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22

It is only ever used in a formal medical sense, with examples from the sixteenth century. Stool derives from the name given to an enclosed chamber, or commode, used for producing stools. The most usual form is in the plural. d. A discharge of fæcal matter of a specified colour, consistency, etc.; the matter discharged (chiefly pl.). (OED sense 5d). It is ...


12

"Stool" is more formal than poop or poo but sometimes more comfortable to say than feces or excrement. You could say "I've been having loose stool" to express that you don't quite have diarrhea, but it's somewhat in that direction. An example from Angel in Disguise: A Memoir The next morning after the children had their breakfast, I asked Verna ...


4

Be interesting to hear other examples of what the teacher considers to be formal words. How did the teacher define 'formal'? Does it mean words only used in certain settings or instances, words not commonly in use or just words that are not usually thought of, or perhaps are not specifically defined, as colloquialisms ? English is widely spoken around ...


3

If it begins a sentence, yes, it should be capitalized. Capitalization aids readability--it is a clear indication of where a sentence begins. Many people have many opinions about the so-called rules of grammar, but as far as I know, agreement that a sentence should begin with a capital letter is universal,* except perhaps in some poetic instances. Even ...


2

Oddly, "Dear So-and-So" is the most formal and appropriate form of address for business letters - either in email or hard copy format. Here the use of the word "dear" is a form of address, not a term of endearment. Just make sure you put the name AFTER the "Dear" and not before! Below is a sample template from: ...


2

As a polite way to address a person you are writing to it has been in used for centuries and has become sort of a cliché both for formal and informal mails: Dear: As a polite introductory word to letters, it is attested from mid-15c. (Etymonline)


2

As I see it, literary means that it is more often found in books, novels, and such. You wouldn't hear it very often in spoken conversation. Formal means that it is used in a context of formality -politicians, speeches, research studies...- , AND it could be both literary or spoken conversation. I am not sure where you can find a list like that, but if you ...


2

Although, as others have noted, stool is mainly used when discussing medical conditions related to fecal matter and is almost never used informally, it does appear in other contexts once in a while. For example, in a classic Saturday Night Live skit, Phil Hartman, playing Frank Sinatra, says to Sting, playing Billy Idol, "You don't scare me. I've got ...


1

Both the sentences are correct grammatically. Use of My name is X Sentence is widespread. Also, if you try to analyse both the sentences more deeply you will find that- 1.When you use My name is X, the emphasis is on you. 2.When you use The name is X, the emphasis is on the name. The name is Bond, James Bond.- Here the name seems to outshine the person.


1

Generally I would have said no, but I’ve noticed that the extensive use of ellipses was a distinctive feature of middlebrow historian Bruce Catton’s work. See, for example, page 26 of this best-seller of the 1950s, where he begins a paragraph(!) with them. So maybe I would say, use them, if you have a distinctive narrative style.


1

An engagement has largely taken the place of betrothal in the West. It used to be that a couple were betrothed (troth and to 'plight one's troth' means to promise or be loyal to someone) but at that stage, there was no set date for a wedding. Children were often betrothed as an alliance between families and that meant (as far as the parents were concerned) ...



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