Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

The problem is that the word is means "the current state of the thing". It implies temporal information -- now, this instant. It conflicts with the rest of the sentence's meaning. What is the MSO/MSE split? It's underway. ... But it's not underway now. It will be underway soon. So, it's not underway. The verb's tense/meaning conflicts with the ...


3

A form that seems to flow better, to me, is "The [split] is happening soon. Please bear..." This has the added benefit of still making sense when you replace 'soon' with 'right now'. (as suggested by @badp)


2

The sense of Harper Lee's sentence is something like this: It would have been more accurate for me to say "built in spite of them" than "built around them." The shorter form that she actually uses is coherent and error-free, although her intent might have been more obvious if (as ChrisW suggests) she had put quotation marks around "built in spite of ...


2

I think it's fine. If there were quote marks (as implied by the verb "say"), then it would use a comma: It is better to say, "Built in spite of them." However, adding 'direct quote' marks implies either that it has been said, or that it should literally be 'said' out loud. So omitting the quote marks is better. I might have used parentheses instead; ...


2

Apart from the fact that the present tense is is perhaps awkward with the future-deictic adverb soon, as commented on in Jeff’s answer, there is a different, more semantic clash going on: Being underway means that something is not yet here, but it is being worked on, and it is therefore on the way and will be here at some as yet undisclosed time in the ...


1

According to books.google.com/ngrams, "soon underway" is used almost 4 times more often than "underway soon" or "soon be underway."


1

In addition to "will soon be underway", "is soon to be underway" works. The problem is the disconnect between "is" (present tense) and "soon" (future aspect), which goes away with either of the above constructs ("will" is future tense and "to be" allows for the future aspect reading).


1

The comma is a very versatile punctuation mark. It has many uses, some of which can sometimes be replaced with another punctuation mark, such as a colon, semicolon, em dash, or period (full stop). As to which punctuation mark would be preferable for any specific sentence will depend on the author and the register that the author is writing for. In a way, the ...


1

Both could be correct but each is used in a slightly different context. If the robot can learn from a human, it could keep track of humans. If the robot can learn from a human, it can keep track of humans. The form in (1) is a statement of possibility: "It is possible it could possess the ability to keep track of humans." Form (2) is a ...


1

"I myself" isn't bad grammar. You can use a reflexive pronoun that way as an intensifier, which is exactly what you want. But it's not exactly a common construction, especially in speech. I think it could come across as formal or outdated. If you are describing why not to do X, then saying "even I" is not IMO pretentious because you aren't saying "even I, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible