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"Awaiting customer" is perfectly correct as such. However, await implies waiting for someone who is not yet there. In the setup you describe, the customer is already there, and indeed he was the one to raise the issue in the first place. So you awaiting his reaction, but no longer himself. Even so, it is not entirely wrong as we can easily argue that the ...


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Usually (necessarily?) await is used in reference to an event, not a person. One could say, Awaiting a customer's arrival → event but Waiting for a customer (to come) → person maybe not Awaiting a customer → person X await verb [with object] 1 Wait for (an event): The trout fishing event was ...


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(We are) awaiting (a) customer (response). is just shorter than the equally fragmented sentence (We are) waiting for (the) customer (to get back to us). Both mean exactly the same and neither are complete sentences Customer response is the object so it is inanimate.


3

Here are the relevant entries in Eric Partridge, A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, eighth edition (1984): beaten at the post. 'Men going on leave would get down to Boulogne [or Calais] and even across the channel when word would come that all leave had been cancelled and that they were to return to units.' (Patch, 1966): coll and s., ...


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It occurs to me that the usage of 'with' makes far more sense than 'by'- since the 'enginer' in question would plan to hoist the petard into place, being hoisted WITH it implies that he has hung the bomb in place, and then become fixed there himself alongside it. He's going to be killed BY the bomb, but he's hoisted together WITH it.


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The meaning in the context of the scene is rather simple. MM isn't religious and doesn't believe in religion or the merits of an afterlife. Therefore, when he tells WH that "at least he's not racing toward a red light" he means he's not living his life with the belief of an afterlife of heaven or hell but that life simply ends with death. He's not racing to ...


1

Pipped came from the name for the black ball. [It] was called a pip - after the pip of a fruit, in turn from earlier similar words which meant the fruit itself, eg pippin, and the Greek, pepe for melon - so pipped became another way or saying blackballed or defeated. businessballs.com


1

In the 1970 movie "Patton", George C. Scott's title character said the quote & cited Mr. Shaw by name as the source in a speech during wartime England. While I admit it isn't 100% irrefutable. I'm willing to bet the screenwriters were probably old enough to have heard or read about it first hand to make it work in the script. The fact that they used Shaw ...


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Googling around for the origin of the phrase, how I roll, I found a commenter who said they heard the character B.A. say it on an episode of the television series The A-Team, which ended in 1987. http://www.606studios.com/bendisboard/showthread.php?74187-What-s-the-origin-of-quot-That-s-how-I-roll-quot


1

All these posts are close but not quite there....it does indeed relate to a dining 'table' but the difference between a table and a board is that a board is just that: a plank, sometimes polished on one side, that rested on trestles and was used for eating meals. Tables have a surface that is fixed to legs. In 16th-17th century England, the pay for farm ...


-1

ger - tribe or fire of home: ogur/urgur/argiv-hellenic/ariyan, ger-jurt-orda, gar in sumer-kiengir and semitic languages and kári - assyrian and lelegs, garten in Europe usw./etc., or great, gross, stark, man - magnus, old-scandinavian-viking madr, magyar/hun/van-urgur-ger/, mann, man, gipsy manus, finnugric mansi, ind-szind-hindi maha(raja) - adult ...


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Teen (from www.etymonline.com) word-forming element making cardinal numbers from 13 to 19, meaning "ten more than," from Old English -tene, -tiene. The Invention of the Teenager (from www.ushistory.org) In the 19th century, the American world consisted of children and adults. Most Americans tried their best to allow their children to enjoy ...


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http://www.definition-of.com/Combobulate According to definition.com, COMBOBULATE is a word.


1

At school in England around the turn of the millenium, "eww" was certainly in usage. I think (as mentioned in the comments) the huge popularity of US television shows may have had something to do with the frequent use of word. Other words that commonly replaced "eww" as expressions of disgust were "sick", "gross" and "vile". Another of the most frequently ...


3

It has definitely crossed over to the UK. My 15 year old (a couple of years ago) daughter used it as expression of choice when faced with a gross situation. Sadly I have even used it myself but I like to think in a post-modern ironic sense ;)


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I’m a 62 year old (U.S. Male); the term ew or eww, as described, is equivalent to yuck in a more tactile sense. You may react to a slimy frog being offered to you, to hold; with the opportunity to say no, with Yuck!, as a response. But if a crass person just says here, hold this, without description, or knowledge of what it is, and you hold out your hand as ...


