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We use Head and Capit for our words along with a few other terms, like Cepha. I suppose if you are creating your own language you can just create your own word. Head is not the "definition" of Capit; that is what has gotten you confused. The definition of both is "the body part just above the neck." Now, we do use the Latin, Greek, and English words (and ...


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I believe you're thinking of the word peccadillo. From Google: pec·ca·dil·lo ˌpekəˈdilō noun a small, relatively unimportant offense or sin. synonyms: misdemeanor, petty offense, indiscretion, lapse, misdeed "I'm sure we can overlook a few peccadilloes"


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The Latin word is caput, nominative, and capit-is, genitive. In the genitive the u changed to i, influenced by the i of the genitive ending. Connected with Latin caput is German Haupt. H corresponds to Latin c, and Latin u jumped before p. Also English head is connected with Latin caput. If you compare Haupt and head you see the similarity. In the course ...


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You need to make up one root, and define it in English. Say you decide op means head or is the root for words that have head in them, like capit is English. Then you can add suffixes and prefixes and such to op so that oppy or arop or tomopsoo mean things (in English) the way capital and captain and decapitate mean things to us. Maybe the people in your ...


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English draws its lexicon from many sources: from Old English, sort of a 'cousin' of Old High German, both being derived from Proto-Germanic; from (at different times) Old and Modern French; from classical Latin (which is also ancestral to Old French) and from classical Greek. Head, as the comments tell you, descends from an Old English word, heafod = ...


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It's a very long story, but English is a mashup, so words have different origins. The word head sounds nothing like capit because capit is not the root of head. It is the root of capital and decapitation. A root word is just the word that the prefixes and suffixes are appended to: capit, capital, capitalist, anticapitalist, anitcapitalistic.


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A deerstalker is a type of hat that is typically worn in rural areas, often for hunting, especially deer stalking. Because of the hat's popular association with Sherlock Holmes, it is also a stereotypical hat of a detective. It appears that a similar hat was formerly worn by hunters of deers, from which the name: Deerstalker: One who practices ...


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From Wikipedia: A deerstalker is a type of cap that is typically worn in rural areas, often for hunting, especially deer stalking. So it's called a deerstalker because it's literally worn when deer stalking (hunting a deer by pursuing it on foot).


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I would assume the "baiting" metaphor would be a reference to the use of stakes in animal trapping, both as anchors for ground traps and in the famous "pit with stakes at the bottom". It also seems plausible that it may seem more bait-related because bait itself is able to be staked to the locality for an animal, as one would stake suet to a tree for ...


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LMGIFY The "burning" metaphor refers to burning at the stake, a method of executing criminals. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_by_burning For a specific example: see, e.g., Joan of Arc. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joan_of_Arc


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I'm not sure of the etymology of this phrase, but I can say something about its meaning and connotations. "Regular old" means something more along the lines of "a typical" (or even "stereotypical" though in the sense of "expected", not in the negative sense that "stereotypical" often connotes). In other words, something basic and ordinary, but not unusual ...


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Already in Latin the verb tractare developed a lot of uses. Dictionaries mostly give up to 10 uses. So if you want to understand the various semantic paths you have to study the various uses of the verb and the example material in the Latin dictionary. But it is possible to understand the various developments. Pons tracto


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The practice and the expression is sometimes to touch wood or to knock on wood: This phrase is used by people who rap their knuckles on a piece of wood hoping to stave off bad luck. In the UK, the phrase 'touch wood' is used - often jokingly by tapping one's head. The phrases are sometimes spoken when a person is already experiencing some good fortune ...


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You can find all details at wiki Knocking on wood refers to the apotropaic tradition in western folklore of literally touching, tapping, or knocking on wood, or merely stating that you are doing or intend same, in order to avoid "tempting fate" after making a favourable observation, a boast, or declaration concerning one's own death or other ...


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How did 'to treat' evolve from 'to draw, drag, move`?... What are some right ways of interpreting this evolution, to make it feel reasonable and intuitive? I struggle to see the bigger picture or key notion that connects or overlies them? The English word did not evolve from 'to drag', it did not evolve at all. The change in meaning took place in ...


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Poky driver does the trick I believe. 2. American English doing things very slowly, especially in a way that is annoying: I got behind some poky driver on the freeway. Longman Dictionary


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There is something mysterious about the term gerund, at least the term does not give a clear insight into this special verb form. By the way, there were two similar terms: gerundium and gerundive. It may be that the terms are not derived from gerere, which does not make much sense. I think it might be possible that the terms ultimately came from agere and ...


