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34

One can take a moment or an instant to indicate a short amount of time; depending on context this may mean a fraction of a second, several minutes, or a period of years: The doctor will be out in a moment. Neo-swing enjoyed a moment of mainstream popularity in the 1990s. Something which is almost instantaneous is done in a flash, blink, or ...


30

For a car or a train, if you stop using the engine to propel it, you can say that you coast to a stop, or that the train (or car) is coasting. I haven't heard this used for boats (and Googling seems to indicate that if you coast in a boat, it often means that you are following the coastline), but I don't know what term would be used instead. UPDATE: As ...


24

Quyer and choir possibly have different meanings. From the context you gave, it looks like quyer is the equivalent of the modern-day word quire. A quire is not a group of singers, but rather it's the part of a church where those singers sit. Choir is clearly a strongly related word, describing the group of singers. To muddy the water a bit, the spelling ...


17

I think the word you are looking for here is momentum, as in traveling on momentum alone. momentum n 2. (Physics / General Physics) the impetus of a body resulting from its motion


16

Playing violin is George's forte a person's strong suit, or most highly developed characteristic, talent, or skill; something that one excels in. Etymologically, 1640s, from French fort "strong point (of a sword blade)," also fort, from Middle French fort. Meaning "strong point of a person" is from 1680s. Final -e- added 18c. in ...


12

Literally, à la only means (in this case) in the. It's an abbreviation of à la mode de, which means in the style of. The de is not governed by the gender of the place/person/etc that follows. So your usage is correct.


12

Q.E.D - Quod erat demonstrandum - is put at the end of of a proof to signify that what we attempted to prove has been proven. Q.E.F. - Quod erat faciendum - is a term that is used in geometric proof to signify that the geometric construction has been completed. It is a rarely used English abbreviation. From the article the correct translation is Q.E.F. but ...


12

A blink of an eye and a split second come to mind. Edit: If you insist on a single word, you'll have to go with an instant, or get creative and change the sentence structure to accommodate a different part of speech, like momentar(il)y.


11

According to this paper (PDF) from Phillip Slavin, chicken was one meat that even the peasantry could afford to eat. Although poultry occupied the smallest part of demesne livestock, constituting about two per cent of it (Table 1), its social importance and omnipresence cannot be understated, despite scholarly marginalization. Chicken meat constituted ...


11

The term cocktail hour has been used in the US to mean the interval before the evening meal during which cocktails and other alcoholic beverages are often served However, this is not limited to beer and light alcoholic beverages, but may include wine or strong spirits as well.


11

Why spell it connoisseur? You’ve basically answered your own question here. The French word has been spelt connaître for close to two centuries. Connoisseur was borrowed into the English language some time around three centuries ago, when it was spelt that way in French. The fact that French has changed the spelling of the French since does not mean that ...


9

Hercule Poirot is a Belgian and speaks Belgian French. In the television series, David Suchet uses and switches between if you please and s'il vous plaît on a regular basis, and as such wears his civilised foreignness openly. I expect that the Poirot in the books shares the same affectation. So, yes, I do believe that the use of if you please is intentional ...


9

First of all, those statistics from Wikipedia may be a bit misleading, depending on your point of view. What they seem to have done is count every word in a 80,000-word dictionary once, regardless of whether the word is very rare or very frequent. Consider the preceding sentences: -First -of -all, -those +statistics -from -Wikipedia -may -be -a -bit ...


8

"If you please" has been found in English at least as far back as 1563 according the OED. c1563 Jyl of Breyntfords Test. sig. B.ii, But tary I pray you all if ye please. So if it ever came from French, it's sure English now.


8

I think the underlying sentiment is probably the same as the English saying All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy, which usually means you need to indulge yourself sometimes.


8

The term appears to be technology watch: Known as "technology watch", this essentially means gathering and analyzing technological information and using it to help grow your business. Technology watch also costs 5 to 25 times less than intensive internal research, especially when acquiring new equipment. Originally applied only to technology, this ...


