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The idea to explain the English word government or the French word gouvernement with Latin/Greek gubernare to govern and Latin mens/mentis mind is ridiculous. In Latin we have a lot of words with the suffix -men: flu-ere to flow and flu-men river. And we have a lot more words with the suffix -mentum as in funda-mentum. Nobody would dare to maintain that ...


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In French there are two etymologically separate suffixes –ment. First there is –ment from Latin mente, the ablative of mēns “mind”. This is used in French to form adverbs from adjectives, like lentement “slowly”. Then there is –ment from Latin –mentum, which forms abstract nouns from verbs. This is not connected with the words for “mind” but derives from the ...


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I have a Latin to English dictionary. It is a BOOK not the internet. [Government comes from the term govern. From Old French governer, derived from Latin gubernare "to direct, rule, guide, govern", which is derived from the Greek kybernan (to pilot a ship).] This part is 100% true but it only covers the first part of the word. This gives NO explanation for ...


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Sounds like it is an au pair for pets. Pet au pair Typically, au pairs take on a share of the family's responsibility for childcare pet-care as well as some housework, and receive a small monetary allowance for personal use.


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Government comes from the term govern. From Old French governer, derived from Latin gubernare "to direct, rule, guide, govern", which is derived from the Greek kybernan (to pilot a ship). Don't believe the nonsense you read online. There is precedent that the suffix -ment is derived from the latin mente meaning mind in some languages, particularly Old ...


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Just google "etymology of government" and you'll get a ton of resources: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/government#Etymology http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Government#Etymology



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