Hot answers tagged

29

I would suggest a deep (if applicable) or serious wound. EDIT: I wasn't sure about the Ngram link to I attached it as picture, it can be clicked and enlarged. The original ngram is over here: Google Ngram Link for the statistic


17

Yes, you can describe a wound as "heavy." Google Ngram shows hundreds of examples of "heavy" being used to describe "wound" this way. In fact, there's even an English proverb that says, "A light hand makes a heavy wound." It figuratively refers to the devastation a woman can wreak on a man's heart. Some examples (emphasis added): From Crime on the Solent:...


4

"Heavy" shouldn't be used as an adjective for the wound, since "heavily" is an adverb meaning "to a large or serious degree". "heavy" and "heavily" are actually completely seperate words, with an obvious shared root. http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/heavily You would most commonly describe the wound as "serious" or "very serious", with ...


4

That's just how some idomatic expressions work. In English, it is sometimes used as a subject, as in it's raining, it's sunny, it's warm. Of course it would be possible to say rain is falling, the sun is shining, the weather is warm, and sometimes people do say that. Most commonly, though, people tend to use the shorter, familiar idioms. About rain is ...


4

The word log originated from its usage in 'Ship Log Book', which originally referred to the book for recording readings from the 'Chip Log' (apparatus containing an actual wooden log, giving it the name). The usage of word log thus is more accurate when used for maintaining well defined records in a more or less scientific way to potentially derive specific ...


3

A wound can be addressed as a heavy wound. It means a very deep or life-threatening injury. We can also address a wound as: a fatal wound One of the heads of the beast seemed to have had a fatal wound, but the fatal wound had been healed. The whole world was filled with wonder and followed the beast. a mortal wound One of its heads seemed to ...


3

Merriam-Webster's New International Dictionary, Second Edition (M.W.N.I.D 2) with a copyright date of 1953 does have such a sense of the word, but it marks it as obsolete. (Obs.) Since; considering that; inasmuch as. B. While on the other hand. However, what I think they meant is that it means whereas, which Oxford Dictionaries Online marks as ...


3

While you can say "heavy wound," as a native speaker I've never heard it used that way except poetically, archiacally, or in relation to an emotional rather than literal wound. In contrast, "heavily wounded" is idiomatic. Odd, but language is odd. Note that if someone is heavily wounded, it doesn't necessarily mean that there is one "heavy" wound. When I ...


3

Some more Ngrams if you already haven't had enough: "adjective + wound" It's certainly possible to use 'heavy + wound'. Are there worse options? Yes. Are there better options? I would say yes, because 'heavy' is sort of a vague descriptor for a 'wound'. It's the most idiomatic of the options to be sure. But 'he has a heavy wound' just doesn't sound as ...


2

It depends on the register you're writing in. If it's relatively informal or conversational, then 'heavy wound' is likely to come across as an error. For a very elaborate, literary style, it may be more appropriate, but in any case I would use it with caution. Possible alternatives include: Serious Grievous Life-threatening Deep


2

This is just my opinion as a native English speaker: Depending on the context, "His friends are constantly visiting him" might imply that while his friends are constantly visiting him now, they have not always in the past. In other words, it emphasizes that this behavior is occurring at this particular moment in time. In contrast, "His friends constantly ...


1

Reason, both in the singular and in the plural, is used in conjunction with both to and for, but in different ways: To is used when the complement of reason is a verbal phrase; the verb is in the infinitive. “There are several reasons to do it”, for example. For is used when the complement is a noun phrase. This includes verbal nouns and gerunds, both of ...


1

Is it ever appropriate to use “where” instead of “because” or “since”? No. It isn't. I have encountered the usage of where in place of under the circumstances where in Singapore. I am not 100% sure whether the usage you heard in your company is just an Indian dialect, but I can confirm the usage does exist. Grammatically speaking, the word where can't ...


1

Both versions would be well understood, but "Take your hands out of your pockets" is idiomatic based on Ngram's corpus. Regarding plurality, if the hands were initially in a single pocket, use the singular, pocket. If they were in separate pockets, use the plural, pockets.


1

There are at least hundreds of words with multiple plural forms: staffs and staves, dice and dies, châteaus and châteaux, pike and pikes, cows and kine, millenniums and millenia, phalanxes and phalanges, mongooses and mongeese, and so on and so on. The reasons why multiple forms exist, and the cases in which one form is preferred to another, are widely ...


1

A log is a series of time-data pairs. A history usually purports to be more comprehensive and explanatory with regards to cause and effect than a simple sequential series of timestamped information. For instance, the log book kept by any individual ship in the Battle of Trafalgar would not purport to be a history of that battle. Computer science uses the ...


1

Ownership and Possession connote same property in our minds. It is only when we look at the two words under a legal angle that we come to see the real difference between the two terms. If I have a motorcycle, I have its possession, and its ownership belongs to me. It seems that the two concepts are intertwined and inseparable. One gets a clear distinction ...


1

Dungeons and Dragons vocabulary to the rescue! As far as "Cure" magic goes in Dungeons and Dragons, the progression is: Minor Wound Light Wound Moderate Wound Serious Wound Critical Wound This is the scale I'd use. http://www.d20srd.org/indexes/spells.htm (under "C" for "Cure" spells)


1

famed etymonline etymology "much talked about," 1530s, past participle adjective from fame "spread abroad, report" (v.), c. 1300, from Old French famer, from fame "reputation, renown" (see fame (n.)). As you can see, since famed derives from a past participle, its usage is more specialized than famous, as famed is best used for historical places, ...



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