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Fat City noun Slang. an easy and prosperous condition or circumstance: With a new house and a better-paying job, she's in Fat City. Also, fat city. Origin: 1960–65 http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/fat+city


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Actually their use as synonyms appears to be still an issue: Usage Note: The distinction in meaning between healthy ("possessing good health") and healthful ("conducive to good health") was ascribed to the two terms only as late as the 1880s. This distinction, though tenaciously supported by some critics, is belied by citational evidence—healthy has been ...


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Merriam Webster gives three meanings for Healthy: enjoying health and vigor of body, mind, or spirit : well evincing health conducive to health I think the third meaning is the one that overlaps with "healthful."


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I learned and always thought "hat trick" referred to a ice hockey tradition of fans throwing their hats to the ice when a player got 3 goals. The crowd is "tipping their hats" for the performance.


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I agree that the distinction is "active" or "inactive" participation. People can "cooperate" with no action at all. Not true with "collaborate". I took a "Collaboration and Facilitation" class in college. We talked about the difference between "Cooperate" and "Collaborate" and felt it was distinct. For example, when facilitating a meeting where a group is ...


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Since I was getting a bit caught up in trying to write out some fairly complex things in comments to @medica’s answer, I am going to write it all out in a full answer here. Basically, there is a more or less regular variation in some words between final -y and non-final -i- (sometimes -ie) in English orthography. That means that when adding various suffixes ...


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It is an expression used mainly by women. Swept off my feet refers to the time when they are hugged by a taller man and spun around, their feet not touching the ground. Hence, 'swept off my feet'.


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The idiom or something like it is attested in writing as early as 1620 The pot calls the pan burnt-arse (1639). I am from the US and I learned the expression from my mother at the age of 8--10 therebouts.


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WiseGeek, the source of Benyamin Hamidekhoo's answer, rightly notes that both the pot and the kettle "turn black with use." That is, they start out a silvery or grayish or coppery color and gradually turn black through exposure to the heat and smoke of the fires or heating elements that they are set above. However, I disagree with WiseGeek's contention that ...


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The pronunciation of words that begin with ag- is stranger than I had imagined. According to Merriam-Webster's (which provides what it considers the main U.S. pronunciation for each one), very few such words are pronounced with the g attached to the same syllable as the a. To my surprise, Merriam-Webster's says that the a is pronounced as a stand-alone ...


1

I found this version: Gin was called mother's ruin because in the mid eighteenth century the effects of gin on the family and economy were disastrous. Considered the poor man's drink due to its affordability, gin drinking had started out as medicine but due to its easy availability, men became impotent while women became sterile causing the London birth ...


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They are discussing religion. Rust (Cop 1) is a nonbeliever and he is discussing his negative views of religion in this scene. Marty (Cop 2) is a religious man and is criticizing Rust's secular view of the world. When Rust (Cop 1) replies with "At least I'm not racing towards a red light.", he is poking fun at Marty (Cop 2) and the Christian viewpoint of ...


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There is really no other way that it should be pronounced. The initial G in Gnostic is silent to avoid pronouncing the word "guh-nostic." But it is not the permanent character of the G to be silent as others have pointed out. When the sound is found mid-word, the G is always voiced as in such words as AGNOSIA, AUTOGNOSIS, COSMOGNOSIS, COGNITION, ...


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In Greek, the "g" is pronounced in the word "agnosis", so that makes me think that Thomas Henry Huxley, who created the word "agnostic" had knowledge of greek and just pronounced it with the "g" as it should be. The "g" is only not pronounced if not preceeded by a vowel.


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Google Books includes a book called "Principles & Practice of Ornamental or Complex Turning," first published in 1884, which uses the term to refer to the configuration of an "elliptical cutting frame." So the idea of "settings" as the configuration of a machine or device predates the electronics age. Before that, the most plausible derivation to ...


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I used to hear from old-timers in the music business (they would have been born in the 1880's and 1890's) that pizazz was a corruption of "piece of ass" (said as "piece a ass" in the local idiom at the time). The word "jazz" was likewise said to have been derived from "ass" (it originally appeared as "jass"). I can't verify whether or not their assertions ...


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I believe this comes from established patterns in spelling. If a word ends in a consonant, you could add -ly. (Nightly, hourly, promptly, quickly, etc.) If a word ends a consonant + y, one changes the y to i and adds the ending (-ly, -ness, etc.) Ready -> readi +ly/ness. Greedy -> greedi +ly/ness. Happy -> happi + ly/ness. When y is preceded by a vowel ...


