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43

Yes, there's even two sections for different types of these in the Wikipedia article about French phrases used in English ("List of French expressions in English"): Not used as such in French Found only in English I remember reading before that nom de plume is not idiomatic in French, where instead they use nom de guerre. However, it appears that nom de ...


42

"Double entendre" is a fake term made of two real French words which is only understood by English speakers and has no real meaning in French: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_entendre#Etymology


32

One can take a moment or an instant to indicate a short amount of time; depending on context this may mean a fraction of a second, several minutes, or a period of years: The doctor will be out in a moment. Neo-swing enjoyed a moment of mainstream popularity in the 1990s. Something which is almost instantaneous is done in a flash, blink, or twinkle,...


31

For a car or a train, if you stop using the engine to propel it, you can say that you coast to a stop, or that the train (or car) is coasting. I haven't heard this used for boats (and Googling seems to indicate that if you coast in a boat, it often means that you are following the coastline), but I don't know what term would be used instead. UPDATE: As ...


23

Quyer and choir possibly have different meanings. From the context you gave, it looks like quyer is the equivalent of the modern-day word quire. A quire is not a group of singers, but rather it's the part of a church where those singers sit. Choir is clearly a strongly related word, describing the group of singers. To muddy the water a bit, the spelling ...


23

In England we sometimes use a similar idiom: meet me in the middle, or meet me halfway, or, equivalently, let's split the difference. They all mean the same, that is, when two parties are negotiating and one wants to sell high and the other buy low, they can agree on a compromise price that's halfway between each of their offers. The Free Dictionary lists ...


21

There are many variations, all of which roughly translate to the same as the French you quote. There's no "definitive" version. A quick Google produces examples including: If you are not paying for it, you're not the customer; you're the product being sold https://www.quora.com/Who-originally-suggested-that-if-youre-not-paying-for-the-product-you-are-...


19

Why spell it connoisseur? You’ve basically answered your own question here. The French word has been spelt connaître for close to two centuries. Connoisseur was borrowed into the English language some time around three centuries ago, when it was spelt that way in French. The fact that French has changed the spelling of the French since does not mean that ...


19

As user77834 points out, the currently accepted answer is quite simply not correct and should not be accepted. This question is really, unwittingly, asking two separate questions: Why is there a difference in the number of consonants in word pairs like attach and detach? Since the answer to (1) lies in etymology, what is the etymology behind attach and ...


19


17

I think the word you are looking for here is momentum, as in traveling on momentum alone. momentum n 2. (Physics / General Physics) the impetus of a body resulting from its motion


16

'Kash' is the correct pronunciation. If you pronounce it 'kash-ey' then you're actually using a different word entirely, cachet.


16

Playing violin is George's forte a person's strong suit, or most highly developed characteristic, talent, or skill; something that one excels in. Etymologically, 1640s, from French fort "strong point (of a sword blade)," also fort, from Middle French fort. Meaning "strong point of a person" is from 1680s. Final -e- added 18c. in imitation ...


16

Either. An animal of unknown gender is it. Look at the cat, it's so cute. Look at what the cat does. It's the cutest thing I have seen. Look at the picture, it's cute. The translations would be It is too cute (the cat, any gender) and It is too cute (the situation). You can use This/That is too cute to emphasize the situation though.


13

According to this paper (PDF) from Phillip Slavin, chicken was one meat that even the peasantry could afford to eat. Although poultry occupied the smallest part of demesne livestock, constituting about two per cent of it (Table 1), its social importance and omnipresence cannot be understated, despite scholarly marginalization. Chicken meat constituted ...


13

Literally, à la only means (in this case) in the. It's an abbreviation of à la mode de, which means in the style of. The de is not governed by the gender of the place/person/etc that follows. So your usage is correct.


13

Q.E.D - Quod erat demonstrandum - is put at the end of of a proof to signify that what we attempted to prove has been proven. Q.E.F. - Quod erat faciendum - is a term that is used in geometric proof to signify that the geometric construction has been completed. It is a rarely used English abbreviation. From the article the correct translation is Q.E.F. but ...


12

A blink of an eye and a split second come to mind. Edit: If you insist on a single word, you'll have to go with an instant, or get creative and change the sentence structure to accommodate a different part of speech, like momentar(il)y.


11

The term cocktail hour has been used in the US to mean the interval before the evening meal during which cocktails and other alcoholic beverages are often served However, this is not limited to beer and light alcoholic beverages, but may include wine or strong spirits as well.


11

First of all, those statistics from Wikipedia may be a bit misleading, depending on your point of view. What they seem to have done is count every word in a 80,000-word dictionary once, regardless of whether the word is very rare or very frequent. Consider the preceding sentences: -First -of -all, -those +statistics -from -Wikipedia -may -be -a -bit -...


11

Parley - To treat, discuss terms; esp. to hold a parley (with an enemy or opponent), to come to parley. (OED) This is a French word that has a different English meaning.


11

Patron First time I traveled to the US, I was quite puzzled by a "Patron Parking Only" sign outside a restaurant. Patron evolved differently with one of it English meaning being customer while in French patron main acception is colloquial for manager, i.e. translates to boss. I somewhat hesitated to risk parking my car to a space I thought was reserved ...


11

There's an idiom Divide 50-50 To divide something into two equal parts. (The fifty means 50 percent.) Tommy and Billy divided the candy fifty-fifty. The robbers split the money fifty-fifty.


10

Hercule Poirot is a Belgian and speaks Belgian French. In the television series, David Suchet uses and switches between if you please and s'il vous plaît on a regular basis, and as such wears his civilised foreignness openly. I expect that the Poirot in the books shares the same affectation. So, yes, I do believe that the use of if you please is intentional ...


10

The term appears to be technology watch: Known as "technology watch", this essentially means gathering and analyzing technological information and using it to help grow your business. Technology watch also costs 5 to 25 times less than intensive internal research, especially when acquiring new equipment. Originally applied only to technology, this ...


10

Government comes from the term govern. From Old French governer, derived from Latin gubernare "to direct, rule, guide, govern", which is derived from the Greek kybernan (to pilot a ship). Don't believe the nonsense you read online. There is precedent that the suffix -ment is derived from the latin mente meaning mind in some languages, particularly Old ...


10

I don't think "it" refers to anything here. "It's too cute" is an idiomatic expression comparable to "It's raining" or "It's time for dinner"--in both of which the "it" is a nonreferential or dummy pronoun.


10

One French word which has (perhaps amusingly) taken on a dramatically new meaning in English (esp. US) is douche: shower



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