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9

I believe "Tige" is indeed a shortening of Tiger, and would be pronounced like tide with a hard g in place of the d. From a story in the Atlantic Monthly published in 1860, apparently by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr (father of the famous American jurist by the same name): Tiger, or more briefly, Tige, the property of Abner Briggs, Junior, belonged to a ...


7

Originally, the drive was not the storage device. It was the appliance on which you mounted the storage device. Spools of tape were mounted on the motor spindle of a tape drive; disk packs and floppy disks were mounted on the motor spindle of a disk drive: As disk technology matured, it became common for disks to be permanently sealed and non-removable –...


7

Reference-work coverage of the construction Nigel Rees, A Word in Your Shell-like (2004) has this entry for the generalized phrase: —— is the new —— Phrase format of epidemic proportions since 1998. Probably a development of the next phrase format (below). 'Why soup is the new sandwich' — headline in The Independent (6 November 1998); 'The 1990s are the ...


7

It appears that it was simply the use of the colour of the root of ginger applied to (the lighter shades of) red hair. Interestingly a very early citation of ginger as a color dates back to the 16th century: Ginger-color in ginger 1538 ELYOT, melinus, na, num, whyte, russette or a gynger-coloure 1552 HULOET, Gynger coloure, after a whyte ...


6

It appears to come from a dialectal variation of the verb to lie: to idle or lie about: Ligger: ‘Hangers on’ such as ‘music groupies’ for LIGGERS is an example of what it can mean, but it’s not the whole story. The Oxford English Dictionary provided the following: LIGGER noun [from verb ‘lig,’ + ‘-er’]: One who gatecrashes parties, a ‘...


6

There's a possible explanation that is very simple — maybe the ginger root that was imported in the 18th and early 19th century really was reddish. From the web: Multiple varieties of ginger can be found, the color of the flesh of the root will range from yellow, ivory, red or light green depending on the variety and age. From The universal ...


6

Antecedents of 'game-changer' For many years people have discussed the effects on various sports and pastimes of introducing innovations in rules, equipment, personnel, or tactics in terms of their potential to "change the game." For instance, "Concerning Rules and Regulations," in The Yale Literary Magazine (January 1905) offers this commentary on football:...


6

It appears that the term game changer originated with the game baseball, it specifically refers to the player who changes the outcome of a match or sporting event. He or she succeeds in overturning the scores, which usually results in the team's victory. The expression was soon adopted in the world of business, because in commerce there are players and ...


5

1. Are there any examples of dogs actually being named "Tiger", let alone a shortened version of "Tiger"? The earliest example I could find of a dog named Tiger is from "Select Poetry, Ancient and Modern, for April, 1791," in The Gentleman's Magazine (1791): The inclosed Occasional Epilogue ["Occasional Epilogue, For Mr. Stanton's Great Dog Tiger"] was ...


4

An interesting question. I'm confident that the first usages of "game-changer" coincide with the first usages of the non-derivative(?) noun form: change/changed/changes/changing the game. In the literal sense, I would expect the term to have been used since people began discussing games, although the derivative noun (or deverbal) form would probably have ...


4

'Ginger' in slang dictionaries and regional glossaries The earliest dictionary instance I've been able to find in which ginger is used in connection with a description of hair color is in Francis Grose, A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (1785), which has this entry: GINGER PATED or GINGER HACKLED, red haired, a term borrowed from the cock pit,...


4

The expression is from the late '70s, probably on the notion of cooling down the eyes from the hot sun. I can't find any evidence that the expression was originally a BrE or AmE one, I think it is an original Indian English one. Cooling glasses, also Coolers (noun - sunglasses INDIA) I bought a pair of cooling glasses today–the sun was so bright. ...


4

1664, Copious Dictionary In Three Parts: I. The English before the Latin, ... With the exception of alight blew the adjective ‘light’ was not used to modify the noun that followed. Instead, the term bright seems to have been preferred in the 17th century. Bright Blue Blew like azure. Blew like the Sea-waves. A bright blew colour. Somewhat blew. ...


4

To supplement Josh61's answer, here (in chronological order) are four discussions not mentioned in the body of his answer. From Jonathon Green, The Dictionary of Contemporary Slang (1984): ligger n. a hanger on; spec. in entertainment industry: a freeloader (qv). fr. least important guest (?) or linger: hang around N[ew] M[usical] E[xpress]. From Paule ...


3

I hate to add this rather robust listing of answers, but I believe this may have been missed. I believe that (speaking on behalf of my age) the term came about because ginger was often pickled for storage, adding longevity and preservation for its use. As a result it is very red in color.... Pickled ginger images So the reference was a natural association ...


3

This is a Community Wiki post, which means anyone is free to edit and add further details, no rep points are earned or lost. The Many Shades of Ginger The etymological background of ginger is as tortuous as its knobbly features. Many sources trace its history to Sanskrit çṛŋgavēra which means “horn body,” due to its semblance with antlers, while the ...


2

Although N-gram shows the first use of “life[-]changer” as predating that of “game-changer” by more than 30 years, it also shows that the latter took a small lead in 2008, which could be partially attributed to it being used (especially in the jargon of winning large, life-changing, lottery jackpots) synonymously with “life-changer”: “Winning Wednesday’s $1....


2

A variant found in Samuel Richardson's Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded (1740): "I was so confounded at these words, you might have beat me down with a feather."


2

It's a set phrase, from 1875 (Etymonline): Miscarriage: 1580s, "mistake, error;" 1610s, "misbehavior;" see miscarry + -age. Meaning "untimely delivery" is from 1660s. Miscarriage of justice is from 1875. (now rare except in miscarriage of justice) A failure; a mistake or error. [from 16thc.] 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.ii:...


2

It just means google was finding words that looked like wifi with its ocr, Internet is VERY hard to miss-ocr, there arn't any words that look like it. You know OCR(Optical Character Recognition) is HARD, right? If you don't, now you do! "Wifi" can be read by an ocr if the original was "Will" or "Wife", the ocr will often make mistakes, these 2 are most ...


2

To add to and strengthen the accepted answer: Publications from the 1950's (when computers had drum memory instead of disk drives, and tape drives for long-term storage) refer to a tape unit, tape reader, or tape recorder for the whole assembly (tape+drive). See, for example, Frizzell, C. (1953). Engineering Description of the IBM Type 701 Computer. ...


1

From the fabulous etymonline website: log (n.2) "record of observations, readings, etc.," 1842, sailor's shortening of log-book "daily record of a ship's speed, progress, etc." (1670s), from log (n.1). The book so called because a wooden float at the end of a line was cast out to measure a ship's speed. General sense by 1913.* So it does have a ...


1

Looking at Ngram, the usage of the term "womyn" is still increasing, so it will be probably be used for the foreseeable future, expecially in feminist contexts: Womyn: women (used chieflyin feminist literature as an alternative spelling to avoid the suggestion of sexism perceived in the sequence m-e-n). Ngram: womyn.


1

After some research, I conclude that it depends on the context. I got here from searching “what does it mean when the brakeman rings his bell?” after listening to these lyrics of Night Flight by Led Zeppelin: Please Mr. Brakeman, won't you ring your bell. And ring loud and clear Please Mr. Fireman, won't you ring your bell Tell the people they got to ...



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