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0

"Intestinal distress" should get the point across without being vulgar or so sing to overthought. I would say that your statement of being ill should be enough though. Could also go with "in and out of the bathroom".


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Supper did not agree with me. This leaves it open which route your supper decided to take, but strongly implies it's taking a shortcut. ;-) That should be enough information even if it isn't actually your supper to blame. (And who could really tell?)


2

I'm sorry, I know this question already has a surfeit of responses, but they all either don't suggest the best, most obvious answer, or they also suggest totally inappropriate answers. To refer to diarrhea without grossing people out (and I'm sorry, any pseudo-playful term like "the trots" or "the runs" is more graphic than just using the D-word), the usual ...


-2

green apple quickstep , Gastro Intestinal distress or simply, 'I feel that my staying at home today would be a gift to all parties involved.' chances are, someone else in town has it as well.


1

I believe your question in considering the use of "ethnic cleansing" in the comment in which you contrast that term with the existence of 60% forest in Bhutan has to do with a criticism that involves the complexities and paradoxes of eco-geo-ethno-politics there. Your question is about the use of "ethnic cleansing" within a comment that is critical of ...


0

Slightly ambiguous, not that common, but definitely euphemistic would be unsettled down below. Here is an example of it being used: ...This tea is good for so much more than nausea. I find it starts to settle any kind of intestinal disturbance in about fifteen minutes. Indigestion, gas, mild food poisoning cramps, helps settle motion sickness, even helps ...


3

The term appears to have arisen in 1992 in connection with Serbian policy against its Croation and (subsequently) Bosnian minority populations. Some books of the period 1993–1995 explicitly equate the euphemism with genocide—the extermination of the target population. For example, Alexandra Stiglmayer, Mass Rape: The War Against Women in Bosnia-Herzegovina ...


0

Thebaid The Thebaid or Thebais (Greek: Θηβαΐς, Thēbaïs) is the region of ancient Egypt containing the thirteen southernmost nomes of Upper Egypt, from Abydos to Aswan. It acquired its name from its proximity to the ancient Egyptian capital of Thebes. During the Ancient Egyptian dynasties this region was dominated by Thebes and its priesthood at the ...


2

One positive synonym I can think of is 'The Sands'. This might be a useful version for you.


1

If the ailment was picked up on a trip to Mexico, you could call it Montezuma's Revenge. This web page has other hilarious euphemisms like The Gringo Gallop and The Aztec Two-step. It also has phrases for other locations around the world: Gandhi's Revenge, Delhi Belly, The Rangoon Runs, Bombay Belly (India), Gyppy Tummy, The Cairo Two-step, Pharaoh's ...


0

In norway, directly translated to English, I would simply say that I was experiencing a situation, where I need to be in the close proximity of an unoccupied toilet/restroom at any given time. It gives the perfect amount of indirect information, while still adressing the very serious need to stay at home :)


15

I recommend the phrase "Gastrointestinal distress." It's relatively formal (appropriate for a work setting), and avoids the messy details, but makes it very clear exactly which organ system is affected. This leaves plenty of room for the recipients' minds to fill in the blanks if they're truly curious about the nature of the ailment, but does them the ...


5

People like to say "stomach flu", even though the problem has no connection with influenza and often isn't an infection at all. You can say "gastroenteritis", which will make it sound like you've been to the doctor. There are a lot of vaguely racist euphemisms, like "Montezuma's revenge", "Havana omelet", and "curry-in-a-hurry", that imply you are ...


1

In British English, you've "picked up a D and V bug". Examples of usage: A number of wards at Doncaster Royal Infirmary have been closed to new patients because they are affected by seasonal diarrhoea and vomiting – D&V or gastroenteritis – caused by the Norovirus. D&V affects people of all ages. It is commonly transmitted by ...


1

The trots. M-W def #4 The squits. Collins


-2

You could run with "stomach flu" :)


-2

"I could shit through the eye of a needle." By way of explanation, this is a humorous euphemism for diarrhea. Many English euphemisms are humorous in nature as both euphemisms and humour may be employed to alleviate embarrassment, either separately or (as in this case) together. It is generally accepted that threading a needle is not easy as the hole is ...


20

It's sometimes referred to as having a tummy bug. The term is suggestive of lower evacuation, though strictly-speaking, it includes upper as well in its list of symptoms. A tummy run is more specific.


10

I have heard the expression "a bout of the gastro" being used before, where gastro is an abbreviation for gastroenteritis or stomach related ailments.


-2

Loose motion? "I've been suffering from loose motion for the past couple of days." A euphemism for such statements does not exist denotatively, as most euphemisms originate from cultural roots. A more scientific euphemism: Gastroenteric discomfort This might sound a little off but I feel that it's better than diarrhea. A funny one: Unwilling ...


13

For a euphemistic balance between professional courtesy and vague-but-useful information, perhaps something like: I am really not feeling well at all. Without going into unpleasant detail, I certainly could try to come in, but I am seriously reluctant to be more than 30 seconds from a toilet. If there is anything you could email me, I will ...


31

Following on from what Dan Bron said, yes, it can often be euphemistically, albeit informally, called the runs. Similarly, it can be called the trots. the runs/the trots informal diarrhoea Source: Oxford Dictionaries Online


6

How about alvine movements/[alvine] flux Now coming home she suddenly developed diarrhea, with copious alvine movements [...] alvine (adj.) Designating an excretion from the intestines or (rarely) other organ of the belly. Also: designating the intestinal tract; of or relating to the intestinal tract. Oxford Dictionaries alvine flux ...


26

I'm not sure why you would want to use a euphemism for a common and unremarkable condition. Indeed, many workplaces (here in the UK) have it written explicitly into their sickness policies that workers suffering from vomiting or diarrhoea should not return to work for 48 hours. In an email, if your colleagues are truly so squeamish I would suggest that you ...


10

Depending on the cause of the condition, maybe something vague like "I've eaten something that disagrees with me" or "I've picked up a bug", followed by "and spent most of the night on the toilet" (depending on workplace and relationship) might be clear enough without being overly explicit? I've used similar constructions in the past in a small company (with ...


12

There's usually no need to mention the reason for sickness. People will understand that it's better that you stay home if you're sick. And if it is asked, only then you may respond with the euphemism, such as those discussed in earlier comments and answers — upset stomach, loose motion, the runs, etc. Just email them saying something similar to these, ...


61

Upset stomach a disorder of digestive function characterized by discomfort or heartburn or nausea Edit — As seen from the comments, this is actually an informal term for Dyspepsia. Dyspepsia, also known as indigestion or upset stomach, is a term that describes discomfort or pain in the upper abdomen. It is not a disease. Dyspepsia is a group ...



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