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I'm a bit astonished about the long discussions in the post How can I prove a word is a noun? I admit that there a certain problems, especially with gerunds. Smoking cigarettes is unhealty. In this example, containing a gerund with an object, it is indeed a bit difficult to say to which word class "smoking" belongs. Is it a noun or a verb? ...


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A gerund after "promise"? Sure; no problem. "He promised cleaning the fish would be easy."


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I have checked two dictionaries and can't find that "to promise" can mean to suggest. "to promise to do" is the typical construction when "to promise" is followed by a verb. What language competence has the person who said "to promise can also be followed by a gerund in the meaning of to suggest"? Added: I've just had a look at BNC, 50 random examples with ...


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You don't need a plural gerund here. A singular form is more idiomatic: There will be many falls, but serious injuries are rare, and picking oneself up is easy. Notice the reflexive pronoun is required because pick up is a transitive verb. However, some sense of resuming a standing position seems better, since that is what a person does after they ...


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There seem to be relatively many 'settings up' around the net. Below, I'm including a shot from A treatise on the mistreatment of cholera morbus by W.S.Prior (digitalized by Google), 1832, p.25, which has 'gettings up'. I give a longer passage, not because of its relevance to the question, but because of its relevance in general. An ngram search hints ...


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The unreduced form of the temporal clause is "The plant dies after it is exposed." Your example A is the reduced form: "The plant dies after being exposed." Your example B is ungrammatical. I don't see any difference in meaning or in formality between the unreduced and reduced forms.


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I don't know about "correct", but they're grammatical. They're called accusative-ing or ACC-ing complements (by analogy to possessive-ing or POSS-ing complements, with which they seem to alternate).


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Based on my research Verbs following by both Gerund or Infinitives: Advise Allow Encourage Permit Require Urge. Verbs following by both Gerund or Infinitives (with different meanings): Begin Dread Forget Keep Need Regret Remember Start Stop Try Verbs following by both Gerund or Infinitives ...


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First, there is no gerund involved here. 2nd version can be or is used in 'spoken' version. It cannot be used in a written form/version.


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Either is correct. Committed, while always taking the preposition "to" may be followed by either an infinitive form or the gerund (-ing) form. http://www.englishgrammar.org/verbs-gerunds-infinitives/



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