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6

That's something I've always known as the sidewalk shuffle: the awkward dance that results when two people approach each other from opposite directions, each attempts to move out of the other's way, and both end up moving in the same direction. Often followed by further ungainly movement, apologies, and awkward laughter. [Urban Dictionary]


5

Pool could fit. As a verb, it can be used to mean combining the resources of several people or organizations so they can be used collectively. Definition from the free dictionary: Pool v. pooled, pool·ing, pools v.tr. To put into a pool, as for common use: Let's pool our resources to finish the project quickly. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/pool


4

A term that U.S. (and Finnish, and Indian) audiences might be familiar with is pocket veto. Here is a bit of the Wikipedia entry for that term as it applies in U.S. law: A pocket veto occurs when a bill fails to become law because the president does not sign the bill and cannot return the bill to Congress within a 10-day period because Congress is not in ...


4

I reframed the question a little, without changing the meaning. The word you are looking for is tickle. When you want to tell somebody that you are not going to touch them in that way, you can say "I won't tickle you".


3

Yes, the meaning of crack may refers to the narrow space of a door left ajar, but as suggested, through the doorway may be a better choice: A slight narrow space, a fissure. The window was open a crack. Through the crack in the door (slight opening) suggests that the door had a crack in it. Note also the expression: Crack the ...


3

If I was giving back a substandard item to someone, I might in a suitable situation use the saying "a bad penny always turns up". It conveys something a bit like your expression, but instead of suggesting the original owner should have kept it, it's saying that it's useless to try to get rid of it because it will come back anyway.


3

Thanks, but I can't keep that poisoned chalice! Poisoned chalice (British) It is something that harms the person it is given to although it seemed very good when they first got it. "The leadership of the party turned out to be a poisoned chalice." I suppose that this faulty item does more harm than good. So this expression works here.


2

In programming, set X to v is a common idiom to mean changing the value of X to become v. Here's an example: The Set X to () block is a Motion block and a Stack block. The block changes its sprite's X position by the specified amount. - Scratch Progrmaming Wiki The form set X as v is not as familiar to me, but it does occur and can be understood the ...


1

You could be a little more nuanced about selecting the way depending on how X is set using v and the data types involved. For example, if X and v were reference types, it makes more sense to me to use "to", and "as" if they were value types. e.g. "Set X (integer) as v (number 5)" and "Set X (interface) to v (an instantiated object)". "Set X v" on the other ...


1

You could say, items include but are not limited to [list]. Or, at some point before or after the list, you could simply say, this list is not comprehensive. EDIT: I realise that I haven't really answered your question, sorry! I think the phrase this list is short of being exhaustive conveys that almost all the items are included, or at least ...


1

"I'll sleep when I'm dead" is an idiom used by people who are trying to get the maximum out of life, biological necessity be damned. The phrase has been used as the title of several songs and at least one movie. It's usually used as a retort when someone has urged you to get some rest. There's also "I must work while it is day (for the night is coming)" ...


1

One way to circumvent possessive pronouns is to refer to the persons you talk about by their names. That is a natural thing to do when your party has already met them (is friends with your family, etc.). But it can be carried out even if they've never met: "Peter -- that's our eldest -- has won a scholarship." From that onwards, just "Peter". It is also less ...


1

'Scenario' and 'worst-case' in Merriam-Webster dictionaries "Worst-case scenario" pretty clearly arose from the cobbling together of two terms that already existed in English: the noun scenario—which Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) dates to 1875 in the sense of "an outline or synopsis of a play," but which seems not to have acquired ...


1

Communal - Shared or used by members of a group or community Communal works great as an adjective to describe a shared location or resource between a group of people. Commonly used in phrases like 'communal land' or 'communal kitchen' In the context of a location for sharing digitally, you could use something along the lines of 'communal repository', ...



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