0

The long and the short of it refers to old weaponry used in wars. The long refers to halberds on very long poles that men would brace into the ground. They would then raise the points as armored men on horseback charged, unseating the enemy from their steeds. Then, men with swords would wade into the fray and kill the downed enemy, "making short work" of ...


1

One relatively obscure meaning of the word "score" is twenty. Etymonline


2

Score simply means 20. The link is the same as between "table" and the thing I put my dinner plate on. Now, as to how this came to be, etymonline has this to say (emphasis mine): score (n.) Look up score at Dictionary.com late Old English scoru "twenty," from Old Norse skor "mark, notch, incision; a rift in rock," also, in Icelandic, "twenty," from ...


0

I believe the road/hoe, and the road/hold sayings are the results of mishearing, or purposely changing the original row/hoe saying. Similarly, on occasions, I have changed the expression "don't look a gift horse in the mouth" to "don't lick a sick horse in the mouth" just to get a laugh. However, we all know the original meaning.


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It appears that the meaning of subjective meaning ' based on personal feelings' and objective as its opposite, have different origins and coincidentally opposite meaning: Objective: 1610s, originally in the philosophical sense of "considered in relation to its object" (opposite of subjective), formed on pattern of Medieval Latin objectivus, from ...


1

You could try cacochronous, where the greek root caca- or caco- means bad, harsh, wrong, evil; incorrect; unpleasant; poor; used most of the time as a prefix There are several example words at the link that use this prefix.


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The Greek prefix "ortho-" means "right" (in the sense of "correct", ultimately deriving from "straight"), so strictly speaking the antonym should have a Greek prefix meaning "wrong", but neither "dyschronous" nor "cacochronus" quite works. So perhaps instead of the antonym of "wrong", we could use the antonym of "straight", i.e. "bent" or "crooked", for ...


4

anti-chronus sounds better to me, b.c anti- has the sense of against


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I know this saying from African-Americans in the mid-sixties. Back then marijuana was still measured in a coffee can lid; that would be a "lid of weed"(an ounce). It makes sense that "book it" it might have come from the military; blacks were certainly over-represented in Vietnam. I guess it could mean sign in/sign out. Shorthand: "book it." The phrase ...


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Transgender refers to "gender" and "Gender Identity" and "transsexual" to the "sexus" of a person. If a person is A and "feels like" B he/she is transgender. If a person is born as A but has body-parts who look like B that's being "transsexual". The words do mean differnt things.


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This phrase came from a poem by William Cowper (1731 - 1800), an English poet and hymnodist (one who composes hymns). The poem 'The Task' mentions: Variety's the very spice of life, That gives it all its flavour. 'The Task' and other poems by William Cowper can be read at Project Gutenberg.


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Fanboi had been in use for some time however a definition of fanboi was posted here: http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=1074739&cid=26265807 To address a fanboi in the appropriate way. It is a composite word made from two different languages, English and Portuguese: fan; describing an overly enthusiastic supporter of a cause, boi; which in ...


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An etymological explanation might be that the word wise is related to the word wit. (The OED traces both back to the Indo-European root weid-.) One sense of wit is a synonym of wisdom or intelligence, but the other sense is "a talent for banter or persiflage" (see http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/wit). So, perhaps the sense of wise as in wise guy, ...


3

For the same reason that "digital computing" doesn't mean counting on your fingers. English expressions grow out of usage, not logic or etymology.


3

The "wise" in "wise guy" is sarcastic. The surface meaning of "wise guy" is synonymous to "wise man," but in actual usage "wise guy" ALWAYS refers to someone who is making a sardonic comment, implying that he (thinks he) is somehow smarter than others.


4

The only things I could find for the word brushwoodsman was a hit Kath Trevelyan, by Jeremy Cooper, although the preview doesn't show it. I thought I would try my luck and look for brushwood men. Surprisingly this actually worked. The first thing I found was a bit disappointing. In the book Sir Nigel (sorry, the link highlights the wrong thing, but the ...


7

The reason the spelling wasn't changed is that Noah Webster didn't know about it. The word glamour does not appear in the original 1828 Webster's Dictionary, so he couldn't change its spelling in that dictionary the way that he did for armour, honour, humour, neighbour, etc. In fact, it does not even appear in the 1892 Webster's International Dictionary, ...


0

I'm 83 years old and I have always heard 'milk and toast' referred to as "Dead Man' Stew". When a person was recovering from an illness ... the first solid food recommended by the old country doctor was warm milk and toast. I quote below one of the answers: "But at least one food writer, M. F. K. Fisher thought is was so interesting in its blandness, that ...


