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0

As I understood it, and was told as a small child, "Hurst" was a small clearing (smaller than a field or meadow), generally along side a body of water, like a river or lake. I was also told that "Hyrst" is the stone below and what the mill stone/"grindstone" travels in to crush/grind the grain. Even here in the U.S. (across the "pond" as some might say) ...


0

It appears that "lac" suggested an Indian word, making the trade name sound less related to "Japan" soon after WWII when tensions among states were still well alive: This ad is from 1951, when, (you would think) there was still a bit of a sore spot in England when it came to Japan. Although, maybe Americans had more of a problem with the Japanese, ...


-2

No NZers don't use it. We would just say "hey,how's it going?". I recently moved to london and am still confused how to answer. My housemates ask me 'you alright?' All the time and or 'you ok?' And for a while i was thinking why do they always seem concerned about me?


1

Two things are crucial to sorting this out, first the meaning of the expression and second, its idiomatic as opposed to everyday usage. The Oxford English dictionary give the following: bells and whistles n. [as on a fairground organ] colloq. attractive additional features or trimmings, esp. in Computing. 1977 Byte July 122/2 This simple ...


1

The term "swing state" comes into play only in relatively close elections like those that have taken place for most of the 21st century. It was not an issue in the 1952 election for instance (Eisenhower won by a large margin), but may have been an issue in the 1948 election (Truman won convincingly overall, but won California, Ohio and Illinois by less than ...


0

The two meanings are not distinct -- to be a "tipping point" a state must have both attributes. In the vast majority of elections a state such as North Dakota has so few electoral votes that it's of little consequence whether it "swings" one way or the other. A state such as Ohio, on the other hand, has a substantial number of electoral votes -- enough to "...


-2

The Oxford Canadian Dictionary doesn't even include 'swing state', but to mist Canadians, yes, it would be a state that can change the outcome of an election. Same in Canada. After living 38 years in Alberta, a western province, it became clear that there are no 'swing states' west of Ontario, due to the populations of Ontario (12+ million) and Quebec (7+ ...


47

The simple answer is that you’re asking the question the wrong way about. In language, the central and most important way to inflect words is always what might be termed the ‘regular’ ones. The patterns that occur most frequently and are most flexible and applicable to the most roots. In English, the regular pluralising pattern is adding /z/ (with some ...


9

house comes from Old English/Old Saxon hūs and mouse comes from Old English/Old Saxon mūs (pronounced like the animal moose), but only the latter experienced the phenomenon known as "i-mutation", where the /u/ sound shifts to an /i/ [then eventually becoming /aɪ/] sound when the noun becomes plural as a shortcut in pronouncing it faster. So mice used to be ...


1

It would take a linguist to give you a precisely accurate answer, and I am not one. However, I have what I'll call an educated guess. Ask yourself how often someone from the 19th century or before would have had occasion to talk about more than one house? Not very often, I'm guessing. Particularly when compared to mice and lice. :) Living languages are ...


-1

I have a Biblical world-view, and using exegete as a verb seems to exactly fit within that world-view; when asking someone to exegete from their world-view, whatever it may be.


0

I typed the following word pairs, and spell-check balks at "convolve." evolve --> evolution; devolve --> devolution; revolve --> revolution; convolve --> convolution; Nonetheless, in my experience, for the mathematical operation of combining two functions, "convolve" is preferred. I found the following web site, which (of course) includes the first ...


1

Uses of the word color can relate to vividness of expression (Oxford English Dictionary). The word can also mean interest or excitement (MacMillan, definition 2). The adjective colorful can mean 'full of interest; lively and exciting' (Oxford). In sportscasting, a color man or color commentator livens up a broadcast by providing (ostensibly interesting ...


2

A color commentator is usually a former player or coach who has insights and colorful anecdotes that complement the matter-of-fact style that a journalistically trained play-by-play announcer brings to the game. The play-by-play announcer gives the facts of what is going on in the game, and the color commentator adds interest ("color"), especially when ...


-2

Wow- an intelligent query. Let's first see what the word means Full Definitions of basting 1 n a loose temporary sewing stitch to hold layers of fabric together Synonyms: baste, basting stitch, tacking Type of: embroidery stitch, sewing stitch a stitch made with thread and a threaded sewing needle through fabric or leather 2 n moistening a roast as it is ...


2

I am sticking to my hourglass. :) run (v.) the modern verb is a merger of two related Old English words, in both of which the first letters sometimes switched places. The first is intransitive rinnan, irnan "to run, flow, run together" (past tense ran, past participle runnen), cognate with Middle Dutch runnen, Old Saxon, Old High German, Gothic ...


1

A "graduate" is someone who has completed a college degree, typically in four years, and who has "moved on". An "undergraduate" is someone who has not completed said college degree, but is only "aspiring" to. This person is "under" a graduate; hence the term, undergraduate. A "college student" is someone who is currently "in" college, as opposed to having "...


