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16

I'm going to go ahead an put in an official answer to the actual question "Is it a recognised use of the word?" the simple answer is, very strongly, "No." your friends / fellow inmates / bosses are either (i) using a very strange "inside" terminology - perhaps from some specific technical field (ii) using a "inside joke" -- some linguistic quirk that ...


8

When you change gears in a manual transmission, you are connecting an entirely different gear to the drive shaft to provide drive. The idiom refers to this switch to a different, discrete mechanism, not the change of speed that can result. After all, it's quite possible to drive the same speed in different gears.


6

Note --just FYI -- that candlestick charting is a technical term used in talking about stock markets. (The system is said to have been invented by Homma, "God of the Markets" in Japan back in the 1700s.) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Candlestick_chart Is there a chance this is the term you overheard? (Just TBC the actual image you present, has no ...


4

According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the etymology of this sense of waste is: waste: c.1300, of land, "desolate, uncultivated," from Anglo-French and Old North French waste (Old French gaste), from Latin vastus (see waste (v.)). From c.1400 as "superfluous, excess;" 1670s as "unfit for use." Waste-paper attested from 1580s. In other words, all ...


4

It's used quite a lot in British English. The verb "cop": 1.1 Incur (something unwelcome):  ‘England’s captain copped most of the blame’ In your context, you could say "Player A copped a knock on the head". Interestingly, you can also receive something welcome by "copping" it: I copped myself a bottle of champagne in the raffle Regarding ...


3

From the Online Etymology Dictionary: cock "male chicken," Old English cocc "male bird," Old French coc (12c., Modern French coq), Old Norse kokkr, all of echoic origin. Old English cocc was a nickname for "one who strutted like a cock," thus a common term in the Middle Ages for a pert boy, used of scullions, apprentices, servants, etc. A ...


3

I couldn't find anything on the etymology of the idiom, but in common parlance let's switch gears or 'change gears' usually means changing the subject. I think this has less to do with the way a transmission works (changing gears changes speed) and more to do with feeling the change of gears. You can really feel gears switch, especially with a bad driver! ...


2

It appears from a web search that it is popular to see how cameras perform in low-light situations, especially those lit by a candle. It would be reasonable to assume someone took the noun candlelight from this and applied it as a generic term for comparison. Admittedly, it's a bit of a stretch to assume that the light source is now verbified to use as a ...


2

As other answers have noted, the first scandal ending in "gate" was the Watergate scandal. The Oxford English Dictionary says that other scandals having a "gate" tacked on happened reasonably quickly Only a year after Watergate, the scandal had become so well known that -gate became detached and was used to create names for other scandals. The OED’s ...


1

http://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/61/messages/888.html I found this reference to Victorian writers using the phrase 'Lawks-a-mussy' Easy to see how this can vary. I cannot find a first usage example however. HTH


1

It looks like your hunch is correct. Lord Jesus, Have Mercy on Me Posted on 08 04 2011 Lord Jesus, Have Mercy on Me In the Caribbean, whenever life takes a turn for the worse, people exclaim, “Lord have mercy.” In colloquial terms, the expression is, “Lord, ha mussy” or for the very illiterate, it is “Lucks an mussy.” Because the phase is ...


1

It's actually colloquial English and didn't originate any place or with anyone specifically. It is a diminuitive form of "all right " and has probably been in the English language since Chaucer's time (1300's & 1400's). In the U.S., it is usually considered more of a a country person's expression rather than a city person's. A related word "all ...


1

Shadows can be (indeed, usually are) crisp: they are basically "accurate, but 'colourless / line drawings' of an object" http://city-mouse-country-mouse.blogspot.fr/2012/09/september-shadows.html It's funny that the high-tech analogy we'd use today would probably be something like "give me the mesh version!" (like, in a 3D game or movie, just the ...


1

If Miriam O'Callaghan had only had the presence of mind to be quoted as saying "I've grown better-looking with age", a tremendous number of electrons would not have had to suffer a futile and inglorious death.


1

To answer part 2, the etymology of appropriate is: from late Latin appropriatus, past participle of appropriare ‘make one's own,’ from ad- ‘to’ + proprius ‘own, proper.’ So it comes from a root that means both own and proper. The verb that means to take comes from the first sense (other words that are obviously related are proprietary and proprietor); ...


1

A click was used as a refernce on mortars, machine guns and some artillery early on in the military. The T&E mech. when moved 1 click would change the strike or impact 1 meter at a distance of 1000 meters. This info. found in the FM's on the above equipment. One click or klick when talking about distance on a military map is 1000 meters or one KM ...


1

"I'm chief cook and bottle washer" meaning: I do everything from A-Z; one man show; especially self employed. Chief cook is the top job in a kitchen; bottle washing is endless, mindless work that anyone can do. If you're doing both, it implies you're also doing everything in between. can also be used sarcastically: "He's chief cook and bottle washer ...


1

It wasn't merely a sexual reference; more of a play on words since there used to be (and still are in a few places) Christmas clubs, in which everyone paid a small amount each week and received a hamper at Christmas, and bottle clubs, in which the reward for your subscription was a bottle of whisky. So presumably the lady in question had received a package ...


1

In the 1828 AMERICAN DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE you can read definitions for pudding: "what bulges out, a paunch." So a pregnant woman had a "bulge" for her tummy same as a "paunch." I was just watching "Last Tango in Halifax," a British sitcom, and the phrase "he put her in the pudding club" was used as it if was commonly understood.


1

The reason that the term "Camp Followers" has become so synonimous with "prostitute" originates in the civil war with Joseph Hooker, a general in the Union army who was known for allowing his troops to consort with prostitutes and for allowing them to follow his army. The term "Hooker" did not originate with him, but it certainly became popular because of ...



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