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90

You could consider "debunk" To expose the falseness or hollowness of (a myth, idea, or belief). Individual cases where a stereotypical assumption is confounded might be described as someone "breaking the mold" Women Artists Who Broke the Mold


21

Debunk is spot on but, if you don't mind being a little less accurate, dispel also works and I've seen it in this context quite frequently. I am posting this in order to dispel the myths and rumours that answers posted three hours after the question never get upvotes.


17

Disprove means "to show that (something) is false or wrong." So you could say, for example, "A recent study disproves the myth that girls are bad at sports."


8

Gender neutrality is fine, I even like it. But sometimes it is carried so far, it's burdensome. I am a member of mankind. That doesn't bother me on a gender level. It is no more charged for me than humankind. I may well not represent the majority here. If you're going to talk about a poor man's oyster, I'd much rather you kept the word man in there. If ...


8

I think the figure of speech you're looking for is to hold your tongue. hold one's tongue (TFD) Fig. to refrain from speaking; to refrain from saying something unpleasant. I felt like scolding her, but I held my tongue. Hold your tongue, John. You can't talk to me that way!


8

This gesture is known as wagging (or shaking) one's finger at someone. Someone using the most aggressive form of the gesture could be said to be wagging their finger in the other person's face. See here for the results of a Google Images search for "wagging his finger".


8

This poem/proverb is saying that the old friends are gold (more valuable than silver): “Make new friends but keep the old; one is silver and the other is gold”


6

Metaphors for keeping quiet are generally transitive, for example muzzled or gagged. The protestors were effectively gagged by the court order. Opposition leaders accused him of muzzling the news media [example from ODO] The reason for this is probably because it's something one would not normally choose to do to oneself, unlike wearing earplugs for ...


6

Both "bargain-basement NOUN" and "cut-rate NOUN" express the essential idea of a lower-quality substitute or stand-in, as does "ersatz NOUN." Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) defines ersatz as follows: ersatz adj (1875) : being a usu. artificial and inferior substitute or imitation [examples omitted] None of these options works ...


5

I think it's OK with break the stereotype. I suggest also demolish, get rid of, eliminate the stereotype, and explode, shatter, ruin the myth.


5

anhedonia is a psychological condition characterized by inability to experience pleasure in normally pleasurable acts. Merriam-Webster Inability to feel pleasure in normally pleasurable activities OED from Wikipedia Anhedonia is defined as the inability to experience pleasure from activities usually found enjoyable, e.g. exercise, hobbies, music, ...


5

According to The Phrase Finder, the origin is simpler and more intuitive than the legends about it might suggest: 'A frog in the throat': is an American phrase that entered the language towards the end of the 19th century. The expression doesn't have a fanciful derivation (see more on that below) but comes directly from the fact that a hoarse ...


4

One U.S. idiom for a person who constantly frets even when nothing is seriously wrong is worrywart. Here is the entry for that word in Barbara Kipfer & Robert Chapman, Dictionary of American Slang, fourth edition (2007): worrywort n phr A person who worries excessively; a constantly apprehensive person [1956+; fr the designation of such a person in ...


4

Mythbusting Only nerds will understand this reference to the TV show Mythbusters, but this could be suitable depending on your audience. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MythBusters


3

One vivid way to describe the act of moving one's forefinger toward the other person's face is "jabbing [one's] finger." A Google search turns up multiple examples of this usage. From Laura Simon, Dreams of Paradise (1991): "It's a legitimate business from which I fully expect to realize a profit. I wouldn't have started it otherwise. I would have sent ...


3

Neither having a crush or being angry is a common meaning for the phrase "butterflies," which usually indicates nervousness.


3

A more colorful phrase to describe your situation is that someone is putting the lie to a myth or cliche. This is usually used to describe something which belies some usually-overreaching claim or statement, and has a somewhat triumphant air of "Ah-hah! I have found a clear counterexample to this absurd statement!" As an example, from last month's ...


3

to refute a myth to refute: Prove (a statement or theory) to be wrong or false; disprove. OxfordDictionaries.com A simple google search shows that to refute a myth is indeed actually used widely enough. It is also used in books, as seen in this Google Ngram Viewer (which also shows how the phrase compares with the more popular to debunk a myth). ...


2

I don't think either of those sentences is very clear. The way that something works can definitely be a mechanism or a principle, but each of those words has a variety of meanings, and "What's the mechanism/principle of IPFinder?" just doesn't give enough context to identify the exact meaning that is meant. I think you're better off just asking: How ...


2

Both questions are valid, but they mean slightly different things. This is how I would interpret them: What's the mechanism of IPFinder? = How does IPFinder perform its task(s)? What's the principle of IPFinder? = What is the concept that underpins the way IPFinder is written?


2

The word pessimism immediately comes to mind. the tendency to see the bad side of things or to expect the worst in any situation: "There has been a mood of growing pessimism about the nation’s economy." Pessimism does not capture the idea of "terminating a happy time", but it it describes the state of mind that drives it. The word trepidation ...


2

I would say spoiling the moment Apparently, this is popular enough to be used as a common musical lyric.


2

"Budget" as in "Mussels are a budget version of oysters - most of the taste for a fraction of the cost." "Sensible" would be an alternative with a slight positive connotation. "This mini-MPV is a sensible replacement to a lumbering station-wagon - you save money without compromising capacity or practicality."


2

Many things other than evidence can be circumstantial in the sense of a detailed account, for example: circumstantial narrative circumstantial journal circumstantial account circumstantial memories circumstantial deliveries However this meaning does seem to be mostly seen in older texts. Looking at recent documents shows a predominance of the meaning ...


1

You can puncture a myth or stereotype: VERB 2 Cause a sudden collapse of (mood or feeling): EXAMPLE SENTENCES the earlier mood of optimism was punctured The company has punctured this fragile mood of optimism with a miscalculation of astonishing proportions. Worse still is the title track - eight-and-a-half minutes of tedium and ...


1

"Pound Shop" is one possible substitute phrase I heard lately. In a televised incident Russel Brand, talking of UKIP leader Nigel Farage, opined He's a pound shop Enoch Powell Pound shops in the UK are budget stores selling most (or all) items for £1


1

Pauper is an antiquated word that will seem awkward or pretentious in use, if understood at all. El cheapo, China store, redneck, ghetto can be seen as racist, but are often used. Generic, Lite, no-name, off-brand, knock-off, dollar store, back alley (can indicate illegality), wannabe (or copy-cat but less so). The idea that “poor man’s X” is not gender ...



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