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In exchanges with lawyers, potential employers and so forth, leave the onus of omitting greetings to the other party. Unless the other party has dropped the greeting, I would suggest erring on the side of formality and always including some kind of greeting, such as a simple "Hi John". The reason is that people react differently to the lack of greeting. ...


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I'm assuming from your examples that you have a given personal name of "Chee Lim", a family name of "Lim", prefer family name first ordering when using your real name, and use "Drew" as a nickname among anglophones. I'd suggest writing your family name in all capitals or smallcaps, while sticking to your preferred ordering. LIM Chee Lim As for the ...


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I suggest replacing "kindly" with "please" or using a "would you" construction instead. Can you please send me more information about the project? Would you (please) send me more information about the project? Or simply: Please send me more information about the project.


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Either would convey the meaning, but only the second one is unambiguous. Can you kindly send me more information about the project? Can be responded to (by someone in a bit of a strop) with 'Yes, I can, do you want me to ?' But Kindly send me more information about the project Is clearly a request that you want more information sent to you.


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The [Last/family name, First/given name] formulation is never used in English in this context. Here are the possibilities: Best Regards, John Smith or Best Regards, John H. Smith or Best Regards, J. Howard Smith or Best Regards, Howard Smith or Best Regards, Howard or Best Regards, John ...


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While this seems off topic for this site (as already mentioned by tchrist) the simple answer is that etiquette would have you list them by order of importance. Their names in alphabetical order is of no significance whatsoever and when formally addressing a crowd and introducing, guests of honor, or formally addressing a cabinet you should address them in ...


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It depends upon what you actually wish to thank her for. They're not the same thing. Thanking her for scheduling the meeting is just that. Performing a task that is part of her daily routine. It sounds like perfunctory or reflexive politeness, not recognizing any particular effort on her part. Thank you for accommodating our request sounds like she made ...


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Either answer is fine, but Thank you for accommodating our request is much more friendly than the first one, which is formal. It depends what approach or how familiar you are with the CEO/their secretary.


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This is more an etiquette question than an English question, but the rule is easy enough. When in doubt, be consistent. If you would address your supervisor as "Mr. X" in person, you should do so in an email as well. Conversely, if you would address them as "Y" in person, address them as "Y" directly as well. It is possible that your subject may have ...


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This is quite possibly a question of personal preferences....... My personal preference for replying to these informative emails is to simply reply with: Thanks for letting me know. If circumstances warrant it, I might add a I hope you get well soon / Enjoy your game of golf / I will forward you the minutes of the meeting. I sign off with my ...


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Formal template: Dear Bob, Yours of the 21st is at hand, concerning your planned absence from work on Friday the 26th. Please accept the heartfelt wishes for a safe and happy day off from Your most humble servant, [signature] Less formal template: OK. [no signature]



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