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4

The popular practice now is to allow people to choose their pronouns. There are a vast array of options available: http://askanonbinary.tumblr.com/pronouns The problem here is that in English, pronouns are largely considered a closed class. In linguistics, a closed class (or closed word class) is a word class to which new items are rarely and with ...


3

This is the middle construction. It's quite common with any number of other verbs ("the door wouldn't shut", "the letter wasn't printing", "the socks didn't wash", "this car just won't sell"), and is not limited to English to boot. Most importantly, quite often, though not always, it conveys something different from both active and passive. That is ...


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There's nothing wrong with inserting a parenthetical question—for isn't that what you intended there?—that interrupts the flow of a declarative sentence. Do not use hyphens, however. Use em dashes: I was a little skeptical at first—what could be more straightforward than CSS?—but I use it in all my projects now. Some stylists prefer actual parentheses ...


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You should not analyse things like “a number of” as prepositional phrases, but rather as premodifiers occupying the determiner slot in a noun phrase. Some purchases were detected. Several purchases were detected. Many purchases were detected. Few purchases were detected. No purchases were detected. A lot of purchases were detected. A number of purchases ...


2

Neither! It would be Somewhere in the middle of the argument, she kisses me with her eyes, and I kiss her with my words.... This is not a compound subject with a compound verb; it is a compound sentence, and the verb of each clause must match the subject of that clause. The first independent clause has a third person singular subject: she ...


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As a sentence fragment, omitting the expected introductory clause "This is a video which shows", it's grammatical. There's nothing about "daily labour" which is any different grammatically to "daily work". Labour connotes expending far more effort than simple work, so the collocation is intended to be mildly amusing. Daily labour doesn't occur in print very ...


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Yes, it is grammatical. It is a form of ellipsis called gapping.


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This is not grammatically correct, but is most likely an allusion to the Apple "Think Different" campaign, which is perhaps one of the most famous advertising campaigns in modern history. See: Think Different Also it is worth saying that in English there is a tendency in some circumstances to use adjectives for adverbs. I have noticed it more frequently in ...


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As, for, because, and due to (the fact that) all mean the reason being. Therefor, "as because" is needlessly repetitive. She couldn't come, as she was ill. She couldn't come, because she was ill. She couldn't come, for she was ill. She couldn't come, due to the fact that she was ill. However, "correctness" is a snare. Let's just say that ...


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As Drew says in his comment: "not mutually exclusive" is correct English and meaningful. It means that the two or more things concerned are not mutually exclusive: they can overlap. However, I suspect you misunderstand the caution against "double negatives". This caution revolves around words that are or contain variations of "no" and "not". For ...


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Get depressed (or angry, or cold, or comfortable, or most physical or emotional states) is an informal equivalent to become depressed etc. So whenever I got depressed focuses the moments when I became depressed, while whenever I was depressed focuses on the times when I was in a state of depression. For many purposes they are interchangeable.


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If I were introducing my siblings, I would consider that simply appearing to follow age order and winding up with "and the youngest is..." would be enough to establish age order. Let me introduce you to my younger sisters. A and B are twins, this is C, this is D, and my youngest sister is E. If you're including ages, like you did in your question, ...


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It is definitely a word: yessir Syllabification: yes·sir Pronunciation: /ˈyesər, ˈyesˈsər Definition of yessir in English:EXCLAMATION Used to express assent: “Do you understand me?” “Yessir!” 1.1. North American Used to express emphatic affirmation: 'yessir the food was cheap' I tend to think that it ...


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Either is grammatically justifiable but "the elements are zero" reads more naturally. In mathematics, there's only one zero so, when you write "the elements are zeroes", it feels like you're drawing attention to the multiple instances of the symbol "0", rather than the single concept they all refer to.


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I have just gone through the switch from permanent to contract myself (and have signed my first contract in the last week). The terms I was using in my frequent discussions with recruitment agents were: I am looking for a contract rather than permanent employment I am moving from permanent to contracting and I am seeking my first contract I am a contractor ...


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Of those, I would say "contracting" because it's now an adjective modifying "capacity". But why not just "as a contractor"?


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Yes, it's correct, although I bet most would write this sentence without the comma: Tomorrow I will buy it. In speech, among native speakers it would be more common to use a contraction: Tomorrow I'll buy it. This is completely correct; however, your brother is right: it sounds a bit unusual (depending on context). Putting tomorrow at the end of ...


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Took is the simple past tense, whereas taken is the past participle. This means that you can say took on its own, e.g. I took the cake, but you have to have an auxiliary (helping) verb with taken, e.g. I have taken In your case the second example is correct, as your verb is in the conditional perfect which requires an auxilliary ('having' in ...



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