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0

The only time I ever heard the word is in my mother tongue, which is Hungarian. When you directly translate 'emerald' in English to Hungarian, you get the word 'smaragd'.


0

I suspect that HI was derived from Hawaiian Islands (as Hawaii is only the largest island of this group) thus using the initial of the two words (rule 2).


-1

i think its origin is from swahili, that its verb is 'safiri' and noun is safari


0

I know this is an old post, but rather than thinking of run in terms of continue to have, is it possible that running is referred to as speed/time? To run is an explanation of speed, it refers to how fast we travel. Therefore, could the phrase 'running a fever' mean it's aggressive speed, and how fast a person deteriorates?


0

It isn't racist, when it was coined "gook" wasn't technically a slur to the South-East Asians, it was slurring Pacific Islanders at the time. So you don't need to worry about offending Asians. The others did a pretty good job explaining the etymological origins of the word but I would like to add something that may be a tad uncomfortable. Why does it matter ...


1

'Doyle' a local term of endearment indeed and local colloquialism - I have grown up in Hartlepool (75 Miles North of Leeds) and still reside there now in my 48th year. And to this day I still use the word 'Doyle' for someone who is daft, fool or idiot, mainly to friends, so the word is very frequent in our everyday vocabulary.


8

The earliest match I could find for "triple threat" is from "Cry of Calamity," in the Marietta [Ohio] Daily Leader (September 16, 1900): When we add to this his [William Jennings Bryan's] declaration of war against Europe on behalf of Aguinaldo, if he should himself be inaugurated so that he and Aguinaido could both be presidents at once there is a ...


4

The OED Online mentions only the sense with reference to a US football back, that is, a back who can run, pass and kick. The earliest quote given is from a 1939 publication by W. H. Baumer, Sports as taught & played at West Point. A search of "2,745,271 Newspapers — 2,779 Newspaper Titles" at Elephind suggests that the earliest uses in the popular ...


5

The earliest source I find for "triple threat" is The British Chess Magazine, Volume 23 (1907) describes (in the old notation) a possible move among several: 1 Q — Q 2 and 1 R — Kt 3 (the latter a triple threat) are also tempting,.... This is situational. (No board diagram is given, and I didn't check the text, but apparently the rook move to the ...


1

The earliest idiomatic use of "island time" that a Google Books search finds is from Dewey Ganzel, "Chronology in Robinson Crusoe," in Philological Quarterly, volume 40 (1961) [combined snippets]: Crusoe spent many days salvaging the ship and months securing his habitation on the island, and after he had "made ... a table and a chair" (p. 76) on November ...


1

The contemporary idiom, 'island time', has its origins in a generalized sense of the word 'time'. time, n., int. and conj. A., n. .... IV. In generalized sense. 35. c. Chiefly depreciative or humorous. With preceding modifying word relating to a group, country, etc.: the attitude to timekeeping associated with the specified type of people, ...


0

These categories are specific to the context, but include both individuals and businesses: Taxpayer - not all, but most, fall into this category (tongue-in-cheek). Account (or account-holder)- in the context of another business.


2

The first instance of the Chicken Little story that a Google Books search finds is from "Remarkable Story of Chicken Little: An Occurrence of Everyday Life," in the [New York] Gazette of the Union and The Golden Rule (December 9, 1848): As Chicken Little was one day strolling about in a garden, she ran under a rose-bush and a leaf fell on her tail. ...


-1

We'll skip over food... since Tex-Mex is pretty much entirely fake Spanish words, and the addition of -rita to the end of drinks is ubiquitous. Cowboy culture & western movies gave Americans a ton of words that are either pseudo-Spanish or pseudo-English depending on how you look at it. It's certainly sketchy to call them "translations" Vamoose , ...


5

Island time is one of those delightful double entendres: On the one hand it refers to pace, a certain slack attitude towards the clock. But it also refers to time well spent, away, in a place that refreshes the spirit and cleanses the soul. If you have ever been to an island in the Caribbean you have slowly sauntered up to the more famous version ...


2

Yea is the original 'yes' word, cognate to German ja. Yes, which is unique to English, is (per the OED) a contraction of géa sí, where the second word is a subjunctive form of be. So yes says literally 'yea, it is', which is why it was used to give affirmative replies to negative questions, and so yea took over the role of affirmative in answer to ...


2

"Beg the question" is a pet peeve for logicians, it's actually a technical term for a circular argument (from the Latin petitio principii), not to be used as a synonym for "raise the question." "More honored in the breach" is from Shakespeare. We typically use it to mean a rule more often broken than followed, but he meant it as a rule so bad it was better ...


