Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

"Excruciatingly beautiful" describes something so beautiful it hurts. According to the 2nd definition from the FreeDictionary.com, "excruciating" can also mean intense or extreme. If something is so beautiful it causes pain, it could be pain from the sheer intensity of the experience: causing intense suffering; tormenting. intense or extreme: ...


6

No, it is not meant in a pejorative sense. Journalists report on events as they occur. It is always helpful to get additional input from parties involved, e.g. family, employer, public relations representative, attorney, or experts. Sometimes that isn't possible, because the event just occurred, and has been confirmed by authorities. If the event or ...


6

tear something apart: 2. to criticize something mercilessly.


4

a finger-pointer - someone quick to divert attention or blame to someone else defensive (though that's more general than just blaming others)


4

A 'blamer'. It's slang for someone who always blames others. e.g. 'My mother was a blamer from her early teens.' It tends to be applied to senior citizens. I don't make these things up. There seems to be a correlation between chronic intermeddlers (yentas) and chronic blamers. Often the blamer and the yenta are the same person.


3

Blameshifter fits the bill. Main Entry: blameshifting Part of Speech: n Definition: the act of transferring responsibility for an error or problem to another; also written blame shifting http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/blameshifting


2

There's a figure in English, "to damn with faint praise." So you might say, oh, you damned him with faint praise. English speakers tend to be a little excessive; in France for example it's possible to (simply) say "that is good" or "the result is correct." In most English-speaking countries you have to go "overboard"... "That is really good, it worked out ...


2

The term subpar means not up to standard; below par [Collins English Dictionary] This term would indicate that the project was unacceptable, that a better effort was essential. While it does not mandate a redo, that is often implied. If you wanted to give some support to the effort, but indicate more work was needed, you could use the phrase first ...


2

The term for his comment is self-deprecating Tending to undervalue oneself and one's abilities. [American Heritage Dictionary] The comment is a mild apology for lack of skill and may reflect actual or false modesty.


2

The phrase "word by word" would mean one word at a time, sequentially. If you're copying something "word by word", it means you're doing it probably means you're doing it in the moment. "Word by word" describes iteration. For example: To ensure she hadn't missed anything, Stacy reread the page more slowly, word by word. Only when the full weight of each ...


2

You can use rumormonger, rumor-monger, or rumor monger to describe such a person, with the assumption that rumors usually are false, or at least unverified. a person given to spreading rumors, often maliciously. rumor: a story or statement in general circulation without confirmation or certainty as to facts If you want a more negative connotation, ...


2

If you would like to emphasise the achingness of the beauty, I think the go-to phrase would be heartbreakingly beautiful.


2

"Stunning" may come more or less close. But does not seem to "hurt", it rather "confuses". Also, I am not sure why "hurt" is associated with something beautiful. Unless, you want to mean hurt by someone else beauty (like in a form of jealousy, or envy)? (In a positive sense also may be somehow useful: astonishing.)


1

According to the American Heritage Dictionary, steal (someone's) thunder means To use, appropriate, or preempt the use of another's idea, especially to one's own advantage and without consent by the originator. The thief could be called a thunder stealer.


1

It sounds to me like coded language, indicating that the writer believes that the party concerned has no available comment. Journalism is full of code. One of the most notorious clichés is found in such as the following: 'The body of the murdered schoolteacher was found at an address in east London. A 45-year-old woman is helping police with their ...


1

Also, "Numinous" is an adjective meaning fearful yet fascinated, awed yet attracted, the powerful, personal feeling of being overwhelmed and inspired. Though this is not the exact feeling you are trying to name, it's definitely in the ballpark. Now, it has become a quest. Thanks!


1

Considering how she ends the message, I think she means looking at it very carefully: like breaking it into small pieces and analyzing each one of it, and every sentence.


1

'Calumny' is close, though it's a legal term, and it refers to making statements wreck someone's reputation (which can't be done if it's done in private.) 'Slander' is probably better. 'Libel' is no good, as it happens in a publication.


1

I would say buck-passer is correct. Anther class of idioms for someone who is difficult to blame involves variations around the word "teflon" "He wears a teflon coat" "He is made from teflon" Because nothing (including blame) sticks to teflon. However, this does not necessarily involve the subject shifting blame, they just somehow always escape blame ...


1

It is grammatically correct, although I suspect that most speakers would omit the last have. I do not have as much optimism as I'd like to.


1

As someone growing up in a Malaysian-Chinese household, I always consider my mother tongues to be the various Chinese dialects while my native languages are Malay (Bahasa Malaysia) and English, since the latter two I began learning concurrently and have been ever since. So for me, there are very distinctive, though as many of you have pointed out, subtle ...


1

It's generally called constructive criticism. From Wikipedia... The purpose of constructive criticism is to improve the outcome. From what I can see in OP's text, the supervisor is more concerned with pointing out ways of improving the implementation of the project, rather than simply complaining about shortcomings in the current solution. In my book, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible