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14

This question is difficult to answer succinctly because the more desirable wording to use may differ depending on the circumstances surrounding the statement. Case 1: When Maybonne was your girlfriend, she often ate at Red Lobster. Now that she is your ex-girlfriend, she may or may not eat there. If you know that she still does, it makes sense to say "My ex-...


11

The first one is simply wrong. The second is grammatically correct but very awkward. You would say "I don't remember ever watching that film." and "I've never watched that film in my life." The second is more emphatic and sure-sounding. In the first, you're allowing for the possibility that you have watched it but can't remember doing so at the ...


9

This is simple reversal of clauses: see this question. If it helps, you could imagine a bracket after 'was', and a close bracket after '2016'. (I also think that using the Free Dictionary to validate the syntax of the University of Cambridge is equally back-to-front, though in a less literal sense.)


5

There is a closer use to your examples , but it may be only UK English, which has more circumlocution. Example .1. "I don't remember if ..." I don't remember if I've ever watched that film: the book was so vivid. I don't remember if Jeremy was there; I only had eyes for his sister. And .2. for the more emphatic sense: "I would have remembered." ...


3

The question 'How are you doing?' is a Pleasantry, rather than a genuine request for information, in this instance (ie the question is from a service employee rather than a friend or anyone who has a personal reason for being interested in your well-being). pleasantry : something (such as a greeting) that people say in order to be polite Source: ...


3

In this case, "savings account" is singular because it is operating as an adjective to "products and services." The phrase says: " ... we offer you a wide range of savings account products and services and fixed deposit products and services ... " This could have had a different typography, like this: " ... We offer you a wide range of • Saving account ...


2

It is a sentence (with some implied words), but the part of speech that the symbol is fulfilling in the sentence is open to the interpretation of the reader. It is most likely functioning as a verb or noun. The symbol represents the word "copyright," which can fulfill 3 different parts of speech: copyright. [ˈkäpēˌrīt] As a NOUN: the ...


2

They are logically different as they are asserting different things. Either Alice or Bob, or neither, are in the room, but not both. Neither Alice nor Bob is in the room. Edit for your additional question (what is the logical negation of each): "Both Alice and Bob are in the room." "Either Alice or Bob, or both, are in the room."


1

Both are correct. If you consider "two cups of tea" as a single entity, you can use "is". However, if you are thinking of the number of cups, you can use "are".


1

One of the answers seems to suggest that it's a case of locative inversion, though I don't see it. I'd suggest that instead you have a complement to the noun congregation consisting of two asyndetically coordinated phrases headed by verbs in past participle form. I.e.,


1

The sentence is syntactically identical to "Triumphant Napoleon returned to France...", except that the adjective "triumphant" (modifying "Napoleon") has been placed in a less familiar location. One of the reasons that distinct adverbial versions of many adjectives exist is so that one can easily discriminate between usage as an adjective or usage as an ...


1

The sentence is missing a comma. The author meant to write Hypothermia, simply defined as low body temperature, begins in its mildest stage at about 96 degrees Fahrenheit.


1

The original expression, as can be discerned from Google Ngrams, is the like of which has/have. In this case, the plurality would have been governed by the original noun. For example, Google Books yields landscapes the like of which have never been seen in nature and a structure the like of which has never been found in any previous exhibition ...


1

It's a simple adjective-noun phrase, grammatically equivalent to saying "We have red hair". Free means "Unrestrained" and "will" means "choice" or "choices" in this context. There's really nothing more complicated than that. It's equivalent to saying "We have unrestrained choices", ie "We can choose to do whatever we want." It's not a compound.



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