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6

Modus operandi is singular in both Latin and English. The plural is modi operandi, and, judging from this Ngram, I would advise against modus operandis. Since there seems to be some confusion over why only modus changes form in the plural, but never operandi, I'll explain that too. Modus is the most important word here, quite clearly meaning mode. It's a ...


4

Weeellll, an argument could be made that the sentence should read like this: Here, resource-specification is a statement or statements that declare and initialize a resource. One noun is singular and the other is plural. In these cases, the verb should agree in number with the noun that is closest, e.g. statements (plural) not statement (singular).


4

Corpora callosa is the plural form. See where it says "plural" here or here.


3

It's possible people in the legal profession may tend to prefer the singular form where there's only a single reason/justification, but I suspect the only reason we're more likely to encounter ground in such contexts is because "legalese" is a relatively conservative context. In more general use, plural grounds became the more common form some decades ago, ...


3

There is something wrong about it. It is preferred as: 'successfully prepare all students for their future' In such contexts, "future" is considered by the large majority as uncountable and singular, even though it relates to a multitude of people. At Google Books (do NOT use vanilla Google): "prepare them for their future" About 29,100 results "prepare ...


3

It is singular. The plural form is modi operandi (modes of operation). See where it says plural in Merriam-Webster's, Dictionary.com's, and Wikipedia's entries. Of note, modi operandorum (modes of operations) is never correct, as plural gerundiums are an impossibility in Latin[1][2]. Sources: [1] See comments to this answer made by Cerberus, a ...


3

You almost had it right: it should be several corpora collosa in Latin. If you are transplanting the whole thing into English without naturalizing it as in this case indeed applies, then just leave it like that. The Latin -a plural is for neuters, not just ones like collosum > collosa and datum > data in the second declension but also neuters in other ...


3

Yes, context dependent of course. The Oxford English Dictionary includes over 500 examples but one, is "Bananas are an important export crop ..." Or, "the chairmen are an honest bunch of people." Critical here appears to be the fact that the second noun is singular ("a bunch", "an export crop") whereas the first noun ("bananas", "chairmen") is plural. That ...


3

Some of this could be covered in the answers to another question, like Is there a correct gender-neutral, singular pronoun ("his" versus "her" versus "their")? . English (or American English, at least) is trying to deal with this idea of a sentient neuter third-person pronoun set. A person generally dislikes being called "it", ...


2

I would say "More often than not, I work on teams wherein I share pools of work with other colleagues." I don't think many would fault your sentence as written, but I think the switch to the singular in "pool" is a bit ambiguous (presumably the different teams have different pools). I also think "wherein" is a better preposition for "teams," since a team is ...


2

Here is an Ngram chart for the years 1800–2000, tracking the relative frequency of instances of "one women" (blue line) and "many woman" (red line): The trend looks positively alarming, until you match instances of "one women" (blue line) and "one woman" (red line): It's true that the numbers for "one women" still aren't quite flatlining at zero ...


2

Well, in English nouns used attributively are preferred to be in the singular, even if they point to a multitude. Thus, it'd usually be "Donor."


2

Units always receive the plural immediately before the "per": Its momentum is 15 kilogram meters per second It receives an impulse of 10 newton seconds The gravitational constant is 6.67 × 10-11 newton meters squared per kilogram squared The permeability of free space is 4π × 10-7 volt seconds per ampere per meter This is because the unit is a ...


2

We do not say "the sewer of Paris", unless we mean "the sewer that is Paris". We say "the sewers of Paris". A charming rat who was a cook found himself in the sewers of Paris. It may be regional, but in practice in American "sewers" refers to a sewer system and "sewer" either refers to that part of the sewer system at hand ("Oh man, my phone fell through ...


2

Octopuses and platypuses would be correct. Octopi and platypi masquerade as Latin plurals on the false premise that the names are masculine Latin nouns of the second declension, and they are no such thing. The -us at the end is not analogous to the -us in fungus; rather it is part of the suffix -pus which is a Latinization of Greek ποῦς, foot. If you want to ...


