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1

The two constructions you've asked about "to see it end" and "to see it ending" have slightly different meanings. The first means that animals hate a particular instant of time, namely when the monotony ends. The second means that animals hate an interval of time, over which an end develops and then occurs. The interval is indicated by the progressive ...


1

I believe there is small difference in meaning. "To see it end" implies an instant at which the the end comes. "To see it ending" implies a process that is not instantaneous but culminates in an end. That said, either makes sense and seems correct to me.


0

Although your example is quite broken in terms of grammar but this depends upon where you want to use them. Infinitive: All we should do is to train our workers. Gerund: You and I should be training our workers! Bare infinitive doesn't fits in your example. The idea is 90% of the times we use Gerunds that is, adding an '-ing' and that sounds normal in ...


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I think either one works, but you need a hyphen between intersection and either detecting or detention. Personally, I don't like the sound of intersection detection method (because of the successive -tions), so I would go with This paper proposes an automated intersection-detecting method.


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Technically intersection detection method works. Intersection detecting method is obviously a gerund phrase fitting nominally as a direct object of the term proposes. Automated is a participle being used to describe such a method. The term automated creates the idea that this method will actively be "detecting" intersections on a map, so I'd go w/detecting ...


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I think detection method is what you want here. detecting is a verb, so would apply in the case of the instrument is detecting a gas leak.


2

This subject has been already discussed. In order to better understand the difference, let's look at each of their definitions separately. Gerund: the -ing form of a verb when functioning as a noun, as "writing" in "Writing is easy." Present participle: a participle form, having the suffix -ing, denoting repetition or duration of an activity or event: used ...


0

In school, we were specifically taught to use to-infinitives in place of for-doing verbs. So "to delegate" would be preferred to "for delegating". Not only is it neater to read, it is the correct usage. "asked delegating" is again wrong. Replacing it with "to delegate", it becomes: "The supervisors were asked to delegate tasks for new employees so that ...


0

I think "when ordering" is equivalent to "if ordering" -- "when" indicates only that in this context, multiple concepts or facts coexist. In contrast, "while ordering" implies that a second activity will take place concurrently, as in, "while ordering he could not help but stare at her nose".


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I believe Hugh is quite right to question the taxonomy here as gerunds. Rather, they should be treated as dangling participles (no subject for "ordering") or as a strained ellipsis ("When [one is] ordering a taxi, etc."). As for the difference between "when" and "while, I'd say that depends very much on context. If the statement is "gnomic" (i.e., trying ...


0

It seems like your confusion here is coming from choice of terms. Since the absence was a result of What your were doing and not exactly where you were, I'd replace "due to" to " because of ". Due to is more appropriate nouns Because of is more appropriate for verbs (action) Ex. My absence at the dinner party was because of my playing chess with a ...


4

The version "my playing chess" has the gerund "playing" and the direct object "chess". This is okay, since a gerund is a verb, and a transitive verb like "play" can take a direct object. The second version, "my playing of chess", may be acceptable (it doesn't sound as good to me), but it's not a gerund. The fact that the logical object "chess" is preceded ...


1

The gerunds here are acting as subjects. Whenever "and" is used — the verb should be plural, aka "are" — the "both" is unnecessary and makes it redundant. This would be the same thing as Pizza and Cake are delicious foods but it's Creating pizza and eating cake are good foods The only exception is listed above, when the two gerunds act as ...


5

I think your colleague is wrong. Somebody has noticed a partial pattern and has elevated it to rulehood. The use of infinitive (with and without to) vs gerund is purely syntactic, depending on the subcatgorisation frame of the matrix verb. It is only incidentally and weakly semantic.



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