New answers tagged

1

Its slang put you brought up prision bucking for solitary, in prision bucking means the oppisite of trying to obtaian something. For example im bucking work call,or if some is gonna jack or take something from you.Im bucking the jack..if someone is called out to fight and doesnt he bucked the callout any who its no answer just insight


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From Oxford Dictionaries online: Late 18th century: from Greek klinikē ‘bedside’ (see clinic) + -al.


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I'll offer a different theory origin. The phrase is a generalization of the phrase bucking for freight From the October 1857 article History of the Express Business: "Bucking for freight" as it was called, was carried to perfection by them, and it is almost incredible the pains any one of them, from the " boss" to the boy, would take to obtain ...


1

Buggins appears in Anthony Trollope's Barchester Chronicles. He was a civil servant who was leaving his job, and a large number of possible candidates were pursuing the position. Pre-dates all other suggestions - i.e. 19th century.


0

beyond means on the far side of, they have passed through a state of reasonableness and out the other side. The phrase acknowledges that the person has known a state of reasonableness, English does have a concept of a person being 'beneath reason', but that would be a rarely used application for a person of restricted mental development who has never ...


3

My research suggests the origin of 'bucking for [something]', military slang for something akin to 'trying very hard to achieve [something]' is as a periphrasis for 'washing your underwear in lye'. This somewhat startling and perhaps overstated conclusion results from my observation that early military use is associated with 'a thorough washing preparatory ...


1

If one is 'beyond reason to deal with' then wouldn't this mean that they are more than reasonable to deal with? No, it means the person is beyond the point where it's possible to reason with them. Perhaps they're in a hurry, or drunk, or in a fever of pain, etc. "Below reason" is not used in English. If I'm less smart, then this could also mean ...


4

Background on 'bucking' "Bucking" in the sense of "avidly pursuing" seems to have its origins in U.S. military slang, but it has much broader application today, as Kristina Lopez notes in her answer. The earliest instance of the word used in this sense, according to J.E. Lighter, Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1993), is from 1881—and ...


1

The word comes down to us straight from the Latin, corrumpo, corrumpere, corrupi, corruptus, bribe, suborn falsify pervert, corrupt, deprave seduce, tempt, beguile This was in use even in ancient times. According to the Oxford Latin Dictionary (sorry, no online link - it's a hard copy), con-, the prefix, was used to intensify: ...


1

Corruptus is the past participle of the Latin verb corrumpere - to destroy, ruin, waste. - OED & Elementary Latin Dictionary,Lewis (1947) It appears in English- presumably from Norman French as corrump. : Etymology: < Old French corompre, corrumpre (modern French corrompre = Provençal corrompre, Italian corrompere) < Latin corrumpĕre to ...


2

Attitude in Aviation is ah extension of its original meaning of "disposition of a figure": the position of the aircraft in the air in relation to the horizon. Origin & History of “attitude”: In origin, attitude is the same word as aptitude. both come ultimately from late Latin aptitūdō. In Old French this became aptitude, which ...


0

new user here, thanks for allowing me to join the discussion. Dough=Duff is probably/might be a regional British pronunciation as in the surnames Clough "Cluff" and Hough "Huff" that has modified in the modern pronunciation of dough "doh". Have often wondered about that "ough" ending on so many words that are pronounced very differently: cough, plough, ...


23

It looks like what Andrew Leach and deadrat pointed out are very keen observations. I checked about 50 links of books before 1820 times, but nowhere have I found the word "fuck" (almost everywhere it is a misreference of Long S (f without the crossbar) , as in ſuck (suck), ſucked (sucked), ſuck'd (suck'd), ſucking(sucking) and other variations). This ...


3

Judge and justice come from the Proto-Indo-European root *yewos (law, precept, to bind) through Latin. Jew comes from Hebrew through Aramaic to Greek to Latin to French. There does not seem to be any connection between the Hebrew root and the PIE root. Judah and Jude come from the same Hebrew root as Jew. Jewel comes from Latin through French, with no ...


40

Did you check any of your Ngram results? The early hits are mostly false drops from typographical and OCR considerations, so the tail on the distribution continues to the left. Prudishness and censorship combined to make it ʃucking impossible to get the word published until "modern" times. Now no one cares about the word when the internet is dedicated to ...


1

'TRON' is an early BASIC programming language debugging command, short for 'TRACE ON', which tells the computer to trace the programs run-time execution and report various variables back to the programmer. To turn the feature off, use 'TROFF'. See TRON command on Wikipedia


1

Entware is package repository for embedded devices. These packages allow you to add new functionality to your device. Most of them taken from OpenWRT, but others are unique. It's usable by router firmwares such as DD-WRT/Tomato/AsusWRT, by Realtek RTD1073/1283/1185/1186 based players, and so on. You can refer to the GitHub link for more info on the topic.


