Hot answers tagged

5

"Spread" and "get" are infinitives, so not in the present tense, and they should stay that way => to help + inf. Your sentence can indeed be read that way: "who helped spread the word and helped get people to..."


2

Get and got both work here but require the sentence to be parsed differently. What your copy-writer apparently intended was for the sentence to be parsed like this: Our small initiative turned into a sizeable movement with the support of influencers, who helped(a) spread the wordand [helped](b) get people to make a pledge by greenifying their Facebook ...


2

"I have made" is the present tense: you are describing the present, and in that present there exists a situation where there are some decisions that you have made, which are now in the past. "I made ..." is the past tense: this is more simple, you're just describing what happened in the past. There may not be any difference between these two in terms of ...


1

The most important word here is probably 'today'. That gives what you say a precision in time that is more fundamental than the difference in the tenses. So long as 'today' is there the two statements are virtually identical and both will work. English is often imprecise about time, with overlapping tenses, so a precise term like 'today' will nail things ...


1

As illogical as it seems, "We got on the bus downtown" often means: "We got on the bus (that goes) downtown." For example - if we start with the premise that a conversation is taking place regarding a concert in Central Park, (uptown, NYC) the conversation may go as follows: "How did you get to the concert?" "We got on the bus downtown." (We were ...


1

Actually they are not the same: accumulation refers to the simple process of gathering but concentrate refers to the result of having a purer liquid


1

Merriam-Webster Unabridged notes that elegancy is "usually used in plural." While elegance has a perfectly valid plural (Macmillan states that the noun form is uncountable, while M-W Unabridged does not), choosing one over the other is likely a matter of which sounds more mellifluous in a particular circumstance: I flatter myself that we've always ...


1

Since the sentence is in past tense, shouldn't "get" be "got"? The word "got" is indeed the simple past tense of "to get", but you need to analyze the sentence a bit more deeply. How is "get" used there? In fact, it is the bare infinitive, as @MorganFR observed. Infinitives function as nouns, and do not change tense. The verb in the sentence is ...


1

The comments from Phil Sweet and sumelic match my intuitive sense of the words and the definitions in my dictionary (Summary: impair = to weaken; impede = to obstruct). It's a clean distinction in theory. A car that is blocked by a boulder in the road is clearly impeded and not impaired. But in practice, I think it can be muddy, esp. as you get more ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible