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5

"I don't know" is just a statement of fact. "I wouldn't know" is often used when the speaker has no reason to know, for example, "I wouldn't know, I don't work here". Sometimes it just comes down to regional differences though; here in Ireland, for example, it's quite common to here people say "I wouldn't know" when they really just mean "I don't know".


5

They are synonyms, but that doesn't mean they are exactly the same. According to Dictionary.com, Sure, certain, confident, positive indicate full belief and trust that something is true. Sure, certain, and positive are often used interchangeably. Sure, the simplest and most general, expresses mere absence of doubt. Certain suggests that there are ...


4

According to the The Oxford Guide to Style British usage of single vs double inverted commas differs from the US one: Quotation marks, also called 'inverted commas', are of two types: single and double. British practice is normally to enclose quoted matter between single quotation marks, and to use double quotation marks for a quotation within a ...


4

Likely not. Here's a rundown of the commonly accepted account of each word: Illicit 'Illicit', like 'elicit' has Latin origins. The original Latin derivative is 'illicitus' meaning il- (not) -licitus (allowed) or simply 'not allowed' (and its a second declension adjective if you'd like to know). We might with more accuracy, considering connotations and ...


3

The phrase older people is a euphemism for old people.


2

No, there is no distinction between 'mail and 'post' in British English. 'Post' is used wherever 'mail' would be used in American English. 'Mail' is going to be understood by almost everyone, but 'post' is the common usage. Post boxes are never referred to as 'posts'. Posts are tall thin things stuck in the ground


2

"coding serb" is confusing as a title (eg a nickname) because it has multiple meanings: it could mean a) "someone who is programming for the serb programming language" (this may or may not exist but the phrase can be parsed this way regardless) - like "coding javascript". b) "a serb, ie someone from Serbia, who is coding at the moment", which i assume is ...


2

"I don't know" simply asserts lack of knowledge. "I wouldn't know" usually also implies that there is some reason why the person is the wrong person to ask a question of that sort. "Can you tell me where the nearest Chase Bank branch is?" "I wouldn't know. I'm visiting from Iceland."* "I wouldn't know" is also sometimes used in contexts where the speaker ...


1

They're both acceptable, and largely interchangeable. In this case, there's a slight difference of emphasis in that growing up shows more interest in the process, and grow up more interest in the result. So the former means the pleasure would come from seeing the "guys" as they grew and learnt new things, while the latter refers more to the pleasure of ...


1

The usual idioms are I had a dream, or I saw in a dream (e.g.the coronation of Donald Trump as King of America). We wouldn't say I saw a dream. Some abstract nouns can be the object of see used metaphorically e.g. I saw happiness, but a dream like a thought is not one of them.


1

You understanding seems to be confused due to a lack of connection with the geometry involved; fill here is suggestive of colouring in, rather than filling with water. You are referring to a 2d plane, the rectangle; thus it is an area and not a volume. The padding is also a two dimensional addition to the box-plane, created by the padding rules, however they ...


1

Here is the design intent of fill_parent and match_parent, taken from your link: Special value for the height or width requested by a View. FILL_PARENT means that the view wants to be as big as its parent, minus the parent's padding, if any. Special value for the height or width requested by a View. MATCH_PARENT means that the view wants to be as ...


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A co-founder can never be the subordinate of the founder. They are of equal stature and are peers. The sentence "A is the founder and B is the [only] co-founder" is not wrong, but try using "A and B are co-founders" or "both A and B are founders of the company". Hope it helps.


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Here are two relevant meanings of the prefix co- in Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003): 3 a : one that is associated in an action with another : fellow : partner {coauthor} {coworker} b : having a usu. lesser share in duty or responsibility : alternate : deputy {copilot} It should be evident from the examples given that, in the ...


1

Sure and confident are very similar -- in fact, the first word in the first definition in The Free Dictionary (TFD) for sure is confident. According to The Free Dictionary, in discussing the definition and synonyms of sure: definition of sure: Confident, as of something awaited or expected: I am sure we will win the game. As a synonym for sure, TFD ...



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