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16

You can use little as an adverb to modify an adjective in some cases. It’s not particularly common, outside of a few stock phrases, to do so with an adjective in the positive, and none of the examples you give sound idiomatic. They’re (probably) grammatical, but I’d say they would normally only be used in a humoristic or sarcastic manner. The most common ...


6

It's grammatically correct, but inadvisable. It is easier on the reader to state "It started off as an incredibly terrible day. But did it? Really? An incredibly terrible day usually starts out with something that is terrible, and builds as additional terrible events occur. If there was a single event that made it all that terrible, I'd refer to it as a ...


5

You would use "a little". It's a little cold today. or Sorry, I'm a little late. I'd be careful about using "a little tall", however. It doesn't quite sound right due to the contradictory terms used. Go with "quite tall" in that scenario.


5

"Why" in this case is not being used as a question word, but as an interjection, such as: "Oh! It tastes just like chicken!" "Why, it tastes just like chicken!" It's a old usage, dating back centuries, and it is not obsolete. It usually indicates a degree of mild surprise in the speaker in response to a remark or a question. I recall a scene in an ...


1

Writing You're not pretty nor funny would also be acceptable. Saying neither/nor is the logically equivalent of saying "You are not pretty and not funny". Saying "You are not pretty or funny" can be parsed to mean "Either you are not pretty or else you are funny."


1

Neither should be used with nor, and either with or. "You aren't either pretty nor funny" is simply incorrect. "You aren't either pretty or funny" is arguably acceptable but "You are neither pretty nor funny" is much more elegant.


1

"I don't like neither of you" indicates the speaker is addressing two individuals, and that he/she dislikes both of them.


1

While it is grammatically correct, adverb chaining like that doesn't roll of the tongue very nicely, and you might ask yourself if just using terribly is sufficient. Terrible is pretty bad, right? The statement begs the question, "How bad was it?" , so it's likely that it will be followed by a story about why the morning was so awful. Unless it describes ...


1

It depends. If 'Who' is being used in a plural sense then 'are' is needed (e.g. Who are those people?) otherwise 'is' is used if it is being used in a singular sense (e.g. Who is this person?)


1

I can think of lots of instances where "to do" is used as an intransitive verb, e.g. "He did as he was told to do". "He did well" is impeccable English. "He did good" would work if you meant "He did good rather than evil". To use "good" as an adverb is not standard English.


1

People often avoid repetition. IncredIBLY, terrIBLY, two vowels of the same contour (sound shape). It's a bit like I'm gonna go ask -- I'm gonna ask is more frequent. :)


1

You can say anything you like. Whether your listeners have the same understanding of what you are saying as you have, or immediately apprehend it, is something else altogether. The normal collocation is neither . . . nor for these sorts of things. Not either has a very strange sound. There are times when one uses nor following a negative that is ...


1

I'm not totally sure I grasp what you're asking, but are any of these phrases along the right lines? Basically, you've written a letter, and want to ask someone to give you their opinion on it? I wrote her a letter. What are your thoughts on it? Would you like to read the letter I wrote for her? Can you give me your thoughts on the letter I wrote for her? ...


1

The word performant is engineering jargon for something that may not be objectively efficient or optimal/fast but meets the performance expectations for which it was created. When an engineer uses the word performant, they mean that it's as fast and efficient as you would intuitively expect it to be. It's not meant to declare that it's the optimal or best ...


1

Ask him what becomes of the dogs. He claims to have rehabilitated them on the show. But after the show ends, he leaves them in the hands of their ignorant owners.


1

I don't think the sentence is excessively long, but you could reduce the ambiguity by moving one of its elements to the front: After the show ends, ask him what becomes of the dogs he claims to have rehabilitated on the show and he leaves them again in the hands of their ignorant owners. You could also simplify the "leaves them in the hands" part: After ...



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