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Merriam-Webster dictionary has 2 pronunciations, both on first syllable: \ˈter-(ˌ)ō, ˈta-(ˌ)rō\ http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tarot All 3 pronunciations on Forvo have accent on first syllable: http://forvo.com/word/tarot/#en (granted, all 3 are US pronunciations) The British pronunciation example on http://www.thefreedictionary.com/tarot ...


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Meet me in the middle, meet me halfway, or, equivalently, let's split the difference all mean the same as each other that is, when two parties are negotiating and one wants to sell high and the other buy low, they can agree on a compromise price that's halfway between each of their offers, but they are different than the meaning of the French idiom. (Yes, ...


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Consider, cut a halfway deal cut a deal: Offer or arrange an agreement or compromise. This expression uses deal in the sense of "business transaction." [Colloquial; 1970s] The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer At least for now, President Reagan is shunning West Europe's advice that he cut a halfway deal with the Soviet Union ...


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You could consider saying, "Let's go halves on something". To go halves means: to share the whole amount (of something with another person): 'to go halves on an orange' Note: You should not use "go half on something". It doesn't have the same meaning. You could also consider using "Let's go (or split something) half and half". Half and half means: ...


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even steven Fair; even; equitable More detail on origin a fair distribution of resources, a mutually beneficial trade ...


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There's an idiom Divide 50-50 To divide something into two equal parts. (The fifty means 50 percent.) Tommy and Billy divided the candy fifty-fifty. The robbers split the money fifty-fifty.


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You can split apples in half, and both sides will be happy (unless they planned to eat the apple later). Sometimes both sides are unhappy with the outcome of splitting, or if you just want a funnier or more visceral version of split the different you can split the baby Definition (from a site dedicated to mediation): ‘Splitting the Baby’ – Thomas ...


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In England we sometimes use a similar idiom: meet me in the middle, or meet me halfway, or, equivalently, let's split the difference. They all mean the same, that is, when two parties are negotiating and one wants to sell high and the other buy low, they can agree on a compromise price that's halfway between each of their offers. The Free Dictionary lists ...


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Why do determiners seem implicit in English? Because the definite article the is mainly used to explicitly identify or specify nouns that are countable such as regular nouns; dog, face, heart which is beating in a body and boy, etc. and collective nouns; family, nation, people, etc. It doesn't mean that countable nouns take only the definite article. ...


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In French prune and raisin refer to plums and grapes in their natural state; in English they refer to the dried variety. I suppose this is because in the old days it was the only way of preserving them for export. Also there's sacre bleu and zut alors, both expressions of annoyance that nobody actually uses.


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I would posit that in US English, Fillet qualifies as a Fake French word, merely due to how most people I have known from the US pronounce it (fɪl·eɪ rather than fɪl.ɪt).


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Would "petty" count? Or has it been part of English so long that it has become an English word?


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Of course there exist words as described and they are called loanwords. From the British Library, we have: "Loanwords are words brought into one country from another. Words are generally 'loaned' when two different cultures come into contact with each other. This might be because of immigration, trade, fashions or foods, travellers tales, the arts ...


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One French word which has (perhaps amusingly) taken on a dramatically new meaning in English (esp. US) is douche: shower


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'Connoisseur' is interesting because it is 'fake' in two ways; the modern French spelling is connaisseur, and the French word refers to knowledge rather than appreciation.


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Patron First time I traveled to the US, I was quite puzzled by a "Patron Parking Only" sign outside a restaurant. Patron evolved differently with one of it English meaning being customer while in French patron main acception is colloquial for manager, i.e. translates to boss. I somewhat hesitated to risk parking my car to a space I thought was reserved ...


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My all time fave is "Voulez vous coucher avec moi ce soir?" Oh wait. What's that? You say that actually does mean, "Do you want to...?" My bad.


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A couple words from western USA/Canada, left over from early exploration days: plew - a beaver skin Dictionaries claim it to be from the French pelu (hairy), but in mountain man/history buff circles it's often claimed to be from the French plus (more) parfleche - dry rawhide, or a container made from rawhide. In reality, it's not literally rawhide. It's ...


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In BrE, as well as in French, "à la mode" means "fashionable". However, in AmE, it means "with a scoop of icecream". Similarly, interpretations of entrée differ radically, meaning "starter" in BrE, and "main course" in AmE, and "entrance" in French.


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I think the term you are looking for is false friend, or in French, faux-ami. False friends are words in two languages (or letters in two alphabets)1 that look or sound similar, but differ significantly in meaning. An example is the English embarrassed and the Spanish embarazada (which means pregnant), or the word sensible, which means ...


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In Eurovision "nul points" or "nil points" are made-up expressions meaning zero points: When a country finishes with a score of zero, it is often referred to in English-language media as nul points, or sometimes nil points. The correct French for "no points" is pas de points or zéro point, but none of these phrases is used in the contest, as ...


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Entrée actually means appetizer in French. the French use "plat principal" ou "plat de resistance" for entrée.


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Coup de grace is sometimes used to mean Mow de lawn. Campers often have En tent Cordial. Fixez les brakes seems to have superseded Reparer les freins


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One interesting case is how chaise longue has long since evolved into chaise lounge in some usage in the US.


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And "cul-de-sac". French call a dead-end street "impasse".


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petite in English is used as an adjective for a woman or girl that is both short and slender. Kylie Minogue is petite Kylie Minogue est toute menue or Kelly Minogue est un petit bout de femme. Whereas petite in French is the feminine of petit, which can be used both as an adjective and a noun for just about anything that is small (in size, scope, ...


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Something that crossed my mind is "Omelette du fromage". I don't know if it is used by English speaking people but I do know it is a well known phrase among some people. From Urban Dictionary: The amazing phrase from Dexter's laboratory in the episode "The Big Cheese", when he listens to a French recording overnight to learn said language. This ...


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"Double entendre" is a fake term made of two real French words which is only understood by English speakers and has no real meaning in French: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_entendre#Etymology


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Yes, there's even two sections for different types of these in the Wikipedia article about French phrases used in English ("List of French expressions in English"): Not used as such in French Found only in English I remember reading before that nom de plume is not idiomatic in French, where instead they use nom de guerre. However, it appears that nom de ...


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Parley - To treat, discuss terms; esp. to hold a parley (with an enemy or opponent), to come to parley. (OED) This is a French word that has a different English meaning.



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