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3

English has names for light blue. You just may not know them. The most common is cyan, like the open sky at sea level. Cyan is a very important color because it is one of the three primary colors in the CMY color model. English words for light blue include celeste, cyan, watchet, fesse, pervenche, periwinkle, and zircon — plus others less common. English ...


0

Sanctus Nicolaus: The modern figure of Santa Claus is derived from the Dutch figure of Sinterklaas, whose name is a dialectal pronunciation of Saint Nicholas, the historical Greek bishop.


0

This is not an answer to anything, but merely an observation. Shakespeare was an inveterate punster. I have no doubt that his intent was to convey that the maker of the explosive device (a bomb and/or a fart) was to be lifted or raised up by the device. As all who have written clearly know, the expression means that the perpetrator's scheme backfires on ...


0

Is there an actual calendar of virtues somewhere with specific virtues listed? Yes. 'Calendar' is an archaic word for a list of any kind (see FumbleFingers's comment). Greek and early Christian moral philosophy was based on the notion that there were certain virtues a person should aspire too. Modern academics typically call them "catalogs". Plato, ...


3

It's generally not confusing to most the obvious differences between a sandwich, a witch and the word "which", but are they related in any way? No. Sandwich the food comes from sandwich the town (quite likely via the 4th Earl of Sandwich). Many English place names have -wich at the end, and some have the related -wick or -wych and a few used to have ...


-1

According to the Dick Gregory short story "Shame," in the 1930's the Negro payday was on Thursday, so the eagle (dollar coins) flew on Friday - they had money to buy food, a little booze, gamble a bit. Eva Cassidy also uses the phrase in "Stormy Monday" on her album Live at Blues Alley.


1

Its usage is certainly literary and archaic. NGram: curiously shows that its usage peaked in the 18th century, and decreased steadily since then. Unluckily, Ngran does not offer instances of usage earlier than the 16th century. 'TIS: (from M-W) it is, ( contraction). Origin - First Known Use: 15th century 'TIS ( from Wiktionary) ...


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This is an example of how the meanings of words slide because children do not fully understand the words their parents are using and make guesses based on context. The sequence probably went something like this: 1) A party means a leader and his followers ("The prince's party.") 2) A party means the group of followers which someone brings with him ("He ...


2

The OP definition of withstand is correct, but it has a passive construction that visually confuses the 4-sentence formulation. In all four of the OP sentences, the meaning is correct: Y happens in spite of X but the 4 sentences have created an optical illusion, because the meaning of the sentences is not tabulated in columns as the OP erroneous assumes. ...


3

AmE usage seems a bit "variable", but I think everyone in the UK recognizes the same distinction... Raisins are dried white grapes (pictured #3 below). They are dried to produce a dark, sweet fruit. The grapes used are usually Moscatel. Sultanas are also dried white grapes but from seedless varieties. They are golden in color and tend to be ...


0

I believe the terminology comes from proofreading and copy-editing. One of the early uses of interactive computers by people without scientific or engineering backgrounds was word processing, particularly at newspapers and magazines. Delete is the word used by editors to refer to the action of striking out text to indicate that it should be removed, so this ...


6

From an American culinary perspective, while generally "sultana" and "raisin" are interchangeable, the unqualified sultana is a light-colored fruit and the unqualified raisin is a dark-colored fruit. To rewrite this recipe using typical American English, replace "sultanas" with "golden raisins." I would expect the recipe would be as easily understood in ...


0

The above quotes explain the meaning and that you can find in any dictionary. But they don't try to find out out where this funny picture comes from. And I dare to say you won't find such an explanation. I have the habit simply to ask can I find a situation or a model where the expression might make sense. And any situation or model that would make sense is ...


0

Yes it is surely metaphorical and refers to legs that will stand no longer, last little longer (without suggesting that sense of 'last')


1

notwithstanding and in spite of call for a noun-phrase (e.g. "its illegality") Moonshine thrives in the Appalachians, its illegality notwithstanding. Its illegality notwithstanding, moonshine thrives in the Appalachians. Moonshine thrives in the Appalachians in spite of its illegality. In spite of its illegality, moonshine thrives in the ...


4

OED's entry for in spite of dates its earliest citation to 1400: "But for noy of my nobilte & my nome gret, I shuld..spede the to spille in spite of þi kynge." I have no idea what most of that means, but "in spite of the king" is clear. in defiance (†scorn or contempt) of; in the face of; notwithstanding. This is not too far removed from the noun ...


