensible in terms of the metaphor of someone falling victim to their own explosive, over other options like "blown to bits" or maimed or merely killed, hurt or caught. But it's worth considering the fuller context of the original use: For 'tis the sport to have the enginer Hoist with his own petar'; and 't shall go hard ...


1

There are answers here that are close, but claim that "how come" is a contraction. Come has a sense, meaning "turn out", "happen", "come about". It's a relatively rare use now, but it was once more common: Til it com on a fest dai, þat king herod did for to call þe barnage — Cursor Mundi c 1400 Whan it came vpon a daye that Elcana offred. — 1 ...



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