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4

Do not use "right up my alley" in a cover letter. A suitable substitute would be, "a perfect fit for me."


3

In this instance it is simple politeness to say "Thank You" when someone hands you something.


3

Generally "It appears" or "It would appear that" are somewhat closer to what you seem to be looking for, though it's not really formal language, per se.


3

I wouldn't use this term in a cover letter as it sounds a little cheeky and I'm guessing that that's not the impression you wish to make with a would be employer. ;)


2

The preposition like is generally considered a bit informal when followed by a clause: It looks like [I misunderstood Berta's explanation] But is slightly less informal when followed by a noun phrase: It looks like [rain]. If you want to achieve a less informal effect you can use a preposition phrase headed by as though: It looks as though I ...


2

AS SD2 notes, "to fuck around" means to putter, dither, do random ineffectual things. "The fuck arounds" is a nominalization. If you wake up with them, then you are going to fuck around and thereby abandon anything you planned to do or anything unplanned but useful. This reminds me too of quantum mechanics, in that people using twitter, reddit, and random ...


2

In America, you'd more often hear "We're going to have beers", or "We're going out to have a beer" or "We're going out for beer" or "We're going out for beers". "Have us a beer" would be understood, but not common in the US, and if someone said it like that, I'd expect it to be delivered with amusement in the person's tone, because the person is probably ...


1

When you sew up something, you are sewing shut a hole. Think of "sewn up" as an antonym of "open." Instead of the sales compitition being wide open, Bil has closed it, or sewn it up.


1

A good clue as to how a person wishes to be addressed by you is how they sign off on email communications, and how they address you too. If they sign off with their first names and use informal closing phrases such as Best, Bob you're probably ok to use the person's first name. Another linguistic clue is how other people in a similar position to you address ...


1

I don't know of any particular connection to Indian English. The idea that lower-case "i" is somehow more humble did appear in a New York Times essay by Caroline Winter about the English first-person singular pronoun, "Me, Myself and I" (hat tip to Neil Fein for locating the article in his answer to the question "Is it alright to use lowercase 'i' or should ...


1

In terms of labelling a human, simply popular is your best alternate. It's that simple. Note however that (as I think you suggest) "cool" (when labelling a human) can have three main meanings: Cool as in Joe Walsh Cool as in sang froid (although this is less used by young people, only boring old people use it this way) Cool as in simply "popular", ...


1

The usual way to denote an acceleration of "ten gee" in technical writing would be 10g (lower case 'g'). Upper case 'G' usually denotes the Universal Gravitational Constant that appears in the law of gravitational attraction.



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