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41

It's an ordinal indicator: In written languages, an ordinal indicator is a letter, or group of letters, following a numeral denoting that it is an ordinal number, rather than a cardinal number. Historically these letters were "elevated terminals", that is to say the last few letters of the full word denoting the ordinal form of the number displayed as a ...


3

This one is right: There is 1 apple and 1 orange available This is wrong: There are 1 apple and 1 orange available. I would personally say There is an apple and an orange available. This is now wrong 1 apple and 1 orange is available This is right (almost): 1 apple and 1 orange are available. But again, I would say An ...


3

In the case of 9th, the superscript shown is indeed called the 'ordinal indicator' as Matt Gutting has noted in his answer. The addition of -th/ -eth relates to numbers 4 to 20 (and similarly,) and is a suffix to the cardinal number. However, as in the second and third examples, the rd & st simply come from the right-end of the word for the ordinal ...


2

When you stick an 's' on an acronym, it doesn't stick an 's' on the last word of the acronym, but pluralizes the whole thing. So POWs means more than one POW, and thus "Prisoners of War" and not "Prisoner of Wars". MOTUs is the plural of MOTU. so it means more than one Masters of the Universe. It's unclear whether it's two masters of two universes or two ...


2

Since you obviously did your research, let me help if I can. Princeton Is Proposing to End Limit on Giving A's - NYTimes M.L.B. Commissioner Bud Selig made a rare visit to the home of the Oakland A's - NYTimes Cuz's of Sorts: North American Descendants of Gaelic Clan MacEachain, Volume 1 Rush initially talked conservative ideas to get the ma's ...


2

It would be "please cut the apple into halves", which is perfectly correct. But you are right, in practice it is rarer in everyday usage than "please cut the apple in half". "To cut in half" is a fixed expression which stands for the verb "to halve" (which is more formal or archaic) and describes the action of dividing into equal parts. There is no ...


2

I believe that "technology" is too specific to encompass more than one type of technology to the average reader. If you said something like "The technologies of the biomedical and microcomputer fields are merging to create exciting possibilities for.... (etc.)" then you have two different types of technology.


2

Truly a matter of opinion and taste as both are correct depending on how one chooses to lump together discrete technologies. My choice is to let context dictate. If the surrounding context touches on specific discrete technologies, plural is the way to go. If the surrounding context is instead focused on Samsung in the display industry, perhaps ...


2

According to ODO : Technology: is both countable and uncountable. ( mass noun) The application of scientific knowledge for practical purposes, especially in industry: advances in computer technology,; [count noun]: recycling technologies. ( specific technologies). These new technologies can be useful, if we apply them to practical ...


2

"Track" as a noun also means path or "way", as in "I'm standing on the track the deer use to get to the water". When I hear "on track" I think of a project as not having deviated from its planned progress. "On tracks" just doesn't make sense.


1

*on track on schedule; progressing as planned. -- The Free Dictionary "On tracks" redirects to on "track" - it isn't the phrase. This is because "track" has 2 meanings - as in rails for a train, and also "A course of action". That isn't plural.


1

This is an example of a compound subject. There are two subjects, and therefore it is plural. Use "appear." This is like John and Mary have a house. There are two of them.


1

The question comes down to who is doing the preparing: The book prepares The set prepares The techniques prepare I’m pretty certain that the intended meaning here is one where only option 3 makes sense. Therefore, the correct verb is prepare.


1

Your first sentence has the impression that there were other people with you, in addition to Victor; so using the second sentence is better: I went for a run with Victor. Alternatively you can say: Victor and I went for a run. Remember that you shouldn't say "me and Victor ...", but "Victor and I ...".


1

For what it's worth, here's my layman's analysis of the logical concerns inherent in such tag-question negation (for anyone who should wish to think about this question from a strictly logical standpoint). But I stress that grammar need not follow logic, so be prepared to see some ungrammatical sentences used to get the point across. For the sake of ...


1

I think the issue is solely with communication(s), the telephone per se does not alter much (it could be any form of communication that present the same issues). I think oxforddictionaries gives a nice overview: 1 [MASS NOUN] The imparting or exchanging of information by speaking, writing, or using some other medium: television is an effective means ...


1

Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) confirms the derivation that appears in medica's second comment above: quota n [ML, fr. L quota pars, how great a part] (1618) The Eleventh Collegiate's entry for quota doesn't include a plural form of the word, but that indicates that the plural form is simply quotas, because Merriam-Webster's ...


1

I agree that A's written with an apostrophe looks more elegant, there is no ambiguity, and it's a fairly established praxis. However, if you're looking for a justification on its use, you could argue that A's is a contraction for "A grades". As for "mas" and "pas" really? Adding the -S changes the pronunciation for me, without context I would not ...


1

Your query sentence would be improved by wording it as follows: 'To identify the contents of each crate or box, a packing list will be prepared for it and attached to its exterior'. This eliminates all possibility of ambiguity. To answer your original questions: Either wording is possible, but both occurrences of the phrase 'crate or box' / 'crates ...


1

At a very basic level, the subject-verb agreement could be leveraged: The Masters of the Universe have spoken would differentiate itself from The Master of the Universe has spoken. Still, if clarity is your goal The MOTU have spoken is perhaps not as clear as The MOTU(s) have spoken or even better yet: The MOTU - all of them - ...



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