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The OED dates boink as a verb back to 1984, citing Stephen King's Thinner, where it appears to be used as onomatopoeia, similar to bonk: He half-expected them to begin bopping and boinking each other. For this sense, the OED gives the definition "to strike, to knock", which is fairly similar to how bonk is used. As for the sexual meaning, their ...


5

It is an error to believe that ye was only used in the nominative or vocative; it wasn’t. The word ye was sometimes used as the object. The OED says: 3. Used as objective (accusative or dative) instead of you (in plural or singular sense). And provides many citations, of which these are but a few of them: 1594 Marlowe & Nashe Dido iv. iv, ― ...


5

According to the following source the usage of 'boink' by David Angell in the American sitcom 'Cheers' may have predated Bruce Willis's line in 1985. But it seems likely now that Cheers used it first, though not very long before. Les Charles, one of the creators of Cheers, said, in remarks delivered at the memorial service for David Angell (and his ...


4

According to Etymonline, the first attested use is from 1830, and it comes from the act of firing a gun: crack Meaning "try, attempt" first attested 1830, nautical, probably a hunting metaphor, from slang sense of "fire a gun." The citation is from Davy Crockett, a famous American frontiersman of the early 19th century: At their head, apart from ...


3

Interesting question! Here's what the OED has to say about -ious: a compound suffix, consisting of the suffix -ous, added to an i which is part of another suffix, repr. Latin -iōsus, French -ieux, with sense ‘characterized by, full of’. ... by false analogy in cūriōsus curious (from cūra): see -ous suffix. and, re: -ous: Nouns of quality from ...


3

Good does not come from God, but probably from Old English gōd, which is not the same. Before 900; Middle English (adj., adv., and noun); Old English gōd (adj.); cognate with Dutch goed, German gut, Old Norse gōthr, Gothic goths. The first hand-written English language Bible manuscripts were produced in the 1380's by Wycliffe from the Latin Vulgate, so you ...


2

It does appear that "crack" refers to a gunshot, and therefore "to have a crack at" means to have a shot at. In "The Pilot" by James Fenimore Cooper, published in 1824, we find the sentence: No, no; not a trigger will I pull in my own regiment about the silly affair; but I'll have a crack at some marine in very revenge; for that is no more than ...


2

Linda Flavell & Roger Flavell, Dictionary of Proverbs and Their Origins (1993) offers this background on the phrase: This [“absence makes the heart grow fonder”] is a line from a song ISLE OF BEAUTY (before 1839) by Thomas Haynes Bayly. It was Bayly who popularized the words, but [Burton] Stevenson [in Book of Proverbs, Maxims, and Famous Phrases ...


2

My answer focuses on the lineage of the form giffy, which is reported in a couple of reference works from the 1830s. William Holloway, A General Dictionary of Provincialisms (1839) has this entry for giffy: GIFFY, n. The shortest possible portion of time ; the winking of an eye. Norf. Sussex. Hants. The county citations indicate that Holloway found ...


1

"Nobody goes there anymore. It's too crowded." - Yogi Berra That's one way to address your concern, but a better way might be to consider rounding error. To an engineer, 1000000 means "between 950000 and 10500000"m because there is one significant digit If he wants to express "between 99999905 and 1000000.5",he writes 1000000.0; numbers to the left of a ...


1

According to this article titled "Ratchet does not come from Wretched – Slang Word Origin History", it does indeed come from ratchet the mechanical device. It comes from the Mr. Mandigo song "Do the ratchet", "The Ratchet" in this case being a dance whose motion is similar to the action of a ratchet.


1

Its origin is biblical and refers to the parable of the labourers in the vineyard (Matthew XX) The following extracts from the OED are interesting and give some indication of the etymology of the modern expression from as early as 971AD. eleventh hour: the latest possible time, in allusion to the parable of the labourers ( Matt. xx.); also eleventh-hour ...



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