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38

This is due to a phenomenon that occurs in intimate conversational spoken English called "Conversational Deletion". It was discussed and exemplified quite thoroughly in a 1974 PhD dissertation in linguistics at the University of Michigan that I had the honor of directing. Thrasher, Randolph H. Jr. 1974. Shouldn't Ignore These Strings: A Study of ...


22

First of all, although sometimes ellipsis is used to describe “conjunction reduction” I don’t agree with the analysis that describes coordination of lower-level constituents as ellipsis. Consider these examples: 1 a. [I want a dog] but [I don’t want a cat]    b. I [want a dog] but [don’t want a cat]    c. I want [a dog] ...


18

The sequence of "dots" to which you refer are called an ellipsis. Although it's common to write it as three periods ..., note that strictly it's a special typographic character …. A proper ellipsis is always three dots, no more, no less. Different style guides have different guidelines. If you are writing for a specific publication, use what is in their ...


16

Your daughter is correct: in standard British (or US) English, it should be “Yes, they do.” The key here is that do, not have, is the auxiliary verb. Have can sometimes be an auxiliary, but in this sentence it’s the main verb. So: “Do they like pizza?” “Yes, they do.” “Have they had lunch yet?” “Yes, they have.” “Do they have some?” ...


11

This is a matter of pure style. I've worked in houses where the style sheet called for spaces before and after points of ellipsis, and in other shops where you close up the spaces fore and aft. What matters most is being consistent once you've selected one style or the other. My preference is for the Chicago Manual of Style method, which closes up the ...


11

One generally does not place an ellipsis at the beginning of a quotation to indicate the omission of material, because it is usually evident (as in your example) that the quotation is only part of the original. However you should use an ellipsis if the words as they appear in your quotation could be mistaken for a complete sentence, but in the original are ...


10

According to Grammar Girl, several style guides support the use of ellipses to indicate a pause (the relevant paragraph can be found under the header The E-mail Ellipsis). She quotes from the Chicago Manual of Style that "Ellipsis points suggest faltering or fragmented speech accompanied by confusion, insecurity, distress, or uncertainty." I would ...


10

A legitimate use of dots is in a quotation from which a part is missing. This piece of punctuation is, as others have said, ellipsis and normally consists of three dots. The only place I have seen two dots is in quotations in the Oxford English Dictionary, where they are used to save space.


10

You may read about the ellipsis in Wikipedia You will note that nowhere in that discussion does it mention that the ellipsis should be avoided due to rudeness. In fact most of the discussion there is about how to properly format the ellipsis rather than how to avoid it- This is telling in my book. I think that you should re-evaluate your reaction to the ...


10

For these to be correct you must be able to attach the subject to both of the phrases surrounding the coordinating conjunction individually, as you stated. There is no reason for a sentence to not be correct if it follows this rule. I [worked] and [did not play]. I [worked] and [not played]. The first sentence is correct because you can split ...


9

Ellipses have only one place in most formal writing: inside a direct quote. Then they have two uses: to reporting halting speech, and if you omit some words. But in the latter case they should be used only in non-controversial cases, as they can easily be used to subvert the original author/speaker's meaning (for example "these are... the droids you are ...


8

Square brackets are used in quotes to mark information that was not in the original quote. This applies equally to added words and omitted words. Compare I wonder... who did that? and I wonder [...] who did that? In the first, the speaker is pondering something; the question is somewhat rhetorical. In the second, the question is literal. Edit: ...


8

As far as I know, double dots isn't actually an established punctuation mark (unlike the three-dot ellipsis), but you can see it a lot in informal written online communications. I think that it comes from overuse of the ellipsis. The ellipsis is overused in emails/Facebook statuses/chats because it's a rather vague and unspecific mark when people sort of ...


8

It is a distinct punctuation mark, yes. It's not a matter of correct grammar though, but orthography. The widespread equivocation of the triple-period and ellipsis arose because typewriters had a limited selection of glyphs and typists were taught to use three periods to compose an ellipsis. This persists in manuscript and screenplay format standards. Prior ...


