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0

I think bad refers to the (risky) reason why you are throwing (investing) money which is likely to make you lose it. Don't throw good money after bad: To spend more and more money on something that will never be successful Investors in the project began to pull out as they realised they were simply throwing good money after bad. The idiom to ...


0

First I think we can establish with some certainty that Gertrude Stein's use was not the beginning of this metaphor. Consider the similarities between Stein's "As a Wife Has a Cow: A Love Story" and the Greek fable of IO, who was loved by Zeus and turned into a cow when Zeus's wife, Hera, discovered them. Hera later sent a gadfly to infect IO in cow form, ...


1

Ngram shows that the expression love to bits is quite recent: Love to bits: love somebody/something to bits (informal) to like or to love someone or something a lot. Clive's the nicest person I know. I love him to bits. 'Do you like your new bike, then?' 'Oh, I love it to bits!' Source: Cambridge Idioms Dictionary. but the expression ...


3

It may come from the older expression "(all) to pieces: to a great degree, completely, through and through. Now colloq." (OED) Doesn't help directly with the etymology, but the first citation, from 1788, is "It beats Pinetti's conjuring all to pieces", suggesting an extension from literally beating into pieces, to "he beat me to pieces at chess", to "I love ...


3

A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English gives thrilled to bits "since late 1940s, perhaps ob[solete] by 1970", though a search of Google Books gives references in the 1930s. "Chuffed to bits" also depends on the prevalence of "chuffed", of course; I was able to find one example as early as 1979. Nowhere have I found any authoritative reference to ...


2

According to this page, the word was created as part of a competition by The Washinton Post, where people were asked to alter a word by changing only one letter from an already existing word or phrase. Looking through the comments, however, I found Narcholeptic given as a (possible) source. The comment also said that the rules have changed, so probably the ...


2

It looks just like a portemanteau of: arachno[phobia] (spider) and [epi]-leptic (falling). I would guess the idea being that one behaves as one would during an epileptic episode, but now cause by a spider(web) - or probably, because of the fear of spiders that the web invokes.


4

While 'Knocked Up' doesn't usually refer to 'Made Tired/Worn Out', this might be somewhat relevant to what you're looking for- "primary meaning of Knocked Up". As you will see, the phrase 'Knocked Up' has different primary meanings over different geographical areas. In short, other than the primary meaning we all know, here are the other(relatively less ...


-4

It only means to be made pregnant, at least in modern usage. It is possible that "knocked out" means tired/worn out, but I haven't really heard that used. Also, knocked about means to have gone through a tough, difficult or stressful time. About here means "here and there" not "in regards to".


2

This would be a comment if I were allowed to comment. I have no good answer for 'next night', but I commend to you 'yestreen' -- a word meaning 'yesterday's evening', which was still in (possibly affected) use in the 19th century. That may be Scottish; a more English version is 'yester-even'. See also 'forenight'. Also, you may be pleased to know the ...


0

There is some dispute about the underlying sense of the phrase "straight from the horse's mouth." John Ayto, The Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms, Third Edition (2009) agrees with Stan Gipple's assertion (above) that the term comes from horse racing: (straight) from the horse's mouth from the person directly concerned or another authoritative source. ...


1

I know the question has been answered, but here are some additional ideas. On moonrise or tofnung (to as in tomorrow, fnung from ǣfnung, Old English for evening)


3

Irredentist(n.) 1882, member of Italian political party which (after 1878) demanded the annexation of neighboring Italian-speaking regions (Trieste, S. Tyrol, Nice, Corsica, etc.), from Italian Irredentista, from (Italia) irredenta "unredeemed (Italy)." Related: Irredentism. Source: Etymonline.com Actually, the expression was coined by the Italian ...


0

This source dates it from the 1500s and says: Fly in the face of The first version, from the 1550s, was to fly in a person’s face and its literal meaning was of a dog that attacked by springing at a person. Very early on, it acquired the figurative sense of verbally attacking someone who disagreed with your opinions or your actions, decidedly ...


1

The answer to the question that I think you're asking is "you wouldn't". You can't just magically figure out the meaning of every word just by using context clues. To "figure out" the definition of the word, you'd look the word up in a dictionary, exactly like you've already done.


5

According to the following source, the expression fly in the face of comes from falconry: go against accepted wisdom, knowledge or common practice An expression in use from the 19th century and probably even earlier, from falconry, where the allusion is to a falcon or other bird of prey flying at the face of its master instead of settling on the ...


