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62

Man-eater and vamp are a little bit "slangy" compared to seductress - a woman who seduces someone, esp. one who entices a man into sexual activity Per Neil's comment to the question itself, bitch isn't really relevant to the meanings involved here. Per comments/discussion below, it's probably impossible to come up with a "feminine version of ...


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18

You could say vamp. "A woman who attracts men sexually, then seduces and exploits them" (Chambers)


10

Wanton is probably the closest term. Dictionary.com define the word as "a lascivious person, especially a woman." There's a good discussion on "What is the female equivalent of 'philanderer'? on Quora, and it explores the complex nuances involved in comparing the sexes in this regard. Personally, I like female Don Juan, a term applied to Carla Bruni in ...


9

One that comes to mind is man-chaser. Another common slang term with a similar meaning is boy-crazy, though it doesn't have the same sexual connotation. A natural follow-up question is, "why is there no such word as manizer?" There is a language log post that discusses the coinage of this word, with the main argument against manizer being the awkwardness of ...


8

'Siren' carries a connotation that the object of her attractions is doomed to disaster.


8

I suggest "loose woman" as an alternative to the very derogatory term "slut." Although "loose woman" also carries a sermonizing attitude, neither is such an implication entirely absent from "womanizer." The latter is certainly not a term of praise. Were it not for the usual sexual asymmetry present in our language and culture, "loose man" would be a ...


6

Please excuse me if you find these terms profane but, my grandmother would refer to woman who chases men as a slut, although this is sometimes used to describe a girl as dirty or messy. I do recall a man using the term to describe another who was especially open and active in his choice of bedfellows. I've often heard the rather coarse term slag used as ...


6

Spinster isn't for old women, but it certainly would be more often used for that, and has a connotation of having failed to get a husband, rather than being happily unmarried. Bachelorette is sometimes used solely for "unmarried" but does indeed sometimes include divorcées and widows. It's rarely used (was popular from about the 1930s through to the 1960s) ...


6

The only reason I can think of always using woman instead of female is to specifically imply that the person or persons being referred to are adult females. Female has no implication of age whereas Woman does. Technically, the use of woman in place of female (in cases such as you point out) is acceptable and is proper english; however I believe many native ...


5

Gentlemen and ladies lend me your ears! You seem to be looking for lady.


5

An archaic term for this is maid. It is not very often used in that meaning any more though, and I would not recommend it. The online Merriam-Webster defines it as: maid noun \ˈmād\ Definition of MAID an unmarried girl or woman, especially when young : virgin a : maidservant b : a woman or girl employed to do domestic work ...


4

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/fairer+sex Adj. 3. fair — very pleasing to the eye; "my bonny lass"; "there's a bonny bay beyond"; "a comely face"; "young fair maidens" 6. fair — attractively feminine; "the fair sex" OED will provide a citation, I'm sure. Chaucer used fair maid and fair maiden, but the earliest use of fair (or fairer) ...


4

As surprising as it may seem to some, women do have "wet dreams" or, to use the medical term, nocturnal emissions. I'll certainly agree that the term is used more often when talking about the male experience, perhaps because there are more obvious physiological signs and the fact that wet dreams are pretty much a part of every teenage boy's growing up. ...


3

A gender-neutral, respectful word to describe a customer is "customer". Even in communications that are likely to be shared with said customer, in practice I've found that the word is far less likely to offend. This is especially true in those cases where your customer sounds like a "gentleman" on the phone, but is in fact a "lady" (or vice versa). Your ...


3

Unfortunately, 'lady' has a paternalistic connotation, and it is best to refer to both sexes as clients, customers, vendors, manager, assistant... -when possible. IOW, avoid referring to their sex but only their position.


3

The word fair is here used in its original sense. It is not uniquely applied to women, although this is what the fair/fairer sex has largely come to mean. The following is an excerpt of the relevant senses, with only a few each of citations, from the OED regarding all this: Beautiful to the eye; of pleasing form or appearance; good-looking. Phrases, ...


2

There must be lots... French: princess (from Old French princesse) and prince; countess, duchess, marquise, baroness, and lots of other -ess words doyenne and doyen Italian: ballerina (although you don't see ballerino very often) prima donna (and rarely primo uomo) Latin: victrix and victor aviatrix and aviator (although we seldom use these Latin ...


2

If you can draw some assumptions from the definition (below), "mistress" could be used. (Primarily, if a woman is the head of a household, she is likely - or traditionally - unmarried.) From [M-W-com]:1 1: a woman who has power, authority, or ownership: as a: the female head of a household


2

The use of "it" or "that" when referring to a person would depend on context and intent. In the scenario you lay out, it is correct to say "Was it a girl?", (assuming you didn't see the salesperson and thus don't know their gender). You would not say "that" in such a scenario. If you were walking with a friend and passed a person of ambiguous gender, you ...


2

Perhaps the most obvious word here is gentlefolks, which until the nineteenth century appeared only and always in the plural. Shakespeare used it in the plural, as did Thackeray. Eventually, however, writers towards latter end of Victorian era began to use gentlefolk in the singular. But it does seem a long word, doesn’t it? As a shorter version, the ...


1

Since we are in a politically correct mood : "Lady"/"Ladies" seems appropriate at least in the "globish" variant of English forced down the throats of the rest of the world by American economic dominance. As for the gender-neutral form, may I suggest "Gentleunnuchs" ? Yes, it's awful. But not half as awful as the belief in the neutralization of the male ...


1

Gentleman was initially a compound noun, composed of Gentle and man. Gentle, here, is derived from French gentil, meaning of nobility by birth. As such, Gentleman can be considered a sort of synonym or Lord, a title for men with female counterpart Lady. With regards to a gender-neutral version, initially Noble could be a title used for either gender. Now, ...


1

floozy A girl or a woman who has a reputation for promiscuity.



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