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In this case, drive is being used in the sense of "forcing into existence through vigorous effort" (see definition 10 in Am Heritage), a meaning which probably follows from the more common use of drive to mean "force to do something" (e.g. bad luck may drive someone to drink). The usage of hard is meant to indicate the effort involved, and is used in the ...


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In drive a hard bargain, drive seems to refer to drive a vehicle used metaphorically meaning to conduct a negotiation. Hard refers to the strong, determined way in which the deal is carried out. Origin: Mid-19th Century, American English. Even though “drive” sounds like it could be a 20th Century word having to do with automobiles, the word goes ...


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The term shows up in credits as "Best Boy Electric" or "Best Boy Grip." Imdb explains the origin of the term thus: The origin of the term is from "pre-union" filming days when the line between Grip [department dealing with cameras and other equipment] and Electric departments was less rigid. When the head of either department needed another body ...


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Jonathon Green, Dictionary of Jargon (1987) has this entry for best boy: best boy n. {Film} a film crew member who is the assistant to the gaffer [chief electrician] or key grip [supervisor of employee who move around various specific types of heavy equipment]. But this only tells us what the best boy does and puts the origin of the term at no later ...


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The department head is in charge of a bunch of people in the department, called boys. The department head appoints a second in command, or foreman, who is the best of those boys.


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Daughter: Wiktionary, Appendix:Proto-Indo-European/dʰugh₂tḗr: The article discusses how the PIE word was reconstructed, and then says "The original meaning is probably "the (potential) suckler, the one that draws milk"; compare Sanskrit दुहे (duhé) / दुग्धे (dugdhe), and the *-tḗr suffix...." (dugdhe probably means dugs although I did not confirm this.) ...


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I have the idea that Latin pater (father) might have been ○parantor (para.tor pa...tor pater), from the verb parare meaning prepare. So the idea might have been: He who was the preparing part. No idea as to Greek thygater. I have the impression it is a word from neighbouring languages the Greeks have adopted and perhaps transformed.


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Words like 'Accidence', 'declension' or 'conjugation' may be used for derivtional words. Of the three words suggested, the first two may be used for noun derivatives and the last for verb derivatives. The modulation of a word can well be described by the term, 'inflexion' as well.


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I always assumed it came from the way we describe species of animals or plants. We call lots of abundant species the 'common ____', just a quick google search throws up the common shrew, the common vole, the common pheasant, to dissociate them from the less common species such as the water vole, the pygmy shrew and the golden pheasant. The term garden is ...


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To supplement Barrie England and MετάEd's answers: Etymonline reports that the pejorative term rag, which is used to express or suggest a newspaper's worthlessness, dates back to the 18th century. rag (n.) scrap of cloth, early 14c., probably from Old Norse rögg "shaggy tuft," earlier raggw-, or possibly from Old Danish rag, or a back-formation from ...


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...it becomes one of those new internet words that no Chinese reader truly understands but they sort of get it just because they have seen it many times in the same context of praising an exceptional performance... There is actually nothing "wrong" with this; this is exactly how most people naturally learn the meaning of words. It also means that a ...


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I can not speak to previous answers. My opinion is based on personal experience. I first heard combobulate/discombobulate (both terms) in the late 1940s from my 60-year-old grandfather, when I was four. On being asked, he could not recall its source. Several days later, he came to me with a crumbling old letter he had received as a very young boy (mid ...


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There were Bible translations before the KJV, and this synonym for death appears in numerous places in Tyndale (1534). For example, Acts 5:5 reads: "When Ananias herde these wordes, he fell doune and gave vp the goost." Cf. Matthew 27:50: "Iesus cryed agayne with a lowde voyce and yelded vp the goost."


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Though in view of the answer above, I thought to quote two answers from this Reddit question which retrograde to Proto-Indo-European. I edit them lightly to improve readability. By: user 'gnorrn', 2015 July 26 The duality goes all the way back to Latin: genius meant "the tutelar deity of a person or place" ingenium meant "innate or natural quality, ...


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I more than once heard my Mother, born around 1902 in west London, in perhaps the 1940s and 1950s. But she used it in a definitely conscious way, almost with verbal quotation marks around it. But it wasn't gloomy, it merely indicated being in deep thought, kind of offline to those around at the time.