4

It is an old usage that derives form the meaning of "under", that is "inferior in rank, position, degree" and "graduate": Graduate: early 15c., "one who holds a degree". Under: Productive as a prefix in Old English, as in German and Scandinavian (often forming words modeled on Latin ones in sub-). Notion of "inferior in rank, position, ...


1

There are at least hundreds of words with multiple plural forms: staffs and staves, dice and dies, châteaus and châteaux, pike and pikes, cows and kine, millenniums and millenia, phalanxes and phalanges, mongooses and mongeese, and so on and so on. The reasons why multiple forms exist, and the cases in which one form is preferred to another, are widely ...


0

Traumata (pronounced "TRAW-muh-tuh") is from the Greek plural; traumas was made in English using the English plural suffix -(e)s. Neither is incorrect. Traumata is not commonly used, or even commonly known, although you can find it in some academic works. A Google Ngram Viewer chart comparing them suggests traumas is more commonly used. But neither of the ...


3

Oodles is a term which originated in the U.S. but its etymology remains unclear. The Word Detective offers a few interesting assumptions: A few early citations from Cassell's Dictionary of Slang: before 1867 “The brilein chickins an' coffee an' the OODILS ove flour.”—‘High Times’ by G. W. Harris, page 176> 1869 “A Texan never has a great quantity ...


-3

off-topic ツ it belongs to language evolution - interexchange of phonetic radicals see also metathesis simillar to the evolution from Latin crocodilus > Italian coccodrillo 'crocodile' https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metathesis_(linguistics) "ludricous" could have evolved as a missspelling of "ridiculous" French ridicule https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


3

I think there are a variety of reasons why *buriation seems wrong. Blocking by burial We already have the noun burial that basically refers to "an event of burying" or "the act of burying" or "the result of burying." This occupies a lot of the same semantic space that I expect would be filled by a noun *buriation. There's a general concept that it's ...


4

I think the answer to this seemingly complicated question is in fact very simple: bury and vary are simply two very unique words and the fact that one is able to be conjugated to a noun form of iation is a mere coincidence that has little to do with its Latin roots. If we examine the number of verbs ending in -ary, only two come up: vary and the rarely ...


0

Listening to NPR's A Way with Words, it was explained that you were given a room, and in that room would often be a board hanging on the wall. Supper would be served to your room and you would sit in your bunk or bed with your meal on your board and eat. This sort of thing wasn't started by inns, but by wayward homes and farms that could take a stranger on ...


0

I think I got this one. As Chappo suggests in the comments, rime is a coating. Moreover, while the dictionary definition he provides seems to indicate it is usable as a synonym for any kind of coating, I have only ever heard it used to describe the kind of frost that you get which thinly covers all the surfaces of a damp area once the temperature drops. As ...


2

It seems that you could use Fair, Fade or Faint (there might be others) Fair and its other forms fair (adj.) Also (early) faȝer, faier, fei(e)r, vair, fare, fer(e, war, fæger, fægerra, fægrost According to the Middle English dictionary from Umich (a) Light, bright, or shining (as opposed to dark); (b) of persons: light of complexion or ...


2

From about 1300 is Lenten ys come with loue to toune (alternative source) The rose rayleth hire rode; The leues on the lyhte wode Waxen al with wille. which has been translated as: The rose begins to blush; The leaves in the light-green wood All unfurl gladly. Other translations exist such as that of Aniee Jeong An early modern English ...


1

I would posit it has very little to do with pronunciation and quite a lot to do with trade mark and copy right laws. Putting an accent on the 'e' magically transforms it from a "word" into a "uniquely identifiable brand name" which Nintendo can legally stop any one else from using. Haagen Das, Nescafe and many well known brands use non standard punctuation ...


4

The -umble words generally share a common ending in the frequentive verb suffix -le. Aside from that, I haven't found any direct etymological connections. (Note that it is regular for -b- to be inserted between m and l in this context.) However, the similar sounds may have influenced the development of similar meanings, and for some words there were other ...


5

Origin of the proverb 'There is honour among thieves' According to G.L. Apperson, The Wordworth Dictionary of Proverbs (1993), the notion that thieves share a bond of honorable conduct goes back at least as far as Cicero: There is honour among thieves. {Cum igitur tanta vis iustitiae sit, ut ea etiam latronum opes firmet atque augeat.—Ciciero, Off[ices],...


0

The link given by Hugo indicates that hashtags (eg for Twitter) were invented by users rather than programmers. I'd agree and extend this to say this is likely to have been completely independent of source control terminology. In fact, tag and hash in computer science were probably conceived independently. The concept of tagging artefacts must've been around ...


5

"-umble" appears to have a phonetic symbolic function in a number of terms as explained by Has Marchand in the following extract: From Phonetic symbolism in English word-formation. Final symbols: rime derivation. Rime plays a great part in language, .... But its part is obviously more important than has hitherto been recognized. In this ...