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What's the meaning of 'pray' as bolded above? Is it the modern one of prayer, or the olden one? How did the 2 syntagma (ex- "out" + orare "pray") combine to mean exorare "to prevail upon,"? I don't understand this key link in the etymology 3 orare means: 'to pray/beg/plead' 2 ex doesn't mean only out, but also: 'out of/ from/ because of' as ...


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Shed = Fall over to the ground; give away eg-1: The trees shed their leaves in autumn (season). eg-2: Women often tend to shed tears when they are emotional.


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shed in this case comes from the German "scheiden" which means "to divide", can be seen in the form "entscheiden" - to make a decision, hope this helps


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There are two types of mechanically activated switches in the electronic and electrical industry. Type A is where the switch remains stucked indefinitely at a lower position even after releasing your fingers from it and type B is a push( downwards of course)- to -on type where the switch bounces back( upwards of course) to its original position after the ...


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As for -path I agree with user49727 (and so do MW and ODO), but I would like to add something about botany. Merriam-Webster online states that: Origin of BOTANY botanic botanical + 2-y First Known Use: 1696 And their 2nd definition of suffix -y: -y noun suffix \same\ plural -ies Definition of -Y 1 : state : condition : ...


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This isn't an English question, but the answer may well shed light on the issue. When a person is sad, the heart actually feels heavy due to a nervous system response to sadness, and so we have phrases like "my heart sank". Unsurprisingly then, the heart is associated with emotion. Likewise, our head literally hurts when we think too much about something, ...


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comm-encement is a compunded latin rooted word (americans have no clue why), A compund word means to put together by combining words that combine to form a whole. In the english speaking world, at bare sight the word comm-encement would not have much of a meaning because it is not a latin base language at the chore. Thus the first part of comm-encement is as ...


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Someone who unfortunately stutters always blinks at the same time. In not so caring days of old people would mock such a person. Fred is on the blink again Indicating Fred is having difficulty.


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I don't know exactly what you refer to by "cause insecurities" but I think the etymology you already included is a good fit for this type of "proof of ownership". Obviously the value of what you own can vary greatly (is that what you refer to?) but that is a separate issue from having something that attests the ownership.


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Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, 1914: "Yet," Conseil asked me, "doesn't master believe in gigantic devilfish?" "Yikes! Who in Hades ever believed in them?" the Canadian exclaimed. Industrial World, Volume 46, Issue 2, 1912: "Are you going up to the roof? Will you take a message to someone for me, Anne? I promised to meet an ...


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I don't think that yikes as an exclamation has any direct connection to yoicks or hoicks, or with yike (the cry of the green woodpecker of Britain and continental Europe, recorded starting in the late 1800s), or with the baby-talk word yikes meaning "likes" and popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s)—or for that matter with yikes in the eighteenth-century ...


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Etymonline says that wreck came from Scandinavian, wrack from Dutch, and wreak from Old English, although these were all descendants of the proto-Germanic verb wrekan. Probably the sound changes going from proto-Germanic to Scandinavian, Dutch, and English are all reasonably predicatable, although I don't know enough about this to tell. I don't believe the ...


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Merriam-Webster online gives two relevant definitions for the adjective: giving pleasure : received with gladness or delight especially in response to a need ("a welcome relief") and, probably more relevant willingly permitted or admitted ("he was welcome to come and go" — W. M. Thackeray) The implication of "you're welcome" in response to "thank ...


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The earliest example for hand job in the OED is from 1939. It's unlikely they used it in the 1870s when Deadwood was set, but still possible as slang was usually spoken and not always written down and published. However, modern swearing was deliberately used in Deadwood, as contemporary swearing would sound silly to modern audiences. According to TV ...


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"What other effective expressions could be used to replace them?" Excuse the profanity, but F*ck this sh!t is an effective replacement in my opinion.


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J.E. Lighter, The Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1997) reports that "hand job" in its sexual sense goes back to 37: hand job n 1. an act of masturbation, usu. by one person on another who is a male.—usu. considered vulgar. [First citation:] 1937 [Pietro] Di Donato Christ in Concrete 107: Then ... go into the cellar and do the ...