5

According to The Phrase Finder, the origin is simpler and more intuitive than the legends about it might suggest: 'A frog in the throat': is an American phrase that entered the language towards the end of the 19th century. The expression doesn't have a fanciful derivation (see more on that below) but comes directly from the fact that a hoarse ...


3

In NYC, the police are "NY's Finest", the firemen are "NY's Bravest" and the sanitation workers are "NY's Strongest". ("Everybody wants to get into the act" - Jimmy Durante)


0

Without recourse to the verifiable original source, I wonder if "feeling blue" wasn't a metaphor for feeling dead; emotionally resembling the pale, bluish pallor of the departed.


8

In the case of "New York's Finest," Barry [Popik] has traced the term back to the 1870s, where it apparently first emerged in the form "the finest police force in the world," a phrase associated with George Matsell (police chief at the time), and possibly modeled on Civil War Major General Joseph Hooker's estimation of his troops as "the finest ...


1

Oxford dictionary of Word Origins says that the British slang use of bird to mean a young woman is associated with 1960s and 1970s but as you mentioned also, it dates back to Middle Ages. It also adds that the Virgin Mary could be described in those days as "the blissful bird of grace." The modern use appears to be something of a revival. OED also mentions ...


0

Reiterate is not a replacement for repeat. It is used in places where we emphasize by repeating. Iterate is a replacement for repeat but more than once usually to achieve accuracy or convergence.


4

Blame the English, they invented the names for all of the sports derived from soccer. Association football (soccer) came first. Then the English named the next game rugby football, after the town in England that changed the rules of soccer. Then others derived games from rugby, still keeping the football name. Rugby Football League Australian Football ...


8

Handegg is a village in Switzerland, in the Canton of Bern, somewhat near Lucerne. Beautiful place, I am sure, but just why they named that hat after it escapes me.


0

The expression is still used in German today. http://www.phrasen.com/uebersetze,Geld-Benzin-Brot-ist-alle,66383,d.html


0

"'Orange Frost', a new cold hardy citrus" Larry Stein, Jerry Parsons, Leon Macha, David Rodriguez, Monte Nesbitt and Brent Pemberton "The earliest citrus in Texas was from seed planted in dooryards by the early settlers (Mortensen, 1983)." Literature Cited: Mortensen, Ernest. 1983. Personal communication. The planting is referring to earlier in the ...


3

Webster's Dictionary traces "Kris Kringle" back to the German "Kristkindl" meaning "Christ Child" and indicates the first documented use in English was 1830. According to http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=Kriss+Kringle, it entered the English language through the immigration of Pennsylvania Dutch settlers. This was likely the work of Martin Luther, ...


0

I have always used and understood Summat/Sommet to mean; "something". As Nowt is; "nothing" and Owt is; "anything". More over, Innit is used in place of "isn't it". As far as I know, these particular slang terms are most common to Northern England, especially Yorkshire. Being native to the West Yorkshire region thee afore mentioned slang terms are very ...


1

ZOMG became popular early in the internet multiplayer boom. If we compare 3 other "text-speak" words from the same time frame the similarities indicate some things about their origin. Compare the following ZOMG, pwnt, teh, and lolz. The first obvious trait is that all four are pretty easily made Qwerty-keyboard typos. Teh is a miss-coordinated version of ...


2

I think it really means, "You can ask for my help anytime," because we normally say "Thank you" after being helped by others. So we just say "Anytime!" meaning we are ready to help you anytime. :)


4

Bullets are so-named because they are round. The etymology is 1550s, from Middle French boulette "cannonball, small ball," diminutive of boule "a ball" (13c.), from Latin bulla "round thing, knob" (-from etymonline.com) Since the objects fired by guns used to be round balls, they became known as boulettes, or bullets. Similarly, the little round ...


0

I think it might be related to a touch-and-go aircraft landing. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Touch-and-go_landing


0

Here's another suggestion - perhaps it has come from French niche: niche: 1610s, "shallow recess in a wall," from French niche "recess (for a dog), kennel" (14c.), perhaps from Italian nicchia "niche, nook," from nicchio "seashell," said by Klein and Barnhart to be probably from Latin mitulus "mussel," but the change of -m- to -n- is not explained. ...


