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3

The OED dates boink as a verb back to 1984, citing Stephen King's Thinner, where it appears to be used as onomatopoeia, similar to bonk: He half-expected them to begin bopping and boinking each other. For this sense, the OED gives the definition "to strike, to knock", which is fairly similar to how bonk is used. As for the sexual meaning, their ...


2

According to the following source the usage of 'boink' by David Angell in the American sitcom 'Cheers' may predate 1985 Bruce Willis usage in 1985. But it seems likely now that Cheers used it first, though not very long before. Les Charles, one of the creators of Cheers, said, in remarks delivered at the memorial service for David Angell (and his ...


0

My mum used the term a lot... she also used to say "home james..." and "home james and don't spare the horses". I took that to mean cracking meant a whip.


2

Interesting question! Here's what the OED has to say about -ious: a compound suffix, consisting of the suffix -ous, added to an i which is part of another suffix, repr. Latin -iōsus, French -ieux, with sense ‘characterized by, full of’. ... by false analogy in cūriōsus curious (from cūra): see -ous suffix. and, re: -ous: Nouns of quality from ...


0

A synonym for "go spare" is to "go thin." If someone's patience is "getting thin," they're about to get angry.


0

It means driving fast to no one’s gain. Like trying to get to an objective when there is none. Religion: fighting and squabbling over non-existent goals.


1

"Nobody goes there anymore. It's too crowded." - Yogi Berra That's one way to address your concern, but a better way might be to consider rounding error. To an engineer, 1000000 means "between 950000 and 10500000"m because there is one significant digit If he wants to express "between 99999905 and 1000000.5",he writes 1000000.0; numbers to the left of a ...


0

Well if you go to St Peters Basilica you'll find two dragon statues there. Where you'll also see an Obelisk the phallus of the dragon...So clearly the connection between basilisk and basilica has already been carved out of stone for all to see!


-3

Yeah, I don't know the source but that is the original meaning. It is something that has been done over hundred of years- people would cut out a part so it wouldn't mean the same thing that it originally did. Like, "Curiosity killed the cat," The original statement was, "Curiosity killed the cat but satisfaction brought it back," and "Be the change you wish ...


-2

I'm certainly not the smartest person on this board from what I've read so far, but 'Curiouser' sounds like it would fall quite nicely under the definition of NEOLOGISM, (i.e., a term, word, or phrase that may be in the process of entering common use but that has not yet been accepted into mainstream language...and is often directly attributable to a ...


2

It does appear that "crack" refers to a gunshot, and therefore "to have a crack at" means to have a shot at. In "The Pilot" by James Fenimore Cooper, published in 1824, we find the sentence: No, no; not a trigger will I pull in my own regiment about the silly affair; but I'll have a crack at some marine in very revenge; for that is no more than ...


-3

Eyeglasses were not invented until the late Thirteenth century and were very expensive and difficult to come by, especially for the common person. This made corrective eyewear very expensive and desirable, especially to thieves who could readily sell the lifted items and make a nice profit. The rightful owners of the glasses were left without the benefit ...


-5

crack (v.) Old English cracian "make a sharp noise," from Proto-Germanic *krakojan (cognates: Middle Dutch craken, Dutch kraken, German krachen), probably imitative. Related: Cracked; cracking. From early 14c. as "to utter, say, speak, talk," especially "speak loudly or boastingly" (late 14c.). To crack a smile is from 1835, American English; to crack the ...


4

According to Etymonline, the first attested use is from 1830, and it comes from the act of firing a gun: crack Meaning "try, attempt" first attested 1830, nautical, probably a hunting metaphor, from slang sense of "fire a gun." The citation is from Davy Crockett, a famous American frontiersman of the early 19th century: At their head, apart from ...


3

Good does not come from God, but probably from Old English gōd, which is not the same. Before 900; Middle English (adj., adv., and noun); Old English gōd (adj.); cognate with Dutch goed, German gut, Old Norse gōthr, Gothic goths. The first hand-written English language Bible manuscripts were produced in the 1380's by Wycliffe from the Latin Vulgate, so you ...


0

I saw that M.Webster, the OED, and Wictionary all have 2006 as the date of origin, but I have found a usage of "bucket list" from 1980 in the relevant sense. From Google Ngram: ...


5

It is an error to believe that ye was only used in the nominative or vocative; it wasn’t. The word ye was sometimes used as the object. The OED says: 3. Used as objective (accusative or dative) instead of you (in plural or singular sense). And provides many citations, of which these are but a few of them: 1594 Marlowe & Nashe Dido iv. iv, ― ...