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Darwin did not use the word 'evolution' in any of his books or essays. He referred to his theory as 'modification with descent'. He used the phrase 'natural selection'. He may have used the phrase 'survival of the fittest' once or twice instead of 'evolution', though I am not sure. Note: If you can find any verbatim quote from Darwin where he explicitly ...


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My opinion is that, like many other such expressions, "Yikes" may have originated from our spontaneous utterance of a sound when we see something quite unpleasant. Might be a form of onomatopoeia, if you will.


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In the 1800s a hand job seems to have referred to a specific printing/bookbinding process done by hand. From Annual Report of the State Board of Arbitration of Illinois, Volumes 1-5: Q. What do you say as to competition in this particular line, hand job work, book and job work, what effect, if there is any, would such towns as Decatur, Jacksonville. ...


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The show you're talking about, Deadwood, was pretty famous for its language anachronisms, especially when it came to swearing. (A coincidence that one of its main characters is named Swearingen?) From "Talk Pretty" on Slate: In interviews, [David Milch, the creator and show runner of Deadwood,] has insisted that the show, particularly the flamboyantly ...


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"Hand job" appears to date only to the 1940s, so it would not likely have been in use in the 1800s. http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=hand+job


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Notwithstanding my tongue-in-cheek comment above, Moses’ use of the expression (translated as “please kill me at once”/ “please kill me here and now”) as reported in the Book of Numbers is probably not directly related to the current use and meaning of “Please kill me” in English today. However, I do think it is possible that Gloria Beatty’s (played by ...


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They actually both derive from PER and TENET Pertinacious:( 1620s, from pertinacy (late 14c.; see pertinacity): pertinacity c. 1500, from Middle French pertinacité (early 15c.), from Old French pertinace "obstinate, stubborn," from Latin pertinacem (nominative pertinax) "very firm, tenacious, steadfast, persevering," from per- "very" (see per) + ...


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The answer is actually yes. Latin (per)tinax and (per)tinens are both related to the verb tenere "to hold". pertinax is literally "holding fast to something".


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mortify (v.) late 14c., "to kill," from Old French mortefiier "destroy, overwhelm, punish," from Late Latin mortificare "cause death, kill, put to death," literally "make dead," from mortificus "producing death," from Latin mors (genitive mortis) "death" (see mortal (adj.)) + root of facere "to make" (see factitious). Religious sense of "to ...


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“Shoot me now” (origin?) Nathaniel Thomas Haynes Bayly (1797 – 1839) an English poet, songwriter, dramatist, and miscellaneous writer, in 1837 penned Kindness in Women. In the following passage, taken from the story entitled Kate Leslie, the phrase ‘shoot me now’ appears to be idiomatic; a mild curse which the speaker utters in mock frustration as he tries ...


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Unfortunately, the phrases aren't necessarily metaphorical. A quote of literal use, which also provides the answer to what is an alternative expression, is taken form Inferno: the life and death epic struggle of the USS Franklin in World War II page 155, quoting Stan Butryn (who had just walked up stairs to the aircraft carrier deck) All off a sudden ...


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My guess is it's from Gossypium barbadense, a species of cotton plant grown in Peru. From 1880, Peruvian Bark: A Popular Account of the Introduction of Chinchona Cultivation Into British India In a crop of G. Barbadense a percentage of the plants almost always yields cotton of a reddish-brown colour.


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The colour seems to be similar to that of traditional Peruvian clay pots, and also to the colour of Peruvian leather. I cannot verify either of these theories, sorry.


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I would say it is mainly the Latin suffix -ia for names of countries as in Italia, Hispania (Spain), Graecia (Greece), Germania. -(i)a is the femine ending for adjectives. The full name of countries was "terra Italia", word for word "earth/country Italian". As terra is a feminine noun the adjectives also have the feminine ending. -ia may have a connection ...


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It might be Randle Cotgrave and his French-English Dictionary, published in 1611. http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Randle_Cotgrave Skeat mentions Cotgrave in his List of Abbreviations in F.-French and also in O.F.- Old French.


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1997 Turns up in twice in Disney's animated film Hurcules. Used sarcastically when spoken by the character Meg, but used sincerely when written in the end credits.


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Sister sites are similar in function, being variations on the same Intellectual property, service, product and/or experience, are usually owned by the same person or at least the same company. Though sister sites can be owned by separate entities that have an affiliation with each other.



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