Hot answers tagged

7

I think a comma is correct. A semicolon would separate two main clauses, but the second part of the sentence is not a main clause (it is not a sentence by itself and has no verb). The comma is used because the second part adds more information on to the sentence.


4

Yes, huge sounds like an absolute adjective, but the following dictionary entry explicitly allows both comparative and superlative forms for huge: Huge adjective (huger, hugest) 1 Extremely large; enormous - ODO This Ngram comparing huge/hugest with large/largest appears to show that the relative usage of the respective superlative forms are ...


2

Neither will work. Doubling the preposition The guy sits in in meetings is too distracting, and The guy sits in a meeting merely means that the guy attends the meeting, without the meaning that the he's a guest or outsider. The solution is to use in on. Here's an example from Cancer and Self-help: Bridging the Troubled Waters of Childhood ...


2

Attitude should always be professional. Looks need not be.


2

The only grammatical correction I would make would be to delete to, but the sentence does need punctuation after professional. Semicolon or em dash is probably your best bet there. As for look vs. looks, I would positively prefer the former, singular form, even though the plural form might be more familiar: one’s looks refers more to the gifts of ...


2

To my surprise, you can say either. To my ear, "scaffolding around the house" sounds more natural, but "a scaffolding around the house" is also OK. Examples: The Free Dictionary. I am giving two examples of "a scaffolding" followed by two examples of "scaffolding" Her father, who was a mason, was killed by falling from a scaffolding We saw a ...


2

First, it's an inherently ambiguous sentence: we don't know whether B and C are one client (as in: partners) or two clients. If you wanna stress that B and C are not a unit, then it might be better to rewrite the sentence. His work for both B and C... would be a place to start. As for weaving, it's not necessarily, included at all with the use of like, ...


2

When using a primitive shuttle loom, the warp is one thread wound (vertically) around the frame. The woof is one thread woven (horizontally) between the warp[s]. It is only after the fabric is removed from the loom that the two threads become many (by cutting the edges). (The woof is usually applied as a series of threads, but it acts like one long thread; ...


2

I think the closest sense of but I can find in the OED is 5b: Whilst 5a applies to: a. Negative and interrogative sentences containing a comparative (esp. more) were formerly followed by but; they now usually take than, or else the comparative is omitted and but retained; modern idiom preferring sometimes one, sometimes the other. 1713 ...


2

You can have singular and plural, but like this: Does there exist a polical business cycle? Do there exist political business cycles? But (as BillJ said) both keep the infinitive form "exist".


2

You and your teacher may both be right, although your reading is more likely to be that intended by Dahl. Typical inversion is that between subject (we) and verb (have), which is not the case here. But you might call this a kind of inversion too, since the adverbial phrase in almost every house is normally placed after be in the sense of being present at a ...


1

Both are correct. "It was" refers to the team being split into two groups, whereas "they were" refers to its members being split into two groups. I think your version is easier to parse, because the reader doesn't need to infer that "they" refers to the members of the team, whereas "it" obviously refers to the team.


1

If something has been resolved, and remains resolved, then it is (currently)resolved.


1

speakspeak To form the past tense of regular verbs which end in -y or Dave's ESL Cafe Change -y to -i and add -ed. This happens when a verb ends in a consonant and y could be assistance to you. Check it out.


1

It is an "introductory clause" insofar as it begins the sentence, but it is also a dependent or subordinate clause: "as the lightning struck the tree" cannot stand on its own--to make sense it requires additional information, which is provided by "The people ran," an independent clause (it can stand on its own). "As" is referred to as a subordinate ...


1

Scaffolding is more correctly used as non-count noun. So therefore, "There is scaffolding around the house" is the correct answer.


1

The words that you are asking about will, in all likelihood, be spelled as one word in the coming years, and future generations will look back and wonder why we didn't spell Data Sheet as Datasheet. Personally, I would choose Time Sheet and Data Sheet because I see Time as a noun functioning as an adjective defining Sheet; similarly Car Wash, Computer ...


1

One thousand three hundred and one is the correct way to say it in both American and British English.


1

Yes, that is correct, though 2nd is an abbreviation. In most cases, you should use second instead. The event is the person's second birthday, and “Happy [event name]” is the usual way to congratulate people, so “Happy second birthday” is correct. Likewise “Happy second anniversary” and “Happy sixty-fifth birthday.”


1

The sentence isn't ok. There are some problems with the spelling and grammar, including comma splices, and some redundant redundancies that are redundant in a redundant fashion. He started off in his truck, but fire was spreading everywhere and partway to the school his wife, wildly fearful, convinced him to turn back to their house. He can head to ...


1

You are specifically asking about your text, not about the various (better) options there are to make your point. The major problem with the meaning of your text is with which. It makes your sentence incorrect grammatically. The proper word is whose. Thus: I have a water faucet whose pressure is very weak. Which is a relative pronoun, and whose is a ...


1

Lain is correct. Lain is the past participle of Lie. Laid is the past participle of Lay. You Lie on the bed reading the book. You Lay the book on the bed.


1

A slightly more muscular construction might avoid the triple past participle. "The idea that had presented itself during the meeting plagued him all night, and he lay awake dwelling on it until... "Had lain" is correct, but it just sounds sort of, well, lame, at least to my ears. The revision would set the "idea" off better as something remote and ...


1

you do not need a semicolon. remember semicolons cannot be used before a dependent clause only a dependent. Ask yourself if this clause can stand alone as a sentence; this means an independent clause must be a complete thought with a verb and noun.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible