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2

It appears to come from a dialectal variation of the verb to lie: to idle or lie about: Ligger: ‘Hangers on’ such as ‘music groupies’ for LIGGERS is an example of what it can mean, but it’s not the whole story. The Oxford English Dictionary provided the following: LIGGER noun [from verb ‘lig,’ + ‘-er’]: One who gatecrashes parties, a ‘...


0

A variant found in Samuel Richardson's "Pamela," (1740): "“I was so confounded at these words, you might have beat me down with a feather.” Excerpt From: Richardson, Samuel. “Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded.” iBooks. This material may be protected by copyright. Check out this book on the iBooks Store: https://itun.es/us/0v77D.l


3

There's a possible explanation that is very simple — maybe the ginger root that was imported in the 18th and early 19th century really was reddish. From the web: Multiple varieties of ginger can be found, the color of the flesh of the root will range from yellow, ivory, red or light green depending on the variety and age. From The universal ...


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Pit bulls will fight with more than one broken legs.


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'Ginger' in slang dictionaries and regional glossaries The earliest dictionary instance I've been able to find in which ginger is used in connection with a description of hair color is in Francis Grose, A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (1785), which has this entry: GINGER PATED or GINGER HACKLED, red haired, a term borrowed from the cock pit,...


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This is a Community Wiki post, which means anyone is free to edit and add further details, no rep points are earned or lost. But it also hopes to explain why a bounty was set up. Why are red-haired people called ‘gingers’? AKA Why a bounty has been set up The OED citations in @Amanda's answer, record the earliest instances of ginger as a colour/color, ...


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It appears that it is simply the use of the colour of the root of ginger applied to (the lighter shades of) red hair. Interestingly a very early citation of ginger as a color dates back the the 16th century:. 1552 HULOET, Gynger coloure, after a whyte russet, melinus. Ginger as a colour was originally used mainly to refer to the ligh red colour ...


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-tine, while going back to Old English for "spike" or "prong," (as in the tooth of a fork) also goes to ancient Norse meaning "tine" as in "point, top or summit."


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Antecedents of 'game-changer' For many years people have discussed the effects on various sports and pastimes of introducing innovations in rules, equipment, personnel, or tactics in terms of their potential to "change the game." For instance, "Concerning Rules and Regulations," in The Yale Literary Magazine (January 1905) offers this commentary on football:...


2

Although N-gram shows the first use of “life[-]changer” as predating that of “game-changer” by more than 30 years, it also shows that the latter took a small lead in 2008, which could be partially attributed to it being used (especially in the jargon of winning large, life-changing, lottery jackpots) synonymously with “life-changer”: “Winning Wednesday’s $1....


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An interesting question. I'm confident that the first usages of "game-changer" coincide with the first usages of the non-derivative(?) noun form: change/changed/changes/changing the game. In the literal sense, I would expect the term to have been used since people began discussing games, although the derivative noun (or deverbal) form would probably have ...


2

It's a set phrase, from 1875 (Etymonline): Miscarriage: 1580s, "mistake, error;" 1610s, "misbehavior;" see miscarry + -age. Meaning "untimely delivery" is from 1660s. Miscarriage of justice is from 1875. (now rare except in miscarriage of justice) A failure; a mistake or error. [from 16thc.] 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.ii:...


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According to World Wide Words the origin of go west — meaning to die, perish, or disappear is related to the idea of the sunset, as a figurative image of death: Go west seems anciently to be connected with the direction of the setting sun, symbolising the end of the day and so figuratively the end of one’s life. Going west has been linked to dying ...


0

I believe it originally referred to the Visa section of the embassy - eg the British embassy in Moscow might have a "Visa section", where they just deal with visa applications. This term may have expanded out to apply to other offices which deal with visas, even if they're not physically located in the embassy. It may even be valid in that case, if it's ...


1

The connection between "the sky is falling" and larks appears also in Ben Jonson's "Inviting a Friend to Supper" (1616), where he promises his guest some larks as a dish: "And though fowl now be scarce, yet there are clerks, The sky not falling, think we may have larks."


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It's an astronomic question vs. a cultural & meteorologic one. Astronomically, the summer solstice is considered to be "mid-summer", because it is technically the longest day of the year. However, using this definition would place the beginning of summer sometime in early-May, and the end of summer in early-August. For most people, this simply does not ...


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You are right that the suffix -able is added to verbs to form adjectives, and objection, originally, comes from a past participle: Objectionable (adj.): 1781, from objection+ -able. Related: Objectionably. objection (n.) late 14c., from Old French objeccion "reply, retort" (12c.) and directly from Late Latin obiectionem (nominative ...


