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7

"that this assemblage of horrors might want no fact of distinguished die," "Die" here is a noun: Die noun (plural dies) 2 A device for cutting or moulding metal into a particular shape. Example sentences In the sealing module, seal grids can be snapped in and out of the sealing-grid die to change the shape of the package seal. ...


3

Two possibilities I can see: 1) It is actually referring to the pain caused by a "bitch", which one could take to mean "A woman who has hurt me, eg broken my heart, not done what I wanted her to do, etc". In other words, hurts like that special way that can only be done by someone with whom we are in a relationship. Note that I am in no way endorsing the ...


3

I believe that the phrase “might want no fact of distinguished die” is confusing because we automatically interpret "die" as a verb. I think the passage is correctly interpreted as involving a noun, perhaps the singular of "dice". dice NOUN (plural same) A small cube with each side having a different number of spots on it, ranging from one to ...


2

The first two cursewords are specifically and characteristically common to modern black American vernacular English, as is the dropping of the "s" in the word "hurts," so that is strongly suggestive of some relationship to this phrase (note also that your Charles Davis citation is actually from a book called On Being Black). I'd hazard a guess that the ...


1

It means the most recent previous June. For an unambiguous example see the 3 January 1874 The Church of England Magazine at page 15: I gave an account last June* of the happy death of one of my little Sunday-school children... *See "Church of England Magazine" June 30th, 1873. Or more specifically concerning writing "last June" during October, ...


1

It's certainly true that a lot of (well-educated) people wrote in that style: not just in novels but in letters to one another, which, even now, tend to be more formal, correct and "flowery" than spoken language. This is partly due to expectations of "how one is supposed to write a letter", but also due to the fact that letters aren't extemporary - one has ...


1

The dialogue definitely is embellished for better reading. Austen was innovative in using far more dialogue than contemporaries. Dialogue is pivotal for her stories and is tuned to the character speaking in a very exact way. Dialogue is narrated as people would love to have sounded, and loved to read about. "Then," observed Elizabeth, "you must ...


1

William Longchamp is credited with its introduction to England in the late 12th century, following the practice of the Chancery of Apostolic Briefs.[2] Its first recorded use was in 1169 when King Henry II, hard pressed by his barons over the Investiture Controversy, assumed the common theory of "divine right of kings", that the monarch acted ...


1

Like what DisplayName said, cursing relieves stress and has similar effects. Pretty much anything forbidden by society (verbally) creates appeal in using them.


1

I only quote from memory here: But curse words in all languages have a certain similar visceral effect. They usually are an affront that you in your right mind being polite would not do. fuck --> low level bitch --> see fuck bastard --> see bitch They are all related to sexuality which is what everything revolves around anyways. Why we curse



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