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55

So, my question: How did they call these herbal infusions? During the Middle English period, the concoction made from the herb was itself referred to as an herb. They would say "Drink this herb". They didn't bother to say "infusion of this herb". Drinke þis herbe..and it [wol] make al þe body in-to a swat. A Middle English Translation of Macer ...


54

Tisane. an infusion (as of dried herbs) used as a beverage or for medicinal effects Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin ptisana, from Greek ptisanē, literally, crushed barley, from ptissein to crush — more at pestle First Known Use: 14th century dictionary.com


11

When you boil down the question, the appropriate answer hinges on what would have been meant by "herbal tea" prior to the introduction of the word 'tea' in the sense of 2. a. A drink made by infusing these [Thea (now often included in Camellia)] leaves in hot water, having a somewhat bitter and aromatic flavour, and acting as a moderate stimulant; ...


4

Likely not. Here's a rundown of the commonly accepted account of each word: Illicit 'Illicit', like 'elicit' has Latin origins. The original Latin derivative is 'illicitus' meaning il- (not) -licitus (allowed) or simply 'not allowed' (and its a second declension adjective if you'd like to know). We might with more accuracy, considering connotations and ...


4

In a languagelog blog post, one of the commenters found in Google books a 1903 shorthand book where the pound sign # is mentioned, and it appears that even at the time, it was in the U.S. a well-established symbol for both number (#2) and weight in pounds (5#), depending on whether it appeared before or after the associated number. I expect that this usage ...


4

Summary (paraphrased from Etymonline): Gadfly probably comes from gad (n), a goad, but "the sense is entangled with gad (v) 'rove about'". Gadabout comes from gad (v) plus about. The noun, gad, is older than the verb, gad (from gadden); both are older than gadfly. (The verb gad may perhaps be derived from the noun gad.) Gadabout is comparatively recent. ...


3

Antecedents: 'Are we not men?' Questions along the lines of "Are you a man or a mouse?" or "Are we mice or men?" rarely appear in Google Books search results until the early twentieth century, but they have antecedents in rhetorical questions that go back much farther. Insistence on the special status of humankind is no doubt ancient, and rhetorical ...


2

Hold is an old word, at least one thousand years old, coming to us from Old English with the meaning of having, keeping, and containing. The figurative sense of holding something in one's mind has been there since the beginning (The OED cites such a usage in Beowulf.) From around 1200, hold takes the connotation of agreement, esteem, adherence or belief, ...


2

Latin influenced an already existing language: English. Therefore, all the most basic words already existed. Things like pronouns, articles, particles, basic (versions) of verbs such as to talk and to eat, and basic nouns such as the seasons, earth, food, etc, meaning they didn't "need" a romantic word. They needed words for things that were being introduced ...


2

Many years ago, when I was working at Wave Hill, a New York cultural property consisting of several acres, gardens and two manor houses, we referred to the walled in courtyard outside the kitchen of Glyndor House as the "dooryard." It was just off the driveway, and clearly would serve for an informal visit -- not necessarily in the dooryard, but by way of ...


2

It may have originated in Italian rather than English, because the 1964 Road and Track vol. 16, page 43 says: had built a pair of muletti — "mules" — whose design had been hastily roughed out by the same internal talent that had drawn up the Dischi Volanti and many other "house" designs. The workmanship of these muletti also was rough as they were never ...


2

According to the Michael Coveney, a theater critic writing in the Wednesday 29 August 2012| Independent, Sir Ian McKellan lost his script and improvised. Theatre critic's view: Sir Ian McKellen improvises as Miranda floats past during the Paralympics opening ceremony But he'd lost his script, so he improvised a modern imprecation, telling his ...


2

It's possible that, having lost his script, Sir Ian subconciously recalled lines heard in his youth: Go forth into the world in peace; be of good courage; hold fast to that which is good; render to no one evil for evil; strengthen the fainthearted; support the weak; help the afflicted; honour all men; ...


2

Ernest Weekley, An Etymological Dictionary of Modern English (1921) gives no indication that the terms gadabout and gadfly use gad- in an etymologically shared sense. Here are Weekley's entries for the the relevant terms (I omit his coverage of gad in the sense of "God," as in gadzooks): gad1. Spike. O[ld] N[orse] gaddr, spike, nail, associated with the ...


1

I went to http://babynames.net/names and found the following (just for A and B). There is more information there about the names and famous people who had the name. "Blossom", "Bond", "Branch", "Brand", "Bud".


1

In French or Italian, car racing teams were/are called "écurie (de course)" or "scuderia", literally racing stable: the race cars are the horses and the replacement car is called in French "le mulet" (the mule) and in Italian "il muletto". Both in French and in English, the sense of mule/mulet later extended to development cars (testbed vehicle equipped ...


1

As an Addendum to deadrat's answer: According to The Families of Words by Mario Pei (Harper Brothers, 1962), tie and tight both come from the PIE root *deuk, "to draw, pull". The root on the Germanic side also gives us tow, tug, taut, team, tether, among many other words, including wanton and Herzog. On the Latin side, we get duke, educate, and conduit, ...


1

The Old English word habban did have a short vowel in all of its forms. However, I would expect the vowel to be lengthened in some forms of the word during Middle English due to open syllable lengthening. For example, this is the reason why we have a long vowel in shave, from Old English sceafan. (The forms with -bb- do not seem to have survived to Modern ...


1

It's informally referred to as a parenthetical read (also discussed here). In some contexts, it's a form of videlicet.


1

According Etymonline the meaning of "raise' is probably from the sense of "pull up", a variant of "hitch" ( from Middle English hytchen, hichen, icchen ‎, “to move, jerk, stir”). Hike: Sense of "pull up" (as pants) first recorded 1873 in American English, and may be a variant of hitch; extended sense of "raise" (as wages) is 1867.



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