1

There are two closely connected idioms here that compare an upper and a lower body part in an allitterative manner, originally switching their locations to indicate the notion of falling or tumbling: one uses head and heels, the other top and tail. Obviously, head and top are supposed to be above/over heels and tail in any normal situation. The original ...


1

According to The Phrase Finder, it is a variation of ass end over teakettle and actually Ngran shows that its usage started a few years later. They are both variations ( other variations exit ) from the well-established expression 'head over heels'. 'Tail is probably used with reference to previous versions which used 'ass or butt.' To me it's most ...


14

"Nexteven" A direct conterpart to morrow=morning=beginning of the day, with a similar pattern of divergent evolution of even vs evening just like morrow vs morning. ...And it rolls off the tongue much better than "to-even" (or "nextnight", which was suggested in comments).


-1

Jose Marti, Cuban Poet, said it.


9

I read your post twice. I think what you're getting at is that in their (vampire) world/life[style], they talk about the nights as periods of activity the way we talk about days/daylight as being a period of activity, right? If so, then a lot of the usual terms non-vampires use still apply. I would think that even the word "day" would be appropriate, as ...


0

The Eastern Seaboard consists of the original 13 Colonies all of which face the Atlantic (although two of their three "offshoots," Vermont, West Virginia and Maine do not). It was the "board" or foundation from which America sprang. Until we reached the "Continental Divide" in the Rockies (late in the 19th century), all ocean bound traffic would head for ...


0

The context is "for good and all" time. Which means "forever."


-1

"Teeth" is a person's final fighting weapon. (After one's arms, legs, etc. have been injured, tied up, or otherwise put out of action.) To survive by the skin of one's teeth" (which have no skin), means that a person's last weapon was not broken or put out of action, and that there was still some "fight" left in the person when the enemy or danger somehow ...


-1

It is "wrapped around his/her little finger" because the little finger is the smallest in terms of diameter compared with all other fingers. It is a fact that it is harder to wrap a stiffish object around a narrow cylinder than a thicker cylinder. Thus, if she can wrap you around her little finger, her effect must be more powerful.


11

The most common theory I can find seems to be that the phrase came about from medieval falconry, along with "under her thumb". Both seem to refer to practices people used to keep the birds from flying off. When a bird lands on your hand, simply put your thumb over their claws to keep them from flying away. (You've got them 'under your thumb') In some cases ...


2

From The Phrase Finder they suggest that other usages of suck-egg may be at the origin of the saying: go suck an egg: In addition, we have the noun "suck-egg", with the following senses: "a. An animal that is reputed to suck eggs, e.g. a weasel, cuckoo; fig. an avaricious person. "b. A young fellow; slang. a silly person (Barr re & ...


0

How about when Jack Kirby used the term 'ping' as early as 1972 to represent the method a device named 'Mother Box' alerted, or otherwise messaged the organic beings subject to it?


1

The Brythonic word U̯entā means favoured/chosen, so I would assume Derwent means "favoured water" And the welsh for White is gwyn not gwent and is derived from Brythonic U̯īndos which means white.


3

My answer merely supplements the useful and succinct answers provided by Erik Kowal and Shisa with a bit more historical and contextual detail. The Phrases “Crazy as a Raccoon” and “Under a Red Wagon” The “under a red wagon” part of the OP’s phrase comes from various similes dating to the early twentieth century that consistently involve dogs. A Google ...


4

It seems your brother-in-law is mixing up two more common sayings - Crazy as / crazier than a pet coon: a much more common saying meaning a crazy/demented person. (Also related: Lazier than a pet coon) References can be found on on urban dictionary, wiktionary, and quite a few other sites. It's agreed to be a Southern/hillbilly colloquism. and ...


-1

Another term for "wired" is "jolted." Which is your state if you have just been electrocuted (not fatally) by a "wire."


1

The German verb "wanken" means "to go back and forth." That seems to describe the British word "wank," which means "to go back and forth" below one's belt.


0

According to Etymonline.com: Badass (n.) Ngram "tough guy," 1950s U.S. slang, from bad + ass (n.2). Ass (n.2) slang for "backside," first attested 1860 in nautical slang, in popular use from 1930; chiefly U.S.; from dialectal variant pronunciation of arse (q.v.). The loss of -r- before -s- attested in several other words (such as burst/bust, ...