0

I too find "way, shape or form" most often used by lawyers or politicians with lawyerly backgrounds. Could it refer to geometrical dimensions, from one-dimensional line (way), through two-dimensional figure such as a square or circle (shape), to three-dimensional solids such as a cube or sphere (form)?


3

If we go back to painting we have words and expressions that offer the very same relationship between painter and subject. For example to 'capture a likeness'. Then let's go back to earlier, to the word 'draw'. To draw means to pull. To draw a horse and cart. To take from one place to another. To withdraw money from one account to another. This idea is ...


15

Because it was not a French word, but a Scottish one. And we did lose a u — just not the u you were expecting. Per the OED, it was a corruption of grammar, which during the 18th century was variously spelled glamer, glamor, glammar, and then in Scotland, as glaumour. That was one u too many, though, and it went then to glamour where it has remained ever ...


0

The origin appears to be from commonsense ( a sober judge) and drinking habits ( of Lords). Sober as a judge Why judges should be equated with sobriety is not known, but the simile was first recorded in 1694. Possibly due to there important staus in society Drunk as a Lord It just means really drunk. Why "as a lord"? Well, I know very ...


1

A judge sitting on the bench certainly ought to be sober. Also, sober also means serious, and a judge in a case certainly is serious so this might even be the ultimate origin of the phrase. As to the other, young sons of the nobility were notorious partiers, and had lordships until their fathers died. Young, no responsibilities, money, and the ability to ...


0

I wrote an answer here on how the meanings of bad and other similar words have changed over time (and actually it was a dupe, and the previous questions' answers may be just as good). The comment on my answer is spot on—that words have often tended to just reverse their meaning. If you imagine, at one point, the meaning of the word badass to be the ...


1

Transexualism refers most specifically to gender identity, whereas transgenderism encompasses gender expression as well (cross-dressing for instance); that is, transexualism is a particular form of transgenderism. For a number of different reasons that are probably well outside the scope of an answer on SE (seriously, I'm sure there are people who have ...


2

I think on one level it's fairly simple: because the Spanish word for all three is the same, too. The Diccionario de la lengua española gives the omelette sense first, with no particular localisation (although it is often called tortilla española and originates from Spain); then the wrap sense, which is localised to Central America, Mexico, Puerto Rico and ...


1

A Chinese perspective: In Chinese, one verb/noun can have totally different meanings. "take a photo" in Chinese is "拍照", "拍" means clap, "照" means "photo". In some province in China people say "捏一张" which also means "take a photo". "捏" means "pinch", "一张" means "one piece". So, what I want to say is, sometimes an existing verb may be 'borrowed' to invent a ...


0

Linguistically speaking, it was because the metaphoric meaning for "rat" (despicable person) was already taken, while "guinea pig" was wide open for having a metaphoric meaning attached to it. (And of course it was also because they were used in experimentation. But so were many other species.)


-2

I have a pet theory that this expression entered the American vernacular via Swedish: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ingen_orsak There are a few other Americanisms that are reminiscent of Swedish in both sound and usage, and of course there was a mass migration of Swedes to the American mid-west around the turn of the last century.


0

Mine is a distinctly provincial response since I have never traveled to continental Europe. However, I have spent much of my life in the southwest United States. I have never seen the omelet you have pictured for the third usage called a 'tortilla' in the USA. I found it strange to see it so called in your example. A tortilla (at least in my humble ...


1

All get-out: To your detailed research I can only add what The Phrase Finder says about this expression. It really appears that its origin is nor clear, probably a derivation of the more common expression get out ( of here). Here's the OED definition of "get-out": " Phr. as or like (all) get-out, used to indicate a high degree of something." The ...


0

I have found this explanation. IN HOCK Meaning: Broke; have all of your belongings in a pawn shop Origin: Comes from the Old West. In a common gambling card game called “faro,” “the last card [to be played] was called the hocketty card. It was said to be in hocketty or in hock. When a player bet on a card that ended up in hock he was himself in hock, at ...


2

The origin of the word is Dutch. The origin of the phrase is American. Per the OED, the noun hock means: Etymology: a. Dutch hok hutch, hovel, prison, (slang) credit, debt. a. Phr. in (occas. the) hock: (a). in the act (of gambling); (b). in prison; (c). in pawn; (d). in debt. So occas. out of hock. b. attrib. and Comb., as hock-game (see ...



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