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20

It's inversion: That heresies should arise, we have the prophesie of Christ; but that old ones should be abolished, we hold no prediction. is a re-ordering of: We have the prophesie of Christ that heresies should arise; but we hold no prediction that old ones should be abolished.


11

To paraphrase, I would say, "Christ predicted that there would be new heresies that would arise, so the author can be confidant that they will appear, but He said nothing about when old heresies would vanish, so the author makes no prediction about them." This is in keeping with Browne's observation that supposedly-suppressed heresies seem to pop up ...


4

In both sentences, the order of the clauses has been inverted. This can be done to shift the focus of the sentence towards the clause that is moved forward. In a standard construction, I could say: We have (a prophesy that heresies will arise); but we have no (prediction that old ones will disappear). By simply moving the italic parts to the front we ...


4

Both sentences are versions of It was said that X would happen == That X would happen was said. The verbal phrase "We have a prophesie that.." is similar to "We have a law that.. "He made an announcement that... So,without the inversion and with some "" (round what was foretold) "" and (<< backshift) shown 1 We have the propehsie of ...


3

Ordinarily you would say, "Spaniards brought horses to the Americas." Subject-Verb-Object, with the ordinary emphasis on the subject, first in line. But you may change the word order to change the emphasis. You might have wanted to emphasize the horses: "It was horses that Spaniards brought to the Americas." Now the previously-important Spaniards have ...


3

It is a common English locution to report someone's words back to them in indirect speech with the rising inflection indicated by the question mark. It indicates some incredulousness: "I can't believe you thought is was that bad." Or an indication that the questioner misunderstood what he heard. The straightforward question with the auxiliary "do" -- ...


3

another in this context is a pronoun. But it's closely related to the adjective sense of the word, because it's essentially short for another part of speech. When used as a pronoun, the meaning refers back to a previously mentioned thing or person, and it refers to additional things or people of the same type. You would not use the other, because the ...


3

"In order to" is a subordinating conjunction. (I.e. a clause that follows "in order to" becomes a subordinate clause, which needs a main clause to make a complete sentence.) "In order to" generally introduces a "final clause," which is a clause that states a purpose. The subordinate clause introduced by "in order to" is an adverbial clause, but the ...


2

"One would hope that by the end of the contract you will have found another apartment"


2

...a study, which so strongly suggests our near kinship with the rest of humanity and points a steady finger toward the great brotherhood of mankind, and by which one is so forcibly impressed with the possible earnestness of life as seen through the teepee door!" Our kinship with the rest of humanity is strongly suggested by the study of Indian ...


2

Wikipedia’s article on “and/or” summarizes and cites both criticisms and defenses of the expression. Among those cited as condemning it are Strunk & White’s Elements of Style, Fowler’s Modern English Usage (2nd ed., ed. Ernest Gowers), and the current (16th) edition of The Chicago Manual of Style—influential ...


2

Yes, you can have a little bit of wine (or other liquid).


1

I assume that you want these sentences to be equivalent. In that case, put a comma after" alley" in the first version. This makes "I remember" an aside applying to the whole sentence. This avoids having your reader think you're calling to mind the alley only, as in "the alley that I remember." Put a comma after "alley" in the second version as well, to ...


1

You should use the same. The only time same is usually used without the is when it's being used as a pronoun, and this tends to be used only in certain contexts, such as business jargon: if you send us your order for the materials, we will deliver same tomorrow When used as an adjective or adverb, it's almost always used in the set phrase the same. See ...


1

It's difficult to pronounce two vowels next to each other, in any language. In English, we elide one of the vowels (America+an -> American), convert one of them to a glide (burial), or separate them with a glottal stop (Anna [ʔ] asked). Using "an" rather than "a" is one of our strategies for preventing two vowels from coming right next to each other in ...


1

No, it should be "a unique". The u has a consonant sound like "yu" here. If it were "uh" like in umbrella, then you would use "an".


