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No, the prefix theo- means "God" from which theology. Theory derived from "theoria" meaning "contemplation sight": Theo- word-forming element meaning "god, gods, God,*" from comb. form of Greek theos "god," from PIE root *dhes-, root of words applied to various religious concepts, such as Latin feriae "holidays," festus "festive," fanum "te ...


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Often the terms calque and loan translation are used. The latter is preferable as there are different types of calques. Please see Wikipedia on these terms.


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'Not worth shucks' John Bartlett, Dictionary of Americanisms, first edition (1848) has this entry for shuck: SHUCK. The outer husk or shell of the walnut, chestnut, &c.; or the husk of Indian corn. In England, the word is applied to pods as well as husks; as, pea-shucks. Not worth shucks, is a Southern expression meaning good for nothing. ...


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Picking up Jimmy's reference to Googly as Australian slang, there are a couple of possibilities. Firstly to establish the early Australian usage: 1904 P.F.Warner How We recovered Ashes 106 Bosanquet.. can bowl as badly as anyone in the world,but, when gets a length, those slow 'googlies', as the Australian papers call them, are apt to paralyse the greatest ...


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An acronym is an abbreviation (or intialism) that's pronounced as a word. They're a relatively modern invention; there are a few earlier examples , but their use really took off during WWII. INRI? INRI may be old, but when was INRI introduced into the English language? What evidence is there for people pronouncing it as "inree" in the English language? ...


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Fix used in the sense you are referring to dates back to the 18th century: Sense of "tamper with" (a fight, a jury, etc.) is from 1790. probably from the earlier meaning : "settle, assign" evolved into "adjust, arrange" (1660s), then "repair". (Etymonline) Ad a set phrase the earliest usage I could find is from the '40s, but ...


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It’s because it never had an afficate there. We spelled it renegue for some time, and some people still do. But just because we dropped the u for ease in spelling doesn’t mean we would change the sound. The OED has: renegue, renege /rɪˈniːg/, /-ˈnɛg/, /-ˈneɪg/, v. Forms: 6–7, 9 reneague, 7–9 renegue, (6 ri-, 7 -neigue, 9 dial. -nague); 7, 9 reneg, ...


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(It's been bugging me for ages this "boink".) The earliest instance I found boink, used unequivocally as a verb, is in an electrical engineering volume called R & D Review, 1957. The analogous picture in a simple mechanical model is that of the bottom of anold-fashioned [sic] oil can just as it “boinks”: there are two stable states separated by an ...


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I am 80 years of age.Lack of moral fibre has been referred to over my life time and others that use the term ,as someone who is cowardly.I have no research to provide.Its a euphamism for cowardly,a softer terminology to not excite too much the person to which you are speaking.


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The parameter part of the word comes from "Mathematics and Logic" where it serves as an agent to satisfy the requirements of a given formula or reason. Since in a heated debate you have to satisfy/justify a reason with an argument, it makes sense for the word to refer to the same root.


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It’s impossible to say what lay behind the gift of this unusual name to any particular individual. However, I think it quite possible that Jayla represents a re-spelling of the Biblical Hebrew name יעלא, mentioned in Neh 7:58 and Ezra 2:56 as the forebear of a family among the descendants of “Solomon’s servants”. The name, following the Masoretic pointing, ...


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A 'rule of thumb' originates from a law that said a man was allowed to beat his wife with a stick, so long as it was no thicker than his thumb. I have remembered this since a history class in secondary school, though I have long forgotten the man (may have been a monarch or politician) who passed the law.


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Is this sufficiently sinister? "Oh the humanity!" (Hindenburg) Reference: http://history.stackexchange.com/questions/24129/oh-the-humanity


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Here is an example from 1814 where it means to tow (by horse). Perambulations of Cosmopolite: Or, Travels and Labors of Lorenzo Dow, I came to a camp where some negroes were toting* tobacco to market. I stopped with them until day, and one gave me some corn for my horse. *The mode of toting tobacco to market, is by rolling it in casks, with a ...


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To the references, you can add the use of the exact phrase "He's not a happy camper" nearly 1:45 into the 1947 movie Tycoon, starring John Wayne. It thus predates all television references.


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Definitely correct use, think of it this way: if one is playing a game or sport the players must work hard and fast to get a point, a coach might say "come on lets hustle out there". The focus is to score a goal. After which the player or team celebrates for achieving their goal, use.


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I note the reference to Shakespeare's Love's Labour's Lost, originally flagged by Evan Morris over at The Word Detective and referenced by Callithumpian here. We are given to understand that Hector is given a gift, which is then described disparagingly as a 'lemon'. I think Morris is on to something, but it's more subtle than just a matter of 'sourness' as ...


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Speaking as a former (1963) craps dealer at Harrah's Tahoe casino, now an attorney (Harrah's hired law students as craps dealers), bets are toggled as either on or off, in play or not, on the come-out roll. The reason: On the come-out roll, seven is a winner, but only at that time. Other bets lose. So on this roll, the shooter hopes for a seven to win ...


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I'm originally from Harrogate, North Yorks, so my local river was the Nidd, which means "sparkling". These days, I live in Perth, Western Australia, where the Swan River flows. Before becoming the Swan River, however, it is known as the Avon River, named after the Avon in England, which of course means River River. Funnily enough though, here it's ...



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