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23

This may be somewhat opinion based, but I don't think that wobble is negative-sounding in and of itself. I think it is fun and silly, in a good way - and it seems to strike the right tone for a web tool, as these often do have silly names (such as 'Pyjamas' or 'Mustache'). Positive meanings of wobble are found in the wobbling of a jelly, or a musical wobble ...


22

Catch-22 To use it in a sentence, "It's a catch-22" or "It's a catch-22 situation" From Google's definition of Catch-22: a dilemma or difficult circumstance from which there is no escape because of mutually conflicting or dependent conditions. "a catch-22 situation" (Paraphrased very slightly) from Wikipedia's Catch-22 (logic): A catch-22 is ...


13

This sounds like a chicken and egg situation. a situation in which it is impossible to say which of two things existed first and which caused the other It's a chicken and egg situation - I don't know whether I was bad at the sciences because I wasn't interested in them or not interested in them and therefore not good at them. Cambridge Idioms ...


6

As you noted, "infinite feedback loop" is not the right term (and not just because your situation has nothing to do with software). That sounds more like a runaway success story, which is quite the opposite of your situation. If you wanted to borrow technical jargon from programming, it would be deadlock: In concurrent programming, a deadlock is a ...


6

The they in that sentence is the apostles, who are mentioned previously. The referent for a personal pronoun will almost always be the nearest prior mention which matches for number and gender. In this case, that produces a consistent reading of the text. For I am the least of the apostles, that am not meet to be called an apostle, because I persecuted ...


4

"The former" refers to "his limitations", "the latter" to "his gifts". The writer is saying that a poet's good qualities, well applied, may enable him to produce delightful work in spite of his limitations.


4

It’s a tradition thousands of years old. It’s a several–thousand-year-old tradition. It’s a many–thousand-year-old tradition. It has been a tradition for thousands of years. You could also use the adjective multi-millenial, but this sounds more formal/literary.


4

I think you should go with something more neutral. It is clear from the other responses that "Wobble" can be seen as positive or negative. So I think you should try moving towards something like: Squiggle noun noun: squiggle; plural noun: squiggles 1. a short line that curls and loops in an irregular way. "some prescriptions are a series of ...


4

Depending on the type of product Wobble can have a meaning of either funny or unsturdy/off balance. If you have a table or a chair that wobbles, people see that negatively. If you have a ball or other toy that wobbles, it makes it more fun. Since you are making a tool, wobble might not be appropriate to use as a product name in this case. Two good words ...


3

Antecedents: 'Are we not men?' Questions along the lines of "Are you a man or a mouse?" or "Are we mice or men?" rarely appear in Google Books search results until the early twentieth century, but they have antecedents in rhetorical questions that go back much farther. Insistence on the special status of humankind is no doubt ancient, and rhetorical ...


2

To help provide a modern contextual background in support of the name Wobble, I want to highlight that the word wobble has actually received a significant positive connotation in certain cultural subsets. Most famously in the past decade (and underground for a decade and change before that) a genre of music has been evolving that actually centers around ...


2

circular dependency a relation between two or more modules which either directly or indirectly depend on each other to function properly. Such modules are also known as mutually recursive. http://wikipedia.org/wiki/Circular_dependency


2

Which got me thinking, is there a name for a Parody of a Parody? The term self-parody does not seem to fit - as that tends to reference parodying ones own work or oneself. In this case, I think the ECHR version may be more of an homage to "The Life of Brian." From http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0079470/quotes: Reg: All right, but apart from the ...


2

The way you have it: "the works" is fine.


2

According to the Michael Coveney, a theater critic writing in the Wednesday 29 August 2012| Independent, Sir Ian McKellan lost his script and improvised. Theatre critic's view: Sir Ian McKellen improvises as Miranda floats past during the Paralympics opening ceremony But he'd lost his script, so he improvised a modern imprecation, telling his ...


2

It's possible that, having lost his script, Sir Ian subconciously recalled lines heard in his youth: Go forth into the world in peace; be of good courage; hold fast to that which is good; render to no one evil for evil; strengthen the fainthearted; support the weak; help the afflicted; honour all men; ...


2

To me 'wobble' does have a bit of a negative connotation, as a wobble is typically something to be avoided, although in some cases, it could also be somewhat endearing. It's a bit like 'toddle' in that respect. On a side note, given the actual name of the ~ character, I'm going to go the less literal and slightly punnier route, and suggest the actual name ...


2

A millenium is an era of a thousand years. Its plural form is millenia, so "millenia-old" is one possibility.


2

To answer your second question first, one method for tackling difficult sentences is to deconstruct and, if necessary, then reconstruct them in shorter, bite-sized sentences so that the meaning can be teased out. The text you've provided is challenging even for a native English speaker. Part of the difficulty lies with former and latter, expressions that ...


1

It's not a big change, but the following sentence will sound more professional: "Even in ..., there is considerable room to improve ...", Altenative: "Even in ..., much improvement remains to be done.",


1

I would play with 'substantial improvements could be achieved' and, more importantly, I would add the ways those improvements can be achieved.


1

The character on the key is the tilde character, and is part of a Spanish character, ñ. In Spanish, the ñ character is pronounced just like an "n" followed by a consonant "y" as in "señor" (mister/sir) or "mañana" (tomorrow). Though if you're afraid your audience might not know that the word "tilde" refers to that symbol, I might suggest: Squiggle noun ...


1

Another idea is "swimming through porridge"


1

Someone who is excited or surprised by the mundane is said to be easily impressed.


1

excitable; [over-excitable] responding rather too readily to something new or stimulating; too easily excited. –Google Imaginational Over-Excitability: (one of the five descriptors for "OE") Imaginational OE [IMOE]: “As the Imaginational OE reflects a heightened play of the imagination with rich association of images and impressions, frequent use ...



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