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As a noun meaning "native or citizen of the island of Lesbos," Lesbian has been used in English as a noun since the earliest translations of Herodotus and Thucydides. As a result, the notion of using lesbian as a noun when the later meaning of "a woman who is a homosexual" (Merriam-Webster's current definition) arose, around 1890, would not have struck many ...


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Adjective: In 1890, the term lesbian was used in a medical dictionary as an adjective to describe tribadism (as "lesbian love"). Lesbianism, to describe erotic relationships between women, had been documented in 1870. The terms lesbian, invert and homosexual were interchangeable with sapphist and sapphism around the turn of the 20th century. Noun: The ...


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I would like to say that Chaucer is a marker and significant contributor to the gradual shifts towards the more intelligible Shakespearean English. Chaucer and his compatriots, and Chaucer himself in no small measures, had contributed to the solidification of the English dialect in London. Chaucer himself contributed to the importing of continental European ...


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Wikipedia has an entry called "Universal History", to quote (emphasis mine): "Universal history is the representation of general facts both of entire nations and of individuals. Its uses are manifold. It teaches human nature and the experience of all centuries. Universal history is commonly divided into three parts, viz. ancient, medieval, and ...


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The word withershins is rarely used anymore, it is the same as counter-clockwise or anti-clockwise, both with Latinate origin, both still English words.


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T. O. Churchill, A Grammar of the English Language (1823) identifies two somewhat surprising culprits as being responsible for the deplorable rise of the apostropheless its: printers, and English speakers who inexcusably use of the wrong contraction for "it is." Here is Churchill's argument: The word it's in particular, is now generally robbed of the ...


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"Mummy" and "Daddy" seem extremely common in books from the period, just as they are in the UK today. (Mummy as a word for mother is all but unknown in American English, which prefers mommy, so it's probably safe to assume that most of the results from that search are British.)



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