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7

The following sources try to shed some light on its origin which actually remains still unclear: Jiggery-pokery: (World Wide Words) It’s not so much found these days, though it is a delightful word for describing underhand practices or dishonest manipulation of individuals for personal profit People also mean by it some form of trickery, especially ...


6

It is because craft is a collective term and OED mentions that it might be originated as an elliptical expression. Craft itself is used as aircraft as well. OED includes the following explanation for the fifth definition of craft: V. Applied to boats, ships, and fishing requisites. These uses were probably colloquial with watermen, fishers, and ...


4

The expression that sucks seems to be predominantly connected to the reduction of a colloquial expression for fellatio as it is metaphorically applied to any disgusting or contemptible situation: Meaning "do fellatio" is first recorded 1928. Slang sense of "be contemptible" first attested 1971 (the underlying notion is of fellatio). etymonline.com ...


3

I am going to have to hazard a guess and say no, "Lexophile" is not a word. If it is any consolation, "Lexiphile" is not much better. Neither are listed on Merriam-Webster's Online Dictionary, which you have probably already checked. Definition Of by Farlex does have a matching definition of "Lexophile" but it is noted as slang and it does not directly ...


3

The word craft is obviously related to German Kraft (plural Kräfte), meaning might, power (or in physics force). It still had this meaning in Middle English. Etymonline explains the connection to boats: Use for "small boat" is first recorded 1670s, probably from a phrase similar to vessels of small craft and referring either to the trade they did or the ...


3

He played alone in his room. She was playing the violin. What synonym doesn’t require a preposition? How about fiddle, which, aside from its rather strong link to the violin, can also mean: pass time aimlessly, without doing or achieving anything of substance (NOAD) So: He fiddled alone in his room. She was fiddling. ...


2

Apparently, the "Superbas" name used for the Dodgers under the management of Ned Hanlon was a pluralized form of "Superba," a reference to an apparently somewhat well-known vaudeville production put on by the Hanlon brothers, an unrelated group of performers, acrobats, and inventors. I'm stumped as to any connection to the word "suburb" (beside a certain ...


2

It is a prefix that in some cases ( like today ) has survived from Middle English usage in words with reference to time meaning on ( this day): Today: Old English todæge, to dæge "on (this) day," from to "at, on" (see to) + dæge, dative of dæg "day" (see day). Meaning "in modern times" is from c. 1300. As a noun from 1530s. Generally written as two ...


2

The word derives from the Latin proprietas which not only had the meaning of property but also took on that word's aspect of particular ownership [1], i.e., peculiarity. (The same goes for "peculiarity" which is related to the Latin pecu, herd (of cattle), the very exemplar of property [2].) Both words took on the meaning of one's own particular behavior, ...


2

Edwin Ashworth's comment (which is beneath your question) sent me to the linked question, the answer to which in turn sent me to the following site: http://www.2wheels.org.uk/return/absent-antonyms.asp. "2wheels" published there his work in progress regarding missing antonyms, which is the term I believe you are looking for. The list (a work in progress) of ...


2

The verb escheat is used only in formal legal parlance, and goes back to old feudal law, It basically means to confiscate. Its etymology per the OED is: Etymology: Middle English eschete, < Old French eschete, eschaete, escheoite, noun of action (originally feminine past participle), < Old French escheoir (modern French échoir) < late Latin ...


2

OED gives the Scottish joukery-pawkery n. (clever trickery, jugglery, legerdemain) as the ultimate origin and the first usage is from 1686: Deil fetcht was it but Jewkrypawkry. G. Stuart Joco-serious Disc. 59 It can serve as roadside laughs as well: Image source: staff.co.nz


2

Vessels usually contain something, most often liquid, for the purpose of carrying it from one place to another. Blood vessels serve exactly this purpose for blood. I'm not very good at biology but still, this definition seems useful: In anatomy, any tube or canal, in which the blood and other humors are contained, secreted or circulated, as the ...


1

The blood in a human body is circulated by blood vessels, but it is also contained within the blood vessels. There is no other reservoir of blood. I suspect it is the latter that led to the use of vessels to refer to veins and arteries. From Oxford English Dictionary 1971: 1398 Veynes ben the vessels of blode. 1495 There is no more difference ...


1

A vessel originally is a ship (vascello in Italian) and ships were once the only way to carry goods in large quantities. In Marine Insurance in the City of London the following phrase is commonly used on Marine Policies (policies for any type of transport): "any one vessel". It follows the Sum Insured, for instance: US$ 10,000,000 any one vessel, any one ...


1

The Free Dictionary offers the following definition of digicam: digicam n. Informal A digital camera. However, the first occurrences of the word digicam in a Google Books search results use the term to refer to a TV videocamera for shooting videotape. Here is the Ngram chart for digicam for the period 1970–2005: The three earliest instances of ...


1

These two words aren't related; they have different roots from Greek and Latin. Superb uses the root super- while suburb uses the root sub-. Super- is for above while sub- is for below (See: List of Greek and Latin roots in English). The word suburb uses the sub and urb roots to make an under-city, or an outlying area of a city. The word superbas is still ...


1

It is an abbreviation of Staff Sergeant, also abbreviated as SSG in the U.S. Staff Sergeant is a rank and, due to its specificity, would be considered a compound noun. I would understand that, just as an acronym for a compound noun is not a compound noun itself, neither would the abbreviation for a compound noun be a compound noun.


1

"Screaming at the top of your lungs" - I believe you can only scream aloud, when your lungs are filled to capacity or "to the brim", and hence "at the top of your lungs". The 'soundness' of our voice is directly related to the 'power of our lungs'. As the air inside the lungs depletes, the pitch (of the sound) goes down. Although there could be no ...


1

The answers by Josh61 and FumbleFingers provide a solid baseline notion of when “state of the art” arose in three senses: “status of the art” (late nineteenth century, according to WorldWideWords, citing the OED, in Josh61’s answer); “current stage of development of a practical or technological subject” (1910, according to Wikipedia, also citing the OED, in ...


1

I think that Josh61 is on the right track with the idea that "Go suck an egg" may have begun as a dismissive insult back-formed from the adjective suck-egg. Here is the entry for suck-egg in Harold Wentworth, American Dialect Dictionary (1944): suck-egg, adj. Egg-sucking ; hence, & usu. mean, base; — used attrib. esp. in 'suck-egg dog' &, less ...



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