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According to the following extract, the term dutchman, meaning a patch of wood, may come from Dutch sailors mended pants: The etymology of this term remains a debatable mystery… was it an ethnic slur motivated by the Anglo-Dutch wars of the 1600's, or the frugal craftsmanship of German immigrants (Pennsylvania Dutch), or perhaps the nameless boy ...


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The book Torching the Fink Books and Other Essays on Vernacular Culture (by Archie Green) offers seven pages on the origin of dutchman. In summary, the most plausible theory suggests that dutchman was first applied by American mechanics to compliment the skill of their German fellows around 1830s-1840s. Here are some relevant parts from the book: The ...


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A means to clean ones own behind. When Romans had slaves the stick was passed from slave to Roman and back again after use, hence someone (usually the slave) occasionally got the shitty end of the stick. Common in shared communal outhouses. I have seen period art depicting this also. If anyone has watched the tv series Spartacus then you would have seen some ...


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I can only find this single instance of OP's cited example, where the blogger there seems to be using place to mean frame of mind (paradoxically, he can't write fluently if he's "confident, in control"). I don't think I've ever seen wrong place used figuratively in this specific sense before, but I imagine it's loosely modeled on the well-established ...


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Arabic words for high and low in music are 9ali (root: ayn-laam-alif) and munkhafidh (root: kh-f-dh) whose other meanings correspond to physical height, as in English.


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Here's a hypothesis. The Greek and the Latin roots may share more in common than this thread suggests. Although the Latin 'timere' is usually translated as fear, it also seems possible that this meaning comes from the concept of awareness of one's innermost vulnerability. Note that 'intimacy' comes from the Latin 'intimus' a close friend - perhaps one with ...


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Etymonline does not explain how to suck in "That sucks" got the meaning of enervating or very bad. But "That sucks" is mainly AmE. Urban Dictionary has something about the use of to suck in the American jazz scene. http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Suck But "That sucks" seems to have extended its use and to have developed a new meaning. Edit: ...


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The expression that sucks seems to be predominantly connected to the reduction of a colloquial expression for fellatio as it is metaphorically applied to any disgusting or contemptible situation: Meaning "do fellatio" is first recorded 1928. Slang sense of "be contemptible" first attested 1971 (the underlying notion is of fellatio). etymonline.com ...


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I think that Josh61 is on the right track with the idea that "Go suck an egg" may have begun as a dismissive insult back-formed from the adjective suck-egg. Here is the entry for suck-egg in Harold Wentworth, American Dialect Dictionary (1944): suck-egg, adj. Egg-sucking ; hence, & usu. mean, base; — used attrib. esp. in 'suck-egg dog' &, less ...


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I am going to have to hazard a guess and say no, "Lexophile" is not a word. If it is any consolation, "Lexiphile" is not much better. Neither are listed on Merriam-Webster's Online Dictionary, which you have probably already checked. Definition Of by Farlex does have a matching definition of "Lexophile" but it is noted as slang and it does not directly ...


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https://wordsbybob.wordpress.com/2011/02/18/lexiphile-or-lexophile/ This page may help you to find your answer.


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The word craft is obviously related to German Kraft (plural Kräfte), meaning might, power (or in physics force). It still had this meaning in Middle English. Etymonline explains the connection to boats: Use for "small boat" is first recorded 1670s, probably from a phrase similar to vessels of small craft and referring either to the trade they did or the ...


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OED gives the Scottish joukery-pawkery n. (clever trickery, jugglery, legerdemain) as the ultimate origin and the first usage is from 1686: Deil fetcht was it but Jewkrypawkry. G. Stuart Joco-serious Disc. 59 It can serve as roadside laughs as well: Image source: staff.co.nz


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It is because craft is a collective term and OED mentions that it might be originated as an elliptical expression. Craft itself is used as aircraft as well. OED includes the following explanation for the fifth definition of craft: V. Applied to boats, ships, and fishing requisites. These uses were probably colloquial with watermen, fishers, and ...


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My darlings, I think we simply need to look closer to home. There are plenty of good old English expressions that date from Chauser and before. Try taking this word apart - the meaning of the prefix isn't hard to parse. And once that is taken off, the rest of the word is self-explanatory. The meaning of this word has very little to do with halters and very ...


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Definitely predates Lennon and Macartney. I remember that phraseology being used growing up in England before the Beatles came into existence. I was trying to remember exactly what the phrase meant and that's why I looked it up. I think it meant in just seconds, no minutes, so technically less than a minute. However the phrase had long ago morphed into ...


