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6

I think what you're trying to say is (Using) museum-quality materials means your document won't discolor. Go with means. Using mean would imply museum-quality materials literally mean your document won't discolor, which can't be what you're saying. This sentence is informal. If you wish to be grammatically correct, don't drop the 'using'.


5

To answer this question directly: synecdoche is a very common figure of speech: noun A figure of speech in which a part is made to represent the whole or vice versa To most of us, the individual soldier (the daughter, husband, sister or father) is exceedingly more important than the rest of the troop! I perceive very conversation about the ...


4

There's no point in confusing yourself and others by saying "field or fields" in the first place. Just pick a plurality and stick with it: Is there any other field that has this property? Are there any other fields that have this property? You should get a "yes, there is one other" or "yes, there are 5 others" or "no, there is no other field" as the ...


3

Yes, it is possible to find it used this way in published works. From Google Books (bolding not in the original): Each decision that created a subtly different universe, created another of us, another of a nearly infinite number of mes, who added just a fraction more to our intellect and understanding. – Paul Melko, "Ten Sigmas" "Me" is being used ...


3

When numbers are used to talk about time, cost, or distance they are singular because the whole thing is taken as one concept: The preferable length of the internship is three months. Three hours feels like forever when you're just sitting there. Fifty dollars is a lot for one book. Three miles is a long way to go on foot.


3

"The canon" can mean the body of works accepted as canonical by a group; "a canon" can mean one precept of a group; and "the canons" can mean the collection of all precepts which a group follows. In some cases, "the canon" will be the same as "the canons" of a given group, if all of their canonical works concern their canons. Of course, for many groups which ...


2

According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, criteria and criterions can both serve as plural to the singular criterion. Here's the link.. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/criterions


2

Since all of your bullet points starts with a possessive pronoun, just move that up to the top line. That means that you can use a longer phrase, because it's only used once. Encountering a succession of people to observe how each one's way of thinking affects that individual's ● way of looking at the world ● ... ● ... [I've made a couple of ...


2

Plural form is mongooses. If you check in any other dictionary apart from this one I included in my answer, you would find the same plural form. http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/mongoose


2

The phrase museum quality materials ought either to be in inverted commas, or in italics. The sentence provides the meaning of that expression, and the expression is singular. Twenty-two yards means the length of a cricket pitch. Love and kisses means the writer is expressing her affection.


2

It is a survival from the strong masculine declension in Old English: e.g. knif, knifas (modern English knife, knives). Intervocalic 'f' was voiced. The modern letter -f- represents a voiceless labial-dental fricative whereas -v- represents a voiced labial-dental fricative.


2

You can't use the possessive 's. So you are correct with leaving "burns nurse" as the nurse of burns.


2

Either presents a choice. The verb depends on what is being chosen, not that there are a number of options. Either my uncle or my aunt... Here, both your uncle and aunt are singular. They will come alone. So it's Either my uncle or my aunt is. Either the Joneses or the Phillipses... Here, both the options are plural: the Jones family or the ...


2

1 and 3 in this instance would be correct. 1) 'Employee Profile' is a complete noun phrase with 'employee' - in this instance - not a noun in its own right but a 'noun adjunct'. It is playing the part of a modifier for the subject noun 'Profile' and it is only this word that would take the plural. 3) Also correct but for a different reason. Here they are ...


2

I don't think the object of comprises needs to be plural. Comprises can be translated to is comprised of; if something is made up of only one thing, like a care home, I think you can still say comprises. Consider this example: "His suggestion comprises the only real solution to the problem."


1

Uncountable nouns are substances, concepts etc that we cannot divide into separate elements. We cannot count them. For example, tea sugar water air rice knowledge beauty anger fear love money research safety evidence Lets look at some sentence examples. We can use some and any with uncountable nouns: -I've got some money -Have you got any rice? Please ...


1

Why not, "...an infinite number of selves"? Though you would have to change, "Each decision that created a subtly different universe, created another self, another of a nearly infinite number of selves who added just a fraction more to our intellect and understanding."


1

"Burns nurse" is correct. "Burns" is used to describe the nurse's specialty. An apostrophe would inappropriately indicate possession, i.e., "of or belonging to the burn."


1

In this post, the OP recommend the first option. The Karamis


1

It depends how many loved ones there are. If just one then one's, if more than one then ones' Although the latter does look odd to my eyes too, I often find words, if you stare at them too long, look (and sound), odd! (Their does not influence this part of the sentence)


1

Where a noun is used attributively (that is, as an adjective) as cottage is in "cottage tariff", it is never* pluralised. Adjectives in English are not inflected for number. If you have more than one tariff for your cottages, it's cottage tariffs. *never is a long time of course; and English is riddled with exceptions. But as a general rule with an ...


1

The subject is plural so the correct usage is "Jennifer and Amy are going". The verb applies to entire subject, not just part of it.


1

When you say every, it refers to a single lesson. (Singular) So, I attend every lesson. is correct. When you say collectively, then you need to use plural lessons. I attend all lessons.


1

I attend every lesson or I attend all lessons


1

"A necessary condition" is the subject and it is singular, so the correct verb is "is".


1

There is a phenomenon called "attraction", where words not in the line of grammar, so to speak, pull at our minds and confuse us. Maybe the singular "museum" is subconsciously haunting you? If "High-quality" materials do not cause you to have the same doubts about the plural "mean", this might be it. I would use the plural myself, but "materials" is one of ...


1

The thing is the books. As the preponderance of comments suggests, an appropriate way to describe the grammar of this sentence, along with a host of others just like it, is: it is aces: Exclamation that expresses something as being exceedingly good. Urbandictionary.com Divorcing the reduced construction from its larger context might give some ...


1

MT_Head's answer sounds right to me when it comes to southern US English, but in Indian English, the situation is a little different - "who all are" is the correct plurality for the verb. I don't think it's correct to categorize the Indian English version of "who all" as a pronoun. At minimum, there is no analogy to "you all", since that isn't a lexical ...



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