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It may come down to usage. Because the word is rarely used, perhaps it is considered safer to warn you in case you have made a mistake. If you really want to use the word, you can easily add it to the dictionary. Google ngram: preconceive,conceive


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To preconceive is to conceive (or imagine) something before the event that reveals or confirms it. It is similar to "imagine beforehand". No-one in the year 1890 could preconceive the atom bomb.


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This dictionary.com reference page has two quotes using preconcieve in the present tense: It was impossible for Harold to preconceive the effect this had on Esther. (Felix Holt, The Radical - George Eliot) How little did I preconceive the conduct which, in an exigence like this, I should be prone to adopt. (Wieland; or The Transformation - Charles ...


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As others have observed, an "axe to grind" is simply an ulterior motive—often, but not always, a concealed one. Most authorities cite as the source of the phrase the cautionary tale of the boy, the stranger, the axe, and the grindstone, which they generally attribute either to Charles Miner (1780–1865) or to Benjamin Franklin (1706–1790). As I've noted on ...


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http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/british/have-an-axe-to-grind to have a strong personal opinion about something that you want people to accept and that is the reason why you do something http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/have+an+axe+to+grind to have a strong opinion about something, which you are often trying to persuade other ...


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Yes it comes from the Latin fascis meaning bundle. According to my father-in-law, who is Italian, the individual sticks of the fascis are easily broken; however as a bundle or fascis they can not. Meaning: Strength United So the Romans’ fascis was a symbol of strength. Similarly fascists have strength as a group.


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There are a few examples of Dutch defence usage before 1789 that refers to war terminology, plus the Phrase Finder cites its usage in legal context. It is reasonable to assume that Elias Stein referred to an existing expression and adopted it to describe a tactic in chess game. From: The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling: In Four Volumes, Volume 2 Di ...


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When Jesus was around, people would go to a synagogue and contribute by putting money in a container with a trumpet shaped top. The more valuable coins were bigger and if you threw them in, they made a noise that let everyone know you were giving a bigger donation. You were blowing your trumpet


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I'm not a scholar of Old English, but I think you're wrong to assume that much changed semantically. The OED gives an example from an Anglo-Saxon calendar from the year 1000 of "but" being used as a preposition meaning "except for one thing." Swylce ymb fyrst wucan butan anre niht þætte yldum bringð sigelbeorhte dagas sumor to tune, So around the ...


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Both meanings are still in usage, and in fact are really the same meaning with slight variation. Consider the following two sentences: He took all but one cookie. and I had but one cookie. They could be rephrased as He took all except one cookie. and I had nothing except one cookie. OR I had only one cookie. The difference is ...


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Your French example is not as much about influence as it is about how the French language is regulated. Information on how a new word enters the French language. In other cases, using English words may be caused by: The increasing number of non-native English speakers outside of English-speaking countries. The strong influence of English-speaking media. ...


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I came to this because I was reading a script set in the late 1970s in the UK, in which the phone is referred to several times as the 'telephone'. The rest of the script is fairly well researched so I wondered why that word jarred to much in my mind. Having grown up in the UK (I was born in 1971) although I admit there may have been a certain snobbery ...


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Nevermind the fact that it's not pronounced ko-ran, or kor-an. It's said just like we spell it. If you need pronunciation spelling, it would be closest to kur-on. It's the name of a holy book. Use the accurate title and learn the correct way to pronounce it. It's not difficult.


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The Wall Street Journal has a good article on the subject, and cites the military and a 1904 article on baseball: In “John Bumpkin Upon Drill,” a comic theatrical song that the Oxford English Dictionary dates to the 1780s, the title character says, “it were enough to make a cat laugh, to see sarjeant drilling me—‘Heads up! Higher! Still higher!’ ” At the ...


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Man of letters suggests a person who travels with letters of introduction acknowledging his status.


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My theory also comes from aviation. It is purely speculation and just me connecting the dots. I saw a gif of a topless girl in a plane that did a roll. When upside-down her "tits" were "up" towards her face. I took it to mean upside-down, broken, oriented incorrectly.


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I'm from the Southeastern United States. I think the usage of I don't care to to mean I don't mind comes from it being the response to a question. Ex: Person 1: Would you care to move you truck so I can get out? Person 2: I don't care to. In this exchange person 1 is making a request which person 2 then agrees to. By "I don't care to move my truck" they ...


