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20

So why does the English language have three different words for "one time", "two times" and "three times"? In other words, why do one time, two times and three times have single words (once, twice, thrice) but four times, five times etc. don't have? Simple answer is; one time, two times and three times were frequently used—as lower numbers like one , ...


12

The etymology of isolate is not the same as the prefix 'iso'. isolated (adj.) 1763, from French isolé "isolated" (17c.) + English -ated (see -ate (2)). The French word is from Italian isolato, from Latin insulatus "made into an island," from insula "island." The French word was used at first in English (isole, also isole'd, c.1750), then after ...


8

Jim Morisson would have sounded funny singing 'Love me twice baby, love twice today, love me twice girl ..." But then, Lennon and McCartney's "One after 909" works better with "Move over once, move over twice, c'mon baby don't you be cold as ice," because "two times" does not rhyme with "ice." But while we are asked to "Knock three times" on the ceiling, ...


8

In her blog on Design Context, Sophie Wilson details the various types of folds and provides the following useful illustration: Regular people call pretty much all of those foldouts, but bookmakers use gatefold as a particular term of the trade. The simple reason that it’s called a gatefold is because it folds out like a double-gate — that is, one with ...


6

Here's Etymonline's origin of recapitulate: late 14c., "a summarizing," from Old French recapitulacion (13c.), from Late Latin recapitulationem (nominative recapitulatio), noun of action from past participle stem of recapitulare "go over the main points of a thing again," literally "restate by heads or chapters," from re- "again" (see re-) + capitulum ...


6

According to World Wide Words, its usage appears earlier than 1932. But the usage in the first part of the 19th century may refer to a different meaning. What we do know is that this expression is first recorded in print, in American Speech, as late as 1932. It comes into existence seemingly fully formed, with no obvious links to any previous meaning ...


5

J.E. Lighter, The Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1994) puts the first occurrences of dibs in print at 1807 (used in the sense of money), 1827 (used in the sense of a portion or share), and 1932 (used in the sense of a first claim): dib n. {prob. fr. dibstones, a type of child's jacks} 1.a. pl. money. 1807 Port Folio (June 6)357: ...


5

The following source provides futher information on the term which don't actually support your assumption of the origin from persian Sher (lion) pa (leg/foot): Although westerners pronounce it "Sher-pa" the native Sherpa pronunciation is "Shar-wa." Shar means "east" -- wa means "person" --- in Sherpa and Tibetan language. In Tibetan script, ...


4

OED confirms that it is from Tibetan sharpa, inhabitant of an eastern country. The other forms listed are Serpa, Sharpa and the earliest forms recorded are Serpa and Sérpá from 1847. 1847    B. H. Hodgson in Jrnl. Asiatic Soc. Bengal XVI. 1237 Cis-Himálayan Bhotias vel Tibetans, called..Serpa, &c. 1847    B. H. Hodgson in ...


3

The OED does have an entry for for all that. Of a preventive cause or obstacle. Thesaurus » a. In spite of, notwithstanding. Rare exc. in for all, for any, with a n.; also absol. for all that, etc. OE Anglo-Saxon Chron. anno 1006 Ac for eallum þissum se here ferde swa he sylf wolde. c1320 Seuyn Sag. (W.) 1135 For al that heuer ...


3

And after the 60s, the quotation has evolved to Tell me and I forget; teach me and I may remember; involve me and I will learn. According to American etymologist Barry Popik, the quotation has been accredited to Dr. Herb True in 1978 in 29 March 1978, Dallas (TX) Morning News, Earl Wilson syndicated entertainment column, pg. 16A, col. 2 and to ...


2

It appears that this may have some relation to an obsolete meaning of brake. From OED: † brake, v.6 Etymology: perhaps repr. an unrecorded Old English *bracian , < bræc , which occurs in the sense of ‘phlegm, mucus, saliva’; compare Old Dutch braeken , Middle Low German and modern Dutch braken to vomit; allied to break n.1 (compare German sich ...


2

In my experience Glass Cannon is also a term used in Collectable Card Games (Magic the Gathering) where a combination deck will be totally unable to recover in cases where the combination is countered/disrupted. In this sense where the combination succeeds it results in a game win and when it fails it is a certain loss as there is no way to recover.


2

"The Conscience of the Court" is a short story originally published in The Saturday Evening Post on March 18, 1950. It is set in Jacksonville, Florida, at the trial of fictional character named Laura Lee Kimble, an uneducated black woman from Savannah, Georgia, now living with her (temporarily absent) employer in Jacksonville. Here is the relevant excerpt: ...


2

False etymology: (pseudoetymology, paraetymology or paretymology), sometimes called folk etymology although this is also a technical term in linguistics, is a popularly held but false belief about the origins of specific words, often originating in "common-sense" assumptions. Such etymologies often have the feel of urban legends, and can be much ...


2

According to the following source the meaning has a literal origin, from the supports (skids) that were greased to help with very heavy weights: To grease the skids: is a phrase which means "to facilitate". Says You! claims that it arose in shipbuilding, where skids were used to facilitate getting the huge ships of the day into the water from the ...


1

I think you're looking for false etymology, sometimes called folk etymology (although that term also has other meanings). An example of this is the urban legend that the word picnic came from "pick a n****r." Somewhat similar to this is a false cognate, where two words seem to share the same etymological origin but actually don't. For example, the words ...


1

An ngram search reveals the usage of the phrase grease the skids in the idiomatic sense at least as early as 1902 in More Ex-Tank Tales by Clarence Louis Cullen, a collection of sketches about alcoholics . . . once more suddenly rising with the determined air of a man who intends to grease the skids and get going right . . .


1

I think you're probably going to get folk etymologies for this one. If you trace this back, "hysteresis" <== Gr. "ὑστέρησις" <== Gr. "ὑστερέω" <== Gr. "ὕστερος". "hysteria" <== L. "hystericus" <== Gr. "ὑστερικός" <== Gr. "ὑστέρα" Gr. "ὕστερος" is the masculine form of Gr. "ὑστέρα", so they are practically the same word. I'm not ...


1

It may be that we would have to look for a paraphrase or a two-word expression, e.g. "great mouse". Just a vague idea for Latin: "mus + cretus" ( mouse + grown big). Perhaps one has not found more information about the origin because the idea is a word must be one word historically. That a lot of words were at first multi-word explanations that were ...


1

The earliest reference to the phrase that I've found in print so far is from 1835, in the New York Knickerbocker magazine: 'Pretty good reasoning, friend Seymour,' said I: 'you've made it very plain, that the DEvil is chief cook and bottle-washer for the slave-trade. I don't wonder it prospers so well, since he is at the wheel.' Another reference ...


1

I don't know if this is correct, but it may be related to 'doofers', Scots for 'horse shit' which also doubles up as an insult. Source: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/feb/27/robert-macfarlane-word-hoard-rewilding-landscape [from the excellent Cambridge academic Robert Macfarlane]


1

I would hazard a guess at a modification of chant, which according to this link appeared in the 1600's from the french chanter: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=chant


1

I am involved in a Shakespeare production of Henry iv part one in which Falstaff complains that if he exerts himself any more he will break his wind ---- It seems an obvious fart joke (though of course the possibility remains that he is out of breath). I can't find any site allowing that this is the first use of the fart idiom though.



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