1

It would appear to have started taking off circa 1970—surprise, surprise. See NGram for “give myself/yourself/herself/himself permission.”


2

It's the regular form for 'something' all over the northern part of the English world, including southern Scotland. Very common to hear it in my Manchester (alongside owt and nowt). It's thus neither 'Scottish' nor 'Yorkshire' but of a far wider area, more or less coterminous with the old Kingdom of Northumbria. Ere's a bit out of an old translation of ...


3

Maybe it came straight out of your brother-in-law's imagination; or maybe he just gave a twist to "cute/purty as a speckled pup under a red wagon". Whatever its origin, it doesn't appear to be recorded in any online source other than the various places you have asked the same question. This strongly suggests that it is unique to your family or the local ...


-1

Stadia is a more general, abstract pluralisation. "How are stadia constructed?". Stadiums is more literal and specific - "How many stadiums were used in the World Cup in Brazil in 2014?"


1

The increase in use of stadiums as plural instead of stadia is probably also due to the fact that stadia has other meanings too. Stadia, Stadium: Ngram: Both stadia and stadiums are accepted plurals of stadium. Neither is right or wrong, but stadiums is far more common. This is the case throughout the English-speaking world, and it has been for several ...


3

Cardinals are quite simply the primary, most ‘basic’ form of numerals. Different languages have different categories of numbers (English has cardinals, numerals, and a few repetitionals or multiplicatives [once, twice]; Latin has these as well as distributives; Irish has animatives; etc.), but if a given language has numerals at all, it will almost ...


91

The Anglo-Saxon calendar only had two seasons, winter and summer, each six months long. They had words for other periods of the year, but they weren't considered seasons. At some point near the beginning of Middle English1, a four-season calendar was adopted. However, the other two seasons didn't have definite names. We can see from the OED that their ...


45

TL;DR: The premise that autumntime “is not a word” is faulty: it is a word. Unlike most dictionaries, the OED does include autumn-time. It is quite rare in comparison with the other seasons’ versions. Variations in punctuation, spacing, and capitalization do not matter. This answer is not meant to detract from Peter Shor’s, which I believe is both ...


0

I believe this could originate with 'The Tinder-Box' by Hans Christian Anderson (1835), where the soldier fills not only his pockets, but his cap and boots with gold. Hence 'fill your boots'.


-1

being who I am [south american] I thought it originated with the latinos coming from 'propinas' - which is a tip or gratuity in recognition of good service/work - and, so as it is often used, giving someone their props would be giving someone recognition for something they've done.


0

Someone else will hopefully provide some historical evidence. I don't have that to offer. For my thinking, this connotation comes from the distinction between (a) what something is in name, that is, as set forth in a definition or specification and (b) what a given occurrence of that something is in concrete reality. The "2-by-4" and other examples cited ...


-2

Looking at definitions from other sources it appears that the meaning of 'nominal' in the aerospace context is close to 'normal' in the sense of within the expected range of performance. The meaning is derived from the definition n.4 given above. Nominal : The use of nominal in aerospace has nothing to do with names, nouns, or interest rates. It ...


1

I'm not allowed to comment yet, so I'll take a stab at answering. I would say it derives from definition 4. In the aerospace industry, to say that something is "nominal" is to say it is within accepted parameters. Everything in the aerospace industry has accepted parameters or "tolerances". Example: "We will accept a tolerance of this measurement ...


0

I've bundled my comments up into an answer in case the comment monster gets them at a later date. A local dialect like BrE? In common use in British English is the phrase I'm going down the pub which means I'm going to the pub regardless of what compass bearing I have to take The same type of phrase can be used in going down the town, up the ...


1

It appears that it because of use of down taken from local dialects meaning; to. down the shore,that is, to the shore ” In New Jersey, you invariably go “down the shore.” Baltimore natives, meanwhile, say they’re going “down the ocean” — but in Baltimorese (make that Bawlmerese), the phrase sounds more like “downy eaushin.” The down of “down the ...


-1

Spiritually, a glass cannon would be as stated before, glass being weak as in a weak vessel or body, while a canon is strong, as in Cinderella's shoe: A weak vessel such as a character who has a stronger spirit to protect them. Cinderella was a good person, therefore she had a good spirit protecting her, God. On the other hand, a character such as a human ...



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