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Your question actually requires resolving two questions etymology of idiomatic use of cut etymology of idiomatic cut some slack Cut I can only respond within my own cultural environment for the idiomatic use of the word cut. Cutting covenant = cutting a deal Genesis 15:18 ביום ההוא כרת יי את אברם ברית In that day cut the LORD with Abram a covenant. ...


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One of the earliest matches for "cut me some slack" occurs in a glossary Jack Sweetman, The U.S. Naval Academy, an Illustrated History (1979) [snippet]: Slack — reduced discipline; see Cut (Me) Some Slack. Unfortunately, we can't see "Cut (Me) Some Slack" because the book refuses to show a snippet view of that entry. The sense of cut in this instance ...


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PART II. Instances of ‘Blizzard’ Before the Snowstorm Meaning Caught On Now let's look at examples of how the word blizzard was being used in the United States during the period from 1835 to 1870. Instances of ‘blizzard’ in the Library of Congress’s newspaper database or from Google Books, 1870 and earlier In addition to the five instances of blizzard in ...


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PART I. Dictionary and Scholarly Analyses of 'Blizzard' One weakness in some modern analyses of blizzard involves a failure to acknowledge the wide (and widening) extent of usage of the word prior to 1870, acting instead as though blizzard as Davy Crockett understood the word in 1834 and blizzard as used by Iowa farmers in 1870 had nothing in common but a ...


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I'm guessing the term arose as a reference to situations where people were physically restrained by things capable of being cut, which when cut increased freedom of movement.


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Cut somebody some slack (American & Australian informal): to allow someone to do something that is not usually allowed, or to treat someone less severely than is usual. Officials have asked the Environmental Protection Agency to cut Utah some slack in enforcing the Clean Air Act. According to Etymonline: Slack: (early 14c., "cessation" (of ...


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The only reference I could find so far refers to Tommy as a nickname of a miner: Origin of Tommy-Knockern (M-W) probably from Tommy (nickname for Thomas) + knocker; from his being supposed to be responsible for the creaking of timbers in the mine.


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Brian's answer, as now edited, is correct. "Exorcism" is from Greek, while "sorcery" is from Latin; the two are not related. To return to the original question: Modern Greek (not classical Greek) ξόρκι is a curtailment of εξορκισμός and is thus only by coincidence similar to "sorcery".


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I think the sequence of meanings in the OED can help: The action of delivering or setting free, or fact of being set free (irrelevant) The action of giving up or yielding; surrender. Obs. The action of handing over, transferring, or delivering a thing to another; delivery. Obs. Sending forth, emission, issue, discharge. The action or manner of uttering ...


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My mothers side of the family also uses this phrase, "fit to be tied". They are from the Georgia and N. Carolina states. It always referred to a person that was very angry or upset. The experience that brought me to this forum was the use of this phrase by Lorenzo di'Medici (1449-1492) in his story "Giacoppo". ("Renaissance Comic Tales" of Love Treachery ...


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It seems to be a coincidence. In the etimology of "exorcise" the Greek horkizein (to take an oath), or rather horkos (oath) seems to have been transliterated eventually to "orc", losing the initial eta and replacing the kappa with C. In "sorcery" the Latin sortiarius, the T sound was eventually transliterated to a C (in English, "tian" or "tion" are ...


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The earliest instance of the idiom I found is from Central Valley project of California: Hearings. United States. Congress. House. Committee on Flood Control February 7-9, 1935: page 52 It's my guess that the idiom is derived from the fixed expression push and shove, which Wikipedia calls Siamese twins or binomials. The order of the words are never ...


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I assume that "pudding" comes from the French "boudin". "Boudin noir" is the French for black pudding (there's also "boudin blanc" for Weisswurst). Pudding therefore means "sausage" - hence the seventeenth-century meaning of "penis"


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I believe the actual stem is an anglicised version of the Irish term 'ag smashalach' which means the same general thing and exists in Irish literature from the 1300s. That is an incorrect spelling of the Irish term as I haven't actually studied the language in 5 years.


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The name Greece is probably due to the dominance of Latin during the Middle Ages. Latin was the language of the Church and of science. Nicolaus Copernicus wrote his De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres) in Latin, published in 1543.


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Why do English-speaking countries not refer to Greece as Hellas? The same reason the French do not call The United States "The United States", nor do they call England "England". Every country is allowed to call other countries by the traditional name in their own traditional language. Of course, if a new country is formed or an existing one renamed, other ...


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Arrogant is definitely gender-neutral. Although you may have heard/seen it used with a male pronoun more often, that is only due to an unfortunate stereotype. As noted by prgSRR, women are perfectly capable of being arrogant as well. Arrogant is defined by the New American Oxford Dictionary as: arrogant (adjective): having or revealing an exaggerated ...


