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To "take a shot at" something is (when used figuratively) to make an attempt at the associated action, though often implying that the attempt is made without much preparation. The term is usually not pejorative with regard to the object of the attempt, though it can (depending on context) imply that the "shooter" is being less that diligent. Very often the ...


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It's a set phrase, from 1875 (Etymonline): Miscarriage: 1580s, "mistake, error;" 1610s, "misbehavior;" see miscarry + -age. Meaning "untimely delivery" is from 1660s. Miscarriage of justice is from 1875. (now rare except in miscarriage of justice) A failure; a mistake or error. [from 16thc.] 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.ii:...


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First, let me diagnose the error. To say that 'cats' is the opposite of 'dogs' is to confuse antonymy with collocation. Likewise for 'apples' and 'oranges.' Both children and adults commonly make this error. I know of no conventional word for these dubious antonyms (although this page suggests there are terms for different types of antonyms). Pseudoantonym ...


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In my opinion, it could work in the right context - but it also sounds rather crass. For example, if you said, "I like Suzie, so I figured I'd take a shot at her," I think I would understand what you meant - but it also sounds like you are just casually "gambling" on who might be interested in you, rather than expressing sincere emotion.


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It is not meant to be taken literally. It essentially means to be careful, or watchful. The phrase is generally context dependent. E.g. "I don't trust her, you should sleep with your eyes/one eye open" would mean to wary of her.


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Consider Neutral Of no particular kind, characteristics So you might choose to say:" I felt neutral towards coffee"


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The idiom be cut out for means "[USUALLY WITH NEGATIVE] have exactly the right qualities for a particular role, task, or job" (Oxford Dictionaries). As you see, the dictionary notes that it is usually used in a negative formation. The example sentence is, in fact, negative: "I'm just not cut out to be a policeman." Most native speakers would probably ...


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The connection between "the sky is falling" and larks appears also in Ben Jonson's "Inviting a Friend to Supper" (1616), where he promises his guest some larks as a dish: "And though fowl now be scarce, yet there are clerks, The sky not falling, think we may have larks."



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