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32

First of all, it should be you're, not your. You can use this more formal phrase: "You're doomed."


22

Fix your "your/you are" mistake and do not use contractions in formal writing. The answer to your question depends on how strong your statement needs to be. You could use a mild version You are in trouble, or possibly you are out of options now. The already suggested you are doomed is a bit more dramatic. As a threat, it could be replaced by you are ...


10

I think what you are actually hearing is a short, simple "uh-huh", which is intended as an acknowledgement that they have received your thanks and consider the exchange complete. It is not intended to be rude; in fact, ignoring someone who says "thanks" is much ruder. It's very informal, and is probably mostly used when whatever answer they gave that ...


6

That really depends on the context, and how the individual is 'screwed'. We can't tell you what word or phrase best replaces it, because this is not the place for writing advice, but we can give you some suggestions. In the case that this person is 'screwed' because their plans haven't gone the way they want, or in the case that some fatal flaw has ruined ...


4

Edited [The original post asked for ah, not aha.] To a peer or a social inferior, aha may indeed be appropriate in casual situations— in fact, a mere mmm or wave of the hand would be sufficient. It is an acknowledgement of the thanks, but simultaneously a dismissal of it as if it were unnecessary. I almost never hear you're welcome, the conventional ...


4

"In serious trouble" is a bit wordy, but gets the point across without breaking formality. "Doomed" might also work if you believe that there is well and truly no good way out of the subject's predicament. If the goal of the statement includes humor, then you could try understatement by using something like "in a bit of a spot".


3

There is no common English phrase akin to bon appetit. In fact the most common way of wishing people to enjoy their meal in the English-speaking world is to use the French phrase bon appetit, which is so commonly used in English that it appears in English dictionaries. For something more "native" to English, sometimes people will simply say "enjoy!" though ...


3

In addition to the other suggestions, here are some alternatives in an approximate order of more formal -> less formal, at least by my reading you've found yourself in a conundrum you're in a bind you're out of luck you're at the end of the road you're done for you're dead you're screwed you're fucked


2

I myself would rather use "Could you please appease my curiosity?", however, I'd say that either indulge or satisfy would be also ok. "Could you please kill my curiosity?" sounds a bit blunt to me in this context.


1

Use the full spelling initially, while introducing the abbreviation. Then you can abbreviate from then on. Such as, "The dependent variable is the logarithm, or log, of GDP." Then throughout the rest of the paper you can use, "The log of GDP..."


1

There is nothing wrong with the grammar of the sentence nor is it language unsuitable for formal writing. If you want, you can describe the difficulties presented in those spots. The writing is illegible. The print has been obscured. The wording is ambiguous. The grammar is flawed. The spelling is inconsistent. This tends to be helpful in formal writing ...


1

"Dear Both" strikes me as very contrived and awkwardly formal. If you're addressing an email to two co-workers, "John and Susan", seems much more appropriate. If they're friends, "Dear John and Susan" seems much more personal.


1

Yes. Unbelievably, it is "reasonable," with closely acquainted addressees. The process of growing friendship can be seen in the greetings: Dear Signora, Dear Mrs, My Dear (the surname crossed out), Marcello and Munira, Cara, give place to My dearest, Dear Both and in the last one, Dear Child. Sean O'Faolain's Letters to Brazil, 2005, p.172 Note ...


1

What about: "your future is bleak" "you're in a dire situation" "A negative outcome is ineluctable"


1

If you are quoting from an online source, do not CHANGE any wording. The genteel way to quote it is You're scr***d.


1

Depending on the finality of the statement, if the person is definitely 'screwed' with no chance of redemption, you could use you're finished.


1

"Let's get tea for you and coffee for me." this sound much more natural in friendly conversation. Oops- that's exactly what Ryan Gell said! Upvoting his comment.


1

Both of those options sound somewhat informal. The more formal version of that phrase would be, "Does that sound acceptable?" or "Does that sound all right to you?" "Does that work for you" is more commonly seen in the form of a response, not a question. As in, "that works for me."


1

I think it depends on the audience, but I think, "Does that work for you?" sounds slightly more informal. However, my first reaction to either of those would not be that they sound "informal". Personally, I'd probably use, "Does that sound OK to you?"



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