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3

"Doing stuff in data in the presence of artifacts" is grammatical, but doesn't really mean what you intend. "in the presence of X" is usually used with X being a person (though it could be something inanimate), and means more than just that X is present: it means that its presence is important for what you are doing, in the sense that if X were not ...


3

Although "doing stuff" in a haystack sounds like much more fun, maybe you could get your point (the difficulty) across in your title by alluding to the haystack metaphor: Finding synapses in an artifact stack/a stack of artifacts. or to the “roses among the thorns” expression: Finding synapses among the artifacts. (Do you really need to use ...


2

"A climbing wall" and "running shoes" - Of course, climbing and running are gerunds. A climbing wall is a wall for climbing where beginners can practise climbing a rocķ face. Running shoes are shoes good for running - just as a washing machine is a machine for washing. (If you use a preposition then the ing-form after it is a gerund and no particple.) This ...


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I think they are using "gaits" as a play on words for "gates". There is no such thing as a "cemetery gait"...at least there wasn't until they made it up!


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Grammatically speaking, the word cemetery functions as a Noun Adjunct, also known as an attributive noun: a noun that serves to modify another noun. As such, there is absolutely nothing wrong with the sentence from a grammar standpoint and your friend is completely wrong. (Ask him if you can use "cemetery" as a modifier to "plot" or "entrance"; if he ...


2

Yes. In this case how is roughly interchangeable with that, and while maybe a little clunky, the phrase is grammatically correct. In this example there's no clearly superior way to phrase it (that I can think of) other than "I like how..."


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On the surface the phrasing feels redundant. However it falls in line with similar colloquial gems such as "also too" and "I know, right?" (The latter being a debatable case of reverse redundancy). As cumbersome as it is on the ear of a lingual enthusiast, it is a difficult one to argue based solely on grammar. Its widespread use is the single factor that ...


1

Without doubt, the construction of an adverb followed by an adjective that it modifies is grammatically correct. The examples provided are not grammatically wrong, although as commenters have noted they are stylistically and perhaps logically flawed. "Blatantly obvious" is at best a well worn cliche. Strictly speaking it is not redundant, because ...


1

'Each' is singular. 'None' is not singular (so it gets lumped under 'plural' {or is it 'mass'?}. None play. Each wants.


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I found the answer within The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language. The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (on page 1651) calls this grammatical structure a gerund-participle. The text starts with an introduction to compounds of nouns + verbs: A great many lexical bases in English can be either verbs or nouns, and as a result there may be ...


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"Media" is the plural of "medium," so technically, the question should read, "Do the media influence us?" However, "the media" have become something of a cultural monolith, so I reluctantly accept the singular use when described in this way. "Do media (television, radio, Internet, billboards, etc.) influence us?" Yes, they do. "Does the media influence ...



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