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Oxford Dictionaries Online specifically references the tarmac (the tarmac) A runway or other area surfaced with tarmac. Similarly Collins a runway at an airport: on the tarmac at Nairobi airport The examples given are for discrete items or examples of a particular tarmac, not a reference to an undefined mass of material, such as pass me the ...


7

In the example you quoted, "a tarmac" is fine. Whether it should be "tarmac" instead of "a tarmac" depends on the intended meaning, specifically whether the author was referring to the type of material ("walked across tarmac") or the type of location ("an airport tarmac"). Normally you would use "the tarmac" when referring to a specific tarmac, however in ...


4

This construction gives a sense of renewal of acquaintance or a rediscovery. Note that you can also employ the definite article. Example *I returned to Anthea's house after many years to find an Anthea who no longer laughed and sang. She was now a sad reflection of the Anthea I used to know.* You can think of it as meaning "a version of". *I returned to ...


3

The traditional explanation for when to use commas around Anne is as follows: If the unidentified he in the sentence has only one sister (Anne), then the word Anne is functioning as an appositive, and you would set it off with commas: His sister, Anne, was not feeling well. But if the he in the sentence has two or more sisters, the word Anne is ...


3

In answer to the question, but also some comments: The sentence is entirely grammatical. If you want, you can imagine a comma in it: A smell leapt out, so horrid that it seemed to colour the air. (But the comma holds up the urgency of the leaping stink). The sentence does not contain a mixed metaphor ( seemed to makes the image a simile if ...


3

(Firstly, I stopped for smoking is not something that native speakers of English are likely to say). I stopped to smoke This implies "I stopped in order to smoke", where the use of to + infinitive indicates an intention: In this case to has the same meaning as in order to or so as to. Examples She came to collect her pay cheque. The three ...


3

This is just an idomatic British usage and could be read as such: "Mr Obama and his daughter Sasha, 14, walk across a tarmac[ed area] in New York." I can't back this up with any real non-anecdotal sources other than the fact that I am a native British English speaker who lives in the UK, but it has a relatively common history in British English usage ...


3

Driving here is a gerund—an -ing form of a verb which acts as a noun. You can tell it's acting as a noun because it is modified with an adjective, bad, rather than an adverb, badly it acts as the subject of the sentence Since it is the subject, and singular, it takes the 3rd person singular form of the verb: causes. It's not just 3rd-person ...


2

Wiktionary has the following usage note for the word data: "This word is more often used as an uncountable noun with a singular verb than as a plural noun with singular datum." So it is correct to use the word data with the singular verb is as in your first sentence. In the second sentence you simply omit "that is", but it is common practice. Wiktionary ...


2

I think there's room for disagreement here. This usage of tarmac almost always appears as the tarmac, and refers to the paved area of an airport intended for airplanes to stand/taxi on. English speakers hear this, and then (unconsciously) classify tarmac as either a mass noun or a countable noun. But there are two possible ways to do this. Tarmac is a ...


2

On the link quoted in the question it does not appear that the President is indeed at an airport. There is a large tree adjacent to him, and park benches. Thus the discussion about whether airports have one or more tarmacs doesn't seem to apply here. Mr Obama and his daughter Sasha, 14, walk across a tarmac in New York on Friday. For me that sounds ...


2

Question 1 - For sentences with an auxiliary (a.k.a. helping verb) In casual speech or writing, as long as you have rising intonation or a question mark, any of these sentences can be made into a question. Usually, context is enough to let the other participant(s) know what you are asking. Person 1: He used to have a Ferrari. Person 2: He was rich? ...


2

"A smell leapt out so horrid that it seemed to colour the air." Your first sentence is well-written and seems to paint a picture of the situation. "Colour" is also correct in BrE spelling. "so......that" - is used in clauses of result, which can be expressed by "so.....that" or "such....that". Examples: The snow fell so fast that the streets ...


