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9

Nowadays we call them 'auxiliary verbs'. The name 'auxiliary' has a similar meaning to 'helper'. However, we now recognize these words as a grammatical class of verb with specific properties, not just because they precede a main verb, because they have some modal meaning, or because we can't use them on their own. The properties just mentioned may apply to ...


9

The term “helper/helping” might be "less professional," “old-school,” "primary school," and/or even "kindergarten level" compared to “auxiliary,” but that doesn’t detract one bit from its value as a clear and useful description of what these verbs do, so if you must use only one term, choose the one that best helps your students to visualize and eventually ...


4

The passive use leaves open the possibility that someone else has taken action to subscribe you. In the electronic age, where spam is not only an everyday hassle, but is becoming a legal issue as well, it can be annoying to the assumed subscriber, as well as factually wrong, to send you en email describing you have actively subscribed. The actual ...


4

I think the point is that if you did need the subjunctive mood, "I be" would be what to use. In an archaic sentence like this one following, there are two uses of the subjunctive: If someone slight me, I shall run him through, whoever he be. It's possible to contrive a similar sentence for I: He can see through any disguise. He will always find me, ...


4

There are lots of ways of talking about starting cars. Except for (1) and (2), these are fine. There is an English grammar rule being violated in (1) and (2). Native speakers know it, because they follow it, but they usually can't state it. Non-native speakers need to be taught the rule, however, because it's not obvious. When a noun modifier consists of ...


3

We would not use coincide unless we were talking of significant events/situations/days that happen, unusually, to occur on the same day, as in " In 20XX, Chinese New Year coincides with western New Year. If there is nothing significant about the dates, we'd just say something like "The 24th of Shawwal is the 12th of October in the Gregorian/Western ...


3

You will never hear I care not in casual conversation in the modern context. It is grammatically correct, but it would be likely perceived as affected, old-fashioned or a deliberate attempt to sound poetic.


3

All four sentences are grammatical. Present conditional following if clause. Future tense following if clause. Subjunctive mood. present conditional following if clause in the subjunctive. Past conditional following if clause.


2

In effect, it means not merely "You have subscribed", but "You have an active subscription", implying that you will be receiving the benefits of the subscription fee for as long as you are subscribed. It also gives the NYT the possibility of sending you an email one day that says "You are no longer subscribed", with the painful implication that you are no ...


2

There is an advantage in abbreviating some things Valid There is an advantage to abbreviating some things Valid There is an advantage of abbreviating some things Bad, ugly English. But... The advantage of abbreviation is that... or The advantages of abbreviation are... Perfectly acceptable.


2

This is an example of a subjunctive. The subjunctive form of the verb is frequently used in mandative clauses (certain clauses which contain the content of an order, desire, suggestion). The subjuntivee uses the plain form of the verb. The same form as the bare infinitive. The Original Poster's example I be would be grammatical in the following sentences: ...


2

You are free to choose any order you like, so long as 'and I' comes last.


2

The usual idiom is "falls on" The 24th of Shawwal falls on the 12th of October


2

1: Yesterday I went to Ascot, and I bet on several races. I couldn't believe it when I actually won... 1a: ...for the first time 1b: ...the first time Clearly there's a difference in that example. #1 means I'd never won (a bet at Ascot) before yesterday (when any or all of my bets might have won). But #2 means I won the first bet I placed ...


1

A relative pronoun standing at the front of a simple relative clause may be omitted unless it acts as the subject of the relative clause. okI contribute to projects that I love. okI contribute to projects that support children. okI contribute to projects I love. but not, in formal use, ∗ I contribute to projects support children. ...


1

I don't think (that) including both sounds stilted. As always, context matters. If the conversation were about the attributes of an enjoyable Thanksgiving, and you said, "I don't care if the Turkey tastes like sawdust, as long as Uncle Bob doesn't make a fool of himself", I might respond, "I hope that Bob behaves himself and that the Turkey is delicious".


1

You are going to have to renew your passport. (future intention - sounds horrible without "gonna") means you'll have to do it in the near future. ("gonna" is a colloquialism for "going to") You have to renew your passport. (present simple) It refers to the present. You will have to renew your passport. (future simple) You'll have to do it at some ...


1

"I don't want you worrying about the oral interview." That sentence is fine. Huddleston & Pullum (The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, 2002.12311-2) note that "the gerund-participial with want generally has a progressive interpretation, but in non-affirmative contexts it can be non-progressive". They say that I want them standing when ...


1

Here are some more variants without "if": Had I played, I would have won. Had I been there, I would have helped.


1

The first is grammatical. The other two are not. They should read: If I had played, I would have won the match. and: If I had been there, I would have helped.


1

"We" and "our" are plural, so "lives" should be plural, too. If you want to use life, then the entire sentence needs to be recast from first person plural (we, our) to first person singular (I, my).


1

catch cold has been used longer and does sound like older usage. The N-gram shows its use has been declining since 1940. Although some people say there is a difference in meaning (one of them being "catch a disease" and the other just "the consequences of having been exposed to very cold temperature") I don't see any. "Please close the window, or we'll ...


1

Every year the Netherlands sends 20,000 tulip bulbs to Canada to thank 'them' for 'their' aid in the Second World War. I understand that them and their is used to say about Canada, Why do they not use her or its or his? We do not know why "they" used them and their instead of her or his or its. After all, we cannot enter into the mind of ...


1

The use of the words their and them are mainly in context. Here, one is not referring to the country(the land) itself, but the people. Therefore, Every year the Netherlands sends 20,000 tulip bulbs to Canada to thank them for their aid in the Second World War. refers to the Canadians who receive gratitude and originally helped the Dutch, making the ...


1

Without context it's difficult to guess what you mean by "hit". It could mean to get physically hit by another person but it could also be a slang word for unwanted sexual attention, use of drugs, etc. Anyway... Do you ever get hit when you approach women like that? I presume you've approached women that way several times and want to know if anytime, ...



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