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I usually just use the words Hi All,


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Certainly it's grammatical, but does it make sense? If you can think of what is reported as being two events, one before this was written and then one as it was written, then it makes sense. Suppose the checking involved typing your name in a search box on the computer screen, and the resulting information is in view as this is written. Then the first ...


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If you say "saw", it hints that the situation may have changed since then. If you say "see/can see", it indicates that there is no change. Example "I looked at your account yesterday and saw that it was overdrawn. However, I looked again just a moment ago and see that today it is in credit."


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Context In very formal letters and emails a little extra courtesy goes a long way. Choosing between the succinct and polite "Please send XXX" and the longer but more courteous request "We would appreciate if you could send XXX" depends on what is being asked, and who the reader is. If you are asking a work colleague, choose the first; if you are asking an ...


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The words "can" and "could" / "will" and "would" can all be used to make requests I would suggest being more direct. "Would you please...", or "Please would you..." might work. "Would" generally sounds slightly more polite. If you wanted to get even more polite you could expand this to "Please would you mind... If it's a business email, be sure to ...


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Constructive Criticism: criticism or advice that is useful and intended to help or improve something, often with an offer of possible solutions I would appreciate any constructive criticism.


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"Openly" is definitely not right. I would go for "Am I missing something? Please be honest [or perhaps frank]."


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Forthright: Please be forthright in your response. Sincerely,        blah blah


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I understand what you wish to say by "openly". Here're some options: Kindly (or Please) be frank and let me know. Please feel free to share your thoughts (with me). I'd appreciate your outspokenness on this matter. Thanks for being straight with me. Be as straight as you'd like.


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The rule I've always followed is: When a word is used in place of a proper noun, capitalize. In this case, you are directly addressing "All," so I would capitalize: "Dear All."


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As when we write essay title we write this way like My Home, My Village. Starting a letter this way is rather informal, so there are no absolute rules. I'd favour Dear All. You might also consider things like Hello Everyone, To All Tenants, Please Note. so no problem if it starts with Dear All or Dear all.


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I like the simple, direct, but happy-sounding examples you use. As a professor, I am satisfied when students send replies such as those you have cited.


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I would suggest: "Thank you, I'm happy to rearrange." Or, "Thank you, when's best for you?" Or, "Not a problem, can we reconvene soon?"


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Thank you for your email - I'm happy to reschedule as you suggest.


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I would recommend "That works for me." or "That sounds good." I would say both of these are one "politeness-level" higher than the two phrases you mentioned. It's fine to use exclamation marks instead of periods here, too.


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I will back my statement up based on the fact that I have a bachelor's degree with a minor in English, and that I have a few grey hairs. We must keep in mind that there is no official sanctioning body that dictates how to use commas in a salutation that includes the word "Hello." In my years, I have come across many different interpretations on how to ...



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