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The following sources try to shed some light on its origin which actually remains still unclear: Jiggery-pokery: (World Wide Words) It’s not so much found these days, though it is a delightful word for describing underhand practices or dishonest manipulation of individuals for personal profit People also mean by it some form of trickery, especially ...


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Usually it seems like you hear it as a response to an exhortation to celerity, which would imply a commitment to priority in respondents personal agenda, eh?


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The blood in a human body is circulated by blood vessels, but it is also contained within the blood vessels. There is no other reservoir of blood. I suspect it is the latter that led to the use of vessels to refer to veins and arteries. From Oxford English Dictionary 1971: 1398 Veynes ben the vessels of blode. 1495 There is no more difference ...


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The want+preposition is less often used now, except as preserved in old expressions like "to want for nothing", or "wanting in courtesy/manners/common sense etc". I don't know if this was the original sense, but to the modern ear, the presence of a preposition denotes that the less common, archaic meaning of "want" (ie to be lacking or needful) is ...


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Vessels usually contain something, most often liquid, for the purpose of carrying it from one place to another. Blood vessels serve exactly this purpose for blood. I'm not very good at biology but still, this definition seems useful: In anatomy, any tube or canal, in which the blood and other humors are contained, secreted or circulated, as the ...


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A vessel originally is a ship (vascello in Italian) and ships were once the only way to carry goods in large quantities. In Marine Insurance in the City of London the following phrase is commonly used on Marine Policies (policies for any type of transport): "any one vessel". It follows the Sum Insured, for instance: US$ 10,000,000 any one vessel, any one ...


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Edwin Ashworth's comment (which is beneath your question) sent me to the linked question, the answer to which in turn sent me to the following site: http://www.2wheels.org.uk/return/absent-antonyms.asp. "2wheels" published there his work in progress regarding missing antonyms, which is the term I believe you are looking for. The list (a work in progress) of ...


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The Free Dictionary offers the following definition of digicam: digicam n. Informal A digital camera. However, the first occurrences of the word digicam in a Google Books search results use the term to refer to a TV videocamera for shooting videotape. Here is the Ngram chart for digicam for the period 1970–2005: The three earliest instances of ...


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The answers by Josh61 and FumbleFingers provide a solid baseline notion of when “state of the art” arose in three senses: “status of the art” (late nineteenth century, according to WorldWideWords, citing the OED, in Josh61’s answer); “current stage of development of a practical or technological subject” (1910, according to Wikipedia, also citing the OED, in ...


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The verb escheat is used only in formal legal parlance, and goes back to old feudal law, It basically means to confiscate. Its etymology per the OED is: Etymology: Middle English eschete, < Old French eschete, eschaete, escheoite, noun of action (originally feminine past participle), < Old French escheoir (modern French échoir) < late Latin ...


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It is a prefix that in some cases ( like today ) has survived from Middle English usage in words with reference to time meaning on ( this day): Today: Old English todæge, to dæge "on (this) day," from to "at, on" (see to) + dæge, dative of dæg "day" (see day). Meaning "in modern times" is from c. 1300. As a noun from 1530s. Generally written as two ...


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Frivol verb gerund or present participle: frivoling behave in a frivolous way. "we shan't have time to frivol" (Google) The children liked to frivol at cowboys and Indians He frivoled alone in his room She was frivoling the violin


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He played alone in his room. She was playing the violin. What synonym doesn’t require a preposition? How about fiddle, which, aside from its rather strong link to the violin, can also mean: pass time aimlessly, without doing or achieving anything of substance (NOAD) So: He fiddled alone in his room. She was fiddling. ...


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The "to" is the versatile preposition, which comes to us from Old English. It has a temporal meaning of on (a day) or in (a time). Others? Sure. "Together" and "toward." The "to" has a different meaning in locational use.


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Haven't you written your best ad right here: "I’m a SWF seeking strong, single-word synonyms for PLAY. Are you game?" Two wonderful word plays (See what I did there?): SW (Single White) and Single Word; "Play" and "game." I shouldn't wonder if you get a torrent of offers on ELU that will be quickly deleted by a moderator. (Ignore them.)


2

The word derives from the Latin proprietas which not only had the meaning of property but also took on that word's aspect of particular ownership [1], i.e., peculiarity. (The same goes for "peculiarity" which is related to the Latin pecu, herd (of cattle), the very exemplar of property [2].) Both words took on the meaning of one's own particular behavior, ...


0

liked to re-enact; our town has been visited recently by Medieval re-enactors who fired muskets and loosed arrows, cooked on open fires and mixed herbal remedies. That's cowboys and Indians for grown-ups. Explore (Chimborazo) or Unmask (Thesaurus.com) eviscerating. Speaking from direct experience, "She was eviscerating her violin," describes the ...


