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21

Spelling Canadian English tends to combine aspects of American and British spelling. Here are some highlights: Some nouns take -ice/-ence while matching verbs take -ise/ense. eg. practise / practice and license / licence Canadians tend to use the British -our ending rather than -or in some words like colour, flavour, labour, neighbour. Generally, words ...


16

Coke is pronounced /kəʊk/ in British English and /koʊk/ in American English. Cock is pronounced /kɒk/ in British English and /kɑk/ in American English. As you can see, it is the vowel sounds that are different. The two sounds are distinguished in two ways: (1) by one being a diphthong and the other being a monophthong, (the vowel sound changes quality in a ...


16

From what I understand, hour, fire, hire, layer, rhythm, etc., are all examples of words which are not easily classifiable. But, according to this linguist, Hour and fire are generally considered to be monosyllabic words containing a triphthong. Wikipedia further confirms this in a couple of its articles. Triphthong (WP): English in British ...


13

Certainly the i in words like bite and fright represents an /aɪ/ diphthong. Phonemically, I come up with these: /aɪ/ as in price, my, high, flight, mice /aʊ/ as in mouth, now, trout /eɪ/ as in face, date, day, they, grey, pain, reign /ɔɪ/ as in choice, boy, hoist /oʊ/ as in goat, toe, tow, soul, rope, cold /juː/ as in cute, few, dew, ewe /jə/ as in onion, ...


13

No. There are no rules for how to pronounce the letter Y -- or rather there are too many rules, and none of them work. Similarly, there are also no good rules for how to pronounce any other letter of the English alphabet. Modern English spelling does NOT represent pronunciation in Modern English. Rather, it represents one spelling (there were many) for ...


12

The directly analogous term is indeed consonant cluster, a combination of consonant sounds that appear together. It is possible that you are thinking of a digraph, which however is two characters representing a single sound, rather than a blending of adjacent sounds as with a dipthong or consonant cluster. For example, the ch in church or the sh in hashish ...


12

I know nothing about Haiku, but I can tell you some general things to think about in terms of the syllable in general. Unfortunately, the syllable is one of those concepts that is difficult to define precisely and uncontroversially in terms of its details, depsite it being one of the few phonological phenomena that your "average" speaker has a good degree ...


11

It rhymes with "poke" and "joke", not "pock" and "jock". It's a long o sound. Or you could just switch to Pepsi.


10

Looking at the Etymonline entry: c.1200, from O.E. ege (Mercian), eage (W. Saxon), from P.Gmc. *augon the g in Old English ege would be the voiced velar fricative /ɣ/. This sound does not exist in modern English as it was palatalised to /ʝ/ and later became /j/, which we usually write with y.


10

This is a huge question. Canadian English has many differences from American English. But it also has many differences from British English. Spelling tends to favour the British way, such as putting the U in favour. Except for words that Americans end in -ize instead of ise; in that case Canadians often use -ize. Much of the word choice is closer to ...


9

Not that everything I learned in school was true, but I remember being taught that most dictionaries – at least print dictionaries – broke words into syllables, and this was one of those things that dictionaries were useful for. So, one could always count the number of •'s, and add one, and get the number of syllables in a word: One dictionary's own ...


8

I believe this is called Canadian Raising. Canadian raising is a phonetic phenomenon that occurs in varieties of the English language, especially Canadian English, in which certain diphthongs are "raised" before voiceless consonants (e.g., /p/, /t/, /k/, /s/, /f/). /aɪ/ (the vowel of "eye") becomes [ʌɪ] or [ɐɪ], while the outcome of /aʊ/ (the vowel of ...


8

(See Semivowels in English and When is Y a vowel? for relevant info) The sounds represented by the letter 'w' in English spelling are somewhat intermediate between consonants and vowels. Sometimes it is closer to a consonant (namely a semivowel or glide because even though 'w' doesn't result in a substantive occlusion in the airstream, there is a ...


