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1

Whoever wrote that column: Parameter Measured Refractive index measuring Mass Measuring Optical rotation Measuring probably wishes that they had written: Parameter Measured Refractive index Mass Optical rotation Those instances of "measuring" look like side-effects of inaccurate translation and/or, more likely, remnants from ...


2

You can, but it's relatively unusual: "glad to hear" is much more common. A search in GlowBE (the corpus of Global Web-based English) shows 97 instances of "glad" following by an "-ing" verb (and some of those are irrelevant because of the idiom "glad handing"), against 21100 instances of "glad to [verb]"


4

In traditional grammar the verb being would be considered a gerund in the Original Poster's example. The reason for this is that the clause it heads (John being absent) is the complement of a preposition. The distinction between a participle and a gerund is troublesome. It looks as if the difference is to do with parts of speech or something similar. In ...


3

It's a gerund. A gerund functions as noun. A noun is a thing. "John being absent" is a thing. It is the thing that nobody was surprised at. It's not functioning as a participle. A participle relates to a linking verb. The only verb in the sentence is "was." The subject of that verb is "nobody." However, "nobody" wasn't "being absent." It's also ...


5

Your English teacher should cut wood but not teach English. There are two special verb constructions with accusative (= direct object in English) + a verb form. (Actually there are more but I don't want to write a grammar here.) 1 - I saw the bridge explode. (noun + bare infinitive, emphasis on fact). 2 - I saw the bridge exploding (noun + present ...


2

When I got to the three log doorsteps I heard them unlocking and unbarring and unbolting. Your English teacher is wrong, I’m afraid. There is no indirect object in your example. "Them" is the direct object of "heard". The participial clause "unlocking and unbarring and unbolting" is not the direct object, not an object at all, though it is a complement ...



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