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It's generally makes more sense to say that clauses and not verbs are transitive or intransitive. However, this won't stop dictionaries or grammar books for language and linguistics students giving lists of verbs that they'll describe as 'transitive' or 'intransitive'. Having said that, it's also true that whether a clause is transitive or not is also ...


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This one is right: There is 1 apple and 1 orange available This is wrong: There are 1 apple and 1 orange available. I would personally say There is an apple and an orange available. This is now wrong 1 apple and 1 orange is available This is right (almost): 1 apple and 1 orange are available. But again, I would say An ...


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Simply put: without the preposition, the infinitive is either a truly intransitive verb, or a truly transitive one; with the preposition, it is what is sometimes called a prepositional verb, i.e., a verb that—similar to how phrasal verbs work—must be paired with a preposition to take an object. The object is then not a direct object, but it is still ...


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nonetheless is most often used as a replacement for however, in spite of or despite that so it doesn't sit well in your sentence. For nonetheless to be useful in your sentence, the second part really has to be in opposition to the first as in I was so down and unmotivated, nonetheless, I clambered on to the chair with the spriteliness of a chimp. Or a ...


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The Corpus of Contemporary American English has 2151 cites for "the way in which" and the British National Corpus has 2574. For "the ways in which", the figures are 2127 and 788. To put that into perspective, both corpora combined barely have 200 cites for "black car". This goes to show that "the way(s) in which" is not only perfectly grammatical and ...


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According to this Wikipedia article, In linguistics, an agent noun (in Latin, nomen agentis) is a word that is derived from another word denoting an action, and that identifies an entity that does that action. For example, "driver" is an agent noun formed from the verb [not the noun!] "drive". Usually, 'derived' in the above definition has the ...


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The first that clause is an object clause, because it functions as the object of arguing. It is not appositive, because it is simply an object on its own. The second example is not written in proper English; I would dismiss it.


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The word such has a definition that is: Of the type previously mentioned. So such would refer to what you just talked about before. For example: Congress has passed so-and-so laws. Such is the way of American policymaking in healthcare.


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The role has gotten easier and easier to play, and been forced upon me more frequently than not. In this sentence, has is an auxiliary verb used in a present perfect construction. Gotten is the past participle of the lexical verb get. (In British English the past participle of this verb is got, but become would be more natural in this particular ...


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The sentence is parsed, Her uncle prefers..."that she speak..." "that she speak" is a subjunctive clause, not an indicative clause. That's why it's "conjugated" differently. And that's true even in the English language.


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If you insist on this inverted formulation -- for scansion reasons, perhaps -- I would suggest changing "be" to "is" unless you're deliberately trying to suggest a nonstandard dialect. I'd also suggest that the second clause should be in future tense to parallel "will you ever". Will you ever ask for the truth, or is it ignorant you will stay? But frankly, ...


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"By avoiding doing something" is the correct form. Depending on the meaning required, verbs will either need to be followed by a present participle (gerund) or by an infinitive form: "Preparing to do something", "I prepared to do something", "To prepare to do something", etc. The choice of present participle or infinitive depends entirely on the ...


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You say, to a group What do you [guys, fellas, all, people,...] have in mind? (singular) It is possible to use use the plural; for example, you could also say What's on your minds?" (plural) The distinction is the former, using in, speaks of containment, and the latter, using on, of placement. But be warned: the two idioms have very different ...


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Both sentences leave out a part: I was thinking about punching him and breaking his teeth. I was thinking about punching him and [I was thinking about] breaking his teeth. Here, because punching and breaking are both present participles, the reader will read this as if you left out the whole [I was thinking about] part. Without that part, the second ...


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"The process creates the prize" is correct, because the verb ("to create") must agree with the subject ("The process"). As the subject is third person singular you should use the proper form of the verb that is 'creates' here. By the way the sentence below is correct: "The process to create the prize...."


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Sorry if this seems old-fashioned. Strunk and White's -- "The Elements of Style" is still the classic. For more detailed explorations of many things related to this site it is fun to read Fowler's "Modern English Usage". The original is sometimes no longer correct, but there are current editions updated from the original. For more modern issues, the ...


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For what it's worth, here's my layman's analysis of the logical concerns inherent in such tag-question negation (for anyone who should wish to think about this question from a strictly logical standpoint). But I stress that grammar need not follow logic, so be prepared to see some ungrammatical sentences used to get the point across. For the sake of ...


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Put 'i.e.' exactly where you would put 'that is'. As you would with that phrase, capitalize only the first letter, and set it off with a comma. It is common to say "Did he say that? That is, was it this man who said it?" So using 'i.e.' that way is also just fine. Overdone, it can sound clinical or pretentious, perhaps because it is very common in ...


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As said in the comments, The nouns on either side of "to be" don't have to agree. Would you say artificial languages are not a waste of time or artificial languages are not wastes of time I think the first one is clearly the correct choice. Taken from the comment by Peter Shor, Aug 29


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Apparently, you're happy with a multi-word verb. The MWV 'fob off', which is transitive (compulsorily separable with pronouns: fob us off) can take a with- (prepositional) phrase, is perhaps the best choice; I'd say it's informal rather than slang: The sense is spelled out at Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 .2. fob off ...


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Ummm... I don't think any English words will fit in this situation. I recommend to use "suggest"and describe more in details if you would like to elaborate it. There is a jargon-"bait-and-switch". However, it is a noun and not exactly what you want. I think @EdwinAshworth's word choice is excellent!


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If you use the singular, most listeners would assume that class meant a series sessions rather than just a single session.


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First you have to adhere to one of the following schools of thought Rob and Mandy are going to school. Rob and Mandy is going to school. School #1 seems to be the overwhelming choice among most, if not all, speakers of English. Then let us use perturbation theory (the theory mostly used in Maths, where you could introduce small amounts of ...


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What do you have in mind is the idiomatic version of what would you (one person or multiple) like to do You might ask one person What is on your mind or more than one What is on your minds which is mostly used to inquire if there is a problem


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All you have to focus on is that the action is continuing or not. if you are still standing in there, you can use have(s) been + ~ing. ie) A) Tom has lived in New York for 5 years. B) Tom has been living in New York for 5 years. If you hear the sentence A, less likely that he is still living in New York anymore. If you hear the sentence B, he ...


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"John has stood there" is much less specific and it should not relate to the 5 hours...It is something he's done before or does at times...example: John has stood there before. I know he has. (This is the Present perfect) "John has been standing there 5 hours" is good. (That is the Present perfect continuous) and it is okay to be more specific with ...


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The first one. I recommended your website to many of my friends This means that a big proportion of your friends were recommended it. This is what you want. I recommended your website to my many friends That means that you recommended it to all of your friends, and you have many friends. That comes across as you are very popular - bragging ...


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Yes, it is correct. The Earth's oceans' sharks' scales' layers' thickness is hard to measure, due to being minimal. Is a perfectly acceptable (while confusing and not necessarily true) sentence. (Just made up, do not take as a fact of shark's scales). My neighbour dog's ball suggests that you have a dog as a next door neighbour - with no owner ...


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Workaround A method for overcoming a problem or limitation in a program or system. -- Google Dictionary Solution A means of solving a problem or dealing with a difficult situation. -- Google Dictionary A workaround is a way of avoiding the problem. A solution fixes the problem. They do both have the same outcome, but a workaround is like ...


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Normally this would be rendered: "The pity is that no sooner had he left the place than the fire broke out"



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