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I have a prolix friend whom I proofread, and I ask him to imagine he is going to be billed per word by the Customs and Excess. "For predicting" pays less tax than "for the prediction of".


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*for prediction of user behavior is just what it is: even though it seems logical, it is an awkward construct, not used by native speakers, and that is caused by the lack of "the" in front or "prediction." See e.g. at Google Books (not vanilla Books) for prediction of user behavior About 1 results which is written by a non-native speaker. "for the ...


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Paper dictionaries will use the accepted "dictionary" form of the word, whether it is the singular form of a noun or the bare infinitive of a verb. The dictionary will typically show the transformations these words undergo, much as you noticed with the online dictionaries. You may see the gerund form of a verb if that form has a meaning distinct from the ...


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"Motoring" is for quite some time past this kindergarten stage of words that you're talking about :-) Also, use the proper Merriam-Webster:-) motoring noun plural -s : the act or recreation of riding in or driving an automobile Origin of MOTORING from gerund of 3motor Merriam-Webster Unabridged Dictionary "Motoring" is a ...


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Yes, it is correct to have such a possessive structure as a subject: The Other Side of the Couch: The Healing Bond in Psychiatry Gail Albert - 2011 Meanwhile she's already called back twice. Her not leaving a last name suggests that she believes I know her when I don't. And the number of calls suggests that she feels I'm a very important—and ...


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Swooping down on the rep carrion left by inveterate commenters FumbleFingers and John Lawler, I submit the following: Yes. Both forms are grammatical. As stated in the comments, nouns (e.g., the production) will carry a style that is more formal. Some will think it sounds fancier, more educated, more elegant, traditional, while others will find it ...


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You're right that "spellatically" does not work; it's a twisted mess of a non-word. I don't know of any way to derive a fitting word from the word "spelling" for this particular context; I think you'd have to either rephrase to simply "bad at spelling" ("bad at" is the same number of syllables as "inept", so this is really the most concise way I can think of ...


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orthographically-inept (or challenged) comes to mind An orthography is the methodology of writing a language. It includes rules of spelling, hyphenation, capitalization, word breaks, emphasis, and punctuation.Wikipedia


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You can refuse a noun ("She refused the medicine they offered."), and a gerund is technically a noun ("Reading is fundamental") but I cannot think of a single example of refusing a gerund that does not sound awkward or just plain wrong. Your example, "The parents refused buying the dangerous toy for their kid", would be in the latter category. "Buying a ...


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Inform is a transitive verb; as such, it requires an object. He left without informing whom? You, or someone else? If, in fact, it was you whom he failed to inform: He left [me] without {informing/alerting/telling} me. Note that you can remove the first "me", not the second one. Now, if you write it the way you wanted to write it, He left me without ...


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1 is definitely the best choice for your context, of that you can be confident. Search at Google Books (not at vanilla Google) for the core expressions: "devoted herself to caring for" About 3,400 results shows up in clear majority, while "devoted herself to care for" About 35 results is quite rare and shows up mostly in 19C samples, but also in this ...


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"Caring" seems more correct but as I think about it I'm having trouble precisely enunciating why. Part of it is that it's an active verb; it more accurately depicts an ongoing process. "Care" seems to be more timeless; she might care at some points and not at others. "Care" also seems more generic. This goes hand-in-hand with the phrase "don't care for" ...


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Yes, that is wrong. This is a proper alternative: "the automated creation of" [tasks] See examples of it at Google Books. "the automatic creation of" [tasks] is also correct and more frequent. Other possibilities: "the automated task creation" "the automatic task creation"


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The gerund can't be modified by an adjective (use an adverb for that), but it can be followed by a noun. So this should be either automatically creating tasks or automatic creation of tasks


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Let's try to construct a past tense verb used as a gerund. A gerund is a verb in nominal position, and it cannot be tensed (i.e., it must be non-finite). A past tense verb which is made non-finite comes to be perfect, as for instance when we convert "It seems that he ate fish last night" into infinitive form: "He seems to have eaten fish last night". So, ...



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