Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

The first variant sounds a little warmer and more personal. The second one has a more formal tone. So your choice will probably depend mostly on how emotionally close you are to your coworker.


0

I think a more assertive and professional tone would be: I will be out of office on June 18th ( Wednesday). Please let me know if it causes any inconvenience to business operations. If such is the case, I can plan a different date. Or if you need that leave urgently and can not alter it under any circumstances, then do not leave the matter open for ...


1

I wouldn't capitalize "all". Collections aren't used as a proper noun. If you were to say, "Tell them to come here in 5 minutes.", you wouldn't capitalize "them". That being said, I really wouldn't start an email with "Hi, all". There's technically nothing wrong with it, but it feels odd.


0

ElendilTheTall has the exact answer. Just review what others have done addressing a similar set of stakeholders and copy the same. It is absolutely cultural. One interesting comment I once read is that emails should have no greeting at all - the addressees are in the "to" field. But I have never seen that followed in practice, except in a rapid-fire ...


1

I'd say go with a word implying their relationship to you like: Dear colleagues, Or something more general/common like: Dear everyone, "Hi" or "Hello" is only for informal, personal emails, not suitable for formal, work emails.


1

It really depends on your relationship with the people involved and the overall 'culture' in your workplace. If your work setting is informal and you are on a first name, friendly basis with everyone, 'Hi all' could conceivably be acceptable. However, if your relationship with any of them is more formal, I would suggest either a simple 'Hello' or maybe ...


1

By the way I forgot to add that... Forgot to mention that... .... is perfect for informal emails.


4

You can use either P.S. or N.B. For informal articles, P.S. is the apt choice. P.S. being post scriptum, and N.B. (nota bene) if it is something important you want to draw the reader's attention to. Source : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nota_bene http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post_script P.S. : In case of an email, the text can be altered, even if you ...


2

Often the best way to indicate that you have understood is to summarize in one sentence what your understanding will lead you to do next. e.g., "I understand. I will get back to you with the revisions you requested by Monday." or "I see. I will make sure to include or discuss your idea that .... in my next paper."


0

Understood, thanks. or I understand, thanks. Is clear, and polite.



Top 50 recent answers are included