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Arrogant is really one of those gender-neutral adjectives. It can describe anybody, one of whose properties is arrogance, regardless male or female. (On a lighter note: I am sure you can encounter real life examples of arrogant ladies in due course of time... :)) In other words: The word arrogant is only as masculine as the words ...


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Well, I suspect the "golden" part comes from the old tradition of companies giving a gold watch (timepiece) to retirees. The "parachute" part may be a visual metaphor derived from the fact that major companies are often located in tall buildings - and the executive offices are on the upper floors. So, your company may be metaphorically "throwing you out the ...


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Here is the discussion of island and isle in John Ayto, Arcade Dictionary of Word Origins (1990): island [OE] Despite their similarity, island has no etymological connection with isle (their resemblance is due to a 16th-century change in the spelling of island under the influence of its semantic neighbour isle). Island comes ultimately from a prehistoric ...


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Jonathon Green, The Dictionary of Contemporary Slang (1984), has this brief entry for batchy: batchy a. silly, stupid [Alan] Sillitoe[, The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1959)]. Paul Beale, Partridge's Concise Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English (1989), has this: batchy. Silly, mad: Army, C.19–20; RN, since ca. 1910; thence to ...


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As far as I know, this saying goes back much farther. During the Vietnam war, it's said that Vietnamese women would throw newborns under American vehicles to collect $500.00 insurance money from the U.S. I can't confirm the accuracy of this, but as a veteran during the Vietnam era in the navy, I heard this more than once. Hence the saying, "Throw him/her ...


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OED3 has sense 5: 5. a. Short for main sea n.; the open sea. Now chiefly poet. 1579 T. North tr. Plutarch Liues 472 The winde stoode full against them comming from the mayne [Fr. le uent se tourna du costé de la pleine mer]. The meaning of main and main sea is made clear in the French translation pleine mer, but it's not clear where ...


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Camelot actually comes from medieval French literature, but its initial derivation is still quite uncertain. I think that the etymology of the French camelote is different, ( probably from Chameau) and refers to fabrics of poor quality. Camelot: (TFD) In Arthurian legend, the site of King Arthur's court. A place or time of idealized beauty, ...


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This is one of those expressions that is so old that it is almost literally translated from Latin, as in "Nulla in mundo pax sincera" ("In this world there is no honest peace.") which is based on an anonymous, ancient poem. The sense of "in the world" being a synonym for "to exist" is found in the Roman legal proverb: "Quod non est in actis, non est in ...


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According to Ngram the expressions ( What/Why in the world) have been used for at least the last two centuries. The earliest instance I could find dates back to 1733: This seems so fair, so exact, that what in the World could have a better Face? Yet for all this, the Scots do not fail to complain of him, and affirm that he had regard only to his own ...


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What in the world were you thinking? is a rhetorical question. That means it is actually a statement: In this world (in actual reality) there is nothing that could explain you thoughts. Similarly, why in the world would I do that? is rhetorical for: In this world there is no reason why I would do that. So basically, adding in the world to a ...


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In ancient Aztec marriages, after the ceremony the new couples clothing was literally tied together into a knot


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The mean in meantime and meanwhile does, as you suspect, come from the same root as the word meaning mathematical average. The original meaning of this mean is middle, and, with respect to meantime, it branches off to meaning intermediate and then further off to mean1: Intermediate in time; coming or occurring between two points of time or two events; ...


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I have located an early usage of the phrase, in "The Singer Passes: An Indian Tapestry" by Maud Diver (1934). But to-night he was chiefly pre-occupied with a trouble of the spirit wrought in him by the phrase that had rung a bell in his brain, by the unheard whisper of some hidden meaning that eluded him The phrase "ring a bell" is also included in ...


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Roundabout the 5th lumbar vertebra?


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The general meaning of pro- is forward but the etymology suggests several derived connotations: word-forming element meaning "forward, forth, toward the front" (as in proclaim, proceed); "beforehand, in advance" (prohibit, provide); "taking care of" (procure); "in place of, on behalf of" (proconsul, pronoun); from Latin pro "on ...


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Christine Ammer, The Facts on File Dictionary of Clichés, second edition (2006) has this entry for the phrase "down memory lane": down memory lane Looking back on the past. Often put in a nostalgic way, this term may have originated as the title of a popular song of 1924, "Memory Lane," words by Bud de Sylva, and music by Larry Spier and Con Conrad. It ...


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Merriam-Webster claims it was first used in 1903. There are mentions here: memory lane, that go back almost that far. Many of them render it as "memory's lane". There is a book of that era, "Queen Mary of Memory Lane", which may have helped to popularize the phrase.


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Early mentions of ‘nannicock’ From Thomas Lewis Owen Davies, A Supplementary English Glossary (1881): NANNICOCK, a silly, affected person. See H. s. v. nanny hen. Hee that doth wonder at a weathercocke,/And plaies with euery feather in the wiude,/And is in loue with euery nannicocke. Breton, Pasquil’s Fooles-cappe, p. 23. Gordon Williams, A ...


