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According to the book Studies in English, Written and Spoken: For the Use of Continental Students. 1st. series, Volume 1 Author Cornelis Stoffel Publisher W.J. Thieme, 1894 on page 247, Top Hat is just a familiar way of saying High hat or Tall hat (self explanatory). It may have been influenced by the French "Haut-de-forme" (name for a top ...


4

This is a case where Ngram has to be used very judiciously. Looking at the results for "rend", there appears to be a very steep drop in usage beginning right around 1959. However, the vast majority of actual results for the period immediately preceding this drop are not for the verb but for the abbreviation "rend." which is part of the abbreviation for ...


4

I believe it is indeed a shortening of Tige (pronounced like tide with a hard g in place of the d). From a story in the Atlantic Monthly published in 1860, apparently by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr (father of the famous American jurist by the same name): Tiger, or more briefly, Tige, the property of Abner Briggs, Junior, belonged to a species not ...


2

1. Are there any examples of dogs actually being named "Tiger", let alone a shortened version of "Tiger"? The earliest example I could find of a dog named Tiger is from "Select Poetry, Ancient and Modern, for April, 1791," in The Gentleman's Magazine (1791): The inclosed Occasional Epilogue ["Occasional Epilogue, For Mr. Stanton's Great Dog Tiger"] was ...


2

English verse is qualitative, not quantitative: it runs stress-to-stress rather than syllable-to-syllable, so an extra reduced syllable here or there is negligible. Moreover, English poets have great freedom to play against strict "meter" for local rhythmic effect. The pentameter line in the English tradition is predominantly iambic, but variation is ...


2

Crayfish, crawfish, and crawdad: are interchangeable terms for a large group of freshwater crustaceans (not fish) resembling small lobsters and living in many regions throughout the world. Crayfish and crawfish are renderings of regional pronunciations of the same word, descended from the Middle English crevise (-vise became –fish), which in turn has ...


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The origin of the term might have derived from an earlier fashion trend set forth in the early 1600s by way of the capotain, or sugarloaf hat. This has was also known as the pilgrim hat and the flat topped hat. The hat is famously associated with the Pilgrims that traveled to the Americas 1. Although it is difficult to find a direct association, the ...


2

In the U.S., doughnut (first OED citation 1809) replaced the Dutch-origin word olykoek (first OED citation 1795). For olykoek, a 1740 calque [translation] oily cake is cited, so the word olykoek may have been in use well before doughnut. This first OED citation for doughnut is D. Knickerbocker, Hist. N.Y. An enormous dish of balls of sweetened dough, ...



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