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4

It’s a tradition thousands of years old. It’s a several–thousand-year-old tradition. It’s a many–thousand-year-old tradition. It has been a tradition for thousands of years. You could also use the adjective multi-millenial, but this sounds more formal/literary.


4

Having looked at your quote in context: "three-master, Pharaon, from Smyrna, Trieste, and Naples." This is describing a ship, called 'Pharaon' which has three masts. I believe that the reference to 'Smyrna, Trieste, and Naples' means these are the names of the three ports the ship has visited before returning to its home port.


4

The OED refers to three possible plurals, two of which are now rare. Status (rare) Statuses (now usual) Statusses (rare). Inflections: Pl. (rare) status /ˈsteɪtjuːs/ , (now usu.) statuses /ˈsteɪtəsɪz/ , (rare) statusses /ˈsteɪtəsɪz/ . Etymology: A borrowing from Latin. Etymon: Latin status.


3

APIs API could mean a lot of things. The list can be easily found on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/API_%28disambiguation%29. But as it is in most cases an acronym, when you append s to it, it unambiguously indicates plurality of whatever the acronym stands for. As in Computer science - API stands for Application Programming Interface. The plural of ...


2

If it's a shared characteristic, there's only one of them... so, their phobias... would be one thing, but their (shared) arachnophobia... is something else. There's only one phobia, after all. I think there's only a reason to use a plural if there's a material difference that makes the (thing) different. So, their skin colour meant they burned easily versus ...


2

A millenium is an era of a thousand years. Its plural form is millenia, so "millenia-old" is one possibility.


2

The first option is incorrect because of lack of properly placed articles. For the rest, explanation follows. Let there be file named "x." The option 3 means you are looking for files that are also named "x." You can rewrite the option 3 as "I'm searching only for files with the same name as x." Option 2 means you are searching a group of files that ...


2

Apology To my intense embarassment I have to say that this accepted answer is not correct for the sentence “The prevalence of both...”. The subject is prevalence, singular, and therefore the verb must be the singular, ‘was’. I offer my profound apologies. Answer to a different question If the sentence had been “Both diabetes and obesity increased with ...


2

Sentence 2 is correct. You are referring to three distinct objects, so your noun and verb must both be plural. The noun and the verb must agree in number. The adjectives don't matter. Some more examples: My brother and sister are silly, but my mother is not. My brothers are silly, but my sister is not. And now with adjectives: My pink and white dress is ...


1

You are quoting the name of the measurement or category, 'hardening mechanism'. It doesn't need to change. Not a grammarian's answer, but consider that if you wrote it as "Hardening timescales are plotted against separation in Fig.2, each broken down by its hardening mechanism." It's clear that this should not be pluralised.


1

Normally I would expect that if you have multiple flights in mind (i.e. potentially separate for each person), you would say "flights", but if you expect they only need one flight, you would say "a flight". However, since in this context the word "flight" is shorthand for "a flight booking" or "an airplane ride ticket", then the plural may make sense. "You ...


1

Let us first get the meaningnof the word "like" in discussion here Like one that is similar : counterpart, equal, kind. One of many that are similar to each other Example - I have never seen the likes of you The likes of such people as : such things as  such a one as and perhaps others similar to the kind or sort of Use with ...


1

The phrase "a bacteria" does not contain a pronoun. The problem is the combination of the indefinite article a (which can only precede a singular noun) with the plural noun bacteria. The standard term for the matching between elements of a sentence is agreement or concord. The Oxford Dictionary of English Grammar (p19) defines agreement as follows: A ...


1

This forum has used the term "plurality" to discuss this issue. See Plurality of a group also referenced using we/our/us, so perhaps "plurality mismatch" or "plurality disagreement" would be descriptive. plurality grammar: the state of being plural --Merriam Webster


1

A standard term is 'subject-verb [dis]agreement'. Another term would be '{phrase} parity [error]'. (Agreement is accomplished by adding a plural phoneme to the verb {predicate} when the subject lacks a plural morpheme)


1

In general "uncountable" nouns are not preceded by the indefinite article. Many of them are mass nouns, such as water, or abstract nouns, such as anger. See this description of them from edufind's "English Grammar" section: Countable and uncountable nouns The metaphorical use of cloak is generally not used in the plural. But it behaves differently from the ...


1

It all hinges on how many names you're looking for. If you're searching a set of files for those that all share a common name, then it's: I'm searching for files with the same name ... because there're multiple files but only one name. However, if you're searching a set of files for duplicate names - perhaps a set of four or five names that you're ...


1

In your example, line's means belonging to the line, whereas lines means multiple instances of a line. So the sentence "We sells car's" does not make sense because you aren't identifying what the part of the car you are talking about.


1

Scott-Fitzgeralds. When there is no obvious principle word in a compound noun, you pluralize at the end.


1

'Has' is the singular auxillary verb, whereas 'have' is the plural auxillary verb. Thus, when the subject that is being referred to is singular, use 'has,' and when the subject is plural, use 'have.' "My ability" is singular. Thus, the correct word to use is 'has.' On the contrary, "my abilities" is plural, so "have been" is correct for the latter ...


1

The only example I could find was "MA", here http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/11776420_16 "We study polynomial time learning algorithms for Multiplicity Automata (MA)..."



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