7

Examples within a single morpheme exist (e.g., pIAno, & nAIve), and across morpheme boundaries, it would be very common (e.g., gOIng). These are not diphthongs because the two vowels occur in different syllables.


7

Both spelling and pronunciation are reasonably regular. The word is from Mercian ēge [e:ɣe] (West Saxon ēage). In Middle English the [ɣ] became [j], and the combination [e:j] developed into the diphthong [eɪ]. In later Middle English this diphthong was monophthongized to [i:], which developed into modern [aɪ] in the course of the Great Vowel Shift. The later ...


6

There are really only two phonemic variants here: First syllable is /tu:/ First syllable is /tju:/ The variation between these two forms is an instance of the widespread idiosyncratic insertion of /j/ before /u:/ in many English dialects. Another common word with this variation is tune, which is pronounced both as /tu:n/ and /tju:n/. Generally both ...


5

The "other stackexchange post" is wrong on two counts. First, as you point out, there are plenty of words of Greek origin where it is pronounced /aɪ/, such as most words containing "phyto-". Secondly, there are plenty of words of Greek origin where it is pronounced /ɪ/ (like "pin"), for example in "syzygy", where for me the first two vowels both rhyme ...


5

In most dialects of American English, vowels are shorter before unvoiced consonants. If this is what you're hearing, then in your dialect the length difference seems to have induced a change in the quality of the diphthong as well. I believe that in some dialects, this determines whether long o and long a are diphthongs or not. To find a minimal pair, ...


4

It's nothing to do with whether the letter "r" is enunciated. It's just a matter of the vowel sound, which I personally would say is a triphthong, though others might argue they don't accept that term at all, and simply call it a diphthong For the purposes of poetry, singing, etc., it's largely a matter of choice and circumstance whether you say these ...


4

Here you can find a chart of the 44 English phonemes. Here you can find a chart of the eight diphthongs. Clicking on each one will get you a huge list of examples. /eɪ/ as in day, pay, say, lay. (Examples) /aɪ/ as in sky, buy, cry, tie. (Examples) /ɔɪ/ as in boy, toy, coy or the first syllable of soya. (Examples) /ɪə/ in beer (the drink), pier, hear. ...


4

IPA isn't that difficult to decipher, is it? hour /ou(ə)r/ (one syllable) hour /aʊər, ˈaʊər/ (one or two syllables, one being preferred)


3

The vowel y has three predominant sounds, and they mimic the long and short sounds of the vowel i, and the long sound of the vowel e. Examples of the long i sound: cry, sty, dye, type, pylon, hyphen, cycle, hyperbole, xylophone. Examples of the short i sound: gym, hymn, cynic, lynx, crystal, typical, syllable, homonym. When the y is pronounced ...


3

In Australian English, I hear /tʃuz/ (chooze). In British, /tyuz/. In American dialects, thanks to yod-dropping, you hear /tuz/. In some dialects, you can hear a diphthong /iu/, which sounds similar to /yu/.


3

The /oʊ/ dipthong is the one heard in most American pronunciations of the GOAT lexical set, so also in words like no, toe, tone, so, sew, boat, soap, tow, soul, sold, roll, cold, folk, polka. In some speakers, the /ʊ/ rounding may be less noticeable in non-terminals like soap than in terminals like sew. See here for a very basic treatment. See here for a ...


3

I would pronounce this with two syllables: Ow - Err Ymmv


3

People who are born to power Lack the time to spare an hour Smelling rose or other flower, Be it sweet or be it sour. Since those lines of trochaic tetrameter all rhyme with each other on the last foot, hour needs must contain two syllables. The stanza is 8/8/8/8 by syllables, with rhyme scheme AAAA. Here is a different illustration of the same ...


2

It depends on your dialect. Dictionary.com lists your first two choices, as well as another pronunciation of day: /ˈtuzdeɪ, -di, ˈtyuz-/ (four possibilities - tooz-day, tyooz-day, tooz-dee, and tyooz-dee). "Correct" is relative. If your dialect pronounced Tuesday choose-day, it would be considered correct by those used to the dialect. The only thing ...



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