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As you can imagine, an idiom in one language doesn't necessarily translate literally into an idiom in another language. So the French idiom "half fig, half raisin" might be guessed to mean something like the English idiom "six of one, half a dozen of the other", in actual usage, it does not. Checking with some French language enthusiasts ...


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Having looked in Petit Robert, I think "mi figue, mi raisin" has an element of personal demeanour about it which none of the suggestions above captures. "An ambiguous appearance of satisfaction and discontent, or serious and joking". I saw it used to describe the behaviour of Inspector Maigret (surly and mercurial by turns...). I don't think there is a ...


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Birdbrain of course. (which is both related to sparrow and skull) Slang A person regarded as silly or stupid. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/birdbrain A depiction of "crâne de piaf": http://www.delitdimages.org/apres-le-crane-doeuf-le-crane-de-piaf/


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Whilst numbskull would have been my chosen answer had not @medica got there first, another possibility is scatterbrain. It has a rather different meaning to numbskull. whilst the first means dim-witted, scatterbrain suggests someone disorganised and lacking in concentration. A dickhead on the other hand is 'a stupid, irritating, or ridiculous man' Oxford ...


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Pinhead. But this can also refer to someone with microcephaly. Both "Crâne de piaf" and "pinhead" make use of the idea (whether necessarily true or not) that a small head implies little intelligence.


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The only "not intelligent" + "skull" that I can think of is numbskull: a dull-witted or stupid person; dolt. Since 1710-20, originally spelled numskull. Per webanswers, The word numbskull or numskull was derived from the Middle English words nome + scolle. The first recorded usage of the term was in the early 18th century. The actual origin of the ...



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