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In English, you'd say that you "placed out" of a class. That means you get credit for it without having taken it, and it implies that you took some kind of placement exam or assessment test that demonstrated that you had sufficiently learned the course material. From The Free Dictionary: Place out of To qualify for a waiver of some requirement or ...


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"Just because he is old, he doesn't need to be slow" implies that he is slow, and that he is choosing to be slow, or being slow due to some failing on his part. That's a totally different meaning to "Just because he is old doesn't mean he is slow" - in fact, you're not making any statement at all about whether he is actually slow or not, but you're saying ...


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Put a brave face/front on something — TFD to behave in a way that makes people think you are happy when you are not "They've had some bad luck, but they've put a brave face on their problems." "She's very ill but she's putting a brave front on it. (= making people believe her illness does not worry her)" Keep up appearances — TFD ...


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The phrase goes back as far as the Roman poet Juvenal who, in the late 1st or early 2nd century, wrote: let her be handsome, charming, rich and fertile; let her have ancient ancestors ranged about her halls; let her be more chaste than the disheveled Sabine maidens who stopped the war--a prodigy as rare upon the earth as a black swan! "Black swan" at ...


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B) is the correct answer. I'll be there in a day or two's time. https://www.google.gr/#tbm=bks&q=%22in+a+day+or+two%27s+time%22


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The generalized Copernican principle. See: In physical cosmology, the Copernican principle, named after Nicolaus Copernicus, is a working assumption that arises from a modified cosmological extension of Copernicus' heliocentric universe. Under the modified Copernican principle neither the Sun nor the Earth are in a central, specially favored position in ...


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In the United States, the term four-year college or four-year university is used, since a community college here typically grants an associate's (two year) degree.


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sycophantic comes to mind. From ODO: Behaving or done in an obsequious way in order to gain advantage Example: I guess some people thought I was a creep, offering sycophantic praise of someone who happens to be my boss Also try flattering or fawning.


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I would call it a good investment or a worthwhile investment, or something that will pay for itself many times over. If there is a more appropriate word or phrase it escapes me at the moment.


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In the United States, the most direct opposite of community college is residential college or residential campus. From the Free Dictionary: Adj. 1. residential - used or designed for residence or limited to residences; "a residential hotel"; "a residential quarter"; "a residential college"; "residential zoning" nonresidential - not residential; ...


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I'd go with obsequious Obedient or attentive to an excessive or servile degree: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/obsequious


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The lizard comparison implies that she held her hands motionless or very still. Cocteau's comparison is added as a parenthetic remark to corroborate the statement that her hands were "glued to the side of her body". You can see from this n-gram that "still" is high on the list of qualities associated with lizards.


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The novel is by Agatha Christie, who wrote many detective stories in which murders are solved. As the characters in this novel include a mortuary priest it seems the title is some punning - on both the idea that we all shall die and that her story includes a death.


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Perhaps you supply a turnkey solution? : complete and ready to be used Full Definition : built, supplied, or installed complete and ready to operate ; also : of or relating to a turnkey building or installation <turnkey vendors> — Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary


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The Ngram chart for "take the initiative" (blue line) versus "make the initiative" (red line) for the period 1750–2005 shows that neither phrase was at all common in English until the early 1800s, when "take the initiative" began a long ascent in frequency that lasted until the 1970s: There are enough instances of "make the initiative" to permit Ngram ...



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