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Incidentals (plural noun): details or costs that relate to something, but which are comparatively unimportant Derives from incidental (adjective): happening as a minor accompaniment to something else [Sources]: Cambridge Dict.; Oxford Dict. Incidentals is often used as an agenda item in financial or business meetings, to record money spent on meals, ...


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"Any Other Business" (AOB) comes at the end of a meeting's agenda and provides for discussion of matters which are less important than main agenda items. That's the theory. In your example, to say "and now for the any other business" would be somewhat clunky, but that might introduce the "humoristic note"? Also, since AOB matters are not listed on the ...


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  The expression on a lighter note may convey the meaning you are referring to: used when you are going to say something that is less serious than what you were talking about before. (MacMillan Dictionar.) On a lighter note, Jane's birthday is tomorrow, don't forget to stock the staplers....


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You might consider In other news This is more broadly just a switch to a different subject but it should work well in your situation.


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In my bilingual school for my european baccalaureate, and from experience being english and french, I believe that it's a "simple question" "question on the curriculum (content)" "part of the course" "fact of the matter question"... fact of the matter is fairly suitable because, it describes simplicity and is "un faite relatif au sujet" which is a logical ...


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Here's what I found: Origin 1425-75; late Middle English rejoinen < Anglo-French rejoyner, variant of Middle French rejoindre, equivalent to re- re- + joindre to join As a French language enthusiast, I know the French verb 'rejoindre' means get back (to s.o), meet (s.o again), catch up with (s.o). It also means rejoin. But it doesn't mean 'reply', ...


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We can follow the development of countenance starting with the etymology of contain: late 13c., from Old French contein-, stem of contenir, from Latin continere (transitive) "to hold together, enclose," from com- "together" (see com-) + tenere "to hold" (see tenet). Moving step by step, through the etymology of countenance: v. late 15c., "to ...


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I believe we derived it from the phrase to keep someone in countenance, which means to help someone to remain calm and confident, or sort of to help them retain a good face. The word countenance comes from the Old French word coutenance meaning ‘bearing, behavior,’ from contenir, from which we also derive the modern word contain. Contenir comes from the ...


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The state of the art The accepted answer is wrong because OP has been misled by incorrect comments: there is no prefix 'at-', and no derivation from Latin. The English verb 'attach' has 2 t's because it derives from the French 'attacher' (ancien français estachier = ficher, du francique *stakka = pieu) The root of both words is Proto-Germanic stakô ...


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the prefix at- literally means to, toward, near, in addition to, by. The prefix de- means from, down, away, to do the opposite, reverse, against. The only difference is that attach has a "t" in its prefix.


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They are different simply because the are derived from two different 'Old French' words: attacher (from Old French: attachier) detacher (earlier: destachier) source: Oxford (pp. 141, 649, since Middle English, from Old French estachier = fasten ) Note : The French words themselves are not derived from Latin but a from Proto-Germanic root, but this is ...



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