2

http://www.grammar-once-and-for-all.com/punctuation/parenthetical-expressions/ calls it a "parenthetical expression." They give an example that's similar to your sentence: Jumbo, it seems, prefers peanuts in soy sauce.


2

OALD online has a good survey. They have three uses. No.1 the shall-futur is becoming old-fasioned. No.3 is old-fashioned or formal. So only no.2 is actually used: shall in questions with I and we. http://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/shall?q=shall


2

No According to this page, initial auxiliary words or verbs never come after the initial subject in questions.


2

If the example is direct address (hint: his sister's name is not necessarily Anne), the commas are required. If the sentence is not direct address, whether or not the commas are required may depend on the stylistic context, among other things. For example, The Chicago Manual of Style, 14th Edition, says this: "Unless it is restrictive (see 5.50), a ...


2

Steps taken towards equality are, in fact, segregating us further. The sentence doesn't explicitly say, but it can be inferred that Steps is referring to all the steps as a whole. It doesn't mean some steps and it doesn't mean all steps. It means that the general trend of the steps leads in the segregating direction. One good analogy is electrical current. ...


2

Technical note: to improve the clarity of this post "import" statements have been omitted from this point onward. Technical note: to improve the clarity of this post "import" statements have been removed from the remaining text.


2

Your phrase is understandable but not common. A formal expression is my word is my bond. old-fashioned or formal If someone's word is their bond, they always keep a promise: "But listen, you must promise never to tell anyone." "My word is my bond." Cambridge Dictionaries Online Other possibilities I always keep my word/promises. I ...


2

The sentence is fine, the meaning clear. It could perhaps be reworded to I am talking with many people, to make it sound like more of a conversation than a speech.


1

I like this question - stimulating. I believe the forms of the statements are equivalent. "It is not ripened yet" seems at first sight to confuse present and past but I understand it as shorthand for "It is not (at the stage where it has) ripened yet." The parenthetical text would put the tenses into order but adds nothing, so why bother with it? Similarly ...


1

You're confusing terminology. "John hammered the metal flat" is indeed a resultative construction: the hammering brings about the flatness. But "I prefer/eat my food salted/hot" is an object-orientated depictive construction. My preferring/eating does not bring about the saltedness/hotness (though some prior process has done). And "This software comes ...


1

It's not grammatically correct. Such a sentence is known as an interrogative sentence. As such, it should start with: A "5W1H" word (who, what, where, when, why, how); OR a conjugation of one the three verbs "be", "do" or "have", e.g. "are", "does"; OR a modal verb such as "may", "might", "can", etc.


1

Yes In this case, the phrase When he returned as the day was ending, I was expecting him is interrupted by a little earlier than the previous day. More information and examples on parenthetical expressions can be viewed here.


1

I'd go with something like "improved" or "increased" instead of "grew." Grow is just a terrible verb to use on a resume. Edit Indeed that was a terse and probably unhelpful response. First, an actual answer to your question: "Grew sales 30%..." -- due to lacking structure -- is much more informal than "Grew sales by 30%..." So if you had to choose ...


1

I find your first sentence clear and expressive. I would not change a word of it. Your second version reads as if the leaping out coloured the air, whereas the first says clearly that it is the horrid aspect that colours the air.


1

I agree with Chasly. A native speaker might switch between these options depending on the emphasis desired. For example, if the house was burning down and my mother asked me if I liked her new dress, I might say "How can you think about a dress at at a time like this!" "A time" and "this" emphasizes the specific moment. In contrast, a politician giving a ...


1

As a web developer is prepositional phrase being used adjectively. Phrases like this should be as close to the noun it's modifying as possible. Most people will figure out "developer" is logically associated w/the only singular pronoun (me), but if you're looking to be grammatically correct, then the first sentence is on point.


1

Taken literally, the second sentence is nonsense, but there's no ambiguity and anyone knows what the sentence means. Constructions like this are best avoided in formal writing, but in informal use, the meaning is perfectly clear, precisely because the literal meaning is nonsense. The only thing that the modifier can sensibly refer to is the object "me." ...



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