Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

It is correct: IT'S (HIGH) TIME + PAST SUBJUNCTIVE It's (high) time + past subjunctive expresses that something should be done and that it is already a bit late: It's time you went to bed. You'll have to get up early tomorrow. It's high time I bought a new pair of jeans. It's about time this road was completed. They've been working on it for months. When ...


3

It's Paula Poundstone seems to me to simply be the answer to an (unspoken but presupposed) question Q: Who is it? A: It's Paula. A question like Who is this person? is taken as a given in any formal introduction. And this is the introduction of a number of speakers on stage before a performance. There are special conventions for this context, as ...


3

"She'll be performing Friday at the Comedy Club, it's Paula Poundstone." In your context, the expression "it's Paula Poundstone" can be considered to be a truncated it-cleft. This usage is acceptable and has been for a long time. It is part of today's standard English. The it-cleft's relative clause has been omitted, because its info is redundant ...


3

Omission of "the" in reference to "protesters" conveys an attribute of a class of people, whereas "the protesters" conveys a reference to the actual, specific people who participated in or witnessed this particular protest. It strikes me that the intent of the writer is to highlight a particular point of view of the incident, namely that of a protester, to ...


2

Sonata of Awakening (yay, Zelda!) sounds a lot better to me personally without 'the' in front of it. Because sonata means a solo composition, it sounds more natural at the end. What I mean is: Solo composition of Awakening Sounds less natural than: Awakening solo composition (Awakening Sonata). However, that might be a personal bias as I am ...


2

Gymnasium Wikipedia is a type of school with a strong emphasis on academic learning, and providing advanced secondary education in some parts of Europe and the CIS, comparable to British grammar schools, sixth form colleges and U.S. preparatory high schools. In its current meaning, it usually refers to secondary schools focused on preparing ...


2

The sense of Harper Lee's sentence is something like this: It would have been more accurate for me to say "built in spite of them" than "built around them." The shorter form that she actually uses is coherent and error-free, although her intent might have been more obvious if (as ChrisW suggests) she had put quotation marks around "built in spite of ...


2

I think it's fine. If there were quote marks (as implied by the verb "say"), then it would use a comma: It is better to say, "Built in spite of them." However, adding 'direct quote' marks implies either that it has been said, or that it should literally be 'said' out loud. So omitting the quote marks is better. I might have used parentheses instead; ...


2

"as" is a function word which has multiple uses. So it is necessary to get a survey about its uses. As a conjunction introducing a clause it can have temporal, causal and comparative use. As already said it can be a preposition and an adverb. And there are special word groups with "as", eg such as, as to, as if/as though and others. The best way to study ...


2

No. "Two times" in this case does not make sense, because you specify "an apple." When you use the verb "to like" in the context of eating food, you're implying a further verb, "to eat." "I'd like an apple," in English, implies "I'd like to eat an apple." At the same time, "an apple" implies a single apple. If you add "twice" or "two times" to that ...


1

Because it changes the natural word order of the sentence, it can be considered a form of hyperbaton. It is usually only seen in a poetic or heightened context: "They, hand in hand, with wandering steps and slow/Through Eden took their solitary way."


1

Which calls are you making? This presumes the calls are being made from a pre-determined list. How many calls are you making? You do't need to ask this question if you ask the first one and get an answer. What calls are you making? This question does not rely on the existence of the pre-determined list.


1

Strunk and White, The Elements of Style, 3rd Edition "That is the defining or restrictive pronoun, which the non-defining pronoun." - Page 59 That would refer to the specific algorithm mentioned before, which would add information. That to me seems to indicate that which is the pronoun you're looking for rather than one which is more nebulous.


1

We'll do almost anything for our beloved animals. The class of NPIs (Negatively-oriented Polarity-sensitive Items) includes the any class of items: any, anybody, any longer, any more (AmE anymore), anyone, anything, anywhere. And you seem to already understand a bit on how NPIs work, in that NPIs are restricted to non-affirmative contexts (where ...


1

I don't think you should write the conclusion can be reached it either has been reached or it has not. With that in mind I would write After reviewing Kowalski's Bank reports, I/we have reached the conclusion that over the next few years the demand for new solutions will be maintained. The new solutions will be adapted to working ... if you want to ...


1

Let's try some minimal pairs: I walk rather than run I walk instead of running I eat apples rather than oranges I eat apples instead of oranges I walk quickly instead of quietly I walk quickly rather than quietly I don't really think there's much of a difference, except perhaps rather than implies preference whereas instead of implies substitution. But ...


1

This is a typical awkward wording I see in Japanese-English translation. If you want to use an adverbial phrase, you need something like the following: As with the previous version of the product, this version also contains feature XXX I suggest something like: As with As in As was (is) the case with A related awkward structure is ...


1

The one with have is correct. You can leave out both, or keep it in. The first sentence would be correct if has were replaced with have. This is because the subject, two things, is plural. An example to illustrate this: I don't like Jim, nor David, they **are** so annoying. I don't like Jim, nor David, both of them **are** so annoying. I don't like Jim, ...


1

The comma is a very versatile punctuation mark. It has many uses, some of which can sometimes be replaced with another punctuation mark, such as a colon, semicolon, em dash, or period (full stop). As to which punctuation mark would be preferable for any specific sentence will depend on the author and the register that the author is writing for. In a way, the ...


1

Transplant, when used as a noun, can refer to either the object being transplanted or the act of transplanting itself. Transplantation, on the other hand, can only be used to refer to the act or the process of transplanting. For example, you would say "the patient's body rejected the transplant," but would not say "the patient's body rejected the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible