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"Travelling" is not wrong and "Travelling" vs "Traveling" is a "British English" vs "American English" thing as well-explained in the linked Wikipedia article: The British English doubling is used for all inflections (-ed, -ing, -er, -est) and for the noun suffixes -er and -or. Therefore, British English usage is cancelled, counsellor, cruellest, ...


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It helps to have the full context of the words you quote: Knowing that a man is not justified by the works of the law, but by the faith of Jesus Christ, even we have believed in Jesus Christ, that we might be justified by the faith of Christ, and not by the works of the law. Knowing is a present participle, a verb form obtained by adding the suffix ...


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Do you know the way to San Jose? Now there's a sentence which contains a to but no infinitive of a verb. Your second group are a bit like that. The gerund is a noun (from a verb). So saying I got used to reading is grammatically no different to saying I got used to Michael. Or He went back to studying just like He went back to Minneapolis. But the ...


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The verb tense is different in the first set as opposed to the second set. In the first set the verb "is" is present so the subsequent verb in the verb-object construction takes the infinitive form. In the second set the verb forms are past participles and the gerunds actually take the form of the object in the sentence as a gerund+object form. So, I ...


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There are certain expressions that take to + ing. Here are some examples: admit to: He admitted to stealing the money. allude to: He alluded to being frightened. amount to: Telling a half truth amounts to lying. as an alternative to: As an ...


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I recently spotted "overwhelm" itself used as a noun, although the usage seems a little odd to me. The line was: Climate change is a planetary emergency of overwhelming proportions. The challenges we face can be difficult even to think about leading to denial, overwhelm, or apathy.


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This is called a dangling construction, so called because your reader is expecting that the subject of the main clause will be associated with the active-voice gerund. That is, whoever is doing the pressing is expected to be the same as whoever is doing the showing. But that's not what your sentence says. Presumably the user is doing the pressing, and the ...


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She had a strange belief that laws are in existence for being violated. This sounds too wordy. You should shorten it to: Strangely, she believed that laws exist to be broken. But that's just my opinion. As for the grammaticality of your sentences: She had a strange belief that laws exist for to be violated. She had a strange belief that ...


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You look forward to something. "Something" here is a noun, the object of the preposition "to." "Hearing," in your example, is indeed a gerund, which behaves as a noun. "Hear" is not a noun, it is a verb--verbs are never objects. Only a noun can be an object. Hence, "hearing." Another explanation that is sometimes offered is that "look forward to" is a ...



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