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42

Did you check any of your Ngram results? The early hits are mostly false drops from typographical and OCR considerations, so the tail on the distribution continues to the left. Prudishness and censorship combined to make it ʃucking impossible to get the word published until "modern" times. Now no one cares about the word when the internet is dedicated to ...


24

It looks like what Andrew Leach and deadrat pointed out are very keen observations. I checked about 50 links of books before 1820 times, but nowhere have I found the word "fuck" (almost everywhere it is a misreference of Long S (f without the crossbar) , as in ſuck (suck), ſucked (sucked), ſuck'd (suck'd), ſucking(sucking) and other variations). This ...


4

Background on 'bucking' "Bucking" in the sense of "avidly pursuing" seems to have its origins in U.S. military slang, but it has much broader application today, as Kristina Lopez notes in her answer. The earliest instance of the word used in this sense, according to J.E. Lighter, Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1993), is from 1881—and ...


4

I worked in the Radio and TV industry as an engineer for over 30 years and have followed the evolution of the term "breaking". This is how I see it. The term "breaking" is a technical procedure used inside a broadcasting studio. Also, it's used by CB radio operators when one keys open the microphone and says, "breaker, breaker or 10-50" to announce their ...


4

It is an English phonetic adaptation of Greek words: There are a number of Greek onset clusters imported into English: 'gn-' as in 'gnostic' 'pn-' as in 'pneumonia' 'pt-' as in 'pterodactyl' 'ps-' as in 'psychology' The 'g' and 'p' are not silent in Greek. But /gn/, /pn/, /pt/, /ps/ are not legal onsets in English phonology. English speakers ...


3

lot (n.): (from Etymonline) Old English hlot "object (anything from dice to straw, but often a chip of wood with a name inscribed on it) used to determine someone's share," also "what falls to a person by lot," from Proto-Germanic *khlutom (source also of Old Norse hlutr "lot, share," Old Frisian hlot "lot," Old Saxon hlot, Middle Dutch, Dutch ...


3

Judge and justice come from the Proto-Indo-European root *yewos (law, precept, to bind) through Latin. Jew comes from Hebrew through Aramaic to Greek to Latin to French. There does not seem to be any connection between the Hebrew root and the PIE root. Judah and Jude come from the same Hebrew root as Jew. Jewel comes from Latin through French, with no ...


3

My research suggests the origin of 'bucking for [something]', military slang for something akin to 'trying very hard to achieve [something]' is as a periphrasis for 'washing your underwear in lye'. This somewhat startling and perhaps overstated conclusion results from my observation that early military use is associated with 'a thorough washing preparatory ...


2

Its slang put you brought up prision bucking for solitary, in prision bucking means the oppisite of trying to obtaian something. For example im bucking work call,or if some is gonna jack or take something from you.Im bucking the jack..if someone is called out to fight and doesnt he bucked the callout any who its no answer just insight


2

Attitude in Aviation is ah extension of its original meaning of "disposition of a figure": the position of the aircraft in the air in relation to the horizon. Origin & History of “attitude”: In origin, attitude is the same word as aptitude. both come ultimately from late Latin aptitūdō. In Old French this became aptitude, which ...


1

If one is 'beyond reason to deal with' then wouldn't this mean that they are more than reasonable to deal with? No, it means the person is beyond the point where it's possible to reason with them. Perhaps they're in a hurry, or drunk, or in a fever of pain, etc. "Below reason" is not used in English. If I'm less smart, then this could also mean ...


1

The word comes down to us straight from the Latin, corrumpo, corrumpere, corrupi, corruptus, bribe, suborn falsify pervert, corrupt, deprave seduce, tempt, beguile This was in use even in ancient times. According to the Oxford Latin Dictionary (sorry, no online link - it's a hard copy), con-, the prefix, was used to intensify: ...


1

Corruptus is the past participle of the Latin verb corrumpere - to destroy, ruin, waste. - OED & Elementary Latin Dictionary,Lewis (1947) It appears in English- presumably from Norman French as corrump. : Etymology: < Old French corompre, corrumpre (modern French corrompre = Provençal corrompre, Italian corrompere) < Latin corrumpĕre to ...


1

'TRON' is an early BASIC programming language debugging command, short for 'TRACE ON', which tells the computer to trace the programs run-time execution and report various variables back to the programmer. To turn the feature off, use 'TROFF'. See TRON command on Wikipedia


1

I'll offer a different theory origin. The phrase is a generalization of the phrase bucking for freight From the October 1857 article History of the Express Business: "Bucking for freight" as it was called, was carried to perfection by them, and it is almost incredible the pains any one of them, from the " boss" to the boy, would take to obtain ...


1

Growing up in Bensonhurst, B'klyn, we always called a (or when ordering) a whole pie, "a pizza pie". If you wanted a piece, it is called a "slice" If you wanted a square, you called it "a Sicilian"...Which my favorite was from the center cut of the Sicilian pie...Which by the way, we never called it a Sicilian pie, it was refered to as a "whole sicilian" ...


1

Buggins appears in Anthony Trollope's Barchester Chronicles. He was a civil servant who was leaving his job, and a large number of possible candidates were pursuing the position. Pre-dates all other suggestions - i.e. 19th century.



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