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I attended four different US undergrad schools, a US law school, and a Chinese economics school's master of laws program, and I have never heard of a greensheet. Like other commentators, however, I found that the Google God declares it is The Truth. First, an Ngram: I did not include before 1920 because there were zero uses before then. Blackboard ...


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The opposite of pogonotrophy is of course pogonotomy. The OED provides these citations, amongst others: 1897 Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch Jan., ― Pogonotomy is what the Greeks used to call the gentle art of self-shaving. 1942 Berrey & Van den Bark Amer. Thes. Slang §125/3 ― Pogonotomy, shaving. 1960 Times 28 Sept. (Advertising Suppl.) p. iii/2 ― This is ...


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The Cassell Dictionary of Slang has no listing for nannicock, but (one of the joys of print dictionaries) I noticed that "nanti" (mid 19thC) meant "nothing" or "none", esp. the phrase "I have none". (Ling. Fr. nantee, none or not; ult. Ital. niente, nothing.) If "nannicock" had evolved from "nanticock" (that is purely a conjecture), it might explain why it ...


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Like the OED (which Hugo cites in his answer), J. E. Lighter, Random House Dictionary of American Slang, volume 1 (1994) gives a first occurrence date of 1973 for "cool [one's] jets": cool (one's) jets to take it easy; become less less agitated or excited. [Examples:] 1973 Eble Campus Slang (Nov.) 1: Cool your jets—settle down and relax: Cool your ...


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Loganamnosis dates from at least 1958, as listed in Reversicon: A Medical Word Finder by Jacob Edward Schmidt: Preoccupation, morbid, with attempt to recall forgotten name . . . . NOMANAMNOSIS Preoccupation, morbid, with attempt to recall forgotten word . . . . LOGANAMNOSIS


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TLDR: Not Basque but Italian, but beyond that, we don’t know. The OED reports Littré’s Basque (Euskera) theory, but does not quite seem to believe it (bold emphasis mine): Etymology: mod.Eng. (17th c.), a. Fr. bizarre ‘odd, fantastic,’ formerly ‘brave, soldier-like’; cf. Sp. and Pg. bizarro ‘handsome, brave,’ Ital. bizzarro ‘angry, choleric,’ dial. ...


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As suggested by John Lawer and according to Etymonline the word is derived from the combination of the following words of Greek origin: petro- before vowels petr-, word-forming element used from 19c., from comb. form of Greek petros "stone," petra "rock". ichor: 1630s, from Greek ikhor, of unknown origin, possibly from a ...


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It sounds like a purpose-created, pseudo-medical neologism to me, like pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis— except there aren't any results at all in CHAE or Google Ngrams. Elsewhere on the web I can only find it in lists of too-clever words, and not in any online dictionaries. The etymology, I think, is reasonably clear: log- This is from the ...


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I did a bit of a deep web crawl on this, as I've never heard a syllabus called a greensheet. This made me curious as to whether it might be regional. I saw several uses of the word as a replacement for syllabus (often with syllabus in parenthesis as well). Several of these uses were as old as 2006. I decided to limit my search to anything before 2006 and ...


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No, I think there is none. Arachnid comes from Greek arakhne "spider; spider's web," which probably is cognate with Latin aranea "spider, spider's web" (Etymonline), while arachidonic is connected to arachis – from New Latin: genus that includes the peanut, from Greek: arakis, diminutive of arakos, a legume (Merriam-Webster).


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The Fox used as a metaphor has a long history, the following extract explains why: The fox has a long history of magic and cunning associated with it. The Indians of central California regarded the silver fox as a culture-hero while in Siberia the crafty messenger from Hell, who lured the legendary hero underground, was often depicted in the shape ...


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To me this phrase makes sense if you interpret as "asking the question for the answer". In other words, obtaining your answer from the question directly, rather than any kind of reasoning process. I'm thinking of something like "he came to beg me for money" as the template. Instead, "he went to the question begging for the answer".


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Well, in Australia 'bloody' is merely an intensifier. You hear expressions like 'bloody hot', 'bloody heavy', etc. It can even be inserted into words, like the infamous name of a hotel, the 'Inter-bloody-continental' ( also 'Interconti-bloody-nental'. The term 'bloody hell' is usually used to express astonishment and disbelief: 'He wrecked his brand new car' ...


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Objective you/ye was probably based on stress contrast like in Modern Dutch jij/je, Flemish gij/ge, or French toi/te. Sprachbund thing I guess.


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I found one somewhat earlier instance—from early 1892—in a newspaper archived in the Library of Congress's Chronicling America database of old newspapers. From "Lee Hing's Girl," in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer (February 14, 1892), attributed to the New York Sun but with no date for the occurrence in that newspaper (which further searches in the database ...



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