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"Native Americans" (both words capped) is reserved for the ancestors of the pre-Columbian Americans, also called indigenous peoples. Of course, Native Americans are themselves immigrants, as human life originated in Africa. Still, if you have no "Indian" blood, you are not Native American. You could say you are "native American" or "a native of America," ...


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"Native" has more than one meaning. One meaning is "born in that country", another meaning is "The first people to be born in that country". eg http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/native Obviously you fit the first definition and not the second. It's quite possible that the tribes of people who call themselves "Native" because they've ...


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Many years ago, when I was working at Wave Hill, a New York cultural property consisting of several acres, gardens and two manor houses, we referred to the walled in courtyard outside the kitchen of Glyndor House as the "dooryard." It was just off the driveway, and clearly would serve for an informal visit -- not necessarily in the dooryard, but by way of ...


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One of the grim tenets of the stand-up comic's vernacular is that you either kill (reduce the audience to a state of helpless mirth) or die (stand at the microphone surrounded by a crushing silence, your jokes withering and expiring as you bring them out for the cruel audience to inspect). A similar vocabulary rules other forms of popular entertainment, with ...


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ate 14c., "natural, hereditary, connected with something in a natural way," from Old French natif "native, born in; raw, unspoiled" Native. It becomes more complicated to say you are a native of a certain place if racial features from another place are more noticeable; for if you considere the word signifying something unspoiled, blended with hereditary, ...


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I don't think it would be accurate to call yourself a Native American. The capital on "Native" indicates that "Native American" is a proper name and that name is already in use by somebody else. I think it's accurate, but liable to generate confusion and conflict, to refer to yourself as a native American.


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Historically, the first use of Native American as a proper name may have been in connection with a U.S. political party of the 1840s and 1850s that called itself (starting in the 1840s) the American Republican Party or the Native American Party and then (in 1855) the American Party—but which is more widely recognized today by its secret society name, the ...


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This is my kind of question! I used to be interested in different kinds of weapons and wanted words for warriors wielding each type. Bow and arrow - archer or bowman. Sword - swordsman. Axe - axeman. Club - I'm not aware of a special word for this, but you could try simply club wielder. Dagger - knifeman or knife fighter. Flail - I never managed to find a ...


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all future generations Source: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/posterity



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