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0

The problem is that you put an unnecessary "is" in your sentence, making it seem to you to be a question. If you omit the "is" and write simply "...to confirm that next week's training dates are going to be the same time as this week's:" then it would be clear to you it is not a question, but a statement; you want him to confirm what you ASSUME to be true. ...


2

As has already been stated, I believe this is more a matter of preference than a matter of correctness. However, my personal experience is that the more professional you want your email to look, the more you will tend to emulate established styles for letter formatting (often Block Format). Here is a link to a few other examples of letter formatting--none ...


3

Omitting the period after the sender's name will not raise any eyebrows and online searches reflect that it's the prevalent e-mail etiquette. E-mail punctuation in my opinion is more a matter of style choice than punctuation rules. Regards, Cristiano


0

1st version is correct, without period. Regards, Arsen Since there are no any general rules restricting the content or the formatting of the signature, I consider 'correct' to refer to the most frequently used and adopted by many legal entities style. See netiquette for some general info, but, again, no strict limitations.


-1

To reply or not is your prerogative. You can simply state "thank you!". Select "reply" and you can put the "thank you" in the subject line of the message after..... ..RE: Enjoy! - Thank you!, will do...or whatever.


1

"Enjoy!" is just common e-mail courtesy and generally doesn't need a response. If you feel the need to reply to the e-mail you should keep is just as succinct as theirs e.g. "Will do!".


1

Tell him that you're grateful for his kind offer but that won't be necessary. If pressed for a reason then say thanks again but you've already found an alternative solution to your problem, or you're now committed to an alternative supplier.


2

Merriam-Webster Online has a verb form of OK, and lists OK'd and OK'ing as inflections. I think it's common to use a apostrophe when inflecting initialism. Other dictionaries have similar entries.


3

I hear it a lot in conversation (in the USA). For example, forms I fill out may have to go to a manager to "get his OK". So it would not be at all unheard of for someone to ask me if said manager "has OKed" the paperwork. The act of doing so could certainly be called "OKing" the paperwork. Since I mostly hear it in conversation, the issue of how that is ...


2

It is appropriate to include one's preferred name on a résumé or other business correspondence. See this page. Many English speakers would have no idea how to pronounce "Minh" (or "Nguyen"). I would prefer Minh (Michael) Nguyen. This clearly tells me, a native English speaker, that I should address you as "Michael". If I have never met you, I appreciate ...


0

I received two phone calls recently from two non-native speakers, one from Poland and one from Pakistan. I wrote to them “Please call me Dick”, so they called me — on the phone. A non-native speaker myself, I have now switched to “Please call me by my first name.”


1

If his delay affected something on your side then you may write about the progress of last week and what was expected from him (a reply on time, in this case; but be polite about it). I could tell exact things to say, but I am not aware of the context. However, it is advisable to not to mention it until unless his delay has caused some problems on your ...



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