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6

The only one that fits grammatically is should. Another idiomatic possibility is to insert no word at all - It is essential that the documents be destroyed immediately. Ought to be, would and had better cannot be qualified by it is essential that... If something ought to be done it ought to be done. It is not gradable and subject to essentiality ...


4

Etiquette is following rules that govern behavior- it might be the reason that causes you to behave a certain way. Courtesy is behaving in a way that benefits others- it means thinking of the effect of your behavior. Your manner is how you behave, regardless of the cause or the effect. Definitions from Collins Online Dictionary: Etiquette: the customs ...


3

That would mean that you wish you knew what caused the stock. The word you're looking for is affect, you wish you knew what caused variance, or vicissitudes in the stock market, am I right? Affect (verb): "have an effect on; make a difference to." Effect (verb): "cause (something) to happen; bring about." "I am greatly distraught inasmuch as I can't ...


3

Words that can be used as prepositions take part in many idiomatic usages in English. That means that rational analysis won't tell you why they're used as they are; you just have to memorize these usages. First of all, as you noted, sometimes prepositions double up. For instance you can say I went to the store with her where with means accompanying, ...


3

If a person hints it is always intentional and delivering the hint is usually their primary goal. If a person implies something what they say suggests an interpretation but doesn't state it explicitly. Implications are usually not the primary goal and can also be unintentional. Typically in American English you would hear "are you implying that I'm fat?" ...


2

I would prefer "...now is working as intended." or "...now is working as designed." The potential problem with as expected is that someone might expect it to fail. EDIT: To address your comment, I think that "as intended" and "as designed" are interchangeable in this context. However, you might use both words just to avoid the repetition of designed. ...


1

It depends on the context. Could is used for past and future instances, or sometimes in the present tense (although in the present tense it is normally describing a possibility or is part of a question). For example, She spoke so fast that I could not hear her, or, he could do it if he chooses to. In the present, we use can. If this is in the present ...


1

'Despite' as a preposition, a noun, and a verb The three answers from 2010 pay little or no attention to the fact that despite can function as either a preposition or a noun—although RegDwigнt does cite Etymonline as observing that "The preposition [despite] (early 15c.) is short for in despite of (late 13c.)" In the phrase "in despite of," despite is a ...


1

As a Brit I can see the confusion. A lot depends on intonation when uttering the sentence. It is partly archaic and you would not use the expression often in colloquial circumstances - but it is a polite form, if you intonate correctly. If you were to "announce" using the phrase, offering the air of being emphatic you could well sound pompous as if you ...


1

I should say: I have never understood a word of what Alice has said. meaning I never understood any of the words. otherwise John might say: I never understood a word that Alice has said. and Paul might reply: Oh? What word was that? Alternatively, if I no longer speak to her I never understood a word of what Alice said.


1

In this particular context, ago and before are pretty much synonymous. In general, ago is an absolute value, while before is relative, in a sense. For example, if today is July 4, and you tell someone you saw them two days ago, that means you saw them on July 2. If you tell them you saw them "two days before today," that means the same thing. But if you ...


1

This is a very interesting question. Matter and antimatter when combined create energy, but they are not the only ways of creating energy so not sure if that answers your question?


1

It's not exactly English, nor is it an English concept, but the Chinese duality of yin and yang might be the nearest to what you need. Yin Yang according to the Chinese lies beneath all reality and is the root of much of their sciences.



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