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"Also" when used in the beginning of a phrase is usually used to introduce a new point. (In any case "also" usually refers to the previous clause) "Also, have you considered using [z]?" - here "also" is just used to introduce a new topic and the meaning is equivalent to "Why do you want to use [x] and not [y]? Have you considered using [z]?" Whether 'z' was ...


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It is called linguistic competence. Linguistic competence is the system of linguistic knowledge possessed by native speakers of a language. It is in contrast to the concept of Linguistic performance, the way the language system is used in communication.


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I've always been wondering if the subject pronoun "We" can be used as an indefinite pronoun such as "Everybody" or "One" to refer to people in general. Probably not. But maybe there is a usage out there . . . In general, the pronoun "we" is characteristically used for the speaker or a group that includes at least a speaker. There is a usage where the ...


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Those who can be a subject. Those who can, should teach. Those who can also be direct objects or objects of a preposition. Those whom you saw... which would explain the existence of both in Google searches. "In speech and informal writing who tends to predominate over whom...[T]he distinction shows no signs of disappearing in formal style..." ...


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Accordimg to oxforddictionaries.com: The normal practice in current English is to use who in all contexts You can also circumvent the issue: "[...] all other supportive people I inevitably have left out".


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my thought is that the first one is correct because news can be countable and/or uncountable and since you are particularly interested about your information, you are looking for that single piece of info that is about your candidacy. hence, "is there any news about my candidacy?" is correct.


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The difference is in whether you want to emphasize the state of being solved or the action of solving. "is solved" indicates that it is in the solved state. "has been solved" indicates that the solving of the problem has been completed, which is really just what it means to be in the state of being "solved".


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Both are correct. Notice the difference in tense. "The problem is solved." [describes the current status of the problem] "The problem has been solved." [directly answers the question Has the problem been solved?]



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