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12

I think it is a better idea to use 'is'. Here is the reason why: Commonly, we say, '1000 km is a long distance.' This is because, 1000 kilometers is considered as one whole unit/set. We are not referring to each kilometer of those 1000 kilometers separately. The idea of 1000 km is one whole, long distance, so we use 'is'. You can use 'are' if you have a ...


8

This isn't a question you can answer by thinking about the grammar - it's just a case of conventional usage. I've previously worked in the tech industry, and we would always say credentials, never credential. That would still be true even if the credentials were a single item like a certificate. [Edit to add: but Samuel has provided a counter-example to ...


8

The phrase Xkm is plural in every instance, unless the value of X is exactly 1 (assuming km is the head noun in the noun phrase). We can see this from the fact that in speech, the word kilometres (or kilometers for American readers) has the plural suffix, 'S', apart from when preceded by the numeral 1: 1 kilometre 0.5 kilometres 1.5 kilometres 1,000 ...


6

'km' is the short form for 'kilometre'. This makes it singular. However, the same symbol is used to denote 'kilometres', which is plural. Understand that 'km' is not a word. Its a symbol. According to the SI system of units, there is no plural for these symbols and the same symbol denotes both 1 and plural quantities. Therefore, distinction of singular and ...


6

It is because craft is a collective term and OED mentions that it might be originated as an elliptical expression. Craft itself is used as aircraft as well. OED includes the following explanation for the fifth definition of craft: V. Applied to boats, ships, and fishing requisites. These uses were probably colloquial with watermen, fishers, and ...


5

When you're talking about multiple readings of the thermometer: "With temperatures in the 90s this week, people should take precautions against heat exhaustion." 91° on Monday, 93° on Tuesday, 90° on Wednesday -- multiple readings, so temperatures plural. (For those who speak Celsius, that's 32° - 37°.) In your example, during the day of the cycling and ...


5

I think it's ok but maybe move the "not" and change "what" to "which" Which of the jobs do students not like very much? or perhaps better Which of the jobs do students like the least? Eplanation: Removing the contraction "don't" to "do not" becomes "do not students like" which sounds wrong. It's very yoda speak. "Which" is preferable to "What". ...


4

Both are correct. In my opinion it is most natural to interpret "1000 kilometres" as a distance, which makes it a singular. English has a tendency to somewhat illogically interpret such measurements as plurals as if we were interested in distinct individual kilometres. In my native German this tendency is even a strict rule in some grammatical contexts. But ...


4

A rule that works very generally is that when the subject of a sentence refers to more than one individual, use the plural form of the verb -- otherwise, use the singular form. So, for your example, where the subject is "a man, a woman, and a dog", if that refers to 3 individuals, the verb should be "were". If you can imagine being in a world with ...


4

I would use "out of which 1,000 km are motorway". My reasoning is that the 1,000 km almost certainly don't come together in one stretch and are an aggregate of separate, shorter sections of motorway.


4

Both are correct, and both have been used in both plural and singular form whether literally (when one has an actual proof of one's being authorised to do something) and figuratively in both plural and singular of a single piece of such evidence from the 1600s until the current day. The plural use is far more common, as the OED confirms. As such it's a ...


3

The word craft is obviously related to German Kraft (plural Kräfte), meaning might, power (or in physics force). It still had this meaning in Middle English. Etymonline explains the connection to boats: Use for "small boat" is first recorded 1670s, probably from a phrase similar to vessels of small craft and referring either to the trade they did or the ...


3

A noun may have several distinct meanings in English language depending on the context. As a result, a noun can be plural or singular (and also countable or uncountable) depending on the intended meaning: It is possible to use temperature as an uncountable, noun meaning 'degree/intesity of heat', The temperatures in Paris and Berlin reached ...


3

News reports often use temperatures in place of temperature measurements, i.e. as a shorthand for official temperature measurements from an unspecified number of regional/national weather stations. The journalist clearly didn't have a report of the temperature at that specific place and time.


