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4

I'll paste you two passages about usage of "mankind" and "man" from my NOAD. It seems you were right, usage has changed for "politically correct" reasons: USAGE of "man" Traditionally, the word man has been used to refer not only to adult males but also to human beings in general, regardless of sex. There is a historical explanation for this: in Old ...


4

Sure, you can say the world is handsome. It's just that the word "beautiful" has worn a path in our language regarding the world. Handsome can also mean imposing, or of great size, as in "a handsome prize" or "a handsome sum of money"; and you can use any human-descriptive adjective you like, really, if you are speaking figuratively and employing the ...


3

Injustice meaning the state of unfairness is a mass noun: Jim Crow was an era of institutionalized injustice. But the word can be particularized to mean an instance of unfariness: The decision in Dred Scott was the injustice that made the American Civil War inevitable. Both uses may be modified -- racial injustice, social injustice, cruel ...


3

It's not bad. Bad is unethical. We're not talking ethics here. But it is potentially dangerous. To any number of people or projects. Anything you present to a client is, of course, actually coming from your employer, and the clients know this. However, the clients are also aware that whatever you're presenting is also going to be interpreted to their ...


2

Sure, you can say that the world is handsome, but it sounds weird. 'handsome' is generally used for a guy's looks. And that's about it (with some stretching of meaning: Can you call a woman 'handsome'? ) 'beautiful' is so general as to be applicable to any positive esthetic experience.


2

Because handsome and beautiful are subtly distinct aesthetic qualities. Handsomeness emphasises form and fitness for function, while beauty is more general.


2

I am unaware with any single word that specifically expresses the distinction between the left eye and the right eye. @Mitch's more general laterality expresses the association of a condition with one side of the body or the other, so you might use that, but as I wrote in comments, I'm inclined to prefer affected eye or eye affected as a less technical term ...


1

This is really a topic to be considered by those running the debate series, and is not something that can be decided here. It may be that there is a tradition of strictly interpreting the statements, or it may be that some sort of "interpretation" is commonly allowed. The opinions of people here don't really matter, given that the statement can be ...



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