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20

A moorland farmer farms the moorland! Moorland is a large region: noun [MASS NOUN] (also moorlands) chiefly British An extensive area of moor: And a moor is a specific kind of land: noun chiefly British 1 A tract of open uncultivated upland, typically covered with heather: Although the connotations of cultivating and farming ...


10

It is an traditions expression used to refer to farmers who usually rear sheep and cattle in the uplands. It is often referred to as hill farming. Farming on moorlands brings its own rewards – and problems! The land is less fertile than in lowland areas and the weather can be harsh. Moorland farmers often have to adapt their farming methods and ...


6

How about "No harm in?" No harm in being a bit more serious. No harm in saying "Thank you." No harm in keeping an eye out for the perfect job.


6

I'm not sure if this what you mean by "little bit less strict context" but a more casual, sarcastic way to say the same thing would be "It wouldn't kill you to say thank you."


6

Archetypal Moorland What are Moorlands ? Moorland is the name given to areas usually dominated by shrubs such as Bell Heather, Ling and Gorse or various rough grasses and sedges. On Exmoor Moorlands include upland heath type habitats as well as the often wetter and more peaty mires. They usually occur on the poorer, peaty soils on the higher parts ...


5

This is not an ungrammatical expression. The sentence is a combination of the phrases "It was cute" and "It was like a shy teenager". One could consider this a case of unclear pronoun reference, which would generally be considered more of a stylistic than grammatical error.


5

The friends went on a walk with a spring in their step. spring in one's step (idiomatic) enthusiasm, energy or a positive outlook or cheerful attitude.


3

Just use the word behoove It behooves you to say Thank You. It behooves you to keep an eye for that perfect job. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/behoove


3

"It would be a good idea to"... Perhaps? It would be a good idea to say "Thank you". It would be a good idea to keep an eye out for a new job. etc. This way, it seems constructive instead of bringing in the negative connotations of "hurt" or "harm".


3

I suspect that the idiomatic sense in English of "patch up holes" is strongly influenced by the fact that, in the terminology of street repairs, a filled-in, smoothed-out pothole is called a patch. (Something similar is at work in software programming, where a correction for a coding bug, glitch, or security vulnerability is likewise called a patch.) ...


3

I don't know that it's especially common as an idiom in English language, but I think the meaning is clear enough, and I can't really think of a better way to say it. I like the phrase because it invokes a journey. It sounds like you are saying that if you tell the whole story, the reader won't be confused or have a lot of questions. The concept of a "hole" ...


3

"Brainwave(s)" is more commonly used in reference to an electrical impulse(s) in the brain, though Google does list its informal usage for a sudden clever idea. For a more established and common term you could go with "flood," as in “a flood of ideas.” As to its frequency of usage, I found many Google hits, one of which I have linked, below. Classic ...


3

Depending on your particular context, you might be looking for Sherpa: 1.1 informal A civil servant or diplomat who undertakes preparatory work prior to a summit conference.


3

Drudge comes to mind: noun A person made to do hard menial or dull work: she was little more than a drudge round the house


2

One should not forget the obvious slave: 1.1 A person who works very hard without proper remuneration or appreciation: ODO


2

Different phrases seem applicable to people in the two situations you name. For "someone who does all the work," I suggest the phrase little red hen—refering to the folk tale of the hen who can't get anyone to participate in the work of producing a loaf of bread until the work consists of eating the bread. For "the person who is exploited when someone else ...


2

The term "punctuation" isn't generally used to refer to the process of punctuating (which is an integral part of the process of writing). Rather, "punctuation" usually refers to a specific case or a collection of cases of punctuation marks as used in a piece of writing. And it's generally assumed that the author is responsible for punctuation--not an editor. ...


2

My advice for determining what the appropriate closing lines should be is to reverse the situation, and imagine that you are the person with the terminal illness (assuming that "terminal illness" is what you mean by "incurable disease") and that the person you are writing to is instead writing to you. Now, what would you think appropriate for that person to ...


2

The important thing to realize here is that 'put on a show/act' aren't different idioms, they are manifestations of the same phrasal verb: From oxford: Put on (sense 5.1) - Behave deceptively: she doesn’t feel she has to put on an act There is a subtle difference. 'Put on a show' is also widely used without the negative connotations, in the more ...


2

An idiomatic expression, particularly after trying multiple proposed solutions: "back to the drawing board". We tried sprays and traps for the ants. I guess we're back to the drawing board. A less idiomatic solution: We call an exterminator every year. Maybe we should try something new. A common way to describe changing a method: I've ...


2

The two phrases "kinda figured it out" and "kinda figured out" can both be grammatically correct (assuming you use colloquial language instead of "kind of"), but they must be used in different contexts. "Kinda figured it out" can be used like a verb: I kinda figured it out. while "kinda figured out" can be used like an adjective: I got it kinda ...


1

In math, a weighted sum of variables x_i generally means S = Sum_i ( w_i * x_i ). So the parsing is (weighted sum) of values, and not weighted (sum of values), which is how you're parsing it.


1

"As in" doesn't necessarily mean the two things being compared are equals, but it can convey that. The definition of "as": to the same degree, amount, or extent; similarly; equally. So when using "as in", you are essentially saying "[to the same or similar degree] in the DSST tracker".


1

Hello, Everyone might be a good start. "Pals" and "Fellows" don't ring quite right in a business environment.


1

A pal is a buddy or friend, or worse, a sarcastic way to indicate your annoyance with someone. It's possible that some of your client employees and partners haven't met. And you don't want to give this large group the impression that you are annoyed with anyone. Probably best to go with your alternative, "To All".


1

Yes, both phrases are common (at least in New England, where snow is common. Not so much in Florida.) The distinction is that a heavy rain is distinctly audible, particularly on a hard surface such as a roof, while snow falling is essentially silent, so one looks at snow and listens to rain. Also, individual snowflakes are larger and more visible than ...


1

I am not sure I understand the question, but perhaps this will answer it: Definitions for it in my Webster's 3rd New International Dictionary include: 2a used as an expletive subject of an impersonal verb that expresses a simple condition or an action without implied reference to an agent about the weather ... or time. ...


1

I find your alternative a bit too long for an ending message. Is something like We wish you good continuation and warmest regards. fits you? It is a solution where you don't talk about the forced treatment. If you want to talk about the treatment, what about : We wish this treatment will ease your pain and the success in your projects.


1

How about "nothing to lose" Why not say Thank you. You've got nothing to lose


1

Perhaps "snatched victory from the jaws of defeat" suggests what you'd like -- a last-minute success in an unlikely situation.



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