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10

TLDR: Not Basque but Italian, but beyond that, we don’t know. The OED reports Littré’s Basque (Euskera) theory, but does not quite seem to believe it (bold emphasis mine): Etymology: mod.Eng. (17th c.), a. Fr. bizarre ‘odd, fantastic,’ formerly ‘brave, soldier-like’; cf. Sp. and Pg. bizarro ‘handsome, brave,’ Ital. bizzarro ‘angry, choleric,’ dial. ...


7

Perhaps the easiest way to understand the emergence of physician is by looking at the allied term physic, which Merriam Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) defines and derives as follows: physic n [ME physik natural science, art of medicine, fr. AF phisique, fisik, fr. L physica, sing. natural science, fr. Gk physikē, fr. fem. of ...


5

physica is from the latin for natural science. As physician (internal medicine doctor) it comes through the old French fisiciien. Originally a medic would have study natural science, plants and the nature of the body (as well as Astrology) while a lowly surgeon merely had to have a sharp knife and a strong stomach. Physicist is from the same root with a ...


5

physicist (n.) 1836, from physics + -ist. Coined by the Rev. William Whewell (1794-1866), English polymath, to denote a "cultivator of physics" as opposed to a physician. As we cannot use physician for a cultivator of physics, I have called him a physicist. We need very much a name to describe a cultivator of science in general. I should incline to ...


4

As suggested by John Lawer and according to Etymonline the word is derived from the combination of the following words of Greek origin: petro- before vowels petr-, word-forming element used from 19c., from comb. form of Greek petros "stone," petra "rock". ichor: 1630s, from Greek ikhor, of unknown origin, possibly from a ...


4

It sounds like a purpose-created, pseudo-medical neologism to me, like pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis— except there aren't any results at all in CHAE or Google Ngrams. Elsewhere on the web I can only find it in lists of too-clever words, and not in any online dictionaries. The etymology, I think, is reasonably clear: log- This is from the ...


4

Christine Ammer, The Facts on File Dictionary of Clichés, second edition (2006) has this entry for the phrase "down memory lane": down memory lane Looking back on the past. Often put in a nostalgic way, this term may have originated as the title of a popular song of 1924, "Memory Lane," words by Bud de Sylva, and music by Larry Spier and Con Conrad. It ...


3

The opposite of pogonotrophy is of course pogonotomy. The OED provides these citations, amongst others: 1897 Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch Jan., ― Pogonotomy is what the Greeks used to call the gentle art of self-shaving. 1942 Berrey & Van den Bark Amer. Thes. Slang §125/3 ― Pogonotomy, shaving. 1960 Times 28 Sept. (Advertising Suppl.) p. iii/2 ― This is ...


3

No, I think there is none. Arachnid comes from Greek arakhne "spider; spider's web," which probably is cognate with Latin aranea "spider, spider's web" (Etymonline), while arachidonic is connected to arachis – from New Latin: genus that includes the peanut, from Greek: arakis, diminutive of arakos, a legume (Merriam-Webster).


2

I did a bit of a deep web crawl on this, as I've never heard a syllabus called a greensheet. This made me curious as to whether it might be regional. I saw several uses of the word as a replacement for syllabus (often with syllabus in parenthesis as well). Several of these uses were as old as 2006. I decided to limit my search to anything before 2006 and ...


2

The general meaning of pro- is forward but the etymology suggests several derived connotations: word-forming element meaning "forward, forth, toward the front" (as in proclaim, proceed); "beforehand, in advance" (prohibit, provide); "taking care of" (procure); "in place of, on behalf of" (proconsul, pronoun); from Latin pro "on ...


2

Loganamnosis dates from at least 1958, as listed in Reversicon: A Medical Word Finder by Jacob Edward Schmidt: Preoccupation, morbid, with attempt to recall forgotten name . . . . NOMANAMNOSIS Preoccupation, morbid, with attempt to recall forgotten word . . . . LOGANAMNOSIS


2

Merriam-Webster claims it was first used in 1903. There are mentions here: memory lane, that go back almost that far. Many of them render it as "memory's lane". There is a book of that era, "Queen Mary of Memory Lane", which may have helped to popularize the phrase.


1

Early mentions of ‘nannicock’ From Thomas Lewis Owen Davies, A Supplementary English Glossary (1881): NANNICOCK, a silly, affected person. See H. s. v. nanny hen. Hee that doth wonder at a weathercocke,/And plaies with euery feather in the wiude,/And is in loue with euery nannicocke. Breton, Pasquil’s Fooles-cappe, p. 23. Gordon Williams, A ...


1

I attended four different US undergrad schools, a US law school, and a Chinese economics school's master of laws program, and I have never heard of a greensheet. Like other commentators, however, I found that the Google God declares it is The Truth. First, an Ngram: I did not include before 1920 because there were zero uses before then. Blackboard ...


1

The Fox used as a metaphor has a long history, the following extract explains why: The fox has a long history of magic and cunning associated with it. The Indians of central California regarded the silver fox as a culture-hero while in Siberia the crafty messenger from Hell, who lured the legendary hero underground, was often depicted in the shape ...


1

I found one somewhat earlier instance—from early 1892—in a newspaper archived in the Library of Congress's Chronicling America database of old newspapers. From "Lee Hing's Girl," in the Seattle Post-Intelligencer (February 14, 1892), attributed to the New York Sun but with no date for the occurrence in that newspaper (which further searches in the database ...



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