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27

Here are three fitting idioms for "going through a hard ordeal to achieve something important": 1) move heaven and earth idiom: Exert the utmost effort, as in I'd move heaven and earth to get an apartment here. This hyperbolic expression was first recorded in 1792. 2) fight tooth and nail idiom: Engage in vigorous combat or make a strenuous effort, ...


15

One that comes to mind that fits right into your sentences is to move mountains (Farlex Free Dictionary). move mountains if someone or someone's beliefs or feelings can move mountains, they can achieve something that is very difficult. If faith can move mountains, we'll win the Cup. if you would move mountains for someone, they are so important ...


13

She will be disposed to go through hell and high water to get them back: Fig. through all sorts of severe difficulties. (Use hell with caution.) You'll have to go through hell and high water to accomplish your goal, but it'll be worth it. The Free Dictionary


9

We have the saying "within spitting distance". . This guy shouldn't be allowed within spitting distance of X. within spitting distance = close, near, beside, alongside, close by, just round the corner, within sniffing distance (informal), a hop, skip and a jump away (informal) • a restaurant within spitting distance of the Tower of London ...


7

I recommend trying something sing-songy and verging on nonsense, in hopes that the very doggerel aspect of it will have catchy appeal to a 12-year-old. For example: Easy-peasy, don't be sleazy. or Keep cool and don't drool. Both of these have, besides goofy rhymes, a vaguely suggestive component ("sleazy" and "drool") that seems indefinitely ...


6

You're asking for an expression describing an extreme sacrifice in exchange for great reward. One common such expression is to sell your soul, suggesting you are willing to give up your own freedom and life for your goal. This often has negative connotations and is frequently related to material gains, but could just as easily describe the desparation a ...


5

You might be looking for the word understatement. According to Merriam-Webster: Understate(v): to state or present with restraint especially for effect The "effect" in this case is often humorous.


4

Reminds me of this epic Chinese proverb that goes, "One moment of patience may ward off great disaster. One moment of impatience may ruin a whole life." But it doesn't get any truer than the way William James wrote it "Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does."


3

Regarding your mention above that “Keep it droopy, Snoopy" would permit your son to make a (less offensive) connection between tits and drooping, with the hope that he'll be able to branch out from there, you could also consider, for a similar reason and with a similar hope, the following expression for “relax[ing] and stay[ing] cool”: Hang loose, ...


3

As is always the case, context makes a difference in English. However here is an explanation that I hope will be useful.. 1. "I tried closing my eyes" ---> This usually signals an action that was actually carried out, e.g. I was at the dentist's; her lamp was very bright in my face. I tried closing my eyes but it was still uncomfortable. I asked her ...


3

A man or woman of this variety should be kept at arms length... this is a bit closer than a 10 foot pole and a little further than spitting distance; you might also say within a stones throw, a distance very similar to spitting distance. It's all about distance and the understanding that coming closer might cause a violent action.


3

There is a phrase I wouldn't touch it [him/her] with a ten foot pole (verb phrase) To be loath to have anything to do with; be suspicious or apprehensive; reject : If I were you I wouldn't touch that proposition with a ten-foot pole [1909+; semantically akin to the proverb advising us to use a long spoon when we eat with the devil; an earlier ...


3

I can't think of a general example but in the specific circumstances you gave, of a friend ruining a friendship by acting badly, it is said that they've burned the bridge with you. Wordreference.com has a good definition: This is an idiomatic expression that all English speakers understand. To burn bridges means to suffer the ultimate consequences of ...


2

Maybe it matches less the situation described, but I like very much a sentence: 'Hold your horses'


2

Perhaps minutiae would work. Although minutiae can be trivial, very often they aren't, but rather each is a precise part of a whole. The small, precise, or trivial details of something: the minutiae of everyday life ODO


2

It appears that Marion may have died in the crash of Flight 452 into the sea off Newfoundland, an event that the narrator recalls later in the same paragraph: Floyd often wondered what Marion would have thought of his strange and beautiful home on the edge of the Pacific. She had never liked the sea, but the sea had won in the end. Though the image was ...


2

Doesn't Marion die in a plane crash off Newfoundland? That's puts the crash site in the Atlantic. She dies in the ocean, so it wins in the end, literally.


2

How about inscribe? to mark (a surface) with words, characters, etc., especially in a durable or conspicuous way. (m-w.com)


2

As someone who has had to plough through CVs, I recommend clarity and succinctness above all else: say what you mean and avoid any expressions that could be are at all colloquial or otherwise could be misunderstood. I would simply say: I am willing to work flexible hours


2

I would say that such people are "self-nullifying". "Nullify" is defined by Merriam-Webster as "to cause (something) to lose its value or to have no effect".


2

You can describe such a person as a Jekyll and Hyde. a Jekyll and Hyde someone whose personality has two different parts, one very nice and the other very unpleasant Usage notes: This phrase comes from the main character in the book The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson. You can't depend on him to be ...


2

A common phrase in English for this is "to throw it all away". Example I: I once held her in my arms She said she would always stay But I was cruel I treated her like a fool I threw it all away. ("I Threw It All Away" by Bob Dylan) Example II: "What you did today was a wonder. In protecting my sons, you justified my faith in you before ...


2

We were such good friends and now you've gone and spoiled it all! Google ngram: spoiled it all 1. ...and then we go and spoil it all http://www.thefootballramble.com/latest/entry/weekend-highlights-and-then-we-go-and-spoil-it-all 2. Barely six weeks after casting the all-female Ghostbusters reboot, Sony has gone and spoilt it all by ...


2

The comments have given you all the details of using numbers in precise ways. My answer is going to give you the natural ways of talking about time (in terms of days) in English. I wasn't sure if you are also interested in that, but in case you are, here goes. Mostly we use the name of the day of the week, but we can also say tomorrow, day after tomorrow, ...


1

A sweeping statement is a statement which covers a broad topic in a concise or even terse manner. It's a simile: a sweeping motion covering a broad area in one simple movement. Often, it is used in a pejorative sense to declare that the speaker has over-simplified a topic, or has made assumptions which are incorrect. In other words, it is sometimes used to ...


1

Well there is a word but it might be a little over the top! emblazon /ɪmˈbleɪz(ə)n,ɛm-/ verb conspicuously inscribe or display a design on. "T-shirts emblazoned with the names of baseball teams"


1

I use "very kind of you to say so". That accepts the compliment and turns it round so as to compliment the speaker. Warm glows of appreciation all round!


1

persevere: to persist in an undertaking despite counter influences, opposition or discouragement. Webster's New Collegiate



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