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The simple answer to the OP is that it's a fixed expression because we've said thanks that way for many centuries: Old English þanc, þonc in late use "grateful thought, gratitude," plural form thanks from mid-13c., from the same root as thank (v.). Compare Old Saxon thank, Old Frisian thank, Old Norse þökk, Dutch dank, German Dank. The Old ...


4

Renal, hepatic, and cardiac are adjectives, while kidney, liver, and heart are nouns. Thus, their uses are quite different. As for using academic terms, there is a logic behind it. Everyday words are used in everyday situations. To be more precise in your meaning, you should use more precise words. For example, heart may be used in sentences such as, “You ...


3

In 1964 Paul Krassner's 'The Realist' Magazine started to run a feature called "soft-core pornography," usually photographs from the mainstream media that could be interpreted in a sexual manner, most famously the August 1967 issue featuring Ronald Reagan. Krassner has stated that he derived the term from creating an opposite to the Supreme Court use of the ...


3

Taking your "words" to mean not just individual words but phrases, sentences, paragraphs, and arbitrary sections of text: Change-of-font: font face and/or font-size and or font-weight. Also, large word-initial capital can be used for emphasis with the first word in a section of text or paragraph. Block caps. Sidebars and insets (with a different ...


1

In addition to the good ideas from Tim Romano, I would add these: Rotation of text (especially handy for labeling charts/graphs, and for fitting text in tight columns, especially column headings). Borders around individual letters, words, phrases or paragraphs. Combinations of bold+underline, bold+italic, italic+underline, and bold+italic+underline. ...


1

The savages flee before us in defeat, just like the cowards they are. For the most part, this sentence is perfectly fine. Nevertheless, before anyone can really tell you what is correct in 'archaic' English, you need to specify which era of archaic English you mean. For the sake of example, I will assume Elizabethan, since that's what usually pops into ...


1

From Wiktionary : -ist Added to words to form nouns denoting: a person with a particular creative or academic role; one who subscribes to a particular theological doctrine or religious denomination; one who owns or manages something; And : -er (added to verbs) Person or thing that does an action indicated by the ...


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I'm a sailor. I believe that this has a nautical origin, like many phrases. Along the lines refers to two things on a boat, and goes back centuries. One common use waas along the lines of the keel, referring to the midline on a boat. Similarly, lines of navigation were and are critical in successfully making passages, so along the lines also referred to the ...



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