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103

“That seems like an odd way to use punctuation,” Tom said. “What harm would there be in using quotation marks at the end of every paragraph?” “Oh, that’s not all that complicated,” J.R. answered. “If you closed quotes at the end of every paragraph, then you would need to reidentify the speaker with every subsequent paragraph. “Say a narrative was ...


17

The lack of closing quotation marks is a convenient clue for the reader that the quotation goes on beyond the end of the paragraph. The addition of quotation marks at the start of each paragraph within a multi-paragraph quotation ensures that a casual or forgetful reader is reminded that the paragraph he is reading is (part of) a quotation, which he might ...


14

When you are quoting multiple paragraphs, closing quotations go only at the end of the entire quotation. Beginning quotes should be placed at the beginning of each paragraph, though; otherwise it would be hard to tell at a glance that the quotation was still ongoing. Common Errors by Brians (one of my new favorites) says it this way: When quoting a long ...


14

A corresponding conversation in English might go something like this: ― You should get yourself a girlfriend! ― A girlfriend? What’s that?! It’s more sarcasm than irony, and the reply is often “deadpanned”.


13

The rule is in place to allow for successive dialog. Two quoted paragraphs in succession with no end quotation mark in the first paragraph are a continued sentiment stated by one person that requires a paragraph break, whereas if there were an end quotation mark, the two paragraphs would be quotes said by different people. Its primary purpose is in ...


10

Another idiomatic option (at least in British English) would be: You should get yourself a girlfriend. Sorry, never heard of it. The use of the impersonal pronoun "it" is part of the humour; it indicates that the speaker not only has no girlfriend, but doesn't even understand the concept that a "girlfriend" might be a type of human being.


6

The first is known as 'direct speech', the second as 'reported speech'.


5

Neither. The right word here is "did": Haha. I'm glad you did! "I'm glad you have" would work if the first sentence were: "I have had ..."


5

OP's second version is standard usage, which is why @Barrie calls it the "uninverted form". But note he's only referring to inversion of subject - verb (the object here being the quoted speech). The most common structure for English sentences is subject - verb - object... Joe said "The sky is blue". ...and the most common "sentence inversion" is ...


4

If you want to turn the sarcasm back on the person giving obvious advice, you could say something like A girlfriend? I didn't get the memo. or A girlfriend? I must have missed a meeting! or A girlfriend? Gee, why didn't I think of that? Any of these implies that the advice is so obvious that the person giving it is either stupid or callous ...


4

Mostly they're not recorded. They're called Hesitation Markers, or various equivalent names. They are the various sounds people make when they're hesitating to think of what to say next, or to remember a word, or just because they've drawn a blank. Emitting one of these markers signals an intention to hold the floor, and to try to keep one's conversation ...


4

Both may be used after what is said, but only the uninverted form is normally used before what is said.


3

It may have something to do with the archaic practise of: - “Using a “quotation mark at the “beginning of every line “of the quoted text. This “practise was actually “pretty commonplace during “the Georgian and Victo- “ian Eras.” See, for example, this 1759 edition of The Monthly Review on Google Books. (cf. Wikipedia article)


3

It’s customary to use inversion only if the attribution follows the quote, not if it precedes it. So: John said, “I am going to the bank.” “I am going to the bank,” said John.


3

As I understand things, you place a comma after the interruption if the first quotation was not a complete sentence, and a period if it was. The rule really is as simple as you inferred. The stylistic element comes in where you have to decide how you would punctuate a quotation if it wasn't to be broken. By example: "My most worthy adversary, we meet ...


2

John told Sean to let him help him. I realise that creates ambiguity as to who was going to help who, but the context would probably sort it out.


2

I'm not an English speaker, but using Portuguese logic I believe it could be called "abrupt rupture". When you start to explain something and your ideas are broken, it makes a rupture in the dialog, starting another one.


2

In American English, titles are generally not paired with first names, except for TV "experts" like Dr. Phil (who does not really hold a doctoral or medical degree) and cartoon characters, like Mr. Bill. Occasionally a teacher at the high school level (secondary school, pre-college) may tell his or her students to call them Mr. __ or Ms. ___ with the ...


2

Interlocutors: The persons who take part in a dialog.


2

We call this behavior shifting blame. This is the act of trying to deflect the blame onto others. Alternatively, (especially when romantic couples do this) it's called he said/she said. As you can see from the name, it represents that each side believes the other to be at fault for an argument/fight/etc so their stories are told from their own point of ...


2

Firstly, quoting the answer of @JohnLawler to lend context to the rest of my answer: Some indication of a gap in sequence is necessary, but " " is not a conventional sign of it. Three ... periods in a row between quotes " ... " is better. Some use two, but three seems somewhat more conventional. The Unicode "horizontal ellipsis" character … takes up only ...


2

The term "copy that" can be used in a few instances. Regarding its literal* sense, take the following example: Secretary: What should I do with this memorandum? Boss: Copy that. As a form of slang, it's a procedure word in radio communications to mean that you've successfully received a transmission. Taken colloquially, it's commonly interpreted ...


2

"Not unless the second part of the quote starts a new sentence," J.R. said. "In that case, you'd start with a capital letter. "However, if both halves are part of the same sentence," J.R. continued, "then the second half begins with a lower-case letter." See Rule 4 at the Purdue OWL: If a direct quotation is interrupted mid-sentence, do not capitalize ...


1

Children usually keep it simple: But there are many ways they do it:


1

I think the word in AE that is most used for this kind of behavior is tattletale. This works in your situation too because really no parent trusts other kids let alone their own when they are telling on someone else. A person, especially a child, who reveals secrets or informs on others; a telltale.


1

It is called transition. It is sometimes called "scene transition" also. Transitions in fiction are words, phrases, sentences, paragraphs, or punctuation that may be used to signal various changes in a story, including changes in time, location, point-of-view character, mood, tone, emotion, and pace.


1

If you're talking about the name for the text that says who is speaking, in screenplays these seem to be called "character cues" or "character names". I've checked several formatting guides for screenplays, and those that have a term for this use one or the other of these.


1

This is not a question about English as such and you have not told us which country this is in. The rules in the US are not the same as those in Britain which are different from those in Australia etc. In any case, if he has told you to call him by his first name, do so. Don't call him professor anything, just call him John. He asked you to, therefore you ...


1

Well Mr John, is probably offensive at this point ("very accomplished and respectable") . In case, Dr. or Prof. John, if applicable (?).


1

Either form you gave is fine. Moreover, either of these forms can also be used in the middle of a quote, too: "I am going to the bank," said John, "before it closes." "I am going to the bank," John said, "to deposit some cash." In writing, you probably want to avoid using the same form, in the same relative location, over an extended dialogue. That ...



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