4

The bullet is not new, nor is its name. It has been used by typographers long before the general public caught hold of it. You asked about the origin of the bullet for this purpose. It turns out that the bullet has been used since time immemorial: merely look at Trajan’s Column or Gutenberg’s Bible. Bullet was used by typographers as the name of the mark ...


1

Early discussions of the phrase 'neck of the woods' in reference works Maximilian Schele De Vere, Americanisms; The English of the New World (1872) believes that the phrase “neck of the woods” was not only native to the United States but especially common in the nation’s Southwest (a designation that, at the time referred primarily to the region occupied by ...


9

Handegg: Etymology From hand +‎ egg, by deliberate contrast to football meaning “soccer”, emphasizing the use of the hands and an elongated rather than round ball. handegg (countable and uncountable, plural handeggs) (slang, uncountable) A humorous term for the game of American football, or for any other sport called “football” that uses ...


5

It's an American football. It could also be related to Rugby football as rugby players are jovially known as "egg-chasers" in Britain.


141

CBS Sports has this nice article explaining the origin of the word, including a newspaper snippet from 1909: “Hand-Egg,” Not Football. To the Editor of The New York Times: Football is certainly a misnomer, for the game is played not with the feet but with the hands, and the ball is not a ball but an egg. I propose that the game be played ...


13

A handegg is an American football. It doesn't (often) touch the foot and isn't (much of) a ball shape.


83

It's a football reference. The hat is a football helmet The football is egg-shaped and held in your hands A touchdown is worth 7 points (including the obligatory point-after-touchdown) Urban Dictionary Wiktionary


5

You're essentially correct. See this article for a plausible history. The salient excerpts: "The use of 'Merry Christmas' as a seasonal salutation dates back to at least 1534, when, on 22nd December, John Fisher wished the season's greetings in a letter to Thomas Cromwell, recorded in Strype Ecclesiastical memorials, 1816): And this our Lord God send you a ...


4

No, you are almost certainly mistaken about any overt borrowing from German Obstgarten to produce English orchard. You are struggling too hard to look for an added -r-, when in fact, it was already present in Latin (h)ort-(us) right from the get-go. There were also cognate Gothic words starting with aurt-. However, there is nothing resembling the ...


2

It is more likely from two OE words: hort from the Latin hortus for garden and geard from the Old High German gart. Making it a garden in the garden. Phonetically it is a small matter for the leading h to be dropped, and then the dental t interacts with the guttural g to move the dental formation to the current ch before spelling was normalized.


1

Fleek has indeed become popular recently. Twitterbots @lovihatibot (searching for "I love the word [X]" and "I hate the word [X]"), @nixibot ("[X] is not/isn't/ain't a word") and @favibot ("[X] is my favorite/favourite/fave word") have been running since 2014 and picked up the word from August 2014: Month @lovihatibot @nixibot @favibot Aug 2014 ...


3

In his book Made in America, Bill Bryson said he thought that this phrase originated from the Algonquian word "naiack," which means "point" or "corner." It may also come from the German phrase "meine ecke," which means "my corner."


5

I can find no source supporting the theory you propose. It seems unlikely for several reasons: 1) "Commencement" is a long-established word that has always had the meaning of "a beginning"; it's listed in the Middle English Dictionary with that definition with citations going back to 1275. 2) I have found no references to a meaning of "commencement" having ...


1

The OED has it from 1941 and originally Australian. They say: Origin uncertain; perhaps related to duff n.1 b, and hence analogous to similar slang phrases for pregnancy such as in the (pudding) club or to have a bun in the oven. Duff n.1 b* is a flour pudding that's been boiled in a bag, or a dumpling. The a sense is simply dough. Of this they say: ...


4

The term "on fleek" first appears in Google Trends in July 2014. (It's difficult to find actual pages with it prior to 2014 due to content aggregation, e.g. 2008 posts on sites with twitter side bars come up in Google searches for "on fleek" limited by time, despite the phrase being part of a 2014 tweet, so I'm not able to truly say it began this year, but ...


-1

It comes from the Nintendo 64 game "The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask", where somebody begins the game as a Deku Scrub, after being turned into one very early in the story. Players who were not able to reach a point where they would return to their human form would be a) terrible at the game and b) scrubs forever.



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