8

I would use the word "elide", meaning to omit. It's usually used for spoken language (as in "midwestern US speakers frequently elide the 'g' in gerunds like 'running'), but can be used for written language as well.


8

QUESTION: Can I say “Coming!” for “I am coming!”, and why? In some languages we can remove the subject (and sometimes a verb too) from a sentence. In Toy Story 3, the kid says "Coming!" instead of "I am coming!" to her mother. My questions are: 1.) Can I say "Coming!" instead of "I am coming!" in English? 2.) If I can, when can I remove ...


8

It's a feature of a lot of texts exhibiting frozen style. It's a highly predictable and regular style found in newspaper headlines, signs, notices, instructions, lab reports, technical reports, legal documents, public declarations and so forth. In this kind of style in certain text-types, auxiliary verbs are regularly omitted when we can recover them from ...


7

The technique you are using is actually called aposiopesis. It's when you pause in a sentence for an effect. There are two ways of doing an aposiopesis, using an ellipsis or an em dash. However, when using ellipsis for aposiopesis after abbreviations, could be quite tricky. Ellipsis when used at an end of a sentence always have four dots, three-dot ...


7

I agree with ShreevatsaR, but I would also suggest that you could also provide a small bit of linking text, like so: "Blah blah blah blah blah blah blah. Blah blah blah blah blah blah blah. Blah blah blah blah blah blah blah. Blah blah blah blah blah blah blah. Blah blah blah blah blah blah blah." Further on, he elaborated on the point: "Blah ...


7

You can use an ellipsis, typeset on a line by itself (or paragraph). The first paragraph of the quotation. […] The third paragraph of the quotation.


7

The "implied" subject is a common feature of conversation and some writing, especially fiction (not necessarily limited to dialogue). Where the subject is clear, it is frequently omitted. This is a form of ellipsis. Great. [For "That's great."] Such a waste. [For "That is such a waste."] Coming! [For "I'm coming."] There are many more. In each case,...


7

Most writers would use a comma in OP's example, not an ellipsis. So the issue wouldn't arise there anyway. Probably the writer intended "Okay...blah blah" to make the reader "internally vocalise" it as "Okaaaaaay, blah blah". In general, it really depends on whether you consider the ellipsis represents an "empty" pause at the end of a preceding sentence. If ...


7

No, you would leave out the ellipses there. The Purdue OWL has a page about this; it lists this example: According to Foulkes's study, dreams may express 'profound aspects of personality'. Even if you aren't quoting Peter's remarks in their entirety, you don't need to use elipses, because your sentence is structured in a way that shows you are only ...


7

Yes, you do put a space in front of three of them, but not in front of four of them. The open questions are whether to use three or four, and whether to put spaces not just fore or aft, but between them. The short answers to those two questions are respectively that you use four without a leading no-break space if it is the end of a sentence, and that ...


7

The standard indicator of missing content is [...], for example: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Phasellus condimentum commodo purus. Vestibulum eget adipiscing mi. Morbi in consequat urna. Vestibulum imperdiet ullamcorper risus vitae vulputate. [...] Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Phasellus ...


7

An ellipsis is used in a quote to convey that the speaker trails off. An em dash is used in a quote to convey that the speaker is cut off, even if the speaker cuts him/herself off, as is the case in your second example. Source: https://nhwn.wordpress.com/2011/09/13/grammar-ease-ellipsis-versus-the-em-dash/


6

No, semicolon cannot be replaced from ellipsis because they have completely different purposes. Ellipsis is used to indicate the intentional omissions of words in a sentence to indicate that a list goes beyond those items actually spelled out in the text to indicate the hesitation in someone's speaking In such cases, a semicolon is never used.


6

The sentences in your examples are examples of Zeugma, and reading that Wikipedia article will be a good start toward learning to write your own. This may inspire you to study rhetoric in general, including other forms of ellipsis and parallelism. A full course on the subject is well beyond the scope of this site, but I hope these pointers are of use.



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