3

I want three kg of carrot or I want three kilograms of carrot is correct. 'kg' is the S.I unit of mass and just like any other unit, it deserves to be treated the way it is. I've seen many internet articles that mention 'kgs' as the plural of kg, but it's wrong according to the rules of physics. Let me explain this to you: 3 kg = 3 x 1 kg 0.5 kg = ...


3

Without any more context I'd say it should be "Loading Bitmap Settings". In this case the settings apply to all bitmaps.


3

People as a plural of person is a mass noun, and we don;t use a plural -s. So when forming a possessive, we only add the 's: I refuse to look after other people's belongings. However, people can also be countable, when we refer to a(n ethic) group of persons: the Belgian people, the British people. Although a bit contrived, you could be referring to ...


2

It would certainly be "allowable", but the question remains: How effective would it be? I might go with a phrasal adjective: a compound of two or more attributive words: That is, more than one word that together modify a noun. Compound modifiers are grammatically equivalent to single-word modifiers, and can be used in combination with other ...


2

Steven Pinker is a linguist and psychologist who studies this type of question -- how words or compound phrases do, or don't, keep the irregularity of their parts. The essentials are captured in his paper "Words and Rules,". Pinker gives several examples to show how irregular forms (like "matrices" as the plural of "matrix") are kept in compound forms that ...


2

Oxford Dictionaries Online confirms that credential does exist in the singular (achievement, quality or aspect of a person's background, especially when used to indicate their suitability for something) but it notes that it is usually used in the plural - which is my own experience. And as Morton notes in his answer it would be usual to say that one had ...


2

So this is very similar to this question, but, as you note, not a true duplicate, because you're asking how to pluralize an already-possessive noun, rather than how to make it possessive. However, many of the same tricks involved still apply. Namely, it's really best avoid the issue by rephrasing it in a manner which allows you to pluralize a different ...


2

You could rearrange your list to start with the plural items first and end with the singular items in which case "there are" would be the correct choice: ... there are: 2 chairs, 2 carpets, a bed and a wardrobe


2

In terms of providing proof of who you are with a user name and password, "Credentials" should be used, even if there is only one set of username & password. When you log into a website, for example, you have to prove who you are. You do this with at least two pieces of information: Your User name, which is used to determine if you have an account ...


2

Staff Sergeant is usually abbreviated SSgt without the period, in rare cases it may be abbreviated SSG but I don't believe I've ever personally seen it abbreviated S.Sgt https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Staff_sergeant With that being said, in any rank system usually the rank is the one that the 's' is added to to make plural and the qualifier is left alone. ...


2

Skullcandy isn't a prouduct, it's a brand. So it would be better if you said "Skullcandy Headphones" or "Skullcandy speakers". The brand is not synonymous with a product, although better known brands do seem to be referred to as my "Nikes", for example. But nearly everyone around the world is familiar with Nike, and not necessarily as many people know ...


1

The plural of an abbreviated rank is formed by adding an "s" to the principal element in the title before the period. The examples given by the AP Stylebook are "majs. John Jones and Robert Smith"; "Maj. Gens. John Jones and Robert Smith"; and "Spcs. John Jones and Robert Smith." Thus, the plural for "S.Sgt." would be "S.Sgts." That said, "S.Sgt." does not ...


1

Samples is plural, therefore the predicate of the sentence should be plural as well. The fact that the property is the same for all items is inconsequential.


1

I choose (a) faculties of medicine in the two Universities. You are writing of two different faculties from two different Universities.


1

Because participle is an English word but not a Latin one (unlike, say index which is both English and Latin). Participle is ultimately derived from a Latin word, (which was similar but not the same in shape), but so what?


1

Well, the main difference between the two is that your first sentence is plural and your second sentence is singular. Depending what you want to ask, both of your sentences are valid to use.



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