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8

There are numerous examples of adjectives which are sometimes or always placed after the noun they modify (postnominal or postpositive usage). Wikipedia has a useful article, which includes: A postpositive adjective is an attributive adjective that is placed after the noun or pronoun that it modifies. This contrasts with prepositive adjectives, which ...


4

To give a diagram for a sentence is to propose a theory about the derivation of that sentence. The correct derivations of sentences of human languages are incompletely known by anyone at all, to say nothing of a computer program. It's completely unsurprising that the program you dealt with doesn't know how to deal with some sentences. I know more than a ...


3

The "Oxford comma is irrelevant to this question. Saying "my family and crew" implies that the crew is part of the family, not necessarily your crew. Saying "my family and my crew" implies that both the family and crew "belong" to you, which is probably what you are looking for. In addition, unless you are a ship's captain, you may want to use an ...


3

This type of construction only works when the subject of the headline sentence does not change or invert. Politician challenged by court, retracts statement Cat climbs tree and can't get down This can also be done with an inverted passive sentence. Case dismissed, dropped by plaintiff Park renovated and now reopened Combining the two in the ...


3

I may not be a great writer, but I am getting better. This conveys your intent with the least amount of changes to your sentence.


3

Both are correct, infested with has a more idiomatic usage. Insects, vermin or other nuisances may infest something. The object of the infestation (e.g., a place, a person, an animal) is infested with (or occasionally by) that nuisance. As a modifier, infested is always hyphenated with the preceding word (e.g., a rat-infested cabin). Ngram: infested with vs ...


3

You don't 'need' 'when'; ''what' is commonly used with expressions of time: What is the time? At what time shall we meet? What is a good time for you to meet at B & N on Thursday afternoon? If you can give of your time helping to maintain this wonderful space, please let us know what is a good time for you to get involved. ...


3

My short story is written in the present tense Is it? The painting summoned emotions... This isn't present, therefore your friend is right: the subordinate clause should be in past perfect.


3

BEFORE a noun, "almost-finished' is better, since it emphasizes that 'almost' is qualifying 'finished', not 'report'. Not important in this case, but compare 'longest living animal' with 'longest-living animal'.


2

Both expressions don't sound English. I would go with: The project will be completed within a few days. So without the next. Since you say will be, it implies the action will take place in the future. Alternatively you could say: The project will be completed within the next few days. So with a the.


2

I smell French word order in "inspector general", cf the company Société Général. But you can do either in English. Some phrases are stuck in the one, though, there has never been a general witchfinder.


2

If you are referring to the same person, then "My mother and best friend loves cooking as much as I do" is correct. If you say "My mother and my best friend", it sounds like you're talking about two different people. Edit: (Thanks to @sumelic - I was searching for a while until I saw the added tags that helped me figure out exactly what parts of speech ...


2

The reason "hopefully" was appropriated for its use, as you noted, is because other adverbs were not satisfying the definition required. "Presumably" does not implicitly provide the speaker's opinion about the inevitability of the statement. If all things continue to proceed as according to expectations, the result will "presumably" happen. "Hopefully" ...


2

Follow from is the standard way to use follow in this sense. From oxford: (sense 2.2) [NO OBJECT] Be a logical consequence of something it thus follows from this equation that the value must be negative If you want to say that X results from lemma (1), you could say: X follows from lemma(1) or From lemma(1), X follows. You shouldn't ...


2

I think the last version is the best but you should perhaps expand it to "A confusion matrix shows the number of true positives (TP), false positives (FP), true negatives (TN), and false negatives (FN)."


2

CMOS (The Chicago Manual of Style) leaves the choice on whether to follow introductory adverbial clauses with commas with you:-) It recommends though - but not very forcefully - skipping the comma for short ones.


2

I have never actually seen either of those usages; what I normally see is either thirty-one-month-old [child] or, if less precision is needed, two-and-a-half-year-old [child] You could also say [S/he] is two years and seven months old or [S/he] is thirty-one months old


2

Unless "city" is part of the name (i.e. "Carson City" or "New York City"), it's not capitalized after the city's name. Even used before (as in "City of"), the capitalization only happens if the title of the city in question actually has that name ("City of London", "City of New York").


2

'I'm' is merely a contraction of 'I am'. From Wikipedia: A contraction is a shortened version of the written and spoken forms of a word, syllable, or word group, created by omission of internal letters (actually, sounds). In traditional grammar, contraction can denote the formation of a new word from one word or a group of words, for example, by ...


1

Alternative: I may not be a great writer, but I know I am a better writer than yesterday.


1

If you put them the other way around, it is fully grammatical: You have the option to use the red ball, or the green. The only way this could be confused is if somebody took "green" to be a noun, as in "putting green", but that seems fairly unlikely.


1

Calls would be better than says. In some jurisdictions, you can be held liable for slander or defamation of character when you engage in certain kinds of "name-calling". You cannot switch from active voice to passive as you did (says...sent) with a mere "and". You must say "is sent". Brevity can be achieved in a number of ways there: Lawyer jailed for ...


1

Your hunch is right. The given statement is wrong. The value is 1, but you can set it to another value, e.g. 100. is correct. The value is 1, but you can set it, for example, to 100. The preposition was a bit off, but correct otherwise It should be noted that e.g. is more commonly used with lists of examples. As in: life events (e.g. birth, ...


1

"Where can I find you?" is generally a safe way to ask. If you prefer to be specific, "Where do you sit?" or "Where's your desk?" would be fine in an office with an open plan. If the offices have dividers, you might want to ask, "Where's your cubicle?" If actual walls, "Where's your room?" might make more sense.


1

The only way the singular would work is the apposition: My mother, my best friend, loves cooking as much as I do. or the better-sounding non-restrictive relative: My mother, who is also my best friend, loves cooking as much as I do.


1

In terms of dropping the auxiliary verb: "Lawyer sent to jail" works, but "[...] a lawyer and sent to jail" doesn't work. I think it's because you can drop the auxiliary verb if there's only one clause, but you can't drop it in a sub-clause. (In your proposed headline, the main clause is "Fascist X" said a lawyer, with and was sent to jail for insulting him ...


1

When used to refer to different activities, "sports" is plural, but it is singular when used to refer collectively to sports in general, such as in the following (from the free dictionary): Sports is a good way for children to get exercise. sports equipment


1

Unless you inadvertently left out a "not", the sentence "Mr Smith has gone on holiday for years" has a totally different meaning to the first two sentences. It suggests that he does not expect to see his home again maybe this decade, whereas in your first two sentences the poor guy is a stay-at-home, perhaps involuntarily. The difference between your first ...


1

The simplest rewrite is: "It's been years since Mr Smith went on holiday" I do not see anything wrong with the second quote. Another equally valid sentence would be: "When was the last time you went to the theatre?"


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Going for parallelism in ing-forms: I specialize in designing wireless and wired network infrastructure, in configuring company's Cisco Systems and MikroTik devices, and in implementing security measures designed to protect IT resources. Additionally, I am dabbling in voice over IP (VoIP) technology. I am dabbling in: just a joke that occurred to me while ...



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