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-1

The word for "juice" in German is "saft." I think it has probably been anglicized to soft in English, and the originally meaning of juice drink has altered over time.


2

It appears that this may have some relation to an obsolete meaning of brake. From OED: † brake, v.6 Etymology: perhaps repr. an unrecorded Old English *bracian , < bræc , which occurs in the sense of ‘phlegm, mucus, saliva’; compare Old Dutch braeken , Middle Low German and modern Dutch braken to vomit; allied to break n.1 (compare German sich ...


1

I am involved in a Shakespeare production of Henry iv part one in which Falstaff complains that if he exerts himself any more he will break his wind ---- It seems an obvious fart joke (though of course the possibility remains that he is out of breath). I can't find any site allowing that this is the first use of the fart idiom though.


3

And after the 60s, the quotation has evolved to Tell me and I forget; teach me and I may remember; involve me and I will learn. According to American etymologist Barry Popik, the quotation has been accredited to Dr. Herb True in 1978 in 29 March 1978, Dallas (TX) Morning News, Earl Wilson syndicated entertainment column, pg. 16A, col. 2 and to ...


5

J.E. Lighter, The Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1994) puts the first occurrences of dibs in print at 1807 (used in the sense of money), 1827 (used in the sense of a portion or share), and 1932 (used in the sense of a first claim): dib n. {prob. fr. dibstones, a type of child's jacks} 1.a. pl. money. 1807 Port Folio (June 6)357: ...


5

According to World Wide Words, its usage appears earlier than 1932. But the usage in the first part of the 19th century may refer to a different meaning. What we do know is that this expression is first recorded in print, in American Speech, as late as 1932. It comes into existence seemingly fully formed, with no obvious links to any previous meaning ...


1

I think you're probably going to get folk etymologies for this one. If you trace this back, "hysteresis" <== Gr. "ὑστέρησις" <== Gr. "ὑστερέω" <== Gr. "ὕστερος". "hysteria" <== L. "hystericus" <== Gr. "ὑστερικός" <== Gr. "ὑστέρα" Gr. "ὕστερος" is the masculine form of Gr. "ὑστέρα", so they are practically the same word. I'm not ...


15

So why does the English language have three different words for "one time", "two times" and "three times"? In other words, why do one time, two times and three times have single words (once, twice, thrice) but four times, five times etc. don't have? Simple answer is; one time, two times and three times were frequently used—as lower numbers like one , ...


2

"The Conscience of the Court" is a short story originally published in The Saturday Evening Post on March 18, 1950. It is set in Jacksonville, Florida, at the trial of fictional character named Laura Lee Kimble, an uneducated black woman from Savannah, Georgia, now living with her (temporarily absent) employer in Jacksonville. Here is the relevant excerpt: ...


0

The Golden This, That, and the Other Thing Family Christine Ammer, The Facts on File Dictionary of Clichés, second edition (2006), has this entry for golden parachute: golden parachute An employment agreement that gives generous benefits to its high-ranking executives if they are dismissed owing to a company merger or takeover. This term, dating from ...


1

It may be that we would have to look for a paraphrase or a two-word expression, e.g. "great mouse". Just a vague idea for Latin: "mus + cretus" ( mouse + grown big). Perhaps one has not found more information about the origin because the idea is a word must be one word historically. That a lot of words were at first multi-word explanations that were ...


6

Jim Morisson would have sounded funny singing 'Love me twice baby, love twice today, love me twice girl ..." But then, Lennon and McCartney's "One after 909" works better with "Move over once, move over twice, c'mon baby don't you be cold as ice," because "two times" does not rhyme with "ice." But while we are asked to "Knock three times" on the ceiling, ...


4

(1) Taio Cruz - Dynamite (Pop song lyrics are a great pedagogical device in these cases. Link) The idea that twice is facing extinction seems whacky, look up the plays of that song. Note that the pop song industry targets the lowest conceivable intelligence and educational demographic market...and indeed targets LCD international English. (2) "twice" is ...


0

The Etymology dictionary also lists job (v) from 1660s, "to buy and sell as a broker." http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=job&searchmode=none


32

The reason English has three different words for those is because English has three different words for 1, 2, and 3. It’s like why we have three different words for sixth, eighth, and twelfth: there’s a suffix here used with regular numbers. The difference is that instead of ‑th for ordinals, it’s ‑ce for adverbials, and you just aren't recognizing that ...