2

My answer focuses on the lineage of the form giffy, which is reported in a couple of reference works from the 1830s. William Holloway, A General Dictionary of Provincialisms (1839) has this entry for giffy: GIFFY, n. The shortest possible portion of time ; the winking of an eye. Norf. Sussex. Hants. The county citations indicate that Holloway found ...


1

According to this article titled "Ratchet does not come from Wretched – Slang Word Origin History", it does indeed come from ratchet the mechanical device. It comes from the Mr. Mandigo song "Do the ratchet", "The Ratchet" in this case being a dance whose motion is similar to the action of a ratchet.


0

Go on youtube and type in "Johnny too bad" by various Jamaican artists,most notably Jimmy Cliff and the excellent Slickers versions as well as another great one by our own Taj Mahall. The term "ratchet" is used in this song for a pistol. My assumption: to ratchet something loose from someone. The tool of choice for a thug,gangster or "jackboy". Makes sense ...


0

They all have root in the general physical action or state of touch, but the motivation behind each act of touch is so varied that there isn't a single rule of thumb that can provide more specificity.


4

The poem found by Andrew Leach as the earliest use in the OED, "A Change Is As Good As A Rest", is printed on page 270 of The Family Herald, Volume 15, 1857, published in London by George Biggs. Google Books finds it here, although the snippet view there is now so unreadable as to be useless. There is a note on the Family Herald here. I cannot find the date ...


1

As far as I can determine, Wise Old Sayings is right, if you're prepared to accept a moderate deviation from the wording of the proverb you are enquiring about. On this page at Answers.com, I found the following chronological list of citations (oldest first), which purports to be taken from the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations: Well, I gave my mind a ...


6

OED doesn't mention Conan Doyle. It does have a similar saying which it dates from 1825: 1825 Christian Gleaner Mar. 62 Change of work is as good as play. And it attributes the exact form to a rhyme in an American publication, again from before Conan Doyle was born: 1857 Defiance (Ohio) Democrat 26 Sept. 1/1 Ye votaries of sofas and beds—Ye ...


2

The prefix be- has a variety of functions; here, its addition has the function of generating an effect via the action of the verb reave. The presence of the separate stative verb be converts the past participle bereaved into what you might think of as an adjectival form of bereave.


2

The OED has a quotation for the phrase dated 1750: Mr. Puff..has wrote a Panegyric on the Occasion; but then he and I have agreed to rub Elbows. [Midwife Pref. p. iv] So between that and Google Ngram, it looks clear that there is no relation with the infection-control practice! Interestingly, OED has an earlier quotation (before 1732) for a phrase ...


4

It is not common. Examples include: parboil (now meaning partially boil, formerly thoroughly boil) sanguine (formerly meaning hot-headed, now happy-go-lucky) I cannot think of any -ive examples. I am not aware of any systematic surveys of this, but it is rare enough to be remarkable. Cleave is also interesting. By two different etymologies (as cleft, ...


5

As with many postfix adjectives in English--e.g. attorney general--we can blame French (or, at least, the Normans) for this one. The OED points to both Anglo-Norman (compare Middle French gomme arabique) and post-classical Latin (gummi Arabicum) roots. So, Dan is more or less correct that Latin is the ultimate source, but we imported the construction as ...


18

No, such reversals are not common; they are quite rare, in fact. Plaintive still connects directly to (com)plaint and fugitive still connects directly to the root also found in refuge, etc., with no reversal of meaning. In the case of restive, it’s not that the word just suddenly happened to reverse its meaning, either. The development is actually quite ...


2

Yes the two terms appear to be related. Both speculum and speculate derive from Latin specere ( to look at, view): Speculum: 1590s, in surgery and medicine, "instrument for rendering a part accessible to observation," from Latin speculum "reflector, looking-glass, mirror" (also "a copy, an imitation"), from specere "to look at, view" As a type of ...


0

Although not an A-S scholar, I've always thought Scathfrith would be the best from-A-S equivalent of Schadenfreude. (I had originally thought "shadefrith" would be better, but etymologically it isn't as good as scathfrith or scathefrith.)


2

My guess is that this is like "on the list" vs "in the list". You generally append new entries to an account book or ledger (more generally, you edit it). It is not like a book that is written once and for all. The same is true of laws and law books (believe it or not). When things are added to a list, they are typically put on it (at the end), not in it. ...


1

provide OED1 2 intr. To exercise foresight in taking due measures in view of a possible event; to make provision or adequate preparation. Const. for, against. c. To make it, or lay it down as, a provision or arrangement; to stipulate that. Cf. provided 5, providing pres. pple., provision 5. That didn't sound 'legal' enough so I had a look at ...