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From the quoted definitions at etymonline, I would suspect that you may be asking the wrong question :) If I look at the related words in other languages (dag, Tag) for day, it seems the final g has changed into a [j]. The same seems to have happened with (Dutch) leggen -> English lay. As it is normally pronunciation that defines spelling, and not the ...


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The pronunctuation (damn I'm good) might be to reduce the confusion between speaking of a gnostic and describing a thing as agnostic.


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I don't know if you can really answer a "why" question and there aren't a lot of "agn-" words to study, but the only other such word that comes readily to mind, "agnate", comes from the same process (ad- + gnātus), and is pronounced the same way.


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From the International French-English and English-French dictionary Editorial Critic of French Pronunciations PAUL PASSY: The words 'discomfit' and 'descomfiture' essentially have the same definition, and synonyms ...


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Etymonline offers very little information on these words: ducky — "excellent," slang from 1897 (often ironical), perhaps from duckie as a term of endearment (early 19c.). Probably not related to much earlier slang noun meaning "a woman's breast" ["...whose pritty duckys I trust shortly to kysse," Henry VIII, c.1536 letter to Anne Boleyn, who, ...


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The idea to explain the English word government or the French word gouvernement with Latin/Greek gubernare to govern and Latin mens/mentis mind is ridiculous. In Latin we have a lot of words with the suffix -men: flu-ere to flow and flu-men river. And we have a lot more words with the suffix -mentum as in funda-mentum. Nobody would dare to maintain that ...


1

In French there are two etymologically separate suffixes –ment. First there is –ment from Latin mente, the ablative of mēns “mind”. This is used in French to form adverbs from adjectives, like lentement “slowly”. Then there is –ment from Latin –mentum, which forms abstract nouns from verbs. This is not connected with the words for “mind” but derives from the ...


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I have a Latin to English dictionary. It is a BOOK not the internet. [Government comes from the term govern. From Old French governer, derived from Latin gubernare "to direct, rule, guide, govern", which is derived from the Greek kybernan (to pilot a ship).] This part is 100% true but it only covers the first part of the word. This gives NO explanation for ...


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N.B. I'm just handling "punchable face" and taking the rest as decorative. Based on transcript research (Google site:avatar.wikia.com/wiki/Transcript punchable - proper link to google site search omitted due to lack of rep), your memory regarding tLA may be faulty (or the transcripts are). In any case, a check on mspaintadventures tells us that page was ...


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When Man began to learn to count this was a great achievement. But when you count your sheep you begin with the number one. When you have no sheep there is no need for counting. That is why the sign cero was invented late. PS In the above original post are a lot of speculations about language that lack any basis.


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It was common in the 18th and 19th centuries to hold impromptu shooting matches where the target was simply a rag hung on a bush in the distance. A good shot would hit the rag, making it visibly jump. A great shot would literally “take the rag off the bush,” putting an end to at least that round of the contest with an overwhelming success. Making this ...


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Yes, it has been debunked many times. Here is one such case: http://www.salaam.co.uk/knowledge/baccalaureate.php


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If you note the quotations with time-related adverbial phrases attached, the phrase makes more sense (from Origin of "More X than you can shake a stick at"): - (1833) There are more rules than you could shake a stick at before your arm would ache - (1833) ...then run into a great picture room and see more fine pictures than you could ...


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My sense, it's similar in meaning to "too smart for her own good" or "A little knowledge is a dangerous thing"; outsmarting oneself.


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I like the "Vaudeville" theory from Theatre Superstitions". Steppenwolf Theatre Company. Retrieved 2012-06-30. that uses the "leg line" as its basis: In the days of Vaudeville, companies would book more performers than could possibly make it onstage, but would only pay those who performed.[19] Since the Renaissance, legs have been used as part of the masking ...


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"Knocked up", in the UK at least, can also mean "made quickly". (not enough reputation points to comment - sorry)


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This aggressive and carnivorous fish resides primarily in the shallow coral and rocky reefs along the Gulf of Mexico and throughout the Caribbean. Adults are easily identified by their cigar-shaped bodies, light green to white coloring with two black or dark purple stripes that run from the eye and pectoral fin to the base of the caudal fin. Like all ...


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I don't think there is any link between them other than knock = hit. "The Oxford English Dictionary traces the expression back as far as 1813 and says it’s of American origin. An OED citation from 1836 refers to slave women who are “knocked down by the auctioneer, and knocked up by the purchaser.” grammarphobia Knocked up in BE is just from knocking on the ...