0

Idiom: in my neck of the woods. "neck" today is understood as the connection between head and body or something similar in shape. But "neck" originally was something else. Originally it was the Middle English word egge meaning corner."in mine egge" was gradually transformed to "my neck" with the n of mine melting with egge to neck. Old English ecg means ...


1

A rolling stone gathers no moss Rolling stones used to be uncool earlier but they are cool now. ...the original intent of the proverb saw the growth of moss as desirable, and that the intent was to condemn mobility as unprofitable. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_rolling_stone_gathers_no_moss


3

It seems highly likely that the members of Monty Python were familiar with Ben Jonson's great comedy, The Alchemist (1612), which begins (Act I, Scene 1) with this exchange between Face (a servant overseeing his master's property while the master is away on a lengthy trip) and Subtle (a con man who poses as an alchemist): Face. Beleive't, I will. ...


2

Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language (1756) has this not-at-all-ominous entry for predicament: PREDICAMENT. s. {predicament, Fr. prædicamentum, Lat.} 1. A class or arrangement of beings or substances ranked according to their natures: called also categorema or category. Digby. 2. Class or kind described by any definitive marks. ...


6

The earliest Google Books match appears to be from "My Hobby,—rather" in The New Monthly Magazine (November 1834)—and it does involve a lawyer: Larry Wynn (now Lawrence Wynn, Esq.) lived here. He had, as they say in the United States, "hung out a shingle" (Londonicé, put up a sign) as attorney-at-law ; and to all the twenty thousand innocent inhabitants ...


3

Hang out one's shingle was originally used especially for lawyers, but is now applied to any kind of profession: Open an office, especially a professional practice, as in Bill's renting that office and hanging out his shingle next month. This American colloquialism dates from the first half of the 1800s, when at first lawyers, and later also ...


8

No, it's not restricted to lawyers: hang out one's shingle Open an office, especially a professional practice, as in Bill's renting that office and hanging out his shingle next month. This American colloquialism dates from the first half of the 1800s, when at first lawyers, and later also doctors and business concerns, used shingles for signboards. ...


2

Well, you're right, but did you even check one dictionary before posting? Check: (Collins) Word Origin C14: from Old French eschec a check at chess, hence, a pause (to verify something), via Arabic from Persian shāh the king! (in chess) http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/check


4

The exception that proves the rule is a good example. According to Wikipedia, based on Fowler’s Modern English Usage, the phrase has its origin in Roman legal doctrine, and at full length reads: Exceptio probat regulam in casibus non exceptis or The exception proves the rule in cases not excepted. For instance, though not matter for a major legal ...


1

J.E. Lighter, Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1997) gives as a first occurrence of "off the wall" in a slang sense this exchange from a 1937 scare film, cited (with interpolated commentary) in Michael Starks, Cocaine Fiends and Reefer Madness (1982): After the usual prologue on the perils of marijuana, we find Lamont High school ...


0

I relate it to the French expression: "faire tapisserie"= wallflower. People are rendered invisible or not interesting when being a wallflower (gender discrimination mostly). Therefore, if you are off the wall, you are visible and become interesting. Crazy in many ways means original, beyond the dull, mass, sheep-like, etc.


-1

To be an asylum seeker, you must meet the definition of refugee. In the US at least, an asylum seeker is a refugee who is already in the country he is seeking asylum from. A refugee is in his home country seeking asylum from another country. The difference is in the location.


1

According the "Academic and Workplace Sexual Harassment " the expression refers to the practice of moving the trash (abusive teachers) from school to school: "Passing the trash" is a common term used to indicate that the harassing/ abusive teacher (trash) gets passed to another district to teach following sexual abuse allegations. These abusers are ...


2

It seems like there's quite a few that are likely to turn up (and I'm going to bet a lot of them will be related to agricultural origins). Here's one of my favorites: "burying your talents" and "wasting your talents" The whole concept of talent in a modern English sense comes from a transliterated unit of money in The King James version. ...


3

I'm sure there are quite a few, but since we're familiar with their present meaning, it's kind of hard to know what they meant before... but here are two (I think). Birthday suit - while I'm not sure when it began as an idiom (it was literally fancy clothes one wore on one's birthday (or the king's birthday, or some such) now refers to the clothes one was ...


0

I thought to supplement the other excellent answers with more information about the PIE root *ghel-. This website lists more derivatives, but references p 29, The American Heritage Dictionary of Indo-European Roots by Calvert Watkins, on which the entry ghel-2 lists many more derivatives an so is too long to reproduce here; so I quote only the underlying ...


2

It's quoting the epic poem The Song Of Roland about Charlemagne going into Spain to fight the Muslims


1

'Scenario' and 'worst-case' in Merriam-Webster dictionaries "Worst-case scenario" pretty clearly arose from the cobbling together of two terms that already existed in English: the noun scenario—which Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) dates to 1875 in the sense of "an outline or synopsis of a play," but which seems not to have acquired ...