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objectionable : arousing distaste or opposition; unpleasant or offensive. http://www.dictionary.com/browse/objectionable objectable: Such as can be presented in opposition; that may be put forward as an objection. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Objectable "Objectable" if googled will get some hits, but if you look at it on merriam webster ...


1

Restroom: Of course no one wants to rest in the room containing the toilet; restroom is an obvious euphemism. Interestingly, English (like some other languages) can express the "toilet-room" concept only via indirect terms like this. Restroom: Originally meaning a public toilet, this seems to be of American origin, with the earliest ...


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A lot of English words come from Low German or Dutch. There is the word "tjokvol" in Dutch meaning exactly the same as chock-full.


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I'm not aware of a male equivalent for "maiden" because of the implied virginity (for example, the hymen is sometimes referred to as "maidenhead"). However, I do know that the male equivalent of "Miss" is "Master," and in formal writing young boys/young men are referred to as "Master Thomas" or whatever. Think of Geoffrey on The Fresh Prince of Bel Air ...


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There probably isn't one specifically for maiden, but bachelor probably captures a similar feeling with regard to men.


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The earliest occurrence in print of hackamore I have found, in this cowboy story from 1850 (very likely the source alluded to by Wikipedia and Etymonline), explicitly associates it with the Spanish term. ('Pete' is 'Dutch' or German, the 'old man' is apparently Mexican.) “When a broncho is lassed, he is fust choked down, then a hackamore is put on ...


1

When I was a British army officer cadet in the 1960s I boned my boots to give them a high polish; any smooth bit of bone will do, even the handle of a knife. The "bone" can be a hard bit of plastic. My boots were gleaming; they had been boned up.


0

Being a Brit, I've always pronounced hello as hallo, and spelt hello as hallo and never known "hello" could be a correct spelling! When I left the UK in 1994 I became convined non-native and US speakers were mispronouncing and mispelling hello!


3

I'm not an etymology expert, but they do not seem to be connected. I haven't found any source that links the etymology of these two words. The correspondences between Germanic languages seem to be fairly clear, and allow us to reconstruct the ancestor of "ghost" in Proto-Germanic as *gaistaz or *gaistoz and the ancestor of "guest" in Proto-Germanic as *...


2

Crayfish, crawfish, and crawdad: are interchangeable terms for a large group of freshwater crustaceans (not fish) resembling small lobsters and living in many regions throughout the world. Crayfish and crawfish are renderings of regional pronunciations of the same word, descended from the Middle English crevise (-vise became –fish), which in turn has ...


1

Because of spelling conservatism and sound changes. The word "ewe" is not really pronounced "non phonetically" any more than words like betrayal (which is not "betra-yal") or wither (not "wit-her"). In modern English, "ew"/"eu" simply functions as a digraph that represents the sound /juː/ "yoo." Digraphs are sequences of two letters that are not pronounced ...


6

TVtropes has some ideas on where the phrase could come from: ostensibly derives from "Relationship" (though it might as well be "Worship"; in some fandoms, it's Serious Business) — was originally coined by fans of The X-Files, who were divided between "relationshippers" pushing for romance and "noromos" who would rather have No Hugging and No Kissing. the ...


0

From the definition of epithet (from the Greek epitithenai, to add on) in Merriam-Webster's Vocabulary Builder By Mary W. Cornog: A descriptive word or phrase occurring with or in place of the name of a person or thing.... Sometimes an epithet follows a given name, as in Erik the Red and Billy the Kid. The definite article specifies the particular ...


0

Its etymology really appears to be obscure, but you can find more material and discussion in the following extract: The problematic etymology of goal (from the OED) "After the solitary (but app. unquestionable) occurrence in Shoreham's Poems c1315 the word first appears in 1531, and soon afterwards is very common; prob. it had survived only as a ...


0

When did a ‘silk hat’ become a Top Hat? I found no evidence that the name top hat existed prior 1875. Even the British Chambers' Encyclopaedia: A Dictionary of Universal Knowledge for the People, printed in 1874, didn't mention top hat in its “hat” entry but spoke extensively about beaver and silk hats. Numerous websites and books cite the Hatter's ...


6

It appears that bedridden is derived from Old English term bedrida which later morphed into bed-rid, a person who typically and regularly keeps a bed From Folk Etymology (subtitled: verbal corruptions or words perverted in form or meaning, by false derivation or mistaken analogy) by Rev. A. Smythe Palmer, written in 1969 bedridden the passive form of ...


