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'From soup to nuts' in reference books Christine Ammer, The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms (1997) has this entry for "from soup to nuts": from soup to nuts Also from A to Z or start to finish or stem to stern. From beginning to end, throughout, [examples omitted]. The first expression, with its analogy to the first and lasy courses of a meal, ...


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The following extract from Grammophobia explains its origin: The Oxford English Dictionary describes the expression as “US colloq.” and defines it as “from beginning to end, completely; everything.” All the published references in the OED are from the 20th century. The earliest is this one from Won in the Ninth, a 1910 book of sports stories by the ...


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Dictionary coverage of 'get cracking' J.E. Lighter, Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1994) reports that "get cracking" came into U.S. English from the UK during the 1940s: get cracking to get busy; get going. {This phr. came into U.S. speech through contact with British armed forces during WWII.} Lighter's first citation for the ...


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Not much to go on but here are a couple of clues: The Latin dictionary (Smith) gives the earliest date for Diphthonga as 450ish. Marc. Carp.; Prisca. Two Roman Grammarians. And Ligature even later. None of the early uncial manuscripts that I have so far looked at show ligatures, apart from the Divine monograms. The same applies to a web-site for ...


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An acronym is an abbreviation (or intialism) that's pronounced as a word. They're a relatively modern invention; there are a few earlier examples , but their use really took off during WWII. INRI? INRI may be old, but when was INRI introduced into the English language? What evidence is there for people pronouncing it as "inree" in the English language? ...


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See: Wikipedia for a good discourse on the historical use of acronyms. I knew the Catholic church used the acronym INRI on top of the crucifix for at least 500 to 600 years. A qoute from the Wikipedia article: "Acronyms were used in Rome before the Christian era. For example, the official name for the Roman Empire, and the Republic before it, was abbreviated ...


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There is a trick for figuring this out. You go to Google Scholar and try out a series of custom ranges. Doing that, I discovered the following: I argue that their work, though powerful and brilliant in many ways, relies on what I call gender essentialism-the notion that a unitary, "essential" women's experience can be isolated and described ...


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Here is an example from 1814 where it means to tow (by horse). Perambulations of Cosmopolite: Or, Travels and Labors of Lorenzo Dow, I came to a camp where some negroes were toting* tobacco to market. I stopped with them until day, and one gave me some corn for my horse. *The mode of toting tobacco to market, is by rolling it in casks, with a ...


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Dictionary coverage of 'golliwog' Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) shows no hesitancy in declaring the source of the word golliwog: golliwog also gollywog or golliwogg n {Golliwogg, an animated doll in children's fiction by Bertha Upton †1912 Am. writer) (1895) 1 : a grotesque black doll 2 : a person resembling a golliwog That ...


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The words “now” and “snow” have never rhymed in the history of English. These two sounds are spelled the same way only by coincidence. The basic elements of Modern English spelling date back to Middle English, where we can already find the digraphs "ow" and "ou" used in many of the same words as in modern spelling. They are used in manuscripts of Chaucer's ...



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