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There are so many options for this: Clerk: Can I help you find anything? You: No thanks, I'm doing fine. I'm good. This is very informal but very natural for a native speaker. Depending on how you say it, it can also come off a bit tersely. I'm just looking/browsing, thanks. "Browsing" is a great word for when you're not ...


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The answers can change according to context as well as how the clerk approaches you, but these work in most cases: I am fine. & I am good. or I got it/(I think) I will be ok. Just browsing. Keep in mind that your body gesture is important too. (crossed arms/open palms to resist the approach is a clear sign that you don't want to be bothered) Edit: I ...


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Contrary to popular thought, ending a sentence with a preposition is not verboten. Here is a wonderful (and short) video discussing the issue: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OLxLK_R6jQ. However, I would never suggest the use of the preposition "for" with the verb "cater". My suggested fix: We did not provide for this capability. "This capability ...


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The merit of their approach is that it eliminates the need for multiple/several fusion strategies. Or to the extent that my rewording changes the meaning too much: …eliminates the need to design/for designing a [different/separate] fusion strategy for [each of] the several modalities. (For other good alternatives to “eliminates the need ...


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Probably the single word you are looking for, which may be "more fit" than ignore, is: disregard transitive verb: (M-W) to pay no attention to, treat as unworthy of notice (or regard) (D) leave out of consideration; ignore: (TFD) to show no evidence of attention concerning (something): Please disregard what I said before. He disregarded his father's ...


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I'd argue that you see "not take seriously" in enough important news sources to think it's not completely informal. If you want something different, how about: not heeded Heed: to pay careful attention to somebody’s advice or warning


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I'd never describe someone who took a course as a "course member"; although it's clear what you mean, it sounds odd. "Fellow course member" sounds even weirder. The idiomatic term is just "classmates". For clarity, we'd spell things out: "we were in the same algebra class", or "they are all taking geometry together."



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