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47

The simple answer is that you’re asking the question the wrong way about. In language, the central and most important way to inflect words is always what might be termed the ‘regular’ ones. The patterns that occur most frequently and are most flexible and applicable to the most roots. In English, the regular pluralising pattern is adding /z/ (with some ...


33

As suggested in the following extract, the reason appears to be the fact that, by the time that the term moose entered the English language (17th century), the big vowels shift was already almost completed, so, unlike goose - geese, the same mutation didn't take place for moose. From the Oxfordwords blog: The simple reason is that it’s a loanword. ...


9

house comes from Old English/Old Saxon hūs and mouse comes from Old English/Old Saxon mūs (pronounced like the animal moose), but only the latter experienced the phenomenon known as "i-mutation", where the /u/ sound shifts to an /i/ [then eventually becoming /aɪ/] sound when the noun becomes plural as a shortcut in pronouncing it faster. So mice used to be ...


6

You can think of "fi" as shorthand for the list of individual functions "f1, f2, ..., fn, ..." Understood as such, the correct sentence would be: Among the functions fi there are no repetitions. This would be a shorthand for: Among the functions f1, f2, ..., fn, ... there are no repetitions. Notice the plural "functions" and the use of the plural ...


4

Based on your comment, I think you intended your sentence to be: A, B and one other letter have been updated. Here, "one other letter" is considered a single noun phrase. It is separate from A and B. Therefore, your sentence is correct. One way to adjust the sentence is to add an extra comma, called the "serial comma". In my opinion, this makes the ...


4

It's dealer's choice. It's however you prefer. If you want to refer to it as a singular entity, as one coastline that both states share, then you'd say "coast," but if you want to refer to them separately, then it's perfectly appropriate to say "coasts." Here is a Google Ngram for using singular "coast": Here is a Google Ngram for using plural "coasts": ...


3

The noun form of forest is countable, eg "There are many forests in France". However, it can be used as an adjective (meaning 'in a forest', or "from a forest"), and adjectives aren't pluralized. For example, your sample sentence could be rewritten as "Our company owns 20 forest locations across the country." which is using the adjectival form of "...


3

Ineffective and Useless respectively. From M-W: Ineffective: not capable of performing efficiently Useless: having or being of no use As in: Fire is strong against steel. Ice is ineffective against steel. Poison is useless against steel.


3

First, consider the sentence: Every dog is nice. This sentence is composed of a quantifier ('every'), a noun ('dog'), a copula verb ('is'), and an adjective ('nice'). Notice that because 'dog' is singular, the singular form of to be is used, 'is'. Now consider Everybody is nice. You can think of 'everybody' as being composed of a quantifier ('...


3

The first sentence is for certain ungrammatical. If we remove the prepositional phrase we are left with The schema are called C and D, respectively. This should be The schemas are called C and D, respectively. This leaves the question of whether it is "buffer" or "buffers". Let's examine just the sentence's subject: The schemas of the A and B ...


2

"Software" (in US English, at least) is never pluralized. One might say "software packages" as suggested by Ste. "Sensitivity" may be pluralized in some cases. In Sensitivities of A and B to the variation of C have been investigated. the plural would be used if you are speaking of separate measurements of the sensitivity of A to C and B to C. But ...


2

An "official Latin binomial taxonomical name", as governed by international codes (International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, etc.), is not pluralized. The first part of the binomial, designating genus, is designated by a Latin or latinized capitalized singular noun. (Merriam-Webster,...


2

According to the ODO: Allium (plural alliums) A bulbous plant of a genus that includes the onion and its relatives (e.g. garlic, leek, and chives). As shown in the following extract from the ODO there is no fixed rule to form the plurals of Latin words in English. The more common trend is to use both original (Latin) and English ...


2

I think it is safe to concede there is no definitive answer. Per Wikipedia, the trend is toward the informal: The general trend with loanwords is toward what is called Anglicization or naturalization, that is, the re-formation of the word and its inflections as normal English words. Many nouns (particularly ones from Latin) have retained their original ...


2

"bodys" just seems wrong, regardless of context. I would say that if you are talking about the body of the email, generally, then say "email bodies" for example, as the plural. If you're talking about the body tag, which is a component of the html version of the email, then say body tags as the plural. This page refers to "headers and bodies" when ...


2

The word setting is in common use. And regarding your question, it is arguably preferable (by orders of magnitude) to the use of parameter. After looking through Merriam-Webster, Dictionary.com, and Oxford Dictionaries, I did not find a suitable definition for setting (which would have included its plural form) from which I might derive a good answer. ...


2

Forest is countable. You can use "There are many forests in the city". There is an exception, When You mean on every forest in the world, It isn't countable. http://www.greenfacts.org/en/forests/l-2/2-extent-deforestation.htm This article use How much forest is there on the planet and at what rate is it disappearing? and not How many.


2

Maybe, it can be better explained using: The last three steps establish the two-way-data-binding. using the third-person plural simple present form of the word vs The last step establishes the two-way-data-binding. which is the third-person singular simple present form of the word


1

Just use the term "fiver" , "tenner" and that avoids a lot of your issues. For twenty you'll have to appropriate an Italian term and use "venti" For single dollars, use the Canadian term "Loonie" I have no solutions for $50 and up


1

It would take a linguist to give you a precisely accurate answer, and I am not one. However, I have what I'll call an educated guess. Ask yourself how often someone from the 19th century or before would have had occasion to talk about more than one house? Not very often, I'm guessing. Particularly when compared to mice and lice. :) Living languages are ...


1

As the grammatical-number tag you have added implies, this is a matter of the 'number' of the word. As the dictionary definition says, trio is a singular noun, even though a trio is made up of three objects or people. So it is correct (and sounds correct to me) to use "was" with it instead of "were". In general, collective nouns such as "trio" take singular ...


1

There are at least hundreds of words with multiple plural forms: staffs and staves, dice and dies, châteaus and châteaux, pike and pikes, cows and kine, millenniums and millenia, phalanxes and phalanges, mongooses and mongeese, and so on and so on. The reasons why multiple forms exist, and the cases in which one form is preferred to another, are widely ...


1

I am not sure about the discussion in the link you gave; however, it is possible that the question "Is this the plans for the Death Star?" is grammatically correct in one situation: If someone pointed to a packet or bunch of papers and asked the question, then the phrase is this refers to the whole (packet/bunch), whereas the plural plans refers to the ...


1

The word artifact (also artefact) takes its original meaning from the Latin ars (art) and the neuter past participle factum of the verb facere (to make). Thus something made by human construction or something artificial. The OED finds the earliest usage from Samuel Taylor Coleridge's Literary Remains: Well! a lump of sugar of lead [lead acetate (Pb(...


1

Can "who" be either singular or plural? Yes. But it's plural in this example because "you" is plural? Yes. What if "you" in the above example were singular, would it be correct to say, "It's you who keep us inspired," or, "It's you who keeps us inspired?" If "you" were singular, then "who" would likewise be singular, so it would only be ...


1

To a mathematician, these look horrible. Much better is simply G is generated by 2k+t 7-cycles. and then the product set A x B has n x m elements. I understand that the first writer (was it you?) was reluctant to leave t and 7 so close together, but my version is clear enough. As for your second example, it looks more like a train crash than a ...



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