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11

"Reflections" as in here addressed by you is an entity say "a magazine", it has to be used as a singular form. So to be correct, it has to be: "Reflections" explores the issue.


9

TL;DR: Both were and was are used when battery of tests is their subject, including in scholarly publications as shown below. Sometimes the choice of number depends on the intended meaning. There may be a relatively recent trend of were becoming a more common choice, but both are frequent. Your intuition is correct — or at least, it accords with how I ...


7

Centuries is correct, because you're simultaneously referring to more than one century as the endpoints of a range. You could also say: "between the 17th century and the early 20th century" because in that case you're referring to each century individually.


5

I don't know about "correct", but both sound okay, to me. It's possible to make a grammatical argument for singular "century" in your title: "between the 17th and the early 20th century". There are two "the"s, so there are two noun phrases in the phrase, each of which is logically singular, since it refers to a single century. (The instance of "century" ...


5

One way to determine which verb to use, is ask: were the tests conducted, or was the battery conducted. In this case, I would say both the tests and the battery were conducted, so you could use either verb. However, if the sentence was: The battery of tests was/were changed, then I think only was works, because it's the whole battery that is ...


4

The only possible way seems: We went to Mexico for our honeymoon where one of us had never been before.


4

I don't believe I've ever heard a native English speaker use the plural in a case like this.


3

Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) suggests that the original apocalypse wasn't conceived of as a one-time-only armageddon: apocalypse n [ME revelation, Revelation, fr. AF apocalipse, fr. LL apocalypsis, fr. Gr apokalypsis, fr. apokalyptein to uncover, fr. apo- + kalyptein to cover — more at HELL] (13c) 1 a : one of the Jewish and ...


3

The expression good offices is a set phrase: noun plural Definition of GOOD OFFICES : services as a mediator Good office is not generally used with that meaning. Set phrase: NOUN An unvarying phrase having a specific meaning, such as ‘raining cats and dogs’, or being the only context in which a word appears, for example ...


3

Matching verbs to collective nouns Collective nouns are nouns which stand for a group or collection of people or things. They include words such as audience, committee, police, crew, family, government, group, and team. Most collective nouns can be treated as singular or plural, with either a singular or plural verb: √ The whole ...


3

This has to do with the general structure of [uninflected noun] [preposition] [uninflected noun], a moderately common English adjective or adverb construct used to indicate the "general case"; that is, it indicates it applies for all instances of those same nouns rather than a specific set or one: The proper way to pour tea is saucer under cup, not the ...


2

There seem to be relatively many 'settings up' around the net. Below, I'm including a shot from A treatise on the mistreatment of cholera morbus by W.S.Prior (digitalized by Google), 1832, p.25, which has 'gettings up'. I give a longer passage, not because of its relevance to the question, but because of its relevance in general. An ngram search hints ...


2

Woman is the abstract representation of a phenomenon, not a reference to any specific individual female of the human species. Ok, that sentence isn't going to enlighten anyone much, is it? If one claims they believe in fairies, or unicorns, it means that they believe these creatures exist. In the case of unicorns or fairies, this is indeed something that ...


2

It should be "is permanent." House is wrong. Consider that you would say "Permanent damage is done to the heart and liver." Only if you were talking about damages would you say "are done."


2

I'm in agreement with the OP that the following sentence sounds better (and is more logical) with the plural verb He was rushed to the hospital immediately and a battery of tests were conducted. Nevertheless, authors, scholars, scientists, analysts, economists, doctors, professors, experts and non, have used the singular verb with the noun battery ...


2

Since Tchrist gave an answer I think while correct in some aspects is quite wrong in others, so I thought I would give it a shot. Historically collective nouns can take verbs both in the singular and the plural - the use of often referred to the context in which it these words were used (action applied to each member of the collective group individually, ...


2

The subject is singular - it's either Tom or Theresa. The verb form usually depends on the principle of proximity: If you or Theresa has time ... If Theresa or you have time ...


2

The subject of the verb "was" here is "battery", which is singular, so the singular "was" is the correct form to use. It helps to read it as "A battery was conducted." as it then becomes clear that "were" is incorrect. "Of tests" does not affect the number of the verb, it simply tells us something about the "battery".


2

"A" is singular: You can't use "cars" and "arms." "A red car and a blue car" and "a left arm and a right arm" indicate two cars and two arms. "Red and blue cars" and "left and right arms" have indeterminate numbers.


2

You want to use "has," as the subject is one kid, not four kids. This is the kind of thing where the technically correct version doesn't sound as good to our ears as the alternative, but the logic makes sense if you restructure the sentence: "Did you know that in 4 kids, 1 has an undetected vision problem?"


2

Since your sentences refers only to one kid, the verb should be "has."


1

Number one looks fairly good(I suppose it should, being a dictionary example), but one does wonder why they use WERE with TODAY. I would have used "are". As for #2, it does not work with uninflected "to city" or "to suburb". However, if you said FROM city TO city (or FROM suburb TO suburb) it would be fine. So the problem about inflection seems to be ...


1

In this case, the compound grid pattern is clearly singular. There are some words in English which will take their number from the number of the noun within their complementary prepositional phrase, but pattern is not one of those nouns. Therefore, I would always use: A grid pattern of streets is shown.


1

I would say that the stakes here are not grammatical, but to do with your perceived "humility". The convention in scientific academic writing is always to let others decide to what extent your results can be generalized. If you've been dealing with just one application and one DAS, then restrict yourself to talking about your own experience and keep ...


1

"Have". Fractions are grammatically plural -- 0.25 kids on average have a problem.


1

Using the plural would be odd, if not outright wrong. A list of messages is a message list, not a messages list. A trap for mice is a mouse trap, not a mice trap. A catcher of flies is a flycatcher, not a fliescatcher. Determination of types of compound nouns is compound noun type determination, not compound nouns types determination.


1

There are plenty of discussions about this topic already, which could be considered a grey area between English and programming, I guess. As an English-speaking programmer, I'd suggest that such names would generally contain singular nouns, such as messageList and appleCount in your case (capitalisation is a whole other issue and possibly a massive can of ...


1

I always understood that if the word ends in a "y" the plural is written "ies" as; berry(ies) ferry(ies) controversy(ies) belly"ies" as y is that sometimes vowel pronounced ee.


1

You don't need a plural gerund here. A singular form is more idiomatic: There will be many falls, but serious injuries are rare, and picking oneself up is easy. Notice the reflexive pronoun is required because pick up is a transitive verb. However, some sense of resuming a standing position seems better, since that is what a person does after they ...


1

In terms of the verb agreeing with the number, you need to be clear about what is doing the verb. For example, "A number of people are waiting for the bus", it is the people who are waiting, and there is more than one person, so use are. Here using "a number" could be replaced by "some". However, when it is the number that is doing the verb, eg, increasing, ...



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