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5

The verb bug fits well with your emotional reaction: 2 informal Annoy or bother (someone): ODO Imagine how you feel if a swarm of gnats gathers around your head, and starts crawling in your ears, eyes, nose and mouth. The bugs are bugging you in much the same way that man is bugging you with his irritating distractions while you are trying to watch ...


4

The final consonant sounds in the question are called plosives and they have two phases when pronounced: first, a closure phase, where air pressure builds up behind a complete obstruction in the oral cavity (formed by the lips, by contact of the tongue tip with the alveolum, or by the tongue dorsum with the palate). For p, t and k, the vocal folds are not ...


2

Wikipedia’s article on “and/or” summarizes and cites both criticisms and defenses of the expression. Among those cited as condemning it are Strunk & White’s Elements of Style, Fowler’s Modern English Usage (2nd ed., ed. Ernest Gowers), and the current (16th) edition of The Chicago Manual of Style—influential ...


2

It's not a sentence because it has no predicate. It's a noun phrase "a great place" that has an infinitive modifier. You'll need to supply more to make this a complete thought. Perhaps: Acme Escalators, Inc is a great place to start to move up the ladder.


1

According to http://www.pronunciationtips.com/syllables2.htm, steps and glides describe the nature of pitch changes in a sentence, for example, the falling tone at the end of a declaration. The rule, which I evaluate as a native speaker and it seems entirely plausible, is that at the end of a sentence, the pitch glides downward if the last word is a single ...


1

I assume that you want these sentences to be equivalent. In that case, put a comma after" alley" in the first version. This makes "I remember" an aside applying to the whole sentence. This avoids having your reader think you're calling to mind the alley only, as in "the alley that I remember." Put a comma after "alley" in the second version as well, to ...


1

It is correct that “If I do not mistake, she would be his fiancée” is ungrammatical. Mistake as a verb is always transitive in normal use in current English; that is, you cannot just mistake—you have you mistake something. In fact, in the vast majority of cases where you use the verb in regular speech, you are talking about mistaking something/someone for ...


1

Has is a 3rd person singular present indicative of have - it is correct if the history is currently ongoing. Had is the simple past tense and past participle of have - it is correct if the history is no longer ongoing or, not very plausibly, the adjectives you use have ceased to apply to the history. The second could occur if we said "Australian music was ...


1

"In his letter he explains how the book has a great plot and is generally enjoyable." If it is a mere statement/assertion we would join the clauses with 'that'. But when the speaker does not stop simply mentioning its greatness or enjoyability, but goes on to elaborating or detailing some aspects of the plot and its ways of providing enjoyment in his ...


1

The word should be class. Even though it is followed by 'are', class is not what makes the sentence plural. Because the subject has two parts, 'Inventor' and 'Inventor’s Society class', the sentence is plural and requires 'are'; since the author is talking about both.



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