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13

In the 1800s a hand job seems to have referred to a specific printing/bookbinding process done by hand. From Annual Report of the State Board of Arbitration of Illinois, Volumes 1-5: Q. What do you say as to competition in this particular line, hand job work, book and job work, what effect, if there is any, would such towns as Decatur, Jacksonville. ...


13

The show you're talking about, Deadwood, was pretty famous for its language anachronisms, especially when it came to swearing. (A coincidence that one of its main characters is named Swearingen?) From "Talk Pretty" on Slate: In interviews, [David Milch, the creator and show runner of Deadwood,] has insisted that the show, particularly the flamboyantly ...


8

J.E. Lighter, The Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1997) reports that "hand job" in its sexual sense goes back to 37: hand job n 1. an act of masturbation, usu. by one person on another who is a male.—usu. considered vulgar. [First citation:] 1937 [Pietro] Di Donato Christ in Concrete 107: Then ... go into the cellar and do the ...


6

Unfortunately, the phrases aren't necessarily metaphorical. A quote of literal use, which also provides the answer to what is an alternative expression, is taken form Inferno: the life and death epic struggle of the USS Franklin in World War II page 155, quoting Stan Butryn (who had just walked up stairs to the aircraft carrier deck) All off a sudden ...


5

“Shoot me now” (origin?) Nathaniel Thomas Haynes Bayly (1797 – 1839) an English poet, songwriter, dramatist, and miscellaneous writer, in 1837 penned Kindness in Women. In the following passage, taken from the story entitled Kate Leslie, the phrase ‘shoot me now’ appears to be idiomatic; a mild curse which the speaker utters in mock frustration as he tries ...


4

mortify (v.) late 14c., "to kill," from Old French mortefiier "destroy, overwhelm, punish," from Late Latin mortificare "cause death, kill, put to death," literally "make dead," from mortificus "producing death," from Latin mors (genitive mortis) "death" (see mortal (adj.)) + root of facere "to make" (see factitious). Religious sense of "to ...


3

"Hand job" appears to date only to the 1940s, so it would not likely have been in use in the 1800s. http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=hand+job


3

The colour seems to be similar to that of traditional Peruvian clay pots, and also to the colour of Peruvian leather. I cannot verify either of these theories, sorry.


2

My guess is it's from Gossypium barbadense, a species of cotton plant grown in Peru. From 1880, Peruvian Bark: A Popular Account of the Introduction of Chinchona Cultivation Into British India In a crop of G. Barbadense a percentage of the plants almost always yields cotton of a reddish-brown colour.


2

I would say it is mainly the Latin suffix -ia for names of countries as in Italia, Hispania (Spain), Graecia (Greece), Germania. -(i)a is the femine ending for adjectives. The full name of countries was "terra Italia", word for word "earth/country Italian". As terra is a feminine noun the adjectives also have the feminine ending. -ia may have a connection ...


2

It's not restricted to pitchers; every player has a meat hand and a glove hand, and my impression is that it's used most often of catchers. The earliest use I've found is from 1911, in a short story by Charles Van Loan, “The Crab” in The Big League, 1911, where a first baseman praises his colleague: “There ain’t a third baseman in the country who has ...


2

Notwithstanding my tongue-in-cheek comment above, Moses’ use of the expression (translated as “please kill me at once”/ “please kill me here and now”) as reported in the Book of Numbers is probably not directly related to the current use and meaning of “Please kill me” in English today. However, I do think it is possible that Gloria Beatty’s (played by ...


2

They actually both derive from PER and TENET Pertinacious:( 1620s, from pertinacy (late 14c.; see pertinacity): pertinacity c. 1500, from Middle French pertinacité (early 15c.), from Old French pertinace "obstinate, stubborn," from Latin pertinacem (nominative pertinax) "very firm, tenacious, steadfast, persevering," from per- "very" (see per) + ...


1

Oxford (OED) is the most complete source I've seen online. It's subscription-only though, unless you are on campus at a university or something. It goes a little deeper than Etymonline, in that you can see cited examples of the earliest uses of a word. Harper's site is perfectly good for most uses, though. If you just want to learn the origins, even ...


1

The answer is actually yes. Latin (per)tinax and (per)tinens are both related to the verb tenere "to hold". pertinax is literally "holding fast to something".


1

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, 1914: "Yet," Conseil asked me, "doesn't master believe in gigantic devilfish?" "Yikes! Who in Hades ever believed in them?" the Canadian exclaimed. Industrial World, Volume 46, Issue 2, 1912: "Are you going up to the roof? Will you take a message to someone for me, Anne? I promised to meet an ...


1

I don't think that yikes as an exclamation has any direct connection to yoicks or hoicks, or with yike (the cry of the green woodpecker of Britain and continental Europe, recorded starting in the late 1800s), or with the baby-talk word yikes meaning "likes" and popular in the late 1800s and early 1900s)—or for that matter with yikes in the eighteenth-century ...



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