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21

I think in this context, "speed" is in fact a noun; (Given that headlines need to use as few words as possible) i.e. [[Ukraine] speed] = [the speed of [the Ukraine football team]]


16

There's no 's' because it is not a verb, it is a noun. The sentence means Germany's new look defence will be tested by the speed of the Ukrainian team Not The Ukraine team is in a hurry to test Germany's new look defence This is evidenced in the article itself where it says Ukraine, while outsiders, are certain to test the Germans' new-look ...


11

Ukraine means in this context 'team Ukraine'. In the same text it says Ukraine, while outsiders, are certain [...] So, here you see that the word "Ukraine" refers to the team with a plural word, as the verb "are" follows instead of "is". There appear to be different conventions with regard to the collective noun team, which seem to differ between ...


6

Virtually always, the s follows the full abbreviation even when a word other than the last one is the proper plural. Paul Brians in Common Errors in English Usage cites POWs, RPMs, WMDs This style is also recommended in the AP Style Guide, so it is what you will see in most newspapers. But not all. The other option is to discard the s altogether, as ...


3

In this case, "savings account" is singular because it is operating as an adjective to "products and services." The phrase says: " ... we offer you a wide range of savings account products and services and fixed deposit products and services ... " This could have had a different typography, like this: " ... We offer you a wide range of • Saving account ...


2

Measurements are written with singular verbs. http://www.aje.com/en/arc/editing-tip-singular-and-plural-verbs-measured-quantities/


2

You should use 'makes'. However the sentence: "Every second of it only makes it worse" ... is unclear without context. Using two instances of "it" is confusing because the reader needs to guess what each it refers to. To be more clear you could replace each "it" with more specific details or emotive words.


1

The writer in the paragraph is trying to explain how and why automobile insurers in Sparva have to pay for far more treatments after accidents compared to any other province in Treland. I think, what the paragraph is trying to convey is that: In Sparva, automobile insurers pay for any medical treatment that is sought by someone who has been involved in an ...


1

In Proper Apostrophe Usage with Initialisms: CCS' or CCS's? the conclusion was that the trailing s is dropped when the thing's singular name ends in an s. Correct usage would then be #4, The OPS' structure. I think there is a little more to it than that; for example my boss's house. I think the best guide is whether you actually pronounce the possessive as ...


1

The original expression, as can be discerned from Google Ngrams, is the like of which has/have. In this case, the plurality would have been governed by the original noun. For example, Google Books yields landscapes the like of which have never been seen in nature and a structure the like of which has never been found in any previous exhibition ...



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