Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

Your absence has resulted in a sense of loss. (Pretty impersonal and somewhat morbid. I can picture this being said by some distant relative at a funeral.) It would be nice if you were here. (Flirtatious.) I miss your friendship. (Suggests that they used to be friends, but no longer are.) How about: I miss hanging out together. It's boring here without ...


6

Historians compare the rise of gin as England's first drug craze. It was considered a bane on society and started becoming an endemic situation. In an attempt to control this rising problem, the government attempted to remedy the situation. The Gin Act of 1736 whereby the government imposed a high licence fee for gin retailers and a 20 shillings retail tax ...


5

"Where's Waldo" is a game where you have to scan a sketch of a crowd, looking for a particular person. By using where's-waldo as a verb, I think the writer means the student is not going to read the passage, but just scan over it, looking for a few words that resemble the question.


4

Apparently nobody has mentioned it yet, so I’ll put forth stud. The term stud comes from the animal-husbandry world where it refers to a male whose purpose is to mate with females and produce offspring. Likewise, male humans who are perceived to have “game” and be able to “score” easily with women are often dubbed studs.


4

What you really want, is a Mack: Or a Playa / Player: They are often used interchangeably nowadays.


3

First of all, you can't say "I give you a call". I gather you meant "I will give you a call". As far as phone calls are concerned, there is little, if any, difference in meaning or register. However, the first sentence: I will call you. is much more generic and, without proper context, may have meanings other than phone calls. For example, when you ...


3

Origin Gin made from grain and juniper berries, the fruit being plentiful and picked in London even today. I know of people who gather these wild fruits in order to make their own home-made gin, the recipe is very simple. Why is it called mother's ruin? Well, as mentioned by the OP it was a cheap means for forgetting your worries. And as we all know, ...


2

I found this version: Gin was called mother's ruin because in the mid eighteenth century the effects of gin on the family and economy were disastrous. Considered the poor man's drink due to its affordability, gin drinking had started out as medicine but due to its easy availability, men became impotent while women became sterile causing the London birth ...


2

One meaning of the term is clearly military. 'Parade' is a formal ceremony at the start of the day/shift etc, where formalities, inspections, roll-calls etc take place. Soldiers, and other armed forces personnel, taking part are said to be 'on parade'. Being 'late on parade', or otherwise deficient in being prepared, kit not in proper order etc., is a ...


2

To avoid some of the confusion, make it a bit longer and play a bit with the sentences :) You divide Your Bid by the Original price, and multiply that with the Base Fee to obtain the Processing fee. Actually, this yields the same result as: To calculate the Processing fee, you multiply the Base Fee with Your Bid, and divide the result by the ...


2

One punches in / clocks in and punches out / clocks out using a time card inserted into a time clock, clocking-in machine or time recorder. The resulting data might be recorded in/on a timesheet or log. Today, one might record similar information in a computer-based system by logging in and logging out.


2

You're not wrong, but "redundant" may be overstating in. Near synonyms perhaps. It is one of those double adjective structures so beloved of marketing people like new and improved. They want the rhythm of the phrase rather than the meaning. Etymologically, both words are French, where they are almost never used together in the way they are here. Fresh ...


1

precentor - a person who leads a congregation in its singing or prayers. cantor and chorister are other words you might wanna consider. cantor - 1.choir leader 2 : a synagogue official who sings or chants liturgical music and leads the congregation in prayer chorister - A person who leads the singing of a church choir or congregation


1

Years ago, National Airlines generated a lot of flack when they ran their Fly me ad campaign. Now there's an airline actually named FLYme. I don't think Try me on the back of a device is at all suggestive, and I've been called prudish (of course, that's not exactly true...). I also don't think it's at all too slangy. All the synonyms for try me are either ...


1

I would say something like "the processing fee equals your bid over the original price all times the base fee" in casual conversation. In a more formal context where 'all times' seems out of place you might instead say "the processing fee equals the product of the base fee and your bid divided by the original price" which is an equivalent ...


1

Unless this occurs in the context of microeconomics, in which there is a distinction between contracted effort/work and delivered effort/work, I can't see how that is anything but a typo. Edit: Adding a link to a source that (sort of) helps elaborate. Essentially, "contracted effort" is what is agreed upon between an employee and employer and "delivered ...


1

The essential part of the question is in the interrogative. Whence (adverb) : From what source The author is saying that though he believed he had accomplished all that he could at his current position, he was still routinely plagued by a question regarding the source of life. Considering he's discussing natural philosophy I would assume he's referring ...


1

According to Wikipedia, double whammy can be applied to multiple things as well. An English expression meaning multiple (or a combination of) negative circumstances, events, or effects. Sometimes hyphenated. Though triple whammy is used in the sense you want also and Wiktionary has a definition: a threefold blow or setback (popularized in the ...


1

The normal way of saying it straight would be: Each time you fall, pick yourself up, (dust yourself off) and try again. You could also remind them that: That which doesn't kill us makes us stronger Finally, and more obscurely: Up from the ashes, grow the roses of success (sometimes abbreviated to "from the ashes...") which derives from/was used in a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible