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11

I think what you are actually hearing is a short, simple "uh-huh", which is intended as an acknowledgement that they have received your thanks and consider the exchange complete. It is not intended to be rude; in fact, ignoring someone who says "thanks" is much ruder. It's very informal, and is probably mostly used when whatever answer they gave that ...


4

Coördinating conjunctions, such as and, or and but, can be used to begin a new sentence. This was already widely accepted in Fowler's time, and probably always. There is nothing wrong with the conjunctions in your examples. In general, though, you should apply this feature of our language judiciously: do not do it every other sentence. However, you should ...


4

Edited [The original post asked for ah, not aha.] To a peer or a social inferior, aha may indeed be appropriate in casual situations— in fact, a mere mmm or wave of the hand would be sufficient. It is an acknowledgement of the thanks, but simultaneously a dismissal of it as if it were unnecessary. I almost never hear you're welcome, the conventional ...


3

Most writers on English style deprecate what is mockingly called "elegant variation", using synonyms purely in order to avoid repetition. Using different words suggests to a reader that two different concepts are involved, which is clearly not the case in your example. You make your point more strongly by using the same word with explicitly contrasted terms ...


2

"enveloped,enveloping,envelops" Put her situation, feelings and wants first then the mans. Sit back and watch the dominance and social conditioning ensue. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/envelop


2

I myself would rather use "Could you please appease my curiosity?", however, I'd say that either indulge or satisfy would be also ok. "Could you please kill my curiosity?" sounds a bit blunt to me in this context.


1

If this were erotic fiction, and I needed to express the assertive role of a woman during lovemaking, I might say: she tightly squeezed his turgid man-root (etc.) her vaginal muscles clenched/seized his phallus (etc.) [the link is not vulgar, but it's NSFW]


1

"Took in" could work. And I've seen "swallowed" in racier contexts.


1

If by correct you mean grammatical, then all three sentences are grammatical, although some might argue for inserting an and after move on,. As for formality, my intuitive response on reading the sentences was that the despite variant is the most formal. This may be because the despite having + past participle seems less common than the (even) though + ...


1

The first one is correct. You have to phrase the others like this: That way my mom can move on, find someone else, (even) though she swore she'd only marry God." EDIT: If you're trying to decide which one sounds the least formal, I'd say go with the third one.


1

You would need to leave out "are" and put a comma after CRC. . . . hashing. MD5, SHA1 and CRC, to name but a few. another way would be to swap like this: . . . hashing; to name but a few, MD5, SHA1 and CRC. (For a bit more punch, you could substitute an em-dash for the period or semicolon above, respectively.)


1

I, while accepting the idea of starting conjunctions, can't quite applaud your own sentences here. I'd say the suggested conjunctions are not optimal for the logical transitions at hand. Also, the first sentence needs a fix in terms of verb consistency. I'd suggest: "The organization should have taken the blame. /Otherwise/If not/, its leader should have ...


1

Admittedly this is not precisely an answer to the question as asked, but be not too hasty to reject hidden gem as unsuitable for formal discourse. Formal discourse does not eschew idiom provided that the idiom in question is neither conspicuously vulgar nor excessively specific to a single region or social grouping; it aims at a certain universality. In ...


1

Starting with the defintion of single: adj. 1.- Not accompanied by another or others; solitary. 2.c. Consisting of one in number: She had but a single thought, which was to escape. the freedictionary.com Continuing with the definition of one: adj. Being a single entity, unit, object, or living being: I ate one peach. ...


1

Packing is a difficult task in itself, let alone moving it.


1

Use the full spelling initially, while introducing the abbreviation. Then you can abbreviate from then on. Such as, "The dependent variable is the logarithm, or log, of GDP." Then throughout the rest of the paper you can use, "The log of GDP..."


1

There is nothing wrong with the grammar of the sentence nor is it language unsuitable for formal writing. If you want, you can describe the difficulties presented in those spots. The writing is illegible. The print has been obscured. The wording is ambiguous. The grammar is flawed. The spelling is inconsistent. This tends to be helpful in formal writing ...


1

"Dear Both" strikes me as very contrived and awkwardly formal. If you're addressing an email to two co-workers, "John and Susan", seems much more appropriate. If they're friends, "Dear John and Susan" seems much more personal.


1

Yes. Unbelievably, it is "reasonable," with closely acquainted addressees. The process of growing friendship can be seen in the greetings: Dear Signora, Dear Mrs, My Dear (the surname crossed out), Marcello and Munira, Cara, give place to My dearest, Dear Both and in the last one, Dear Child. Sean O'Faolain's Letters to Brazil, 2005, p.172 Note ...



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