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Back in the old days, we were taught to avoid "ing" as much as possible. Could be correct or not, but for some reason our English teacher though it awkward, and to be used sparingly ;]


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I tried to Y I tried Y-ing If you 'tried to Y', your goal was Y. If you tried Y-ing, Y isn't (necessarily) what you wanted. It's just what you did to get Z. For example: I tried to stroke the baboon. ( - because I wanted to stroke him) I tried stroking the baboon. ( - because I wanted him to release my friend's leg from his jaws) Mnemonic ...


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You asked for a mnemonic. Here's one. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_COP3cyN7zg "Try To Remember" from The Fantasticks.


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NOTE: Please ask only one question at a time. I shall answer the interesting question that wants to know what a gerund is, not the trivial one asking whether his can ever be the subject of a clause, as that answer is curt and boring. A gerund is always a noun and verb at the same time. It is type of verbal noun, a noun that has verbal properties as well. ...


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His/Him are not interchangeable here. His is possessive. The following are all nouns, and smoking is a gerund because it is a noun formed from a verb by adding 'ing': His smoking upset me. His attitude annoyed me. His thoughtfulness pleased me. It's like a trait or quality that he has, the fact that he smokes. On the other hand Him smoking upset ...


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Life's much simpler if we look at a gerund as verb present continuous, where it is, and a nominalization of verb, where it is. The two uses are unrelated in behavior. Verbs and nouns are chalk and cheese. The underlying semantic is common but the POSs are distinct.


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If you try to do something, you make an attempt to do that something. The use of the word 'try' followed by a to- infinitive suggests that you are not sure whether you will succeed in a future attempt: I am trying to open the window. I will try to open the window. It suggests you did not succeed in a past attempt: I tried to open the window. If you try ...


2

(1) Try to-infinitive ==> Try (in order) to-infinitive (2) Try -ing ==> Try (by) -ing In (1), think of the to-infinitive as a purpose not yet actualized at the time of "trying". In (2), think of the "-ing" as some action being actualized at the time of "trying", with the purpose of "trying" being only recoverable from context. This way, you will ...


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The normal verb construction is try to do ( to do stands for any infinitive). A special construction is to try doing. An example: If you want to improve your English try writing little texts of your own. As the gerund has a verbal and noun character you can transform this into: Make an attempt at writing texts of your own. or Make an attempt ...


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Both are correct: "Interventions that may be required to meet minimum safety standards." "Interventions that may be required for meeting minimum safety standards" Sarah went to the computer lab to print out her research report. This function on the air conditioner is for reducing humidity. Clauses of purpose are usually introduced by ...


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The teacher was right. In the example, the initial gerund creates a poor sentence structure that needs to be improved by rephrasing. Do not use an initial gerund in such sentences. This is about writing style and readability. The teacher was wrong in not explaining that this is not about grammar, certainly not a rule. **See our sister site ...


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Gerund as subject: Smoking is bad for your health. See link http://www.grammaring.com/the-gerund-as-subject


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I'd be a little careful about our poor teacher. I feel that the proposed examples don't illustrate the true gerund. In each case the gerund phrase was functionally used as a (compound) noun. The typical usages in a sentence would have one activity while another is happening at the same time. (DISCLAIMER--I am not any expert nor a native English speaker).


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Believing your teacher would be a mistake.  (Did you see what I just did?)


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Verb + infinitive/gerund is a chapter you find in any grammar of English. Unfortunately grammars only give lists and, of course, these lists can't be complete. If you are in doubt consult a larger dictionary. There you will get information whether a verb is followed by an infinitive or a gerund. I think grammars should not only give lists, they should try ...



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