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6

There may be some confusion here between language and behavior. Politeness is a combination of the two, and care with the former cannot forgive lapses in the latter. If you were to interrupt two strangers having a semi-private conversation, perhaps by physically inserting yourself between the two so that you address one party while turning your back on the ...


6

Ellipses have only one place in most formal writing: inside a direct quote. Then they have two uses: to reporting halting speech, and if you omit some words. But in the latter case they should be used only in non-controversial cases, as they can easily be used to subvert the original author/speaker's meaning (for example "these are... the droids you are ...


3

MW says it is used in informal contexts for the third definition as shown. Otherwise it is okay for formal use. in the same way in addition —used in informal speech to say that you share the feelings that someone else has just expressed Macmillan dictionary says likewise. FORMAL in the same way, or in a similar way "The character of the ...


2

Specifics: I can find no evidence whatever that ‘hails from’ is ‘necessarily formal’ in any particular form of words, in any instance of English anywhere. That does not mean that it does not figure in some process somewhere (maybe English-speakers getting mortgages in Bangalore have to use this term in declaring where they are from), but it does not ...


2

In Australia at least, direct questions are polite, provided basic manners ("excuse me", "please", "thank you") are used as well. To reiterate what deadrat said above, as long as this is phrased as a question (usually with "could" or "would") and not as a demand, it would be fine. Indirect questions are also used. Neither would seem out of place, regardless ...


2

In a formal essay, you should not use ellipses. Ellipses are a form that is mostly used in fiction, as it implies a dramatic pause, would could both upset the serious tone of the essay and imply feelings towards the reader, which a formal essay is not intended to do. If you feel as if the ellipse is intended to provoke a feeling from the reader you should ...


1

I think jboneca's answer above is perfect if this sentence has no subsequent verbs. When I first read it, however, I interpreted it as the first two parts of a three-part sequence: "studied...has completed..." [and done something else, e.g., graduated in the top ten of his class]. It comes down to what appears after the ellipsis. If this sentence has only ...


1

According to the 1847 Constitution of Liberia (as quoted in 1850 US senate documents): Article 1. Sec. 2 It is further enacted, That all vessels hailing from ports, and sailing under the flag of this Republic, are hereby prohibited from any and every species of intercourse with slavers, at sea and elsewhere... So it is formal enough to be used in a ...


1

I think "kindly" is rare and becomes rarer. Some said it's old-fashioned and too formal. It's also often used by the senior to the junior. So in my opinion "please" would be more appropriate.


1

Would the word troll work for your purpose? The other word that comes to mind was already mentioned by k1eran - anonymity. A similar word is pseudonymous. Many people speak bravely as long as they're posting under an alias (e.g. "Political Warrior"), but you have to wonder why they lack the courage to speak out more directly, using their real name. In many ...


1

This event addresses the need for good communication. This event focuses on the need for good communication. Samantha, can you respond to these dot points?



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