0

Jake colloquial or familiar abbreviation of the masc. proper name Jacob (q.v.). As the typical name of a rustic lout, from 1854. (Jakey still is the typical name for "an Amishman" among the non-Amish of Pennsylvania Dutch country). Slang meaning "excellent, fine" is from 1914, American English, of unknown origin.


0

There are two possible etymologies I can think of. In nautical terms, to be "pooped" is to be overwhelmed by an unexpected wave from a vessel's stern, or poop deck; this can be catastrophic for many types of vessel. So to "poop" a party might mean to overwhelm and destroy it. In common parlance, around the 1950s when the term emerged, "pooped" also meant ...


5

"X, here we come" or "X, here I come" is a phrase meaning "We are/I am going to X". It pretends to be addressed to the place itself: Hey, Bora Bora, I'm coming to you! The important meaning here is that X is usually a luxurious place such as you'd visit for holidays or hope to live in after retirement. What the phrase is getting at is that the speaker is ...


0

Full Definition of PARTY POOPER :a person who refuses to join in the fun of a party; broadly : one who refuses to go along with everyone else. First Known Use: 1954 Related to PARTY POOPER Source: Merrian Webster It looks like it was first used in US in 1954. All I Have found.


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Fiber: a. Something that provides substance or texture. b. Essential character: "stirred the deeper fibers of my nature" (Oscar Wilde). c. Basic strength or toughness; fortitude: lacking in moral fiber. Source: American Her. Dic. It's use in a figurative sense has been common for a while. I think it refers to the threads that compose a texture, which in ...


1

The OED has a reference from 1873. I sense it may have been widely used in the two wars to describe soldiers and airmen who lost their nerve. The OED shows the abbreviation LMF meaning 'low moral fibre', which sounds like a file annotation for a personnel record. moral fibre n. = moral courage n.; esp. in lack of moral fibre (abbreviated LMF). ...


3

The phrase is a slight variant of "Is this the hill you want to die on?" which is often used in the military when discussing holding a position at all hazards. In this case, the answer is assumed to be "no". When you decide to defend the spot to the limit, then "No better place to die" is often used. I have heard this used for many actions, back to the US ...


0

Sorry this doesn't exactly answer your question, but this is my experience with this usage. In a software development project I participated in a few years ago, our lead developer (and my good friend) seemed eager to fight for every little principle of "good design" that came up, and he was constantly getting shut down by the project manager. I tried to ...


0

Just googling it brings up that it is the title of a blog by Glennon Doyle. Whether it has an older origin I don't know. Avoid such trite hyperbole. Refer people who say it to Wikipedia article about the Eiger which has claimed dozens of lives


1

The earlier phrase "to a tittle", of which "to a T" is apparently a shortened form, would seem to be derived from King James bible (originally translated in 1611, and by the end of that century the most widely used English language bible). Matthew 5:17-18 17 Think not that I am come to destroy the law, or the prophets: I am not come to destroy, but ...


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I strongly feel that it means -: a hard task ( mountain ) in pursuit of which a person is willing to give up anything ( ready to die on ).


3

"Woodchuck" is a name for a marmot, Marmota monax, also known as a groundhog. The name comes from a native American (Algonquian or possibly Narragansett) wuchak. Wikipedia says the tongue-twister comes from a 1902 song, but the song is really from 1903. It was however a nonsense verse published in a children's magazine in 1902 or earlier. Wikipedia: "The ...


1

As you said in your question, the woodchuck is a groundhog, used in the tongue twister because of its name rather than for any wood chucking ability. The tongue twister came from a 1902 song 'The Woodchuck Song' by Robert Howard Davis. According to this article in the Spokane Chronicle from 1988, "Woodchucks can't chuck wood, but they do 'toss or discard' ...


0

From Plato Statesman - the long and short speech that brings the essence into being and the excess or deficency of which determine the good or bad of the action. Because the end does no justify the means, the statesman operates by persuasion, and the expenditure must be in proportion to the reward. Shakespear took many ideas from Ancient Greece, including to ...


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Unfortunately, contrary to the above article, the word cocktail was defined within the drink word long before any of the above horse related references. The first appearance of the word 'cocktail' in relation to drinks was, so far as we know, on 16 March 1798, the Morning Post and Gazetter reported that a pub owner won a lottery and erased all his ...



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