5

Caliber was originally used to mean a unit of weight for cannon shot. So, for example, you might have "12 pounds caliber". Much later it came to mean a bore size, but until about 1800 guns were always sized by the weight of the shot. The analogy to human characteristics refers to weight, not size. So, someone or something of "high caliber" would be someone ...


6

The sense of "inside diameter" is probably from the the Arabic meaning of "mold for casting bullets": Caliber: 1560s, "degree of merit or importance," a figurative use from Middle French calibre (late 15c.), apparently ultimately from Arabic qalib "a mold for casting." Arabic also used the word in the sense "mold for casting bullets," which is the ...


5

I think it's a variant of : What's his face/What's his name. Sl. someone whose name has been forgotten; someone whose name is being avoided. Was what's his name there? I never can remember his name. I can't remember what's his face's name either. McGraw-Hill Idioms And chops can (sort of) mean face : : The part of an animal's face that covers ...


0

The British refer to a car's trunk as the boot. The OED entry for boot is "3 British An enclosed space at the back of a car for carrying luggage or other goods." In the car designs of the early 1900s onward, the attractive boots of cars did remind one of bums, human or other animal such as horses. A related term is "dicky" which the OED states is "2 ...


2

It indicates proper stress in pronunciation, just as an accent mark is intended to. Natural pronunciation of words in English does not adapt well to Japanese loan words. The reason is stress patterns. For native English speakers, trochees, spondees, and dactyls are the most natural, especially with nouns. That said, we can safely assume that English ...


5

Surely the accent is there to indicate that the é isn't silent. If the accent wasn't there, Pokémon would be pronounced poke-mon, according to the rules of English. The accent is probably being phased out because 1) people were most likely leaving it out due to laziness and 2) it doesn't really matter because Pokémon is now an established brand and everyone ...


172

The mark in question is an acute accent mark and is absolutely intended to mimic the native Japanese pronunciation, which itself is based on the English words "pocket monster". Because of English orthography, there is considerable ambiguity surrounding the pronunciation of the character "e". (Compare the way you pronounce the "e" in "pocket" with the way ...


0

Here is the best interpretation of BEEF: http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-bee2.htm We have to go back further to trace the verb to its beginnings. In the early eighteenth century there was a slang phrase to cry hot beef or give hot beef, which meant to raise the alarm, to start pursuit or to set up a hue and cry. This may have been based on a ...


18

In French loanwords, é (e accent aigu) is often pronounced as [eɪ] or [e] (as in fiancé, exposé, etc), so therefore Pokémon would likely indicate to most English speakers that the word is pronounced "po-kay-mawn".


3

First, consider the sentence: Every dog is nice. This sentence is composed of a quantifier ('every'), a noun ('dog'), a copula verb ('is'), and an adjective ('nice'). Notice that because 'dog' is singular, the singular form of to be is used, 'is'. Now consider Everybody is nice. You can think of 'everybody' as being composed of a quantifier ('...


4

According to the OED Online, "re" is an English preposition arising from a Latin borrowing,1 meaning Originally: in the matter of, referring to; in re (see in prep.2 23d). Subsequently: about, concerning. 1707 T. Hearne Remarks & Coll. 17 May (O.H.S.) II. 14 Amused by Charlett's trick re Tacitus. ("re, prep.". OED Online. June 2016. ...


-2

(1)As the Google definition says, it means "in the matter of", or in other words "about this thing". (2)It's often written with a colon following. (3)According to my dictionary it's pronounced "ree".


24

It's a stylistic choice that also emphasises that the "e" is pronounced. Think about how the word "Pokemon" looks devoid of two decades cultural osmosis. Given that "poke" is a slangy sexual term, the marketers did their due diligence and found a flashy looking way to keep the Japanese title.


3

Yes, "builded" is an archaic form for the past of:. To build: verb, built or (Archaic) builded; (Dictionary.com) Build: late Old English byldan "construct a house," verb form of bold "house.Rare in Old English; in Middle English it won out over more common Old English timbran (see timber). Modern spelling is unexplained. ...


-11

The reason seems very simple. It is stylized. Taken from wikipedia; Pokémon Go (Japanese: ポケモン ゴー, stylized as Pokémon GO) is a location-based augmented reality mobile game developed by Niantic If something is stylized it means it's represented in a non-naturalistic conventional form. Update: It seems the wikipedia page is changed but search ...


161

It's probably to indicate that the "e" is pronounced, not silent. The word "sake" (in the meaning of the Japanese rice wine) is sometimes spelt saké for that reason.


4

" Grandmama is an archaic form of grandma according to the http://www.oxforddictionaries.com which is is another name for a grandmother, or the mother of one's father or mother.""a grandmother; an old woman"", from ""grand"" (adjective) + ""dame"". An interesting etymology of the word 'mama'. 1707, spelling variant of mamma. Meaning ""sexually attractive ...



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