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12

Geometry is singular and should be followed by a singular verb ("is", "has") geometry - noun, pl. geometries. The mathematics of the properties, measurement, and relationships of points, lines, angles, surfaces, and solids. The Free Dictionary. geometries - pl. "Three geometries were used to show this effect." "These geometries were chosen ...


12

To talk about several people each doing the same thing, English usually prefers a plural noun for the repeated idea. Tell the kids to bring raincoats to school tomorrow. (More natural than Tell the kids to bring a raincoat ...) Plural forms are almost always used in this case if here are possessives. ...


8

Table of Contents is the correct form. Leaving off the 's' is simply a typo or a mistake. The contents of something refer to what the thing contains, like the contents of a jar, or a book. You wouldn't say the 'content of a jar'. When used as singular, the meaning is more abstract, eg. 'the content of one's character', rather like it's value.


7

The verb corresponding to declension is decline. However, your example of day - daily is not an example of declension. It is an example of word formation (with the adverbial suffix -ly). Declension adds/changes inflections, not suffixes. And here's a little on-topic joke I came across recently: A verb walks up to a noun in a bar: -- Hey, babe, ...


6

A much better alternative would be greater: In the empirical formula, there would be a greater number of moles of water per mole of anhydrous salt than if the compound had not spilled. Or, even better: In the empirical formula, there would be more moles of water per mole of anhydrous salt than if the compound had not spilled. As for moles that ...


5

As any other unit of measurement, bit also has its plural form - bits. 20 bits of data is received. The capacity of this medium is 200 bits. Using the singular form in both sentences would be wrong. If you use just the single-digit version - b, you do not need to put the s at the end: 200b. Maybe in some contexts, where each of the separate bits ...


4

It is one of those words where you have to determine from the context if plural or singular is appropriate. The whole family sat down to eat breakfast. Here "breakfast" refers to the communal meal. Joe ate eggs, mom had cereal, dad had cold pizza. All the breakfasts were different. Here we are referring to the individual food on people's plates, ...


4

The "any other" construction takes the singular because the comparison is one-to-one. She is more beautiful than any other girl. is equivalent to: She is more beautiful than any other individual girl. You could express a similar sentiment with a construction that takes the plural "girls" like so: She is more beautiful than other girls. But ...


4

Assuming you're a native speaker of English or speak it as fluently as a native, always use the regular plural form for nouns except when you already know you shouldn't. The idea that words that originate in Latin should take Latin plural forms (and likewise for Greek) is a baseless superstition inherited from neoclassical-era scholars with inferiority ...


3

Most dictionaries (such as http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/geometry) give the word as uncountable. In the original sentence, it is definitely not plural. The sentence is: The geometry [of objects] is known.


3

In present-day U.S. publishing, people often use the term content to refer collectively to the editorial and design elements in a periodical or book. And yet, as DJ Far observes, the front-matter listing of the book or periodical's editorial content is usually called the "Table of Contents." The Ngram chart for "table of contents" (red line) versus "table ...


3

The devil is in the details. The definite article you put in square parentheses, as though it makes no difference, makes all the difference. Indeed, the sentence I have to change subject every time is wrong, whereas I have to change the subject every time is perfectly fine and idiomatic. I have to change subjects every time is technically ...


2

There is not necessarily a logical grammatical justification. In the case of million, usage patterns have shifted. "Two millions" vs. "Two million" According to Google Ngram, "two millions" has long been the standard expression. However, starting around 1850, its usage declined while "two million" rose in popularity. Around 1920, "two million" became ...


2

One should mention that in antiquity the celestial model was totally different of ours today. We know only one sky but in the model of the ancients there were seven spheres which might as well be called skies. The ancient needed seven spheres to explain the movement of the different celestial bodies. English Wikipedia has an article on "celestial spheres". ...


2

Stack Exchange is the best of the few useful question-and-answer websites on the internet. If you are referring or comparing a thing to something similar (of the few) then the plural (websites) is required. If you are being specific about just one thing then; Stack Exchange is the best question-and-answer website on the internet. This could be the best ...


2

In Latin, certain nouns that ended in -us in nominative singular had the same form in nominative plural (so-called "4th declension" nouns). The term "zero plural" refers to the lack of change in the English word, or lack of an overt plural morpheme, going from singular status to plural status. "Anglicized plural" refers to borrowing the word into the ...


2

Bit when used as a unit of measurement is singular. ASCII encodes 128 characters into 7-bit binary integers. Otherwise it works like a normal noun, with singular and plural. The client received 2,146, 567 bits of data from the server. About two million bits were received. Here we flip the leading bit to zero.


1

I assume you are talking about atlas which is a book. Plural of it would be atlases. However if you are taking about the titan, it has no plural.


1

The Chicago Manual of Style (section 8.8, 13th ed.) says this about Consistency: Numbers applicable to the same category should be treated alike within the same context, whether paragraph or series of paragraphs; do not use figures for some and spell out others. In your example, you are using numbers in a mathematical or scientific context. Section ...


1

It ain't acceptable. ;) "My favourite animal" is the subject of the sentence and singular. The verb needs to agree with the subject in number. So it has to be "is" rather than "are": 'My favourite animal is the dog' forces the complement also agree.


1

In the phrase "I am but a piece of pie", pie is being treated as a mass noun, as if it is the name of an uncountable substance - in the same way as "...a pile of sand" or "...a bucket of water". If you were using a countable noun, however, the analogous phrase uses the plural form of the noun: "I am but a pile of peas" or "...a basketful of kittens". As ...


1

Both are standard, and both can refer to the same or to different speeches. Consider something as ordinary as: We have executives from headquarters visiting this week. I need to wear a tie on Tuesday and Thursday. In my experience, no one would give a second thought to such language, it violates no widely held grammar prescription, and the context would ...


1

I think it depends how you are using it. If you are speaking of the mathematical discipline of statistics, then it is alright to use it as a singular noun as you would with mathematics, economics etc. However if referring to some specific sets of figures, then it should be conjugated as a plural: e.g. Statistics show that women live longer than men.


1

Your audience may have 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, or any number of questions. To cover all the cases (well, you don't need to cover zero), use the plural. (If you really can't come to an agreement with your boss, you could always compromise with "Please call me with any question(s) you may have." — but that's unnecessarily ugly.)


1

To answer your main question, the verb is fine. If you took out the subordinate clause, you'd be left with "Inspection is already done." However, I can understand your confusion, as it might also be reasonable to say "Inspections are already done." The key here is whether there is one inspection which happens to cover two places, or two inspections. Either ...


1

They can't agree. And if they did agree, the next generation of professors would agree that they were wrong. But to answer your specific question, even when "Foreign Language Department" is used, the department almost certainly teaches more than one foreign language. To reiterate John Lawler's comment above, “Foreign Language Department,” “Foreign ...


1

Logically, 'this' is singular. So the determiner 'all' is redundant, because only one of the subjects can be referred to as 'this'. Hence 'all this' cannot refer to a subject that indicates a singular object or item. It follows that 'all this' must refer to the individual elements making up the totality of the subject. However, it should be noted that ...



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