1

No, not by itself, as a gesture of gratitude or acknowlegement. Also requiring the plural: congratulations, commiserations, condolences, felicitations. 'Thank' singular, must be followed by 'you' and indeed, is often rendered as a single word 'thankyou'. As a response, 'Thank you' is more formal, respectful and impersonal than 'Thanks'. 'Thanks' would ...


1

The original sentence is okay grammatically, especially in spoken English. It is a bit terse, though. In written English, I would suggest an em-dash, rather than a comma—for stronger contrast (and I would substitute who for that, although there are many who might argue that that is just fine!) Anyway, one might rephrase it in any of these ways: I do have ...


1

"These matters" concern noun-noun compounds. One rule is that the first noun must be singular, so it's "sector vertices," not "sectors vertices." The other rule is to make sure that you don't mislead your reader. When you decide to use "variable names" instead of "names of variables," make sure that your context is clear enough that no one will think that ...


1

If you had multiple boxes each containing multiple nails (boxes of nails) you surely would say they were "nail boxes" not "nails boxes". The latter sounds like it is possessive missing its apostrophe. The former is a noun as an adjective to a noun (nail box): it describes the type of box - boxes that contain nails. I think in all your examples that is ...


1

I would say it slightly differently: A gift from my classmate; it's times like these which make my heart grow fonder of Pheonix Tumbleweed High School everyday. However, moments like these is just as acceptable. Here is a nice graph: Interestingly I would always say "these" - not sure why, and it should probably technically be "this" - it's only one ...


1

"Who" refers to people; "that" may refer to either people or things. Use "who" if doing so would help your reader identity the antecedent. That's not a problem with your text. "... the only way to do this was by taking control ...."


1

Merriam-Webster lists eight different definitions for the phrase "put down". When someone says they'll "put you down for a weekend tour", they mean they'll write your name down in the list of weekend tour bookings. Or maybe instead of writing it, they'll type it, or drag it there. They'll put it there somehow.


1

It's fine. Put down meaning kill is only ever used of an animal. It would not be understood in that sense in referring to a human, and if you found a way to force that meaning it would imply that you were regarding the person as an animal. However there is another idiomatic meaning which could occur here, meaning "deprecate", or "diminish in status". I ...


1

While I'm not sure of any differentiation between "other" and "the other", I would say that the difference between "another" and "other" is the difference between "additional", and an exclusive choice. I've had one dessert but want another. (an additional dessert) You can have this for dessert or the other choice. (the choice is between the two, both is not ...


1

It's possible that the book was illustrating the fact that English reverses the subject-verb order in a complete question. So if A says "I am happy for you" (subject "I" followed by verb "am") and B wishes to question the assertion or ask for a clarification, he says, "Are you happy for me? (verb "are" followed by subject "you"). Unfortunately, in ...


1

"She fed him lamb" is the best way to say that she gave him a meal of lamb. The phrase "She fed him on lamb" implies a steady diet of lamb that she's feeding him. The phrase "She fed him with lamb" doesn't sound as correct as just leaving out the preposition entirely. How did her dog get so big? She fed him on lamb (habitually). What did she feed ...


1

No it is not correct English to say "set all about", try using "almost here" or "incoming". Depending on how informal you're willing to go you could even try restructuring your phrase and saying "Classes are almost finished." If you want to be slightly dramatic you could go for: Course completion is imminent.


1

This can sometimes be tricky because there are a variety of constructions which will change a verb's valency. But the archetypal categories of intransitive, transitive and ditransitive are still easy to grasp. I like to use these three verbs to show the base categories: Intransitive: I slept Transitive: I kicked the ball Ditransitive: I gave the ball to ...


1

Intransitive is an imprecise term as it can mean 1 the verb has no object at all, neither a direct object nor a prep-object. 2 a verb with a prep-object as to wait for the bus, to click on a button, to talk about sth etc. Huddleston and Pullum in CGEL use the terms transitive/intransitive in a different way. By the way, there are 717 posts on ELU about ...



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