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The construction of bridging A to B sounds, looks and feels weird. Although it is clear what the tag-line is supposed to mean, it does not seem to convey its message in a natural way. As Edwin Ashworth mentioned, the usage of bridge may be creeping, mirroring verbs like connect and join, but I have not seen it used in that way. (And I happen to work in IT ...


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*to bridge: *vb (tr) to connect or reduce the distance between: let us bridge our differences. Source: Collins Dictionary Yes it is correct and very effective in the idea it conveys.


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As both John Lawler and Edwin Ashworth note in the comments, you are correct. The primary example on the Wikipedia article you wrote is very similar to the usage you are asking about: A verbal noun is a noun formed from or otherwise corresponding to a verb. Different languages have different types of verbal noun and different ways of forming and using ...


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As a general point, in English we would say 'which led' or 'that led', but not 'what led'. Both sentences make grammatical sense (if you replace 'what' with 'which'). The problem lies with uncertainty about what is doing the leading. They crossed a highway along the river shore and then a bridge, which led them to a dirt road winding down a thin ...


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"learned about" is a phrasal verb -- see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phrasal_verb Pilgrims = subject noun learned about = phrasal verb learned about what? planting crops planting = gerund (Present participle verb form used as a noun - in this case the direct object.) crops = gerunds may have their own object


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The first of those really needs an object. One of my greatest strengths is critically analyzing (something). Otherwise, the third would be the best choice.


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I'd suggest "one of my greatest strengths in the critical analysis", or "one of my distinctive features/characteristics is the critical analysis".


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Formatting is a gerund - the present participle of a verb used as a noun. So the can be used with it, just like any other noun. A gerundive is where the present participle of a verb is used as an adjective. For example, 'running shoes' is a gerundive (adjective) but 'I like running' is a gerund (noun).


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The gerund phrase is the object of the peposition for, not a subject. A gerund can be either timeless (it can refer to any time in past, present, or future) or refer to a specific time frame. In your example, the timeless gerund leaving the window open works well enough; in who is responsible for leaving the window open, it refers to leaving the window open ...


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Going by what you've written, you've got an 'it' which refers to something which is the cause of the problem, and you've got something which is being affected ('you paying your debts off'), and the action going from one to the other ('slowing'). In this case, I'd advise 'slowing down', and greater clarity in terms of exactly what is being slowed down. ...


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Yes, the sentence is grammatical, if somewhat awkward. Out of context, you need both instances of my to make it clear that it is you who is doing the paying off and that the debts are yours. The words my paying constitute a gerund (paying) modified by a possessive (my). Less formal English would accept the pronoun me here: It's slowing me paying my debts ...



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