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9

Ragging is the present participle of verb (rag- to scold). Ragging is similar to but not the same as hazing. Ragging in India is synonymous with bullying, the act of intimidating someone. Why it is being used in India => While ragging may indeed have started out as a term for teasing (British- to play rough/boisterous practical joke on sb). ...


6

In general, these verbs used to end in a g, k or ch /tʃ/ sound. In some of the modern forms of these words, this sound has changed, such as in "buy". The "t" of the ending is just a form of the past tense suffix, as in "burnt" or "learnt". Before this -t, a g, k or ch sound often alternated with a kh-like sound /x/ in older forms of English (this sound is ...


6

The British influence is no long on Indian English. Since the teachers in India are themselves not native speakers of the language, they fail to bring in the native flavor, and the usage at times is archaic or direct translations from the native tongue. However, if we examine the print media, the usage of terms such as eve-teasing and ragging is rampant. ...


6

Ragging was a schoolboy (mostly public school) word for teasing, playing practical jokes on, and so forth (you could certainly rag a master, but care was needed). It was still in use when I was at school, but has probably died out by now in England, save for those who deliberately use archaic slang.


5

I recall back in the 70's (in the US), my friends and I using the term ragging when we meant someone was picking on / harassing us.


4

I am a little confused by your question. You appear to have answered most of it yourself. This is is also called hazing. (see your Wikipedia excerpt) It is probably derived from rag. (see your OED excerpt) The dictionary says it has been used. (see your Longman's excerpt) Many English speakers in India learned from the British colonists; it's why the ...


3

In 1964 Paul Krassner's 'The Realist' Magazine started to run a feature called "soft-core pornography," usually photographs from the mainstream media that could be interpreted in a sexual manner, most famously the August 1967 issue featuring Ronald Reagan. Krassner has stated that he derived the term from creating an opposite to the Supreme Court use of the ...


3

I would expect a native English speaker to be able to work out the meaning from the context (if the writing is informal) and otherwise use the intended synonym (bullying, practical joking etc.) Yes. "Ragging" is formed from the word "Rag". The OED definition you gave reminded me of "Rag Week" at just about any UK university. Basically the Student Union ...


2

This is a common thing in many languages. We use base 10 now, and we count easily and in an organised way into the thousands, but historically many things were measured in other quantaties, like twelves or even twenties (score, see meaning 1.b at MW). So before people ever had a necessity to count large numbers in a structured way, they would use words ...


1

From Wiktionary : -ist Added to words to form nouns denoting: a person with a particular creative or academic role; one who subscribes to a particular theological doctrine or religious denomination; one who owns or manages something; And : -er (added to verbs) Person or thing that does an action indicated by the ...


1

The phrase appeared in works by E. E. Smith. I can't do a citation just now - need to get out the books. But that would put in not later than the 1960s, and possibly as early as the 1920s. My best guess is the 1940s or 1950s.


1

Mostly, but not necessarily. Here are some examples where they have negative connotations: A new, extraordinary tax was imposed by the government. Theirs was an exceptionally stupid idea. You have outstanding debts. Granted, the last one is cheating since this is a different meaning of outstanding, but it is certainly not a good connotation. ...



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