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31

I believe the word you're looking for is reduplication. From Wikipedia: Reduplication in linguistics is a morphological process in which the root or stem of a word (or part of it) or even the whole word is repeated exactly or with a slight change. Wiktionary gives specific types: Exact type: acute-null accents; baby-talk-like bye-bye, ...


17

The item you are describing is prerequisite for whatever more comprehensive thing will be based on it. The term prerequisite certainly indicates that your subject is required or necessary, but also implies that its establishment or attainment is not the main goal. The noun form, referring to your subject as "a prerequisite" for something else, may be clearer ...


14

The phrase "you belong to me" is an expression in English (at least American English) most often used in an address to a romantic partner. The phrase belong to, in this case, clearly conveys possessiveness (belong to) Be the property of: the vehicle did not belong to him Oxford Dictionaries Online There is a bit of a chattel tone to the overall ...


12

hanky-panky is an example of rhyming reduplication zig-zag is an example of ablaut reduplication https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/reduplication


8

The difference is huge. "Belong to" means you treat the person as your property. (This may not go down well with your significant other.) "Belong with" means you find it proper that you should walk together.


6

Elementary may suggest the idea of something basic but not definitive: Of, relating to, or constituting the basic, essential, or fundamental part: an elementary need for love and nurturing. Of, relating to, or involving the fundamental or simplest aspects of a subject. The Free Dictionary


6

In my head sorting Is really just ordering. There's no inherent requirement that the ordering in particular be well-defined, ascending/descending, or aesthetically pleasing. M-W definition 3 the act of separating things and putting them in a particular order : the act of sorting things A random order doesn't seem to break these definitions. ...


2

Totally random guess, but what about "nor their stated aim is to return the president to power"?


2

What the entry in the manual says is: -R, --random-sort sort by random hash of keys Ie, the software hashes each entry using a hashing function primed with a "random" state and then, using a normal deterministic sorting algorithm, sorts the entries based on their hashes. (Random is a property of the hash.) This is arguably an overly ...


2

"Random" does not apply to "sort" in this example, but to "hash of keys". You shouldn't read it as "sort by random, hash of keys", but as "sort by the keys, which themselves are random", so you are not "sorting by random", but sorting by the keys / hashes, which might happen to be random, but the sorting is done with regard to these keys (or hashes), and is ...


2

A contrarian, perhaps? a person who takes an opposite or different position or attitude from other people This in commonly applied in economic contexts, but it is applicable in other cases too. EDIT: To describe their act of "presenting the same stuff with a new name", you could consider old wine in a new bottle (uncountable) An existing ...


1

Crucial might be a good option. The crux is indispensable, but it is always only a part, never a whole. "The crux" almost always means "the most important part," but, for example, every step in a mathematical proof can be "crucial."


1

Perhaps the word you are looking for is 'required'. Something can be required but not sufficient for the whole.


1

Technically speaking, no. It is an oxymoron. Shuffle is more fitting than random.


1

It's funny how a single word can change the meaning. "You belong to me": It has a sense of ownership in it, implying that the person or the thing that is being referred to is owned by you or is yours to keep. "You belong with me": It has a lighter tone and a sense of opinion in it. that in your opinion, the person or the thing being referred to "SHOULD" be ...


1

They can have similar or even identical meanings in certain contexts, e.g.: a 'romantic' relationship with one particularly dominating partner. Typically, though, "belong to" implies outright ownership (like a master owning a slave) while "belong with" suggests that the speaker feels that s/he and the person s/he is speaking to belong together. It's ...


1

The final example sentence sounds wrong to me. I suppose this is the case because "tell apart" is a phrasal verb that requires an object pronoun. He duct-taped his toothbrush so he could tell it apart from the other toothbrushes. If he hadn´t, it would be impossible to tell them apart. And, as someone answered in a comment, the answer to your other ...


1

Naturally, it depends on what the exact digression is for. If I were to use the digression as an illustration or example, I might use the obvious choice of As an illustration . . . to frame it, and return to the original line of thought once a conclusion about the example has been emphatically stated, without necessarily adding anything to state ...


1

I think Sherlock Holmes digressing may be a good example: When Sherlock Holmes is digressing, I think he uses the term to talk to a reader or observer of the digression which is usually, from Sherlock's perspective, Dr Watson. When Sherlock Holmes digresses and then comes out of the digression it is usually because the observer may not be following or may ...



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