1

The Latin verb pro-vide:re (pro in front, ahead, for, as to the future and vide:re to see) is a paragon of semantics. Already in Latin this verb develops meanings that can be seen as the near consequence. If Caesar foresees that his soldiers will be lacking of corn and food, the consequence will be that he finds means to get enough food. And he will deliver ...


0

It's a New Zealand English term derived from the Samoan version of a Portuguese version of a Latin phrase. From The New Zealand Herald Pasifika is an odd term, and one gaining increasing currency outside the annual festival at Western Springs. Essentially, its the samoanisation of a Portuguese nod to the Latin phrase Mare Pacificum, or peaceful ...


1

"why" can be compared to an old Latin form qui, an ablative form, meaning how. Today "why" is used as a question word to ask the reason or purpose of something. This use might be explained from a formula such as "How does it come that ...". If you meet an old friend of yours, whom you never expected to meet in town, you can express your surprise by saying: ...


3

"Etymologicon Magnum, or Universal Etymological Dictionary" by Walter Whiter (1800) makes the claim that "chiffy", as used in the term "in a chiffy" derives from the Anglo-Saxon word "Caf". "A Dictionary of the Anglo-Saxon Language" by Joseph Bosworth (1832) confirms the meaning of "Caf" as "quick, sharp, nimble, swift". This is my oldest source yet, this ...


2

When my brother took a navigation course in the UK they told him 'When you're facing north, if the wind is coming over your right shoulder the weather is more likely to worsen'. That would be an East wind. I think Dickens probably was aware of that general principle. He was writing in the UK after all.


0

WWII slang. The pros from Dover, as in the white cliffs of Dover. A reference to the troops that flooded Europe from England to end the war.


4

OED has a very early citation: c1394 P. Pt. Crede 375 Þey ben digne as dich water þat dogges in bayteþ. In this case, digne doesn't mean dull, it's related to dignity and OED has it defined as "Having a great opinion of one's own worth; proud, haughty, disdainful; (cf. ‘stinking with pride’)". Ditchwater is generally muddy and not clear: it's ...


0

"My Dogs Are Killing Me" It's quite simple actually, way way "back in the day" people ate dogs, and as with everything back in the day nothing was wasted, the dog hides were tanned, and you gussed it, the hides were made into shoes, hence "My Dogs Are Killing Me."


1

How about these: Harbinger Obsequious Restive Garble Pabulum Beldam Prude Quantum Sycophant Meticulous Some of these may not be exactly what you are looking for.


0

Sugar was often rationed and even when not, would be a luxury ... So it certainly stands to reason that toffee candy would be a sweet that poor children would not often get. I remember my Mother talking about the war and how hard it was to come up with enough sugar to make her wedding cake. Grandpa might have been right, or wrong, but certainly it's not ...


0

Patria is derived from Latin (fatherland) and, in English, means One’s native country or homeland: they remained faithful to their patria, Spain [Oxford Dictionaries Online] When a colonial power transfers power to a colony, the old father/motherland is no longer the homeland. The former colony now becomes its own homeland. At that moment, a new ...


1

"Repatriate" means "to bring back to its original land/country," the prefix "re-" here giving the coming back home part of the meeting. Historically, as a British colony and later as a dominion of the British Empire, Canada did not have a home-grown constitution. It was originally a British document, so could not logically "return home" to Canada in the ...


-3

The Bible answers it for me in verses below and supports the blood of covenant is greater than water of the womb. Matt 10: 34 “Do not suppose that I have come to bring peace to the earth. I did not come to bring peace, but a sword. 35 For I have come to turn “‘a man against his father, a daughter against her mother, a daughter-in-law against her ...


3

According to this ngram, the phrase dates back at least to the middle 1800s, and usage to convey the inexplicable can be found in numerous examples around the turn of the century, for example But it was just one of those things which occasionally come to pass ... The Grey Monk in The Argosy, Volume 57 (1894), edited by Charles W. Wood I suppose it ...


0

It is probably derived from the earlier idiom, "get on the bandwagon," which had just come into common use a few years earlier. The original form, "water wagon," may also have been a humorous alusion to "temperance wagons," (like Salvation Army wagons) that drove around cities preaching the gospel of abstinence. To be "on the water wagon" was to be "on the ...


1

“Just one of those things” was a song written by Cole Porter for the musical Jubilee in 1935. The lyrics are online, but although they include that particular phrase it doesn’t appear to have much to do with “an event you do not like but cannot change,” or indeed, to “an event or situation that you cannot explain.” In these rather wistful words it seems to ...


1

According to the following source the phrase popular after a famous Cole Porter's song: Just one of those things: (noun phrase) Something that can hardly be predicted, justified, explained, or avoided, but is an intrinsic and sometimes a distressful part of living •The gestural equivalent is a shrug : Their divorce was just one of those things ...



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