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Actually Etymonline suggests that the first use dates back to 1917 and is referred to trucks loads while its military application was later, around 1936. Payload (n.) also pay-load, 1917, from pay + load (n.). Originally the part of a truck's (later an aircraft's) load from which revenue is derived (passengers, cargo, mail); figurative sense of ...


4

You pose what I take to be two questions: (1) Why is 'head hair' two words instead of one (especially given other words like bedroom)? We all know what a car radio, a toaster oven, a graveyard shift and a spring chicken are; I don't think we'd benefit from making them a single word, even if other languages might do so -- indeed French and German have ...


3

Given this citation from 1724... To be Stupid and Ignorant is seldom the Character of a Thief. Robberies on the High-way and other bold Crimes are generally perpetrated by Rogues of Spirit and a Genius, and Villains of any Fame are commonly subtle cunning Fellows... ...I think we can safely say OP's cited "Benjamin Franklin" quote would have been ...


2

If you refer to someone's "coif", (short for "coiffure") it refers to the hair on a person's head - usually styled nicely, as in "Her friends all envied her new coif", but it is most definitely a reference to head hair. From MWO - the origin of COIFFURE is French, from coiffer - to cover with a coif, arrange (hair), from coife, from Old French First ...


2

In Irish author James Joyce's Ulysses, written early in the 20th century, one character refers to another character's shoes as "kicks", so the term was familiar in Ireland at least that far back.


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English has a word for head hair: locks 1lock noun \ˈläk\ Definition of LOCK 1 a: a tuft, tress, or ringlet of hair b:plural: the hair of the head http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lock The etymology can be traced as: "tress of hair," Old English locc "lock of hair, curl," from Proto-Germanic *lukkoz (cognates: ...


1

The question is why some languages have different lexemes whereas English has a single lexeme with compounding possibilities. The notion of need or cultural salience has often been brought into the discussion. Chinese has different lexemes for uncooked rice (米 mǐ) and cooked rice (饭 fàn). Malay has different lexemes for rice on the stalk padi, uncooked rice ...


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The Brythonic word U̯entā means favoured/chosen, so I would assume Derwent means "favoured water" And the welsh for White is gwyn not gwent and is derived from Brythonic U̯īndos which means white.


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In the 1960s and early 1970s in the New York metropolitan area, people did refer to the shoes as thongs. It was from the early to mid-1970s that the transition to the term "flip-flops" started to take hold, with thong becoming the term for a bikini bottom with minimal covering over the derrière area.


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Relevant to your question is a conversation between the French linguist Mitsou Ronat and Noam Chomsky from 1976: Ronat: I think it is very important for [William] Labov to show that the language of the ghetto has a grammar of its own, which is not defined as a collection of errors or infractions of standard English— Chomsky: —But who ...


1

AAVE/Black English is an identifiable dialect; a hypothetical "White English" could only be identified and unified as being "other than Black English". There are large number of "White Englishes", several of them endemic to the United States, and each of them is identified separately. When considering grammar (which, in the linguistic sense means ...



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