1

Results from a Google Books search strongly suggest that the expression originated (in print) in religious publications. At least in my search results, publications of the missionary wing of the Methodist Episcopal Church account for the first five matches, spread across a period of seven years. The earliest of these sources (from January 1910) credits the ...


2

'Turk' in reference books J.S. Farmer & W.E. Henley, Slang and Its Analogues (1904) has a fairly lengthy entry for turk: TURK, subs. (old).—1. a sword [other old slang terms for "sword" cited by Farmer & Henley include andrew, fox, and toledo (or tol)]. 1638. Albino and Bellama, 108. That he forthwith unsheath'd his trusty turke, Cald forth ...


4

Your last question first: no, save in this sense is not archaic. It’s not as common as except, but it occurs in natural speech, especially as part of the phrase save for. As to why save (for) means ‘except (for)’, that is a relatively long story. Originally, in mediaeval French, sauf/salf (masculine) and sauve/salve (feminine) were used as adjectives ...


4

A quick look at etymonline tells us (emphasis mine): 1630s, "capable of shaping or molding," from Latin plasticus, from Greek plastikos "able to be molded, pertaining to molding, fit for molding," also in reference to the arts, from plastos "molded, formed," verbal adjective from plassein "to mold" (see plasma). Surgical sense of "remedying a deficiency ...


4

John Camden Hotten, The Slang Dictionary; Or, The Vulgar Words, Street Phrases, and "Fast Expressions of High and Low Society (1864) has a couple of interesting entries for job: JOB, a short piece of work, a prospect of employment. [Samuel] Johnson describes JOB as a low word, without etymology. It is, and was, however, a Cant word, and a JOB, two ...


32

It looks like it is originated as a slang term for drugs, then gained a broader usage in time. Below is an excerpt from The Routledge Dictionary of Modern American Slang and Unconventional English edited by Tom Dalzell: And here is the earliest usage of the shit as a drug in 1967 from the book How to Talk Dirty and Influence People By Lenny Bruce: (the ...


0

I found "’tis seeking a needle in a bottle of hay" in the book, The Armourer's Prentices, by Charlotte Mary Yonge, Chapter III, Published October 1883-August 1884, serialized in The English Illustrated Magazine. 1884, published by Macmillan. I found this at http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext06/arpn10h.htm Sarah Meisner Texas


0

These words aren't even the same word in Proto-Indo-European, so the link wasn't quite there even in late stone age. According to wiktionary, "think" came from PIE *teng-, while "think" came from *tenk-. Maybe they come from the same word in an unknown ancient language which PIE came from, but the answer is "probably not".


0

Another guess. http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/job #5 says, "Informal: A thing of somekind." I bought one of those little quilted jobs [=items, numbers] at the craft fair. This would make sense as the "lot" is a group of "jobs" that are things of some kind.


-1

I am not a native english speaker. But i heard that "thing" comes from "think". In the sense metioned above it is something you can't named yet but you think about. I wonder if it is the etimology origin of "thing".


0

The Ngram chart in the OP's question suggests that "dog eat dog world" first appeared in print in 1954, and that "doggy dog world" first appeared in 1984. A Google Books search, however, finds earlier instances of both phrases. 1. In the jungle out there, do dogs normally eat dogs? In fact, the phrase appears to have arisen first in the context of an ...


0

WHen I was about ten (i.e. about 1970) I used this expression. My father took me aside and explained that it was not a proper one to use in polite company, as the "hissing" referred to is actually the sound produced by involuntary voiding of liquified bowel contents and urine. In other words, the person throwing the fit has become so distraught as to cause ...


1

Henri mollet is where the word mullet came from but, the hair style is from The 6th century. Byzantine scholar (Procopius) males wore long in the back & short in front. Called a Hunnic.


1

I used the term "withdraw my instruction".


2

According to Etymoline the term referring to women was first used in the 15th century. It probably derives from Old Norse 'lauss' meaning 'free, dissolute': Loose: early 13c., "not securely fixed;" c.1300, "unbound," from Old Norse lauss "loose, free, vacant, dissolute," cognate with Old English leas "devoid of, false, feigned, incorrect," ...


3

I will go with @undefined: the abbreviation TX for internet transaction is borrowed from telegraph abbreviation for transmission, Tx, for an internet transaction involves sending a coded signal from my computer to , say Amazon.com, internet site.


1

I have no evidence to support this answer, so feel free to downvote it, but this might help: The X, itself, stands for trans (see also the answer by @undefined, with examples). I believe (again, I don't have proof) that this comes from the association of trans with its meaning of across (hence, a cross). A guess (only a guess) would be that TX is related ...


