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8

Some of the style guides that I have are categorical in claiming that the plural verb is correct in such constructions as: One of the things that makes/make him great is he brings it every night. Follet in Modern American Usage (p298) states: These words (one of the [plural noun] who .. ) introduce the most widespread of all defiances of ...


5

In this sentence the subject appears after the verb. If you rewrite the sentence with normal subject-verb word order--My resume and cover letter are attached--you can plainly see that the subject of the verb is plural, therefore the verb must be plural. The word "attached" is a subject complement or predicate adjective (terminology varies), not an object. ...


5

Modus operandi is singular in both Latin and English. The plural is modi operandi, and, judging from this Ngram, I would advise against modus operandis. Since there seems to be some confusion over why only modus changes form in the plural, but never operandi, I'll explain that too. Modus is the most important word here, quite clearly meaning mode. It's a ...


4

Consider... Greenfinch and red kite are birds belonging to the finch and kite families respectively Red kite are birds of prey that like to collect things with which to decorate their nests Personally I don't see anything particularly unusual about such usages in a "species identification" context. We can't do this with all "living creature" ...


4

Corpora callosa is the plural form. See where it says "plural" here or here.


3

Some of this could be covered in the answers to another question, like Is there a correct gender-neutral, singular pronoun ("his" versus "her" versus "their")? . English (or American English, at least) is trying to deal with this idea of a sentient neuter third-person pronoun set. A person generally dislikes being called "it", ...


3

There are animals, like moose and fish, where the plural noun in English is identical to the singular one, and perhaps "kite" sounds like it should belong in that category to your ear, but every source I've seen pluralizes kite as kites.


3

This has to do with the general structure of [uninflected noun] [preposition] [uninflected noun], a moderately common English adjective or adverb construct used to indicate the "general case"; that is, it indicates it applies for all instances of those same nouns rather than a specific set or one: The proper way to pour tea is saucer under cup, not the ...


3

"Starbucks" comes, as far as I know, from the possessive, i.e. "Starbuck's Coffee", as it was named after the character Starbuck from Moby Dick. With that in mind, it makes sense to me to use "Starbucks" as that would be the same as the plural possessive. However, I know I've heard "Starbuckses" plenty in conversation. So as far as Southern American usage, ...


3

I bought two fruit jams in different flavours because the jams would be sold out. I couldn't take any chances. Alternatively, I bought two fruit jams in different flavours because the jams would be sold out. I couldn't take chances. Even... I bought two fruit jams in different flavours because the jams would be sold out. I didn't want to take ...


3

Yes, context dependent of course. The Oxford English Dictionary includes over 500 examples but one, is "Bananas are an important export crop ..." Or, "the chairmen are an honest bunch of people." Critical here appears to be the fact that the second noun is singular ("a bunch", "an export crop") whereas the first noun ("bananas", "chairmen") is plural. That ...


3

Weeellll, an argument could be made that the sentence should read like this: Here, resource-specification is a statement or statements that declare and initialize a resource. One noun is singular and the other is plural. In these cases, the verb should agree in number with the noun that is closest, e.g. statements (plural) not statement (singular).


3

You almost had it right: it should be several corpora collosa in Latin. If you are transplanting the whole thing into English without naturalizing it as in this case indeed applies, then just leave it like that. The Latin -a plural is for neuters, not just ones like collosum > collosa and datum > data in the second declension but also neuters in other ...


3

It's possible people in the legal profession may tend to prefer the singular form where there's only a single reason/justification, but I suspect the only reason we're more likely to encounter ground in such contexts is because "legalese" is a relatively conservative context. In more general use, plural grounds became the more common form some decades ago, ...


2

One of the things that make him great is that he brings it every night. You are absolutely right. The exact same issue exists in Dutch. The relative clause that make him great defines the things, which would otherwise make no sense. So that refers back to the things and thus takes a plural verb, make. It is an extremely common mistake, caused by ...


2

First off, the verb "to sound" is a little tricky, because, depending on interpretation, almost any "plural" subject could actually be singular. For example, we could interpret your phrase as: "Cabbage and beets together" sounds good. Where "cabbage and beets together" is viewed as a singular phrase. You can even extend this to: "Cabbages" sounds ...


2

Doubt can be both a mass noun and a countable noun. So one can be filled with doubt (mass noun), one can have a a number of doubts about something (count noun), and one can also have just a single doubt about the whole complex process (count noun).


2

If you are happy with the level of verbosity of Ducks walk like ducks and quack like ducks. then, IMO, you are bound to be happy with the level of verbosity of Dogs neither walk like ducks nor quack like ducks. But if, on the other hand, you do not mind the (potential) ambiguity of Ducks walk and quack like ducks. then, of course, neither ...


2

I would say: Dogs neither walk nor quack like ducks.


2

As @Kris noted, the word equipment is a mass noun, meaning that it refers to a quantity of something as a discrete, undifferentiated entity. Singular verb forms are used with mass nouns, so you should "is" rather than "are" in this case. But it's an awkward sentence either way. It would be more natural to use some other verb than "to be" to relate the two ...


2

Units always receive the plural immediately before the "per": Its momentum is 15 kilogram meters per second It receives an impulse of 10 newton seconds The gravitational constant is 6.67 × 10-11 newton meters squared per kilogram squared The permeability of free space is 4π × 10-7 volt seconds per ampere per meter This is because the unit is a ...


2

One of the things that makes him great is he brings it every night. One of the things that make him great is he brings it every night. We might consider the case as being a difference between two types of meaning: There are several things. One which makes him great, is that he brings pizza every night. There are several things that make him ...


1

Well, in English nouns used attributively are preferred to be in the singular, even if they point to a multitude. Thus, it'd usually be "Donor."


1

I would say "More often than not, I work on teams wherein I share pools of work with other colleagues." I don't think many would fault your sentence as written, but I think the switch to the singular in "pool" is a bit ambiguous (presumably the different teams have different pools). I also think "wherein" is a better preposition for "teams," since a team is ...


1

You're nearly there. Sentence 1 should read: Dogs are the most lovely animals in the world. Sentence 2 should read: The most lovely animals in the world are dogs. Generally speaking, plurals are accompanied by "are" when used collectively. Also, in instances like these two sentences, Sentence 1 should be the sentence of choice as it is easier to read and ...


1

According to Wikitionary, it can either be "ethe" or "ethea". Origin: From the Ancient Greek ἤθεα (ēthea), the uncontracted nominative plural form of ἦθος (ēthos).


1

Sentences 1-4 As a determiner, any implies "some, at least one, or one kind"; permits either singular or plural, depending on the context; and does not carry any number in itself: 1.0 [USUALLY WITH NEGATIVE OR IN QUESTIONS] Used to refer to one or some of a thing or number of things, no matter how much or how many: [AS DETERMINER]: I don’t have ...


1

There is no correct version here. It altogether boils down to what you want the sentence to mean. One of the things that makes him great is he brings it every night. This means that the "One" is what makes him great, not all the "things" in general. For example, "One of these cookies that tastes awful is the one with the pink frosting on it." One ...


1

How many different diameters are there? If all the diameters are the same, then it's diameter and is (because there is only one); if there are a number of different diameters, then use the plural sentence. Or: since you are measuring a single property of a set, you can use diameter is. Either is possible and would be understood. But since we don't know ...


1

There doesn't appear to be a universal consensus on this point. I would suggest that the OP chooses the form he or she prefers and remain faithful to that. CDO life's work noun [U] (US lifework) Your life's work is the work that is most important to you and to which you give a lot of time and effort: Her garden was her life's work Without ...



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