2

One of the better places to look is with The Guild of One Name Studies a web-site used by genealogists etc. I couldn't find Peters (it appears not to be one of the names for which they supply a possible etymology). However one that falls into the category is Phillips which you will note from the etymology they deem to be patronymic.


21

According to Mckinley's A History of British Surnames, the major rise of surnames derived from a personal name with the addition of -s or -es was among the "peasant" classes in the late 13th century. These people didn't have hereditary surnames of their own, so the implication is that they adopted their master's name as befitted their social status as they ...


0

The confusion over the etymology of countenance is a direct result of mistranslations in Genesis 4:4-5 (KJV) 4And Abel, he also brought of the firstlings of his flock and of the fat thereof. And the LORD had respect unto Abel and to his offering: 5But unto Cain and to his offering he had not respect. And Cain was very wroth, and his countenance fell. ...


1

I received my first black eye last year. I was hit on the brow bone. It WAS a shiner, literally. It was the most reflective thing in any photo. Without flash. An egg on a forehead could/will also be called a shiner. The shiny part was never dark with bruising.


3

Sure, per the OED, the word doubt comes to us from the Old French douter, no b, and in the 14th century, the English word had no b either. But those familiar with Latin on both sides of the Channel, inserted the b to indicate that the word ultimately came from the Latin dubitare. The pronunciations remained unchanged, so the b was silent. By the 17th ...


0

I read in a newspaer article called AJ Boyd if I rememer right that in the old west in cowboy saloons there was always a piano where the piano player whatever he knew. In time some man started writting piano music for those saloons, standarizing popular songs that caught on. His name was ______Tonk. In time people starting requesting from the piano player to ...


8

In the Oxford English Dictionary, "steal" is the fourth, and " To pass (a credit card, identity card, etc.) through an electronic device in order to read and process data magnetically encoded on it" the fifth meaning given for the verb "swipe". In other words, they are independent developments from older meanings, perhaps from meaning 3 ("To deal a ...


2

My father, born in 1914 in Ohio and lived in and around Detroit had told me that playing hooky was in reference to kids not going to school and going fishing instead. Boys my dad's age would carry hooks and string to school in case they had a chance to go fishing. If they got caught at school with this they told school officials that it was a game called ...


4

Emperor is from Latin imperator, a commander, from imperare, to order. A related word is imperative as in the grammatical term imperative voice, i.e. the voice in which commands are given. "Empire", "emperor" came from this via Old French. Empirical is from Greek experienced by way of Latin empiricus: no relation to imperator.


3

No: imperial is from Latin imperium "power". Empirical is from Greek empeiros "experienced", from peira "attempt".


0

You know, Antoni Gaudí was hit by a tram and died in 1926. It left his work on the church Sagrada Família incomplete. So here is a literal rather than figurative instance.


3

The View at Wikipedia The Wikipedia article on "Structuring" as a type of financial crime indicates that the term smurfing was adopted as a way of indicating the perpetrators' use of multiple smaller transactions to evade regulatory oversight: Structuring, also known as smurfing in banking industry jargon, is the practice of executing financial ...


3

The American word "Smurf" is a transliteration of the Belgian French "schtroumpf", "little blue elf", which the creator of the eponymous comic characters used at a dinner when the French word for "salt" escaped him. The word and resulting conversation eventually inspired both the comic and cartoon series, and the use of the word in both French and English ...


0

I have an alternate etymology from Mehper (or perhaps just an extended one) based on the pre-decimalization British coinage system. Prior to the 1970s when the British Pound was "decimalized" and became a fiat currency, British currency had three major denominations, originally based on gold, silver and copper coin values. Beginning in 1816 and until ...


0

This Sears page shows an assortment of US "spanner" wrenches. As can be seen they come in an assortment of shapes, all pretty odd looking compared to a standard US "wrench". If you look closely, the jaws all end with small pins or teeth which are designed to engage in holes or notches in the object being manipulated. I have no idea whether it's ...


0

I always thought that a spanner for tightening nuts was so called because the jaws of the spanner spanned the flat faces of the nut. c.f 'open-ended spanner'. Ring spanner. Also spanner sizes are 'AF' (Across flats) - true for metric spanners and 'AF' imperial. Whitworth imperial spanners are sized according to the bolt diameter and not its head diameter.


0

The word 'chief' derives from Old French chief "leader, ruler, head", as you know. This word in Old French evolved into the Modern French word 'chef' (as you probably also know). Now, in French, the phrase 'en [something]' very roughly translates to 'in [something]". In reality the preposition 'en' is a really slippery thing to translate, and can mean ...


