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Perhaps rephrasing it as a question would sound less precipitous. (e.g. Have you had the opportunity/time to read/consider the email I sent you last Thursday? do you have any thoughts/feedback regarding its content?)


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By asking a prospective employer about his thoughts on an email you sent previously you may appear to be pushy. It depends on what was in the email. If the prospective employer asked for your input on something and you are responding, it would be appropriate to ask this. If instead you are inquiring about your resume or cover letter this may not be ...


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An example: Sir, could you please share your thoughts about the email that I sent you last Thursday? Thank you.


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I'm from the UK and I personally use 'Regards' on its own, like you. Even to somebody I don't know. That's usually for the initial contact type of email, when I'm first raising a subject with somebody. Subsequent responses tend to become less formal, with either a simple 'Thanks' or no ending at all. However, from your list above, I most often see 'Kind ...


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Dear Mr. John J. Smith or Dear Mr. John Smith. . In Britain, these are possible as a salutation: Dear Sir, Dear Mr (Dr, Professor, General, etc) Smith, Dear John . In certain male circles in the past, this was appropriate: Dear Smith, My dear Smith I doubt if anybody uses that form of address these days. . Most people consider this not ...


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If you want to be that formal , write him a letter and send it via the post office. For an email, you do not need an address lineā€”if you send it to his e-mail address, he will get it! Start off with Dear Mr/Professor/President/Whatever Smith:


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If it was a very formal email I would first write the person's name, ad designation, in full, and then address them Dear Mr, or Dear Ms etc. e.g. John J. Smith, Chief Education Officer, South Borsetshire Borough Council. Dear Mr Smith, This could be written Dear Sir, Dear Madam etc. as appropriate, depending on the level of formality.


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Well, the requested information sounds stilted to me (British English native speaker). I suggest: Open the email with a bit more than 'Hi'. E.g.: Hi, thanks for getting back to me. Rather than 'the requested information', use 'my phone number': My phone numbers are 0000000 (primary) and 0000000 (secondary). Conclude the email with a ...



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