2

In the old days amateur radio operators, who abbreviated wildly because they were using Morse code keys to exchange information, used to use XCVR as transceiver and XMTR as transmitter. A lot of older programmers also have amateur radio licenses so they probably just continued the tradition. I cannot begin to guess how you would ever find the first use of ...


2

iterate has to do with repeating an action - reiterate has to do with repeating verbally


0

If you have a look at Collins and typ fingertip you get a result. Longman DCE online has the complete expression under fingertip. http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/fingertip


2

Although "having the world at your fingertips" can mean having the world at your command, it can also mean having ready access to the world—in many instances, specifically, through technology or through other sources of information. A Google Books search finds an example of the phrase used in this sense in the title of an article about short-wave radio that ...


1

Having the world at your fingertips means you control it; you can do with it what you want. Having the world at your feet means the world adores you; you can control the world based on their adoration. The effect can be, and often is, the same. But the meaning is slightly different.


1

I believe it entered popular usage with a comedy TV show called "Hi-de-Hi" that was set in a Butlins-style holiday camp. From memory, a catch-phrase was "Hi-de-hi, happy campers!" but pinning down a definite connection is a bit elusive. However, "happy campers" on its own became popular in the 1980s which correlates nicely with the Hi-de-Hi show being aired ...


3

Complacent means pleased, especially with oneself or one's merits, advantages, situation, etc., often without awareness of some potential danger or defect; self-satisfied: The voters are too complacent to change the government. pleasant; complaisant. Complaisant means inclined or disposed to please; obliging; agreeable or gracious; compliant: the most ...


4

In my opinion, camping is a miserable activity. A happy camper must be an unshakably happy person, and a lot of people seem to share my opinion: obviously, the phrase unhappy camper refers to the homesick city kid who mopes about the countryside hating cows, cursing mosquitoes, refusing to make up a bunk, rejecting the hearty companionship of ...


5

From its official website; The name Cordon Bleu ( the association with cookery was due to the feasts given to celebrate the high royal officials): has been used for the first time in relation to culinary excellence since the 16th century when King Henry III created one of the most important orders in France, “L’Ordre du Saint-Esprit.” Symbolizing ...


0

Possibly a reference to hall-of-fame basketball player Alex English. English is an all time top scorer, who scored with technique rather than strength or speed.


2

Actually, decimate isn't the only word linked to its number-related root. You will still find people who, for example, mentally connect hecatomb with the sacrifice of 100 oxen, myriad with the number 10,000, and millennarianism with 1000 years in Christian eschatology. I'm one of them. To me, these connections don't provide a compelling reason to banish ...


1

The first three instances of "handed him his hat" that a Google Books search for the years 1700 through 2000 finds are from 1843, 1845, and 1846. Here they are, in context. From Ben Bradshawe: The Man Without a Head (1843): Sophy had stuck it [Ben's hat] upon a bust of Shakespeare which adorned the hall, but as Ben never dreamt of having such a head in ...


0

Apparently it's called the 'quotatative like,' and you can read about it in this great Boston Globe article. From the article: “I was like” is neither just “I said” or “I thought,” but an opening into either direct quotation or inner condition, as well as a much wider range of dramatic reenactment or, especially on the Internet, visual ...


5

I am also not an academic, but I am fairly well-read, including occult studies, and other than in your OP, I have never encountered the term about which you ostensibly inquire. Aside from mentioning nigromancy in association with necromancy /ˈnɛkrɵˌmænsi/ in its definition of the latter term, Wikipedia has little to say, mentioning only that according to, ...


-1

I always thought it was more of an African American language pattern. I grew up in the 1970s-1990s hearing people use " be like" in place of "was."


0

In more modern terms... Many folks wear baseball hats. Being handed your hat would be the result if you were involved in the losing end of an altercation. If someone punches you hard enough in the face it will usually knock you to the ground quite naturally your hat will be knocked off in that process. Hence, having your hat handed to you as you're ...


0

The book, "The Englishman's Guide-book to the United States and Canada," published in London in 1885 by Sampson Low, Marston, SEarle & Rivington says on page 20 "an Indian name, meaning "a place where everybody gets drunk." I suppose this was some wild story made up for amusement, or who knows. The full text is in Google Books.


0

Never mind the bollocks, we are the sex pistols! relates to the british history of sex and prostituion in the 18th century "punkish" later used as an association between the green and yellow society and young boys between london and paris homosexuals.



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