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9

Flatulence: the presence of too much gas or air in the stomach or intestines. The action would be flatulate: To emit digestive gases from the anus, especially with accompanying sound. Fart is the slang form. After long hours of scouring the etymology of 'noisy bowels', I came across this gem. Borborygm: The noise made by gas in the bowels. Thought ...


6

OED does note that Anglican has been used to mean English: 2. gen. In non-religious contexts: English. Now rare. 1871 J. Ruskin Fors Clavigera I. iii. 19 The quite Anglican character of [King] Richard, to his death. 1959 Amer. Lit. 30 449 The sources of future enrichings of the Anglican speech are the same old fountains. Sense ...


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It's probably best to use English instead of Anglican (and Anglomania instead of Anglicanism), as Anglican is used to describe the Church of England, while "English" does not have this confusion. Dictionary.com reflects this in its meaning for "Anglican": adjective 1. of or pertaining to the Church of England. 2. related in origin to and in communion ...


4

GIG noun: : a job usually for a specified time; especially : an entertainer's engagement. Source: Merriam-Webster Dictionary gig (n.2) "job," first used by jazz musicians, attested from 1915 but said to have been in use c.1905; of uncertain origin. As a verb, by 1939. Related: Gigged; gigging. Source: Etymology online Given the origin and use I'd say ...


4

You should probably avoid saying it directly, as directness is often impolite. To end an argument, you can suggest that the two of you could "agree to disagree". If you're looking to discuss a matter further, you can start your comment with, "Respectfully, sir/ma'am/professor, ..." Then follow up with something that is actually respectful of the ...


3

All it does is to emphasise that someone has gone about something in a very businesslike way, with determination. It is neither polite nor impolite. And it is not a radical expression. But it is often spoken with irony e.g. emphasising a business-like way of dealing with something that is not normally a business matter, in order to get over the idea of a ...


3

To make [a task] one's business is to devote oneself to the task, and treat it as a priority. There is often an implication that the person is taking on a task that no one else is willing or able to do: When I saw what state the club's books were in, I made it my business to ensure that all of the accounts balanced correctly. Depending on the context, ...


3

It depends what you mean by I don't believe you. If you mean that you think the teacher is lying, then you are probably better advised to talk to a counselor or administrator rather than confront the teacher directly. I can't think of any tactful formulation of your assumption that the teacher is deliberately deceiving you. If, on the other hand, you are ...


2

In general, you would likely wish to suggest that the error is yours, not theirs. It's a way of keeping them sympathetic to you. And, allows both of you to save face. So, rather than saying you don't believe them, you would say that you don't understand their explanation. Several good ways to do so have been suggested above, to which I will add: I'm ...


2

There used to be a distinction. "Do you have a car?" meant "Do you possess a car", whether the car is here now or at a garage or parked in your driveway at home. "Have you got a car?" had a more immediate meaning of "Have you got it with you now?" However, I think that distinction disappeared a long time ago.


2

"has made it his business to..." means to take on a cause and be an advocate for something. It means the person is applying himself to a challenging course of activity and has made it an important part of his work. In other words, the person has decided it is up to him to do something that others are not doing, and that he deems worthy. When someone has made ...


2

The general sense of charging something is to bring a strong accusation or assertion (particularly of wrong-doing). Clearly, the most common place for an assertion of this type would be in a legal proceeding. Charge that is used in the legal sense in your first two examples. It means that legal allegations have been brought against an entity or person ...


2

I guess I kinda can add something of value here. I'm AmE, and I do sometimes use those colloquial, non-standard spellings, such as "kinda", "sorta", and others -- intentionally. (There are other non-standard spelt words which sometimes are used for similar intentions: gonna, gotta, hafta, oughta, supposta, usta, wanna. Those examples happen to have the ...


1

I try to avoid using "so" in formal / business writing. Someone suggested "therefore" as an alternative, but in some cases that may sound too strong, as it implies an indisputable logical conclusion. I don't think your example is trying to express it that strongly. Perhaps it's helpful to put things in a different order, and use because instead: You are ...


1

Terminology varies across the software industry; in some companies everybody is happy with "bug"; in other places you might be expected to use terms like "defect", "fault" or "issue". Sorry to not be able to give you a definite answer, but you'll need to ask around to find what's in general usage in your context. One piece of advice which is useful though: ...


1

Defect is generally preferable, it covers deviations from the expected results of a system, although it usually excludes problems caused by human operators (e.g. if the user enters some bad data, and the program handles the exception appropriately, as per spec, it's not a defect). Bug is more informal - I will sometimes say something is a bug but not in ...


1

Noun: accompaniment -2. something that is supplementary to or complements something else, typically food. "sugar snap peas make a delicious accompaniment for salmon" Verb: accompany M-W A delicious sauce accompanied the grilled fish complement M-W a delicious dinner complemented by a splendid dessert


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In exchanges with lawyers, potential employers and so forth, leave the onus of omitting greetings to the other party. Unless the other party has dropped the greeting, I would suggest erring on the side of formality and always including some kind of greeting, such as a simple "Hi John". The reason is that people react differently to the lack of greeting. ...


1

Aside from "with regard to," consider "with respect to." People tend to make subjective decisions with respect to traveling.


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You can certainly use "likewise" anywhere it fits and there is no reason why you can't also use the word "also" in an academic paper. I personally tend to use "also" only when necessary but sure, you can do it. also (adverb) in addition in a similar way likewise (adverb) in the same way in addition They aren't exactly synonymous but they can often ...


1

This type if construction is one of the most confusing in English. We native speakers do it instinctively, but I'm struggling to explain how/why so you can understand. The best way to think of this: it is an event that will have passed at some point in the future. (And, at that time will be referred to in the past tense.) If you wish to used paid (the ...


1

This is more an etiquette question than an English question, but the rule is easy enough. When in doubt, be consistent. If you would address your supervisor as "Mr. X" in person, you should do so in an email as well. Conversely, if you would address them as "Y" in person, address them as "Y" directly as well. It is possible that your subject may have ...



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