4

According to the OED, one meaning of the word "ridden" is "afflicted or beset with", as in "fog-ridden" or "angst-ridden". I would imagine that bedridden most likely has always meant afflicted by not being able to leave one's bed.


0

The way I understand it is when you ask someone, you are requesting something, but when you invite them, you are requesting their participation. You invite them to dinner, to a party, to tea. You ask them to pass the salt, or ask them a question, expecting something in return. Perhaps consider starting the sentence with "May I ask you kindly to...... or "...


3

I always thought it was just short for "snake in the grass". Edit: I can't comment yet, and I'm not sure if it's acceptable to respond to comments below, so if not I guess it can be edited or removed. I disagree that the top sentence of this post was not an answer, when the question asks if there are "any other possibilities aside from the rhyming slang ...


17

The Phrase Finder explores three different possible origins in the following extract: Grass up: In 2005, British newspapers picked up on a story about a burglar who had stolen cash, jewellery and an African Grey parrot from a house near Hungerford, Berkshire. David Carlile, widely described in the press as 'feather-brained', explained to the police ...


0

Its main purpose is to distinguish between the total area of land being bought and the floor space of the house. But yes, it is an Afrikaans word of Dutch decent and is used in South Africa.


0

It likely comes from the size of the payout relative to the size of the bet. If a particular horse has a very small chance of winning, a bookmaker might "stand the horse at a long price", meaning the odds against are high, so the winnings will be much greater than the outlay. Conversely, if the horse is the favorite to win, then you might stand to win less ...


2

The origin of the term might have derived from an earlier fashion trend set forth in the early 1600s by way of the capotain, or sugarloaf hat. This has was also known as the pilgrim hat and the flat topped hat. The hat is famously associated with the Pilgrims that traveled to the Americas 1. Although it is difficult to find a direct association, the ...


0

collaborate- different people working on the same project but in different areas in order to work towards a common goal. co-operation -different people working on the same project but in the same areas in order to work towards a common goal. (or achieve a common goal )


3

According to Oxford Dictionaries Online, the spelling is skedonk: [South African informal] An old, battered car. 'Back then my hippy, varsity friends and I all piled into a few skedonks and headed for the mountains.' ODO says the word is of unknown origin, but your suggestion that it's onomatopoeic seems reasonable.


2

If you bet on a long shot, you get long odds. It's possible that this is where long odds came from. The OED first citations are: long odds from 17641; long shot with the meaning unlikely from 1796, but it's possible that the expression long shot was around earlier, but not written down. And where did long shot come from? If you're shooting at something that'...


2

It is common to tell children It's [gone] well past your bedtime This simply means the hour which the children should have gone to bed has gone. The expression well past strongly hints that it is significantly later. Consequently, I would not understand gone past eight as meaning, as suggested by the OP, 8.50 pm. Dancing well past midnight, they ...


3

I may have a useful (and/or flawed) perspective on this, having been born English to American parents, then raised from the age of 2 through adulthood in the U.S. immersed in U.S. language and culture, but also watching lots of BBC and ITV imported television on PBS and reading Dick Francis and P.D. James novels; and then having moved back to England and ...


42

Concerning the etymology of 'butterfly', several theories have been proposed. Ernest Adams in Notes and Queries, 1876, first observes that the second element of the word poses no particular etymological difficulties, then ably summarizes the theories: The following theories have been advanced. Skinner writes, "nobis sic dictus ob levitatem fere ...


4

butterfly (n.): Old English buttorfleoge, evidently butter (n.) + fly (n.), but of obscure signification. Perhaps based on the old notion that the insects (or witches disguised as butterflies) consume butter or milk that is left uncovered. Or, less creatively, simply because the pale yellow color of many species' wings suggests the color of butter. ...


0

Already mentioned is the meaning of "cooking the books," but my first reaction was a visual of book burnings--where people are literally cooking books. There does seem a meaning in "cookbook" of a "cook's book" or "how-to-cook book" layered into the present usage. As for cookery, I think of a cookie factory when I read or hear it, but I believe it is just ...


0

Left field in baseball is a very busy place with a lot of hit baseballs going there due to the majority of batters being right handed and tending to pull the ball that direction. So things going into left field are common. A natural contradiction is that things coming out of left field would be very unusual and unexpected. Thus the saying. PB


5

Gone is used to say, usually imprecisely, that a particular time is now in the past (usually by a matter of minutes/hours). "It's gone 8 o'clock" means simply that it is now after/past 8. If it is still a moment within a few minutes of 8 then you would say "It's just gone 8". It can easily be invested with an elegiac and regretful sense. Absurdly ...



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