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I have heard and used “falling INTO (clinical) depression often, but never “falling IN depression.” (Please see my comment under your question regarding Google results for “falling IN depression”) For an idea similar to “falling into,” I’ve also heard/used “SINKING into (a) depression,” either with or without the article when related to mental health. ...


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It's clearest if you place the word "only" in front of the word it modifies. In this case: "Ensure the string contains only printable ASCII characters." For more info, see this WikiHow post.


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It depends on what you want to mean by "tense". If, as highly educated people have always agreed, "tense" is a precise term for a finite inflected verb form, then there are precisely two tenses in Modern English: Present (goes, has, is, makes, wants) Past (went, had, was, made, wanted) On the other hand, people who vaguely recall grammar-school ...


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Summmary Thanks to the various suggestions I received, I obtained the following results from Ngrams. The expression entered depression showed no results on Ngrams, which doesn't mean that it's never used nor said, but simply Google Books fails to report its presence. British English Corpus American English Corpus All the following verbs listed below ...


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"I don't want you worrying about the oral interview." That sentence is fine. Huddleston & Pullum (The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, 2002.12311-2) note that "the gerund-participial with want generally has a progressive interpretation, but in non-affirmative contexts it can be non-progressive". They say that I want them standing when ...


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It can appear that there is no 'acceptable answer' to this question. The reason is that a sentence has tense, aspect, and mood (remembered as TAM) but a lot of educated people, including a lot of English teachers, lump aspect and mood under a generic 'tense' umbrella and come up with answers like "There are 16 tenses!" In simple terms, tense situates an ...


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Both are used, but "After the 7th grade" is slightly more common. Source: Google ngrams


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I would use the expressions "develop depression" or "succumb to depression" to speak strictly of the mental state, clinical or not. However, "falling into depression" can be understood in the way you say, depending on the context. For example, "The country fell into depression" is clearly pertaining to its financial situation, whereas "She fell into ...


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In most instances in the general population, if I heard the idiom "fall into depression", I would tend first to interpret it as an economic term. When I heard the phrase "she became depressed", I would be more inclined to think of the mental health term. But all forms of the word can be used in either the sense of finances, or mental health, so if I knew I ...


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You're use of the word myself is incorrect. Myself is a reflexive pronoun, that is referring back to something, most often the word I. In the example you gave, the proper use would be, Some very successful people and I are building a team across the Globe! OR (Name) and I are going to be on the call tonight. Usually, the first person pronoun is ...


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Yes, it should be shunned. Give replaces it perfectly in every instance, without sounding contrived, ignorant, effete, or commercialistic, and that's not an accident. You wouldn't cleft* a diamond, you'd cleave it. You wouldn't receipt* a shipment, you'd receive it. And so on.



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