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Based on what Wikipedia and LDOCE suggest, the difference isn't between the American and British English (apart from the little bit of background on ditch). It's just the subtle difference in the type of hole that's dug/built. Ditch and trench are much closer in the meaning, while gutter is slightly different. A street gutter is a depression running ...


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The two phrases often have similar meanings and uses, but in many cases are not interchangable. For example, in “She made the cake from scratch”, which means she made the cake from separate ingredients rather than from a mix, from the ground up won't substitute properly for from scratch. Another instance where that substitution won't work is “The cave grew ...


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They have very similar meanings, but come are derived from entirely unrelated areas of life. "From the ground up" is a construction metaphor, speaking of starting a project anew, beginning with the foundation. "From scratch" is apparently a sports metaphor, although more commonly used these days as a cooking reference, as in to say that you gathered all ...


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The subject of the meeting is what you talk about in the meeting. The object of the meeting (perhaps a better word would be objective) is the expected result of the meeting (such as a marketing strategy, etc.)


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The first sentences here, I think, are meant to be in the past simple, not the present: I stopped working. I stopped watching movies. I stopped cooking. All these sentences mean that I was doing some activity, working, watching or cooking at some point in the past, and then I finished doing it. In these cases, the verb stop is taking another verb as its ...


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Distinctness isn't a great word, but it means the quality of being distinct. Distinction is what makes the things distinct. To put it another way: There is distinctness between distinctness and distinction The distinction between distinctness and distinction is that the former is an abstract quality and the latter is a specific example. For your example, ...


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I think you're on the right track here: version implies a bigger difference than variant. The first Oxford definition of each are similar, but they have some key differences: Oxford definition of version: A particular form of something differing in certain respects from an earlier form or other forms of the same type of thing: Oxford definition of ...


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Here is the discussion of reliable and dependable in Webster's Dictionary of Synonyms (1942): A person or thing is reliable when one can count on him or it not to fail in doing what he or it is expected to do competently (as, she is a very reliable servant; one of the most reliable of our employees; a reliable washing machine), or to give or tell the ...


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To refuse something (to) someone means that you make sure that that someone does not have access to that something. This (ditransitive) use is complete different from refuse to do something, which means that one will not do something. So, in short, no, you can not use myself the way you did in the second sentence. Completely unrelated, you can add myself ...



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