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I'm not clear about what phonetic difference you think there is between vowel+glide and diphthong (I don't think there is such a difference), but I have a guess. C.-J. Bailey described a distinction in his and other Southern dialects between Maya, the Indian people of central America, and Maya, the name of the poet Maya Angelou. According to Bailey, it's a ...


2

Sure, you should practice pronouncing the diphthongs (and trifthongs as well) correctly. Try phonetics practice exercises. American English Diphthongs by Rachel's English Listening to your own speech when you repeat after a native speaker record and try to repeat as close to the native speech as possible is very helpful. Actually, many people who ...


0

It isn't obvious, but this is a duplicate of a question I answered a few days ago, here: Why the extra syllable?. It's not obvious, and supposing I've correctly understood this question, because (1) the glides [j]/[w] of this question were there all along, and just become more obvious when the following [l] is syllabified, and (2) the syllabicity of the [l] ...


3

Simple answer: no. There is no phonological rule that I’m aware of that requires ‘doubling’ any final glides (or making a diphthongal offglide out of a long monophthong) in any variety of English. It’s certainly true, however, that many speakers (not just of American English, but also of other dialects) add a brief [ə] between any high vowel and an [ɫ], but ...



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