0

ASHRAE defines air conditioning as follows: air conditioning the process of treating air to meet the requirements of a conditioned space by controlling its temperature, humidity, cleanliness, and distribution. Note that "ASHRAE was formed as the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers by the merger in 1959 of ...


3

Vision Something that you imagine : a picture that you see in your mind Prophecy A statement that something will happen in the future A vision necessarily implies a 'visual' (hallucinatory, imagined, etc.) experience, which doesn't necessarily include a prediction of any kind nor need it even be about the future (for instance you can have a ...


3

The bias against 'out loud' An excellent answer posted and then withdrawn by Josh61 notes that "out loud" has endured considerable opprobrium from usage experts of the past and present. Webster's Dictionary of English Usage (1989, reprinted five years later as Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of American Usage) lays out the details of the criticism: out ...


3

According to the following source the origin may date back to the beginning of the 18th century. It’s actually a shortened idiom. The entire idiom is, “The devil may care, but I do not.” The expression appears to have had the same meaning from its earliest usages: A number of dictionaries state that the first published use of the expression was 1837 ...


6

I have not been able to find a concrete link, but in addition to all of the above, it seems to have roots and influences in nautical/mechanical terms, hunting/sportsman terms, and with the shift from outdoor shooting/hunting to target shooting/marksmanship, the shift from "dead shot" to "dead eye" happened sometime after WWI, and the generalization to ...


0

I think LOL as 'Laugh out loud' was a corruption of LOL as 'Lots of laughter'. At least that is what I remember from my first encouters with the internet in the 1990s. By that time both varient explanations were in use and I'm not sure which came first. In anycase, LA wouldn't work well as a laughter acronym as it lead to too much confusion with the city.


5

'Deadeye' and the character 'Dead-Eye Dick' The outlaw character known as "Dead-Eye Dick" appears to be one of the sources of deadeye in the sense of a marksman. An early mention of the character and his marksmanship appears in Arthur Holt, The Bible as a Community Book (1920): The first person to offer a solution of the problem [of living together] was ...


-1

The term came into origin early for archers that could hit a knight in full suit of armor. Moderate breast plates stopped bullets at intermediate distances. Good plate armor stopped crossbow bolts. Many full suits of armor had only slits for the eyes and the only practical killing point for archers and slug throwing weapons.


7

I think this is related to the phrase "dead on," which is also used in marksmanship and comes from the fact that what makes a shot successful is often that it's fatal. OED has: Quite certain, sure, unerring. (Cf. dead certainty in sense A. 31a.) dead shot, one whose aim is certain death; so dead on the bird. dead-on: certain, unerring, exactly right ...


10

You've referred to etymonline, but perhaps you need to think of it as a compound adjective+noun, not a simple noun: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=dead Used from 16c. in adjectival sense of "utter, absolute, quite" (as in dead drunk, first attested 1590s; dead heat, 1796) As such, someone with a "dead eye" or who was a "dead-eyed shot" had ...


2

An educated guess: A particular type of deadeye was called the bull's eye. It is most likely that the former came to be used for a sharp shooter that often hit the bull's eye. The slang meaning is quite recent and very rare in BE, is found in AE since 1940, usually associated with 'shot', which suggests that the meaning is not referred to to blinked eye of ...


6

I would guess not, although I haven't made an extensive search. There don't seem to be many possible ways for it to develop according to the regular sound changes between Old English and Modern English. I believe the main source of this sound is coalescence of early Modern English [zj] (as in vision), which often resulted from voicing of even earlier [sj]. ...


0

Never ever heard 'despisable' used in British English (and had to force it as my spelling dictionary didn't recognize it). 'Despicable' is perfectly acceptable and what I would use as an adjective. .


4

It's hard to tell without any context, but if you mean Middlesex, with an initial capital letter, then it's a place name, the original one in England. The -sex part is a reference to a group of people called the Saxons, a Germanic tribe that came to England after the Romans left. Apparently some settled in the east (so that location came to be called ...


1

A Google Books search finds multiple instances of shill in the sense of "accomplice" from Robert Brown, "The Watch," a short story set in an auction in New York City, in The Metropolitan Magazine (April 1911): The auctioneer passed the cheap glasses into the audience, looking after them fondly and retaining the leatherette case in his hand. "You are now ...


4

The older meaning of fast, with an example dating from the 9th century, has to do with things being solid or firm. The first OED definition is: I. Firm. a. Firmly fixed in its place; not easily moved or shaken; settled, stable. Obs. or arch. exc. as said predicatively of something fixed as in a socket (e.g. a nail, a post), where the sense ...



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