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22

First of all, although sometimes ellipsis is used to describe “conjunction reduction” I don’t agree with the analysis that describes coordination of lower-level constituents as ellipsis. Consider these examples: 1 a. [I want a dog] but [I don’t want a cat]    b. I [want a dog] but [don’t want a cat]    c. I want [a dog] ...


17

This is due to a phenomenon that occurs in intimate conversational spoken English called "Conversational Deletion". It was discussed and exemplified quite thoroughly in a 1974 PhD dissertation in linguistics at the University of Michigan that I had the honor of directing. Thrasher, Randolph H. Jr. 1974. Shouldn't Ignore These Strings: A Study of ...


14

Your daughter is correct: in standard British (or US) English, it should be “Yes, they do.” The key here is that do, not have, is the auxiliary verb. Have can sometimes be an auxiliary, but in this sentence it’s the main verb. So: “Do they like pizza?” “Yes, they do.” “Have they had lunch yet?” “Yes, they have.” “Do they have some?” ...


11

One generally does not place an ellipsis at the beginning of a quotation to indicate the omission of material, because it is usually evident (as in your example) that the quotation is only part of the original. However you should use an ellipsis if the words as they appear in your quotation could be mistaken for a complete sentence, but in the original are ...


10

You may read about the ellipsis in Wikipedia You will note that nowhere in that discussion does it mention that the ellipsis should be avoided due to rudeness. In fact most of the discussion there is about how to properly format the ellipsis rather than how to avoid it- This is telling in my book. I think that you should re-evaluate your reaction to the ...


8

It is a distinct punctuation mark, yes. It's not a matter of correct grammar though, but orthography. The widespread equivocation of the triple-period and ellipsis arose because typewriters had a limited selection of glyphs and typists were taught to use three periods to compose an ellipsis. This persists in manuscript and screenplay format standards. Prior ...


7

A legitimate use of dots is in a quotation from which a part is missing. This piece of punctuation is, as others have said, ellipsis and normally consists of three dots. The only place I have seen two dots is in quotations in the Oxford English Dictionary, where they are used to save space.


7

No, you would leave out the ellipses there. The Purdue OWL has a page about this; it lists this example: According to Foulkes's study, dreams may express 'profound aspects of personality'. Even if you aren't quoting Peter's remarks in their entirety, you don't need to use elipses, because your sentence is structured in a way that shows you are only ...


7

The standard indicator of missing content is [...], for example: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Phasellus condimentum commodo purus. Vestibulum eget adipiscing mi. Morbi in consequat urna. Vestibulum imperdiet ullamcorper risus vitae vulputate. [...] Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Phasellus ...


7

QUESTION: Can I say “Coming!” for “I am coming!”, and why? In some languages we can remove the subject (and sometimes a verb too) from a sentence. In Toy Story 3, the kid says "Coming!" instead of "I am coming!" to her mother. My questions are: 1.) Can I say "Coming!" instead of "I am coming!" in English? 2.) If I can, when can I ...


6

No, semicolon cannot be replaced from ellipsis because they have completely different purposes. Ellipsis is used to indicate the intentional omissions of words in a sentence to indicate that a list goes beyond those items actually spelled out in the text to indicate the hesitation in someone's speaking In such cases, a semicolon is never used.


6

This is a matter of pure style. I've worked in houses where the style sheet called for spaces before and after points of ellipsis, and in other shops where you close up the spaces fore and aft. What matters most is being consistent once you've selected one style or the other. My preference is for the Chicago Manual of Style method, which closes up the ...


6

As far as I know, double dots isn't actually an established punctuation mark (unlike the three-dot ellipsis) but you can see it a lot in informal written online communications. I think that it comes from overuse of the ellipsis. The ellipsis is overused in emails/facebok statuses/chats because it's a rather vague and unspecific mark when people sort of ...


6

Yes, the formally correct way to indicate that you have changed a direct quotation is by using brackets, but I would use them around the whole word you changed, like so: "Our approach ... [uses] blah blah blah." As StoneyB points out in the comments below, some styles prefer you to put the "..." in brackets as well, so it's clear that they weren't part ...


6

The correct expansion of the phrase is not "It's better (to) call Saul", what it means is "You had better call Saul". Looking up better in the dictionary, it offers some phrases, one of which is: had better do something would find it wiser to do something; ought to do something: you had better be careful. And later in the usage notes: usage: In ...


5

The sentences in your examples are examples of Zeugma, and reading that Wikipedia article will be a good start toward learning to write your own. This may inspire you to study rhetoric in general, including other forms of ellipsis and parallelism. A full course on the subject is well beyond the scope of this site, but I hope these pointers are of use.


5

In your examples, (1) is known as VP ellipsis and (2) is VP elision (although, not correctly formed: it should be 'He asked me to go, but I don't want to do so.'). Both are phenomena found in other languages, but are particularly prevalent in English (both British and American). As a linguist, I should point out that both forms are 'correct'; correctness is ...


5

The implicit verb is simply “be”: Some symbols acquire a multitude of meanings, some [of which] [are] widely shared [meanings], others [of which] [are] personal [meanings], [and] some [of which] [are] contradictory, conflicted, or ambivalent [meanings]. This is a common structure to describe different parts of a subject with different adjectives, ...


5

An ellipsis indicates either a pause or that something is missing, whereas a semi-colon is used as punctuation to join two clauses. So you would use an ellipsis in a sentence like this: I went out to buy a ... what is that thing called? In this case, the ellipsis is indicating a pause while they consider the name of the thing they purchased. A semi-colon ...


5

When I quote a long passage I might elide some irrelevant parts, and in their place I put ellipses. For example, When I quote a long passage, like when I quote from an old email or when I quote from a taxation bill to illustrate a nuanced legal point, I might elide some irrelevant parts, and in their place I put ellipses. becomes When I quote a ...


5

Your two quotes don't actually have the same meaning. "I'm not living there!" is close to "I refuse to live there", while "I'm not going to be living there" is a prediction. Technically, the first is "I will not live there", while the second is "I shall not live there", but I doubt whether many people these days appreciate the difference, particularly with ...


5

Yes, you do put a space in front of three of them, but not in front of four of them. The open questions are whether to use three or four, and whether to put spaces not just fore or aft, but between them. The short answers to those two questions are respectively that you use four without a leading no-break space if it is the end of a sentence, and that ...


5

Recast them as declarative sentences: It is a good time to call you [at four o'clock]. [Four o'clock] is a good time to call you. In the first version, the question word corresponds to a temporal adjunct, while in the second the question word corresponds to the subject.


5

He is making a little joke, and treating p's and q's as possessives. He is saying that "Mind your p's and q's" is missing the noun that your p and q have. "Mind your p's and q's descender," for example. [A descender is the part of the letter below the baseline it sits on.] He is not commenting on the sentence overall, and you don't need "need them" after ...


5

No, Better call Saul is exactly the way it is said. That is because it was created to fit one specific situation and is understood by all Breaking Bad fans as exactly in it's correct context. To change it would be to lose its connotation immediately. This is a case of context, not grammar. Got busted with a kilo of meth? Better call Saul! Looking at ...


4

You may be governed in your typing by what is most convenient; it's largely irrelevant, because the final decision rests with your publisher. Academic publishers will impose the standards defined in the style manual adopted by your discipline, other publishers will have their own house standards. And unless you are deliberately employing a non-standard ...


4

Square brackets are used in quotes to mark information that was not in the original quote. This applies equally to added words and omitted words. Compare I wonder... who did that? and I wonder [...] who did that? In the first, the speaker is pondering something; the question is somewhat rhetorical. In the second, the question is literal. Edit: ...



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