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6

This is nominalization produced by zero derivation. That happens when a non-noun is used as a noun without requiring a derivational affix. Per Wikipedia: In linguistics, nominalization or nominalisation is the use of a word which is not a noun (e.g. a verb, an adjective or an adverb) as a noun, or as the head of a noun phrase, with or without ...


4

She thinks that to become a marketing manager is the opportunity she seeks for. As @John Clifford points out, the last for is wrong. Seek doesn't need a preposition. There are four clauses (one main and three subordinate), viz. (deleted words parenthesized): She thinks [that to become a marketing manager is the opportunity she seeks]. Main ...


3

Both are acceptable grammatically, but I would take a different meaning from them. If I heard the first, "tell you about my favourite movies" would lead me to expect a detailed description of the speakers favourite movies - the plot, the characters, why they like them etc. The second, "tell you my favourite movies" would have me expecting a nice, short, ...


3

They're called articles; "a" (used in front of a noun that begins with a consonant) and "an" (used in front of a noun the begins with a vowel) are known as indefinite articles while "the" is the definite article You're correct that the indefinite article is used to refer to something non-specific, while the definite article is used to refer to a particular ...


3

According to Jack Lynch, whose book The English Language: A User's Guide is well worth the modest investment for those without the patience to deal with the OED or Fowler, Many people get spooked by the plurals of proper names, but the rules aren't that different...The only difference between proper and common nouns is that the proper names ending in -y ...


3

Sentence A is grammatically correct, but logically problematic. This is because A compares two unalike things: the price of the apple, and the onion itself. A price cannot be greater than an onion. It would be correct to say "The price of an apple is greater than the price of an onion." (As you've noted, sentence C is correct, and is basically an ...


3

Women are always right Sir! On a serious note, she is on the dot. According to me "where does" is correct since the milk is physically existing. Drink it fully and speak to her again. She would probably ask: "Where did it come from?'' I request for a feedback please.


2

"something you would like to see being removed" implies that they might want to watch the process of it being removed (i.e. continuous present) "something you would like to be seen removed" is not grammatical. "be seen" is passive. If someone wants to "be seen" then it means they want someone else to see them doing something or in some condition. ...


2

It's acceptable in dialogue. It's short for "Is tomorrow good?"


2

"...at least two or more..." is a frequently used pleonasm. So are "...at least two, or more..." and "..., at least, two or more ...". Two or more or at least two are the non-redundant equivalent sub-phrases. However, a Google search for "at least two or more" can also yield this: But here's the catch---when you bring up Free Transform, at least two ...


2

Yes, among would be better than in in a medical textbook. In medical writing, among is the standard term when reporting on, or even when merely referring to, a category or group — of patients, of candidly-observed people, clinical-experiment subjects, laboratory animals, . . . The term in is used more for specifying a ...


2

Although your three versions are grammatical and equivalent, and although you can use phrase it using there is / there are, the standard idiom in common use is: Life has its ups and downs. (Link to an example.) There's even a website with that phrase as the main part of its domain name.


1

It's an archaic grammatical form. English is originally a Low Germanic language with SOV (Subject-Object-Verb) ordering, and in Old English, it would have been how you said that phrase. For example: Age does not make an authority Alter (age) spielt keine (does not) Autorität (authority) machen (make) Age does not an authority make.


1

A singular noun becomes it when referred to by a pronoun; a plural noun becomes they. I am sure you know this, but it is the only grammatical point your question raises. More interesting is why some apparently plural nouns are in fact singular. Vegetables is normally plural (lunch may include two vegetables, and you eat them without worrying about the fact ...


1

The subject of the sentence comprises two things - "use" and "research", and hence it is in the plural, and requires a plural form of the verb, viz. "have".


1

Let's begin by clarifying some definitions. As usual etymonline.com is a helpful resource for identifying early attested usage and meaning. Wrought is a past participle for work. It's generally archaic, since we would say "worked" in modern contexts. The old Middle English forms of "work" are still present in modern usages like: "Wrought Iron" for worked ...


1

Here's an Ngram chart that tracks the frequency in Google Books search results of "wrought havoc" (blue line) versus "wreaked havoc" versus "worked havoc" (green line) for the period 1800–2005: Although "worked havoc" has, since the late 1800s, been consistently less common than "wrought havoc," both show the same hill-like trajectory, rising between 1880 ...


1

Although prepared can be a past tense conjugation of the verb prepare, it can also be made into an imperative (command) by putting "be" before it. This makes it a past participle as an adjective meaning be ready for something that is likely to happen done or made beforehand In this case, it's not being used as a past tense verb. You can see this ...


1

(1) I've taken antibiotics for 10 weeks. "have taken" denotes a present state. You say this at the end of the 10 weeks, and it does not imply anything about whether you will continue taking. (2) I've been taking antibiotics for 10 weeks. "have been taking" denotes a present state in the middle of an ongoing event. For 10 weeks already you have ...


1

Almost, but it's missing a preposition and article. You should say I'll come sometime at the end of March.


1

If you're asking about the definite and indefinite articles in general, have a look at these questions on ELU and this question on ELL. For better, there is another consideration that depends on the context of the situation. That is, it depends on the way in which you consider that life, job or work to be better. For example, if Company A offers you a job ...


1

Back in high school one helpful tip a teacher gave to me was if the following word starts with a vowel use 'an', otherwise use 'a'. "He is a soldier, while she is an athlete." The parenthesis act like commas, in which a subordinate clause is enclosed between them. You could phrase it that way but most people are used to something like: "He is, ...


1

The question in your title is already addressed elsewhere, e.g. the site Rathony mentioned in comments (here and there). This answer addresses the ambiguity between the two sets of Jesses. Words that look the same on the printed page but differ in meaning are called homographs. The inherent ambiguity is part of its nature - they won't be homographs ...


1

From Oxford Dictionaries: It’s often important to use language which implicitly or explicitly includes both men and women, making no distinction between the genders. This can be tricky when it comes to pronouns. In English, a person's gender is explicit in the third person singular pronouns (i.e., he, she, his, hers, etc.). There are no personal pronouns ...


1

The word "proposition" itself refers to a statement that proposes some idea that - for e.g., in the case of an essay question - is intended to be further discussed or debated. From Google: prop·o·si·tion ˌpräpəˈziSH(ə)n/ noun 1. a statement or assertion that expresses a judgment or opinion. "the proposition that all men are created equal" ...


1

I don't think it's true that you always put personal pronouns last at the end of a list. For example, "you" tends to be listed first,as in: "You and Mike did a good job on that project." I think that emphasizes that the practice is a matter of courtesy. You list the person you are speaking directly to first, yourself last, and everyone else in between: ...


1

If you don't understand the difference between regular and irregular verbs and if you don't understand the use of the three stem forms, eg begin/began/begun you have a long way to go yet. Here's a first website about this topic: Link You should study other websites too. It is absolutely necessary that you understand the conjugation system of English ...


1

The use of adjectives as nouns is common in Latin, from which some of our vocabulary and forms derive. Ave Imperator, morituri te salutant (Hail Emperor, those who are about to die salute you) Morituri is actually a participle form, used as an adjective, and could be translated literally the about to be dying. Using adjectives as nouns in English has ...


1

For a specific object, use past tense because we are talking about its history, but for something representative of a class (like milk in general) use the present tense since the same answer applies to all instances. The first is about an object having arrived from somewhere else, the second is about the origins of that thing in general. So, that bottle of ...



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