2

"hordes of" vs "a horde of" is an amplifier here, as already suggested in the comments. If you want to be literal about it, one horde corresponds to one group, so "a horde of zombies" would refer to one tight group of zombies, while "hordes of zombies" would imply that there are several such groups.


2

there is a theory that, way back in the days of proto-indo-european, this, (and, generally, the changing of vowels but not so much consonants, save voicing or [not] aspirating) was the norm for pluralization. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proto-Indo-European_nominals this book, 'the horse, the wheel, and language', has also been a very interesting and ...


2

Yes. There's nothing apparently wrong about it. Maybe the context might make your doubts more clear. Also, this has nothing to do with American English versus British English. I agree with Marius that the plural "futures" does sound a bit odd. I didn't think anything of it, though, because there are multiple students. I don't think it would make a ...


1

Since the difference between the words is not a simple addition of characters, using parenthesis to show the optional form is not clear. Instead, it would be clearer to write: policy (or policies).


1

Both work, different applications: Children will have their picture displayed. A single picture, covering everyone. Children will have their pictures displayed Multiple pictures, each of them covering everyone. or Multiple pictures, covering them individually and/or in groups.


1

It should be "combine with the default set A or B" in this example. If you were to have options where each choice is a set of sets, then "the default sets" would be correct. In quick, relaxed English speech, this rule may not be followed. For example, with your second sentence, any person directing crowds toward queues may say "join queues A or B," but it ...


1

How much time did you spend in Spain? He punched me three times. In the first sentence time refers to the amount of seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, years, decades, centuries, millennia and so on. This noun is uncountable. In example (2) times refers to the number of occurrences. The number of instances that something happened. This is ...


1

According to this article at grammarist, criteria is gaining traction as a singular noun, and appears in that role in notable publications. Although criterion lives, criteria is gaining ground as a singular noun, as used below: Careful though… this criteria is a double edged sword. [Schriever Air Force Base] The only criteria is that it ...


1

The first one is incorrect. The value of cars depreciate over time. The verb should agree with 'value', not cars. For this reason, the 2nd and 3rd ones are both correct. Their usage depends on context. Consider: The values of (most) cars depreciate over time. Values of different cars and The value of (my) cars depreciates over time. ...


1

The key here is that subject and verb must agree in number. From the 1st group, the first sentence is the only one correct. They have their phones in their hands. If you use phone or hand, you are implying they have collectively one phone or one hand. Not likely. Each is always singular. Technically, all 4 sentences of your second group are ...


1

Totally wrong: you've chosen the obsoleted versions, and dismissed the modern one:-) In 7.14 Plurals for letters, abbreviations, and numerals Capital letters used as words, numerals used as nouns, and abbreviations usually form the plural by adding s. the three Rs IRAs URLs BSs, MAs, PhDs CMOS (Chicago Manual of ...


1

Quantities or measurements of time, money, distance, weight usually take singular verbs. That is, they are regarded as one unit. Example: Five hundred dollars is too much to pay. See here and here.


1

Your sentence is probably not technically incorrect, because you can omit a noun in some cases. But you should only omit the noun if the meaning is clear without it, and in this case the meaning isn't clear. The hyphen isn't correct. While you do want a hyphen in a compound adjective, e.g. state-of-the-art technology, you do not want a hyphen between an ...


1

Check out this article: Can a plural noun act as an adjective? Here's the biggest point that the author makes regarding your situation: This is a good question, and the short answer is yes, plural nouns often act as adjectives, as in these examples: Teachers unions Girls hockey Nurses station There is a tendency for nouns that ...


1

I think 'Hair' is Material noun. Brick, wood, skin, muscle, oil, glass, paper, paint, gold etc. are all Material Nouns. So, if wish to refer to a particular number of Hair, we should say 3 or 4 strands of hair. Consider the sentences : "The other was Della's hair". (not 'hairs') My hair is turning grey. (not 'hairs are') My hair is black and his hair is ...



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