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From http://www.fangraphs.com/blogs/today-in-1899-the-brooklyn-superbas-were-born/: Today in 1899, The Brooklyn Superbas Were Born by Alex Remington - February 7, 2013 Today in the 1898-1899 offseason, a remarkable thing happened: as the ownership groups in Baltimore and Brooklyn swapped part shares in each other’s clubs, the Orioles ...


2

Apparently, the "Superbas" name used for the Dodgers under the management of Ned Hanlon was a pluralized form of "Superba," a reference to an apparently somewhat well-known vaudeville production put on by the Hanlon brothers, an unrelated group of performers, acrobats, and inventors. I'm stumped as to any connection to the word "suburb" (beside a certain ...


0

Brooklyn Superbas is an interesting name - and I think a sophisticated play on words. Pronounced English it recalls suburb - Latin sub + urb-, under + city. It also reminds of Latin super and superbus. Superbus has a lot of meanings, one is excellent. So the name indicates "the team from the suburb", but also "the excellent team, maybe the best".


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These two words aren't related; they have different roots from Greek and Latin. Superb uses the root super- while suburb uses the root sub-. Super- is for above while sub- is for below (See: List of Greek and Latin roots in English). The word suburb uses the sub and urb roots to make an under-city, or an outlying area of a city. The word superbas is still ...


1

It is an abbreviation of Staff Sergeant, also abbreviated as SSG in the U.S. Staff Sergeant is a rank and, due to its specificity, would be considered a compound noun. I would understand that, just as an acronym for a compound noun is not a compound noun itself, neither would the abbreviation for a compound noun be a compound noun.


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Even though the "to" use is noted as old/archaic, the construction can be thought of in contemporary terms. In general, the presence of the preposition "to" in front of a verb is just an infinitive phrase. In that context, "to want" is not really that different even in a contemporary context from other infinitive phrases such as "to eat," "to walk," etc.


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Oxford Definition: A small disc or knob sewn on to a garment, either to fasten it by being pushed through a slit made for the purpose or for decoration. Obviously if used for decoration it is going to be pretty and small-ish. as for cute as a bug in a rug... wrong. SNUG as a bug in a rug is correct. Who would think a bed-bug or similar would be ...


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If you have someone "wrapped around your little finger" you've twisted them into the most contorted position possible.


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"Screaming at the top of your lungs" - I believe you can only scream aloud, when your lungs are filled to capacity or "to the brim", and hence "at the top of your lungs". The 'soundness' of our voice is directly related to the 'power of our lungs'. As the air inside the lungs depletes, the pitch (of the sound) goes down. Although there could be no ...


1

Here's The MED entry of the use of 'by' with numbers. See 10a. The use in multiplication (and, by extension, when stating the dimensions of two sides) would appear to derive from the idea of 'in groups of N'. 3 x 4 = 3 by 4 = "3 groups of 4". xxxx xxxx xxxx


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The Wikipedia article is, um, not as technically correct as it could be. FM interstation hiss should not be called static. FM interstation hiss is not really accurate white noise (equal power at all frequencies) either, although it comes close. True "static" wrt radio reception usually does not happen on FM, at all. (It can, if the source of the ...


0

Irish speaker here. Sionnachaíonn makes some amount of sense alright, the literal translation would be something akin to "to fox". Totally irrelevant but this has been pretty interesting


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Why is white noise called 'static'? OP refers to the sense of static employed in physics, where it represents electrical interference. My intuition is that we refer to noise, or white noise as static because it interferes - disrupts, distorts and obscures - the data or information we are trying to focus on, which is a cause of aggravation. How static came ...


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Static noise in a receiver is produced by static electrical charges, i.e., stationary charge, the kind not running in a circuit.


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"Non-" words are almost always composed without a hyphen. The exception is when the word to which this prefix is added is a proper noun, as with "non-Hispanic." There is a list of "non-" words in the Merriam-Webster entry: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/non-


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A long time ago I was serving a custodial sentence. Anyhow, while the prisoners were locked in their cell they used to talk out of their windows while sticking their neck out. "wind your neck in" was often a phrase of banter. Therefor, I think it is very much possible that the police officers have actually got the saying from the potential prisoners


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I don't think that the combination of pro- and portare had anything to do with the emergence of a negative connotation in the word purport. I say this because dictionary coverage of the term shows no sign that such a connotation was widely understood in contemporaneous use for at least the 225 years between between John Kersey's dictionary of 1706 and ...



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