0

The earliest Google Books match for the phrase appears to be in Walter Downing, Digger Dialects: A Collection of Slang Phrases Used by the Australian Soldiers on Active Service (1919): ANNIE (n.)—"Gentle Annie," a big German howitzer, which fired on Bailleul during March and April, 1918. "In Annie's room"—an answer to questions as to the whereabouts of ...


7

Every source I could find seemed to place the origin of the phrase as the UK, some time in the early 1900's most likely during World War I Eric Partridge's Dictionary of Catch Phrases makes mention of "Up in Annie's Room", saying (that form) came to be around WWI, and was originally used as a response to an inquiry of an absent man's whereabouts. ...


0

That is just the first instance of the word in a print publication. The first use of the word likely happened years before that. I don’t think you have any evidence at this point for what country it started in. The Australian article reads like they are using a common term, not coining the phrase or celebrating its novelty. The best bet is to try and get ...


0

There are 2 kinds of mail: postal mail aka post electronic mail aka email When somebody says “mail” they may be referring to one or the other or even both. If most of your mail is email, you are probably referring to email when you say “mail.” If most of your mail is postal mail, you are probably referring to postal mail when you say “mail.” To ...


1

Adding to the previous answer:, In AmE, you'd probably shout dibs. In BrE, at least down here in the South, bagsy would do, though it might just be bags. To put this in the verbal form, you can bags or bagsy something, but, as you can see from the OED examples, the spelling is hard to pin down: 1946 B. MARSHALL George Brown's Schooldays xxi. ...


0

It is a colloquial use of bag as a verb, in widespread use in Britain in the mid-twentieth century. One still hears it today, but it has become slightly dated. I can well imagine its continued use in Australia. The following examples from the OED illustrate that it has two senses, labelled as 6a and 6b. It is the second one which implies an idea of ...


4

In Computable Numbers (1936), Turing doesn't use the word "digital" at all. He refers to "computing machines" and in particular the "universal computing machine", which is what we now call a Turing machine. In modern terms, we would not usually refer to something as a computer unless it represented a concrete implementation of a Turing machine (except that ...


1

The yod, /j/—the sound at the beginning of the word yes—has dropped out of very many words beginning with alveolar and post alveolar consonants in English. This has happened more widely in American English than in Southern Standard British English (SSBE), which still retains yods in many words beginning with /t, d, n/. Just behind your upper ...


1

The word metaphysician has been in use since a time when physician could also mean a physical scientist. The distinction between physician and physicist has later hardened only to avoid ambiguity. But in the case of metaphysician there is no danger of confusion: there is no study that comes after the study of medicine like metaphysics come after physics. ...


0

A practitioner of physics is known as a physicist. Well, yes. A practitioner of the modern science called 'physics' is known as a physicist. But 'physic' is an ancient term and until the Enlightenment, 'physic' (or 'physick') was what we would now call 'medicine'. And a practitioner of 'physick' is a 'physician'. Hence, a practitioner of 'metaphysics' is a ...


1

The Hoodlum Band was arrested on December 13, 1866. Refer to The Frederick Bee History Project "Hoodlum" page. From that page: Hudelum means disorderly in a German dialect, Swabian. This is corroborated by the etymology for 'hoodlum' given at WordReference.com: Etymology: dialect, dialectal German; compare Swabian derivatives of Hudel rag, e.g. ...


1

One not well known fact is that Google has an excellent dictionary. To use it you simply type define word and search. Usually you will be able to see word history, usage graphs and more. Using this technique I found: Perhaps from Mexican Spanish Nacho, nickname for Ignacio, given name of the chef credited with creation of the dish. An alternative ...


1

Digital computation dates back much further than you think, to the origin of numerals them selves; It is of interest that essentially, digital computation can be assimilated to two counting systems; that of base ten or decimal, in which we can do math whilst counting upon our fingers, using both hands. Secondly, to a base twelve system, the dozen; a method ...


3

Actually, this was fairly easy to research. From Wikipedia: "Cataract" is derived from the Latin cataracta, meaning "waterfall", and from the Ancient Greek καταρράκτης (katarrhaktēs), "down-rushing",[52] from καταράσσω (katarassō) meaning "to dash down"[53] (from kata-, "down"; arassein, "to strike, dash").[54] As rapidly running water turns ...


2

Etymonline says that "predicament" meaning "unpleasant situation", is first recorded 1580s. It appears that the term, originally meaning assertion, proclamation or declaration, has been used with a different and negative connotation from the end of the 16th century. I think that this change may have originated from one of the meanings that "predicament" ...



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