8

You might be looking for the phrase "savoir-faire" also. In English, it mainly means know-how (knowing how to do) but it connotes a knowledge that comes from an expertise as well. From vocabulary.com: The nearest English equivalent of savoir-faire is know-how. But while know-how pertains to nearly all skills, especially practical ones, savoir-faire ...


8

Government comes from the term govern. From Old French governer, derived from Latin gubernare "to direct, rule, guide, govern", which is derived from the Greek kybernan (to pilot a ship). Don't believe the nonsense you read online. There is precedent that the suffix -ment is derived from the latin mente meaning mind in some languages, particularly Old ...


7

A couple of rather-peripherally-related idioms are neither fish nor fowl and "some of this, some of that", neither of which is as close as Martin Beckett's Curate's egg suggestion, but both of which seem more related than phrases like "six of one, half a dozen of the other". The idiom "mixed bag" meaning #3, "something tending to have both good and bad ...


7

Perhaps this might be relevant to the Cookery SE as well. How about Turkey à la King? As you say, à la means "in the style of". It's reached English and is now subject to English rules, which do not [for the most part] include gender-specific expressions. It doesn't matter whether Gordon Ramsey is male or not: à la is used regardless. Further examples: ...


7

I would say they are colloquial, but I have always like tad or mite


6

This depends on the country or university. For the US in general: lectures - where the professor (prof) talks a lot for the whole time, with few questions or interruptions. recitation or section or discussion - recitation is more formal hoe it might be referred to officially or in course catalogs, section is what people actually say. Section is usually ...


6

It depends on the type of class, the type of school, and quite possibly geography. When I took engineering and chemistry classes in university (in the United States), we had lecture, recitation ("travaux dirigés"), and labs (laboratory.) In non-science classes, practical work was a part of recitation and there was no separate laboratory section. This was ...


6

The train is 'traveling under its own inertia': Inertia is the resistance of any physical object to a change in its state of motion or rest, or the tendency of an object to resist any change in its motion. The train is resisting the frictional forces acting on it, and thus slows, but continues without an external driving force acting on it.


6

S’il vous plaît means if it please you, not if you please. The formulation if it please occurs often enough in the KJV. If it please the king, let there go a royal commandment from him, and let it be written among the laws of the Persians and the Medes, that it be not altered, That Vashti come no more before king Ahasuerus; and let the king give her ...


6

"Away boarders!!!!' is a classic cry. Or, "Away all boarders" in US Navy use. Wikipedia - Danile V Gallery - the last man to use it officially. They say: This incident was the last time that the order "Away All Boarders!" was given by a U.S. Navy captain. Lieutenant Albert David, who led the boarding party, received the Medal of Honor for his courage in ...


6

Fowl and poultry are both used for birds-as-food, although not exclusively. It sounds a bit fancy. So I would say that your assumption is mistaken, because fowl is the normal word for the flesh of birds used for food. The OED’s sense 4a of fowl is indeed “The flesh of birds used for food,” as in the phrase fish, flesh, and fowl. You would probably find ...


6

The OED takes a whack at explaining this as follows: Etymology: app. orig. = invoyes, pl. of invoy, corresp. to 16th c. Fr. envoy (now envoi), f. envoyer to send: cf. Fr. lettre d’envoi letter of consignment, invoice. Inferentially, this derivation is satisfactory, both as to meaning and form. In‑  from Fr. and earlier Eng. en‑  is usual; and the ...


6

The orthographical resemblance is purely accidental. According to the OED, seize < Old French saisir < Frankish Late Latin sacire, which in turn might originate with a Frankish cognate of the English set. On the other hand, French seize < Latin sēdecim, which can be analysed as sex + decem (i.e., "six" + "ten"); indeed, I suppose one could argue ...


6

This question is really very interesting. tl;dr The short answer is no, not really: there is nowhere today in the English-speaking world where religious imagery is anywhere near as frequently used for swearing as occurs in French-speaking Québec. Detail, details, details I strongly encourage anyone who can read French to read the Wikipedia article on ...



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