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Radio slang is correct. This term was introduced by truckers operating on Citizen Band radios. Truckers often came up with their own terms and verbage to use on the radio, most often so that law enforcement couldn't understand their messages. As a little side note, you will often hear the term "Wilco" in conjunction with "Roger"... "Roger Wilco".... ...


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"Peta-" and "tera-" are prefixes in the International System of Unites. The former comes from the Greek word "πέντε," meaning five because "peta" means 10005 or 1015. Tera comes from the Greek word for monster, "τέρας," and it means 10004 or 1012, also known as a trillion. So a petabyte is 1015 bytes or 1000 trillion bytes.


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This question is answered in relation to two-dimensional and three-dimensional usage for on/in in John Lawler's answer to Why are you “On a train” yet “In a car” when you are inside both vehicles?


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It could be a reference the stubbornness of Pharaoh leading to his army getting stuck in the mud of the red sea (see Exodus 14:21f)


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Maybe this is true, but it is equally true that most English speakers don't know Old Norse, so while its etymology may be redundant, its current usage is not.


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Words are only very rarely invented by a committee. Occasionally an individual is solely responsible for inventing/selecting the word and somehow "injecting" it into the argot. Sometimes this individual will consider, eg, Latin roots when constructing the word, sometimes it's just a whim. More often, the need for the word exists and various people use ...


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Think of it in steps It is visual and optical illusion. First, it is an illusion Illusion then it is a Visual Illusion and then it is an Optical Illusion You could probably even get away with writing optical visual illusion Optics is the science behind the eye. It isn't just about vision. For instance, an optic nerve aids you ...


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They are the same thing as far as I know. I guess it is the person using it or the difference between a magician using it or a scientist.


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Raubritter seems to be the name of the person who developed the kind of roses called Raubritter: http://www.classicroses.co.uk/products/gardenplants/macrantha-raubritter/


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It looks as if the only certain etymology is for hunting Pink, the scarlet coats worn when riding to hounds. They are named after the inventor, like Burberrys and Macintoshes. The Tailors who designed the coat still have a shop in London. The subject is complicated. Even the Shorter Oxford English Dictionary has a column of Pinks, with ten separate ...


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Etymonline has an entry on pink. It says that "pink" was the common name of a garden plant. The origin of the word pink itself is unknown. The rest of the text consists of assumptions.


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I have read (can't remember where) that the colour pink comes from the name of the flower. And the flower was so named because its edges are pinked; i.e shaped as they would be if cut with pinking shears; To pink meaning to give a decorative frilly edge. Edit: a reference - The color pink is named after the flowers called pinks... The name derives ...


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Etymology of word pink, from Google: mid 17th century: the early use of the adjective being to describe the color of the flowers of this plant. Origin: mid 17th cent.: adjective describing the color of the flowers of pink |pɪŋk| (flower name) -- a herbaceous Eurasian plant with sweet-smelling pink or white flowers and slender, typically gray-green, ...


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Alas, "etymology obscure" according to the OED. Sometimes the answers to simple questions about word origin have been lost.


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The OED finds that the first use of "execute" meaning to carry out a plan, instruction, or command in 1386 (from Chaucer, no less) and the first use of "executor" meaning the person who does the carrying out, two years later. The first use of "execute" meaning to inflict capital punishment is found in 1483. So the non-lethal meanings of "execute" and ...


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For execution, http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=execution says Specific sense of "act of putting to death" (mid-14c.) is from Middle English legal phrases such as don execution of deth "carry out a sentence of death." For execute, http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=execute says Meaning "to inflict capital punishment" is from late ...


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Albert Barrere & Charles Leland, A Dictionary of Slang, Jargon & Cant, volume 2 (1890) has this entry for posh: Posh (society) modern term for money, originally used for a halfpenny or small coin. From the gypsy pash or posh, a half. In Romany poshero, the affix ero being corrupted from hāro, copper, i.e., a copper or a penny. Posh an' posh, half ...


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Originally, SUVs had four-wheel drive and lots of luggage room. The idea behind the name is that as well as regular driving, you also used SUVs for off-road travel (sport) and/or for carting stuff around (utility). However, the advertising guys figured out how to sell SUVs to rich people who used them for driving around town, and since then they have been ...



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