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45

Formally this can be analysed as an example of metonymy, a figure of speech in which a term that denotes one thing is used to refer to a related thing [Wikipedia]. Here, the name Zodanga (which normally refers to a person) is used to refer to his actions (which are a related thing). — What happened here? — Zodanga arrived and caused mayhem. The ...


30

The following took me about two minutes, so I wouldn't be surprised if it can be improved: "I can never remember what kind of fruits the tree in my garden has - until I look out of the window and see it[']s apples."


16

I gather from previous answers that there are two ways in which this question can go—either we interpret it strictly, and don't make assumptions about what it's asking, or we interpret it loosely. If we interpret it loosely, we can bend the rules a bit: As in the Hans Adler's answer, which I was picking on earlier, we can interpret "same meaning" more ...


8

In addition to Andrew's very fine answer, I'd like to point out that 'Person's name happened' can also signify the start of a relationship or meeting someone who made an impression. I was just living my life, and then, all of a sudden, Silvia happened.


7

This is what I can think of... Although he has read about the color of blood being red, being a visually impaired person since birth, he cannot comprehend it[']s red. Why can't it be blue or something? But the two sentences have slightly different meanings. One is that he cannot comprehend the fact of blood being red, the other is that he cannot ...


6

Well I came up with two strategies: 1) find descriptive adjectives for X that also, as a noun, are what X is: I wait at the light until I see it's/its green. I examine the shirt and notice it's/its cotton. 2) shift the referent of 'it', without changing the practical meaning: That thing that every family wants, it's/its happiness. The ...


6

There's a very obvious solution. Here's the question: Can you think of a sentence that keeps the same meaning whether you use "it's" or "its"? And here is the answer: Can you think of a sentence that keeps the same meaning whether you use "its" or "it's"?


5

I would also like to point out that Zodanga was, in fact, the name of a city in the story (John Carter is based on A Princess of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs). This doesn't invalidate the accepted answer, except perhaps the example. — Zodanga happened. — Zodanga arrived and caused mayhem. — Zodanga's military arrived and ...


5

It's slightly humorous and playing on the ungrammatical-ness. Something like, "Zodanga is such a larger-than-life person, that when I say 'Zodanga happened,' you understand he is a force and know exactly what I mean." Perhaps most analogous to "a tornado happened," as a tornado is a noun whose mere presence indicates event-like qualities.


3

I can think of something the same as you. "I see a fruit bowl and it[']s orange"


3

Although grammatically (I think) it's correct, personally I might change it. The more repetitive this action becomes, the less sincere it is. But you could very well say, "The smaller an object gets, the denser the object gets", though again it would sound better as "...the denser it becomes."


3

What can you tell me about the state of the golf place? Its green, it's green. It's green, its green.


3

A neutral term--but hardly amusing or unique--is feedback. Personally, I'm not a big fan of the word, implying as it does a machine with a built-in device for detecting an increase or decrease and then responding accordingly by performing an operation. Example: a thermostat that controls the temperature in your home. I prefer the term reaction. A somewhat ...


3

It may sound odd to say, but the reason that 'triplets' is plural is because two people are in the subject. Going off of your example with 'twin', you could say: "Those two are twins." which is perfectly valid because you are talking about two people. The word 'twin', like the word 'triplet', is a singular word that must become plural when it is used ...


2

Neither is a conjunction, implying that there are two or more negative statements in play. I would reword your example as Despite the fact he was nearing his thirties and got stressed a lot at work, he still had a full head of hair. No thinning at all. Nor did he have wrinkles, and his face was still long and thin—not the least sign of weight gain. ...


2

This question is perhaps more interesting historically than the OP realizes because it involves warring prescriptivists—on the one side those who argue that a person should always be connected to a following clause by who, and on the other those that argue that the choice between that and who should follow the same logic as the choice between that and which. ...


2

This sentence should be understood as 'In theory this should be easy, however I need an idea with which I can replace my thoughts of her'


2

This is a somewhat facetious sentence. The meaning is that for four months, John has been going around every day saying, “I’m going to have finished my novel by tomorrow”, i.e., by the next day, he’ll have his novel all finished. When ‘tomorrow’ comes and he still hasn’t finished the novel, of course, his statement can be related in indirect speech as, “He ...


2

Unless is a kind of negative of if—think of it as very much like “if . . . not.” Adding if to it is thus redundant, confusingly so—it makes it seem as if the main clause is being limited by two conditions, not one. For instance, your last example would only really make grammatical sense in the context of a larger sentence ...


2

From Subscription-only LDOCE: That is often left out when it is the object of the verb in the relative clause: They have not kept the promises they made (=that they made). That can only be used as a relative pronoun to specify a person or thing, not to add extra information. When adding extra information, use who or which: She had to ...


2

Yes........in the sense of "deeply felt" or "severe"


2

I don't have a complete answer, but what about a sentence like "I want to hold the cat before its/it's shot." That is, pairing "its [noun]" with "it is [past participle]". Also pointing out that in some Englishes, you could interpret "it's" as "it has". EDIT Or a slightly more grammatically correct variation on Hans Adler's: "It's not architecture that ...


2

I liked the smell of the cooked meat until I noticed (it's/its) fat. :)        


2

They have rather different meanings, depending on what counts as "meaning". They both assert the same thing, under the same circumstances. But their connotations are quite distinct. Although you are in possession of a valid visa presupposes that you have a valid visa. I.e, that you have a valid visa is a fact which the speaker acknowledges and cannot deny, ...


1

Take a look at this very similar question here on EL&U. Quoting the relevant answer from here- In terms of meaning, there is no difference between these sentences: It seems that they have not completed the task yet. It seems they haven't completed the task yet. The word that is not necessary to be there when it is used as a conjunction to ...


1

Yes, though it should be noted that this is saying that it is generally true (that loneliness is intense on weekends for everyone or a majority of the population) rather than specifically true (someone being intensely lonely during weekends). If you wanted to say the later, you would say "I am profoundly lonely on the weekends" or "My loneliness is profound ...


1

There's nothing wrong with the structure. It is common in writing and literature, especially at the end. If rewritten into two sentences or conjoined by "and" and 'finitizing' the verb (revealing->reveal), it could be seen as stylistically wordy or clumsy. It also provides a smoother cause and effect/result: The blanket had been peeled back, (cause) ...


1

Different publishers are likely to handle the punctuation differently. I doubt that you'll be able to please them all, whichever convention you adopt. At this point, I'll express my own preferences plus my reasons for those preferences. Where you wrote "We can't know for sure," he mused, leaning back in his chair, "Not until we ask more questions." ...


1

I don't know if there is a standard ESL guideline for this but we ask our team/colleagues to mentally substitute very nearly for almost and see if the sentence makes sense to them. If it does, almost can be used. This isn't foolproof and probably won't make sense to native speakers, but it works in almost all the cases we encounter on a regular basis! PS: ...


1

Because I had a similar question to this, I stumbled upon yours, and I apologize for "necro-bumping" this thread, but I feel that I should help because I have found an answer myself. They are called pronominal adverbs. Here's the definition from wiktionary: "A type of adverb occurring in a number of Germanic languages, formed in replacement of a ...



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