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24

If you drop the 'I' it becomes less one-on-one - 'Love You' suggests a generic love for a person - like a rock band or an actress - 'We love you Paul' isn't a personal love, or the hippy 'free love' of the 1960's - 'Luvin' You Man', would go from Brother to Brother, regardless of skin color or religion beliefs. One may love the Lord in a passive way, and the ...


15

I often tell friends both male and female that I love them; I don't think it's necessary to diminish the sentiment with flippant phrasing just because it's not romantic love. We don't do this for our family members, and they don't assume we mean we love them in a romantic way. I say trust in the existing context of your relationship; it isn't necessary to ...


11

Whipping could be used metaphorically, to describe both the wind and the jacket: 2.0 Move fast or suddenly in a specified direction: In the continuous form, the word picture of "quick motion" is ongoing, evoking the image of a literal whip being drawn back and struck forward repetitively. It applies to the jacket metaphorically as it moves back and ...


10

If you qualify the meaning further, you can use the "I love you" such as "You are decent person. I love you, bro". Also, if you are addressing to a group of friends you can say "I love you guys"


8

I'd go with His coat was flapping in the wind.


7

Alleged (adjective) : said or thought by some people to be the stated bad or illegal thing, although you have no proof. (Cambridge dictionary). The sentence essentially says the accused man committed the crime. In my opinion, the writer has used "alleged" as a synonym for "accused", though in its objectionable sense. Another fairer phrasing could ...


6

Buffeting: 1. the action of striking someone or something repeatedly and violently. see google.com, “buffeting” Link • "His nylon jacket was shredded by the buffeting winds" Buffet verb: 1. (especially of wind or waves) strike repeatedly and violently; batter. Synonyms: batter, pound, lash, strike, hit; see google.com, “buffet” Link • ...


5

The meaning is as much about context and delivery as it is about wording. A sing-songy "Love ya!" as you're saying goodbye for the day can't be taken romantically. On the other hand, being physically close, locking eyes, and saying "I love you." with gravitas is difficult to take any way other than as a romantic gesture. John Mark Perry's answer, suggesting ...


4

Consider: I am very fond of you Be aware that in some cultures (Britain, US for example) non-romantic expressions such as "I like you" and "I am fond of you" can be used as ways to flirt or make romantic overtures, while making rejection less embarrassing. I really like Jean's answer, and I also think your own translation of I care about you holds a ...


4

A relatively common if still somewhat colorful phrase for this situation these days is to declare the earlier problem or proposed solution rendered moot, which includes both solutions which subsume the original and those which cause the original action to no longer apply for some other reason, as in: My need to find a ride to the airport was rendered ...


4

Alleged is an adjective: ADJECTIVE [ATTRIBUTIVE] Said, without proof, to have taken place or to have a specified illegal or undesirable quality: In that sentence, it correctly modifies attacker as an adjectival use of the past participle form: mid-15c., "quoted," past participle adjective from allege. Attested from 1610s in sense ...


3

"Company man"/"Company's man" is a term I've heard used dismissively - as in: "Ask a company man a question, get a company answer" or "There's no point asking him, he's the company's man". Basically the meaning is someone who is hopelessly biased and unable to think for themselves.


3

I'm surprised nobody's yet mentioned pen-pusher: (or pencil-pusher in the US) a person who has an office job that is not interesting a person with a clerical job involving a lot of tedious and repetitive paperwork un-needed, bureaucratic employee not making any difference and hampering efficiency


3

I think I'd just say shop around (never mind the "a bit before you make your decision"). And so would Smokey Robinson's mama.


3

The best way I've come across for this sort of thing is phrases in the form "You're a" or "You're" . For example: "You're a good friend." "You're awesome dude." "You're a great guy." "You're a real pal." There are a few reasons why phrases like this tend to work well as a good expression of friendship. Firstly in the phrase "I love you" there are ...


2

"Love" is a particularly widely-used word in the English language - to the point where in some areas it has lots its significance as a term of affection. "I love you" would probably not go out of place when in the company of a very good friend, even one that you could be interested in romantically (and incidentally, "I want you" would definitely be a much ...


2

Maybe battered? "The wind battered at his jacket". I assume he's wearing the jacket, not that it's hoisted into the air from the ground or a clothesline.


1

If you are simply stating your feelings, I would use, "I love you like a (brother/sister)". Or, "I love you like the (brother/sister) I've never had." It might be more wordy than Te quiero, but it clearly gets the emotion across that you love them like a member of your own family rather than romantically, if you are worried that I love you will sound ...


1

For American men in a certain age range (say, 25-50) "I love you, man" is a common way to express an explicitly non-romantic brotherly love. The expression was popularized by a television commercial circa early 2000s, and is nearly always used in a joking or ironic way that helps neutralize the emotional riskiness of the statement (the generic identifier ...


1

I agree one can say "I love you" to a pet or family member (relative) without meaning anything romantic. You could also say "I love you" to a friend, including a close friend without meaning anything romantic. One assumes that friends, especially when romantic feelings could arise or even be present within at least person, talk about the status of their ...


1

I'd emphasize that "alleged" refers to a charge or claim, usually by authorities. And "alleged" is not a dodge to avoid libel charges, because, for one thing, it is not a defense for libel. If a statement is defamatory and untrue, that's libel per se. Publishing that a person "was an alleged embezzler" is actionable libel if it's not true. "Alleged ...


1

To be clear, as well as not judging who's guilty or lying, they should have said She reported that she pleaded with her attacker (allegedly Mushataq) to take her to the hospital. Or, if she knew Mushataq: She reported that she pleaded with Mushataq (allegedly her attacker) to take her to the hospital. But as noted, it's easier (and typical) for ...


1

Supersede - to take the place of (someone or something that is old, no longer useful, etc.) : to replace (someone or something) (merriam-webster.com)


1

Subsume verb: [with object] Include or absorb (something) in something else: 1.Subsume is to absorb, contain or include something into something else. See, Oxford Dictionary, “subsume” Link • The task of fixing the dripping faucet was "subsumed" in the renovation of the whole bathroom. • The problem of fixing all the typos in the ...


1

How about erratic Depending on whether you like the sports person in question, the Merriam-Webster dictionary also notes that erratic is a geological term for a boulder, indeed: a boulder or block of rock transported from its original resting place especially by a glacier


1

You have already expressed two qualities "almost redness" and "crispiness". As for other words, it depend on what aspects you wish to describe. Some fried foods have a distinctive aroma; some are spicy, some salty, some sweet; some a combination of these. A dumpling's exterior can be soft, or it might be crusty, maybe even flaky (if made with phyllo or ...


1

Use of the phrase "have no words" to indicate (as Centaurus says) "not know what to say" goes back much farther than I originally thought it did. The earliest relevant Google Books match for the phrase has the more particular sense "words are inadequate" or "words fail us." From Frederick Faber, The Creator and the Creature, Or, the Wonders of Divine Love ...


1

The famous letter that Abraham Lincoln didn't write According to an online article by Thomas F. Schwartz, "Lincoln Never Said That," on the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency website, the supposed letter from Lincoln to his son's teacher is not by Lincoln at all. It is the fourth of ten examples Schwartz cites of quotations misattributed to Lincoln: ...


1

Assayer- Old formal word used for taste testers to check for poison in food.


1

Could also mean: "The little maid". :) Minute has many meanings and with different pronounciations (se below). Examples: - One minute (time). [ˈminit] - Insignificant, very small, slight etc. [mīˈn(y)o͞ot] /Adam



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