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1

You could just as productively ask "why Gaelic culture" and "why Gaelic Languages?" if you find that you don't have the same hesitations with that usage... then your hesitation really is your own political perceptions and not Linguistic. But let's look at the linguistic effects here though. You're right, it's not the Romans. The Romans delineated the ...


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It seems that the voiced dental fricative [ð] is not generally considered to have been the realization of Old English (OE) /d/. Instead, [ð] was the voiced allophone of the dental fricative /þ/, which was unspecified for voicing. And /d/ and /þ/ were distinct phonemes (contrastive sounds): for example, the word fæder "father" had the phoneme /d/, but the ...



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