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40

You are being followed by zombies. You pick them off one at a time (shooting them in the head, of course) until there are no zombies left. Can you count the dead zombies? Of course you can. They are countable. So the word to describe them is number. A small number of zombies were chasing me. They were part of a large number of zombies that were detected ...


32

Smoking, drinking and eating is not allowed would mean that if you try to smoke, drink and eat all at the same time, as one activity (good luck with that!), then that activity is not allowed. But smoking, drinking or eating (as separate activities) would be ok. Smoking, drinking and eating are not allowed means that neither smoking, nor ...


20

Emails and email are both correct plurals, but each has its own context. It depends on whether or not you are using it as a countable or uncountable noun. Email You can use email as an uncountable noun, just like mail. For example, "I received lots of email today" or "John sends me too much stupid chain email". But, you cannot use email as a ...


10

Dan Bron's comment (above) that e-mail/email at its inception was treated as a mass noun is correct—and so is Kristina Lopez's comment (above) that e-mail/email is widely applied today not just to the medium of electronic mail but to individual messages sent and received in that medium. For many years the technology magazines where I worked enforced a ...


10

There is nothing grammatically wrong with the sentence. It is equivalent to: "They are not allowed." In which the verb is plural because the subject is plural.


9

"Couple" can be taken as singular or plural depending on the context. When used to refer to two people who function socially as a unit, as in a married couple, the word couple may take either a singular or a plural verb, depending on whether the members are considered individually or collectively. -The Free Dictionary


8

To add on to Medica's answer, the reason why "number" can be both singular and plural is because it is being used differently in the two cases. A significant number of purchases were detected. One was for shoes, three purchases were for coats, and two were for umbrellas. The total number was six. In the first instance, the noun is "purchases", and ...


5

The rule will add one or more assertions. You could put or more in parentheses if you like. I can't think of any other way of writing this that doesn't sound inelegant or, worse, downright nonsensical when read aloud.


5

A row is singular, but small pictures is plural, and because it is the small pictures that are allowing you to take the action, you use "allow." Likewise, we could expand your second sentence as follows: The first row alone consists of five rooms that contain tables and chairs. Consists refers back to row, which is singular, but contain refers back to ...


5

That sounds like a newspaper headline and, as such, it shows a telegraphic style of writing. In this case, in addition to what has already been mentioned by JoAnne ("couple" being considered "two persons" and verb, therefore, in the plural) the article before "terror couple" has been omitted. Because space is limited, headlines are written in a ...


5

Related: http://ell.stackexchange.com/questions/22900/who-singular-or-plural Closed, nearly-identical question (off-topic): "Who is" vs. "Who are" Relevant discussion: http://thegrammarexchange.infopop.cc/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/340600179/m/7756074182 Who can be both singular or plural dependent on the noun which it is replacing. 'Chairs' ...


4

Couple is one of a couple hundred words in the English language that is categorized as collective nouns -- team is another very familiar collective noun, as are family and congregation. While it is evident these nouns describe a group -- more than one -- they do not always call for a plural verb. With collective nouns, subject/verb agreement is determined ...


4

You are looking for a way to isolate determination and belief, a compound subject, from the other plural entities in the first sentence so that you can refer to them clearly in the second sentence. The possibilities are bounded only by your imagination (and the rules of English grammar, of course). "His determination and belief in his purpose have helped ...


4

The popular practice now is to allow people to choose their pronouns. There are a vast array of options available: http://askanonbinary.tumblr.com/pronouns The problem here is that in English, pronouns are largely considered a closed class. In linguistics, a closed class (or closed word class) is a word class to which new items are rarely and with ...


3

It's a colloquial, informal way of saying "Does anyone have...?"


3

You have a single reservation for ten people all sitting at one table. The reservation is singular, so you say "The reservation is for 11.30."


3

Your peers are not wrong.Technically, email appears to be correct since the word e-mail stands for electronic mail. It can be used as a verb (meaning sent by email) or as a noun (meaning a message sent by email). To make the noun plural, some writers prefer to use the term “email messages.” However, I am going to say you are both correct.


3

Yes, these words only have a plural form and require the verb in the plural. A list of such words would be very long and, to mention just a few: glasses (spectacles) trousers binoculars tweezers pajamas, pyjamas knickers clothes belongings but beware of "maths" and "aerobics" which are always singular. For a complete list, ...


3

They are termed as duals : denoting a form of a word indicating that exactly two referents are being referred to. Consider these : trousers, panties, glasses, binoculars, both, couple, legs, arms, feet, youse, pair etc. The singular form is commonly used in compound words such as: scissor-hands, spectacle-case etc. Scissor used in the singular as a ...


3

You can use "it". It was a wolf that killed him. It was wolves that killed him. both of these work, to give you an example.


3

Aside from how this is formalized in grammar rules, you aren't comparing like with like. You'd say "John and Jim both have a hook for their right hand", not "John and Jim both have a hook for their right hands". Or you could say "John and Jim have hooks for right hands". Similarly, you can say "All multiples of ten have zero as their units digit", or you ...


3

You should not analyse things like “a number of” as prepositional phrases, but rather as premodifiers occupying the determiner slot in a noun phrase. Some purchases were detected. Several purchases were detected. Many purchases were detected. Few purchases were detected. No purchases were detected. A lot of purchases were detected. A number of purchases ...


2

It would be 'delta velocities'. Nouns are pluralised — modifiers aren't. An attorney general is a type of attorney (hence 'attorneys general'), and a delta velocity is (sort of) a type of velocity, so 'delta velocities' it is. As an aside, I've heard 'delta' used as a noun often enough that 'velocity delta' and 'velocity deltas' sounds fine to me too. I ...


2

Apostrophes were once used in a lot of plural cases (I've said more on this here) and while some such cases are now completely obsolete, some are still used to varying degrees. The case of pluralising a single letter is perhaps the strongest survivor of the pluralising apostrophe (and indeed even in the case of pluralising letter grades, as despite your ...


2

Both are used. That is to say, either is used. "An amount of zombies" could be a singular compound noun. If you detected zombies combined together as an amount then you can say "an amount of zombies was detected". For example, maybe your zombie detector showed up orange to mean "an amount", as opposed to red meaning "shedloads" or green meaning "no ...


2

Amount vs. Number General Rule: Amount is used in reference to mass nouns Number is used in reference to count nouns Mass Noun A noun denoting something which cannot be counted (e.g. a substance or quality), in English usually a noun which lacks a plural in ordinary usage and is not used with the indefinite article, e.g. We ...


2

'A significant number' is a stand-in for what can only be imagined as a relatively large number. More importantly, that number of significant size would merit pluralization. "1 was detected" "2 were detected" "A significant number were detected" "A number [of something] were detected" As the only number that leads to the singular case is 1, ...


1

As @Nicole stated, the proper quantifying adjective would be "number" as opposed to "amount" since it refers to a countable noun. However, you are correct in that the best way to word the sentence is: A significant number of zombies was detected in your city. The "was" refers to "a significant number" which is a singular collection, not plural. If you ...


1

You have booked a table for ten at a restaurant. A single table qualifies as a single reservation, therefore singular verb. The table is booked for 11.30 or the table is reserved for 11.30, both are grammatical. If you have booked say three separate tables for ten at a restaurant. The tables are booked/reserved for 11.30, would be the ...


1

The correct sentence would be: "Does this product have any product groups?" Any would always be followed the plural (or mass noun). You could also say "Does this product have a product group?" However, "product group" is a weird phrase that doesn't mean what I think you want it to mean. I would say that a product group is a group of products, so for a ...



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