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6

A length of cable is an item that might be a five foot bit of cable, or a three foot bit of cable, that is to say, a piece or portion of cable. If you say lengths of cable, then you're talking about multiple pieces. So an endless length of cable is a run cable that goes on forever, whereas endless lengths of cable would be a unending number of cables or ...


5

Many nouns in English have a plural form either with an s/es ending or without. Hair vs hairs is one of the many plural issues. Hair can be a singular, plural, or collective noun depending on the context. Usage suggestions - They had golden or brown or ashen hair." His black and white hair had now turned into complete white I found two/a ...


4

Staffs, when you're talking about the staff of Office A and the staff of Office B. If you are talking about the kind of staff that Gandalf carries, the plural is staves, which is a word I've always liked.


4

"Staff" as a collective noun meaning a body of people takes either a singular or plural verb depends on whether you're thinking of the body as a unit: The staff is unanimously opposed to the dean's recommendation. or as multiple individuals All the staff were shocked by the dean's recommendation. The plural of "staff" is "staffs," and when you ...


4

Nigel Rees, Cassell's Dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins (2002) has this entry for martini: martini There has been a firm, Martini & Rossi, makers of Italian vermouth since 1894, but the origin of the term 'dry martini' may have nothing to do [with] the firm (even though it can, of course, be made with Martini). The 'dry martini' is said to have ...


3

If you multiply zero by two you get zero. If you multiply nobody by two you still get nobody. Therefore the answer is: Nobody from the Police Department and nobody from the Fire Department is going to the rescue. If you doubt that, consider the following. Two nobodies are going to the rescue, one from the Police Department and one from the Fire ...


3

People as a plural of person is a mass noun, and we don;t use a plural -s. So when forming a possessive, we only add the 's: I refuse to look after other people's belongings. However, people can also be countable, when we refer to a(n ethic) group of persons: the Belgian people, the British people. Although a bit contrived, you could be referring to ...


2

The statement is incredibly ambiguous due to ten thousand neither being a significantly large nor small number. For instance -in my opinion-, the first two of 400, sounds more like 2 instead of 200. Whereas the first two of 3 million sounds far more like 2 million. For this particular statement, it is far more probable that the "two" refers to 2000. As a ...


2

wares by itself is plural but when it is a compound (software, silverware, hardware, Tupperwaretm) it tends to be singular/non-count. In online forums it frequently appears in the plural (softwares) since non-native speakers often frequent such forums. You'll see the word "informations" used online as well, especially by speakers in whose native language it ...


2

The rule is that you add 's to a word to make it posessive, unless the word is a plural that ends in "s" already. Any style guide will tell you that. For non-plurals that end in "s" usage varies. For example, the possessive of Jesus is often Jesus' but the possessive of bus would normally be bus's. The usual example of a plural possessive ending in 's is ...


2

The first is correct. The singular "people" can refer to any number of persons. The only time the plural "peoples" is used is to refer to multiple ethnic, national or racial groups.


2

It depends on the meaning of the whole sentence. However, it can be determined based on the following criteria (as a general rule of thumb): "a specific type of solutions introduces" - Correct, if this type consists of solutions, which are all similar and neither one of them (individually) "introduces"(sth.). Thus the agreement of the verb goes with "type", ...


2

In keeping with your example of "lens," add "iris." In keeping with the puzzle nature of the question, "rebus." Any medical condition ending in -itis, e.g., "bronchitis." Any word ending with the suffix -osis, e.g., "hypnosis."


2

If you allow multiples of the letter s, there are a ton (class, pass, mass, etc). If you restrict it to words that end with a single s, I suspect there are still a great many. Dias, bias, alias, octopus, cactus, and mucus all come to mind. Come up with common word endings that have an s and I think you can generate more.


2

The sentence is fine, the meaning clear. It could perhaps be reworded to I am talking with many people, to make it sound like more of a conversation than a speech.


1

In general, no, the kind of pronoun-antecedent number disagreement in your example is not grammatical: the number of a pronoun should agree with the number of its antecedent. Your example is trivially ungrammatical because the number of "this cookie" (the antecedent) does not agree with the number of "them". In the case of your example, a fix is trivial: ...


1

I don't like a revision that has "futures" and "presents." While I don't like to fall back on the comment that "it doesn't sound right," here it really doesn't. What about this: "May those hoping to enjoy the future waste none of the present." What do you think?


1

I have difficulty editing such prose. Majority and minority are clearly singular, as in "Those who voted yes are in a majority". Nevertheless, when attention focusses on those who comprise the majority, I commonly see examples such "The majority are fools". It is pedantic and may be prolix and awkward to re-cast such examples, so I permit the plural use.


1

I've never heard "The magazine" used as a plural in this way, and Google Ngrams doesn't return any results. However the name of the publication, like the name of a company, is often used to mean the people behind the name. So one might say "The News Of The World were hacking phones", as one might say "Google are recruiting". Obviously this is not to imply ...


1

I agree with your reader. 1. "The evening zephyr ruffled their long flowing hairs - the Indian village girl's shiny, black hair, and Audrey's curly blonde hair." (incorrect) Possible rewrite: "The evening zephyr ruffled their long flowing hair - the Indian village girl's, shiny and black and Audrey's, curly and blonde." Others might disagree. 2. "They ...


1

I expect an answer to your question will be difficult to come by. Many fish names form regular plurals (Bluegills, guppies, sardines), and many of the irregular plurals are fairly modern usages, so someone will have to account for the regular plural disappearing. As You Like It, Act II, Scene IV. Touchstone says ... and I remember the wooing of a peascod ...


1

Samples is plural, therefore the predicate of the sentence should be plural as well. The fact that the property is the same for all items is inconsequential.


1

Your case (the statement) is completely complicated. Here we can have both meanings. Either it could be two thousand out of ten thousand or it could also be just number two (2) out of ten thousand. But just two is only possible if we are talking about something precious thing, and the speaker and listener must know this small amount also matters. If someone ...


1

Cargo is defined by Google as: Goods carried on a ship, aircraft, or motor vehicle. Therefore, you would say: Cargo is usually transported on boats. The plural form of cargo (cargoes) can be used in some cases, such as: The ship containing our weapons will arrive in 10 minutes, as will the vessel containing the medicine. Please assure both ...


1

Because you are referring to a solitary member of a group for the subject, the singular conjugation of "to think" is correct. In this case the reference to the group of three is adjectival to the one member. While I know it might sound strange, to an American ear it is fine.



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