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0

I am not a native speaker, but I just want to share my opinion. I have learnt that "promise" should be followed with "to + verb" as you mentioned. However, I have found many "promise" with gerund on google in some cases. This appears mostly in News (Headline news sometimes), so I wonder if it is a way to make the sentence sounds more concise and ...


0

As far as I know, the verb 'promise' can only be used in three ways. 1) with a noun: He promised me a present next time he went to America 2) with an optional 'that' followed by a clause: They promised (that) they would never forget what had happened. 3) with a full infinitive: She promised to take me to the doctor's. I have never seen 'promise' with a ...


4

The sentence is grammatically fine, yes. But it does not really make complete sense. To join [X] in doing [Y] means that X is already doing Y, and you now join them and start doing it together with them. In your example, though, X is the entire procession, and Y is the carrying of the casket. Now, depending on the size of the procession (and the casket), ...


1

The sentence seems ambiguous. Try rearranging the order of the words: In [the act of] carrying the casket, Pip joins the procession... This would mean that carrying the casket has included him in the procession, but it's not clear from the original sentence whether this was its author's intention. Pip joins in the funeral procession... but 'in' has been ...


0

This sentence is quite confusing and I believe the main reason for that is the use of "in" in the sentence. It is better if you remove "in". I believe you can use "to" for the last part of the sentence. Pip joins the funeral procession, planned out by Mr. Trabb, the tailor, to carry Mrs. Joe’s casket through town.


-1

First, I feel I need to convince you to be comfortable with using gerunds, in ways wheree gerund-phrases are usable in places within a sentence where you could fit a noun. If the examples below are insufficient, refer to my paradigmatic explanation on gerunds and their siblings: Gerund ending in -ings?. I like {something} I like {cooking dinner} I like ...


3

No. To drench is a verb meaning to saturate something with water or make it extremely wet. If you said "I am drenching" that means that you are the active agent causing something else to get wet. For example, it would be perfectly reasonable to say: I just drenched those anchovies in salad dressing. Similarly, where the rain is the agent of the ...


1

The first sentences here, I think, are meant to be in the past simple, not the present: I stopped working. I stopped watching movies. I stopped cooking. All these sentences mean that I was doing some activity, working, watching or cooking at some point in the past, and then I finished doing it. In these cases, the verb stop is taking another verb as its ...


-5

I think it is completely possible to use the word in the sentence as you did in a general way. But technically, I have no idea whether it is allowed or not. A quick google gave me few references where people have used the word as you did. Reference Links: https://www.facebook.com/pages/drencing-in-rain/112775732150457 ...


2

The adjective curious doesn't really match the idea of learning languages. Curious has the implications of asking questions. You could be curious about languages, but probably not about learning languages. (Unless you're curious about the study of language acquisition, but even then your sentence is odd because it has the quantified always.) I would say one ...


0

In answering your question it is helpful to start with an extract from the definition of gerund in The Oxford Dictionary of English Grammar (p178): The noun-like and verb-like properties of the -ing form are on a cline. Nouns are not followed by direct objects, so we cannot say: *The planning my vacation (took a lot of time) since planning in ...



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