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"When going to school I wore necklaces with starfish pendants." "When I went to school I wore necklaces with starfish pendants." Speaking as a native British speaker, I instinctively see the difference as follows. When going to school I wore necklaces with starfish pendants. ---> When travelling to school I wore necklaces with starfish pendants. ...


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You must use the gerund (-ing form) in this case. Dedicate and its derivatives take as complement a preposition phrase headed by to ... He dedicated his life to music. This work is dedicated to my wife. Harold's dedication to his job precluded romantic relationships. The to in to help people lost its prepositional sense about 700 years ago; it ...


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"PREP applying s to the coefficients of the polynomials defining our variety X, we obtain a new variety sX". (a) PREP = By This highlights the actual method used, emphasising this and to some degree downplaying the result. (b) PREP = On This connotes either a slight degree of mundaneness or this being one in a long line of operations, or an ...


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I'd like to acknowledge Josh61 whose comment clarified this for me. The use of 'on' suggests that you are talking about a specific instance. I would also expect the past tense to follow. General results (and conclusions) usually need the present tense. Example Specific: On applying the new anaesthetic, patient A immediately fell asleep. General: Applying ...


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On applying, as you observe is a gerund, and the critic wants to know what this verbal-noun phrase, in this sentence, is in apposition to. It is sort of adverbial with reference to obtain. It works and everyone understands what you mean, but it is clumsy. (paraphrase: When there is an application of...) but Applying is a verbal adjective, a present ...


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The infinitive expresses an action that has not been realized, or that is in question: I want to play basketball ( to play basketball is something that has yet to be done). To be or not to be? ('to be' is in question, ) I have to go. (here 'to go' is something that has to be done) His parents wont allow him to go ( 'him to go' is something that hasn't ...


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Sorry to say that second one is completely natural for native speakers. Please review some grammar of the English language: http://www.getitwriteonline.com/archive/022205posscasegerunds.htm


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The sentences I love to play basketball and I love playing basketball are totally identical in meaning. But if you're saying that you would really like to do something (perhaps as a response to an offer), you'd say I'd love to. If you turn that into a complete sentence, you'd choose the infinitive only: --How would you like to shoot some hoops with me ...



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