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From the quoted definitions at etymonline, I would suspect that you may be asking the wrong question :) If I look at the related words in other languages (dag, Tag) for day, it seems the final g has changed into a [j]. The same seems to have happened with (Dutch) leggen -> English lay. As it is normally pronunciation that defines spelling, and not the ...


7

I believe this comes from established patterns in spelling. If a word ends in a consonant, you could add -ly. (Nightly, hourly, promptly, quickly, etc.) If a word ends a consonant + y, one changes the y to i and adds the ending (-ly, -ness, etc.) Ready -> readi +ly/ness. Greedy -> greedi +ly/ness. Happy -> happi + ly/ness. When y is preceded by a vowel ...


5

"X, here we come" or "X, here I come" is a phrase meaning "We are/I am going to X". It pretends to be addressed to the place itself: Hey, Bora Bora, I'm coming to you! The important meaning here is that X is usually a luxurious place such as you'd visit for holidays or hope to live in after retirement. What the phrase is getting at is that the speaker is ...


3

Regarding how long a nap must last not to be a sleep, science tries to give us an idea: How to Take the Perfect Nap: Watch the time. The most beneficial naps during the day according to sleep experts are relatively short. This is because short naps only allow individuals to enter the first two stages of sleep. Once you enter slow wave sleep, it's much ...


2

There is really no other way that it should be pronounced. The initial G in Gnostic is silent to avoid pronouncing the word "guh-nostic." But it is not the permanent character of the G to be silent as others have pointed out. When the sound is found mid-word, the G is always voiced as in such words as AGNOSIA, AUTOGNOSIS, COSMOGNOSIS, COGNITION, ...


2

The phrasing 'toss in a canvas sheet' is confusing. What it is trying to convey is the formerly common activity of a group of people holding a stretched sheet of canvas on which another individual is lying. The group repeatedly throwing the person on the sheet into the air and then catching him or her. This was done usually as a playful activity but also as ...


2

Actually their use as synonyms appears to be still an issue: Usage Note: The distinction in meaning between healthy ("possessing good health") and healthful ("conducive to good health") was ascribed to the two terms only as late as the 1880s. This distinction, though tenaciously supported by some critics, is belied by citational evidence—healthy has been ...


2

I've found this: Fat City History – By Dan Ellis – The first phase of Lakeside Shopping Center became established in 1958-59 – Bob Spraque, architect. It was soon to become the anchor for the birthplace of numerous high-class lounges and happy-hour bars that would eventually be built. These were followed by apartment complexes that catered ...


2

Since I was getting a bit caught up in trying to write out some fairly complex things in comments to @medica’s answer, I am going to write it all out in a full answer here. Basically, there is a more or less regular variation in some words between final -y and non-final -i- (sometimes -ie) in English orthography. That means that when adding various suffixes ...


1

Kip and nap are the same. Kip is more like the informal version of nap in BrE. Snooze also means nap and is the informal version of nap in both AmE and BrE. When it comes to their history, snooze, according to the ODE, emerged in the late 18 century and is of unknown origin; nap comes from Old English hnappian, which might have originated from German. The ...


1

Fat City noun Slang. an easy and prosperous condition or circumstance: With a new house and a better-paying job, she's in Fat City. Also, fat city. Origin: 1960–65 [EDIT] As for why 'city,' Joe-ks has this to say under 'Phrases, Clichés, Expressions & Sayings,' though I'm not sure of the authenticity (Scroll down to 'Fat city'): ...


1

I found this version: Gin was called mother's ruin because in the mid eighteenth century the effects of gin on the family and economy were disastrous. Considered the poor man's drink due to its affordability, gin drinking had started out as medicine but due to its easy availability, men became impotent while women became sterile causing the London birth ...


1

The idea to explain the English word government or the French word gouvernement with Latin/Greek gubernare to govern and Latin mens/mentis mind is ridiculous. In Latin we have a lot of words with the suffix -men: flu-ere to flow and flu-men river. And we have a lot more words with the suffix -mentum as in funda-mentum. Nobody would dare to maintain that ...


1

In French there are two etymologically separate suffixes –ment. First there is –ment from Latin mente, the ablative of mēns “mind”. This is used in French to form adverbs from adjectives, like lentement “slowly”. Then there is –ment from Latin –mentum, which forms abstract nouns from verbs. This is not connected with the words for “mind” but derives from the ...


1

WiseGeek, the source of Benyamin Hamidekhoo's answer, rightly notes that both the pot and the kettle "turn black with use." That is, they start out a silvery or grayish or coppery color and gradually turn black through exposure to the heat and smoke of the fires or heating elements that they are set above. However, I disagree with WiseGeek's contention that ...


1

Google Books includes a book called "Principles & Practice of Ornamental or Complex Turning," first published in 1884, which uses the term to refer to the configuration of an "elliptical cutting frame." So the idea of "settings" as the configuration of a machine or device predates the electronics age. Before that, the most plausible derivation to ...


1

It was common in the 18th and 19th centuries to hold impromptu shooting matches where the target was simply a rag hung on a bush in the distance. A good shot would hit the rag, making it visibly jump. A great shot would literally “take the rag off the bush,” putting an end to at least that round of the contest with an overwhelming success. Making this ...


1

From the International French-English and English-French dictionary Editorial Critic of French Pronunciations PAUL PASSY: The words 'discomfit' and 'descomfiture' essentially have the same definition, and synonyms ...


1

I don't think there is any link between them other than knock = hit. "The Oxford English Dictionary traces the expression back as far as 1813 and says it’s of American origin. An OED citation from 1836 refers to slave women who are “knocked down by the auctioneer, and knocked up by the purchaser.” grammarphobia Knocked up in BE is just from knocking on the ...


1

This aggressive and carnivorous fish resides primarily in the shallow coral and rocky reefs along the Gulf of Mexico and throughout the Caribbean. Adults are easily identified by their cigar-shaped bodies, light green to white coloring with two black or dark purple stripes that run from the eye and pectoral fin to the base of the caudal fin. Like all ...


1

The OED has a reference from 1873. I sense it may have been widely used in the two wars to describe soldiers and airmen who lost their nerve. The OED shows the abbreviation LMF meaning 'low moral fibre', which sounds like a file annotation for a personnel record. moral fibre n. = moral courage n.; esp. in lack of moral fibre (abbreviated LMF). ...



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