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2

Both are grammatical, but the form with "the" is overwhelmingly more common in phrases of this sort. I find it hard to explain why. I think it's something to do with the fact that the "of" phrase limits it and makes it in a sense more definite. But I suspect it's just one of those oddities of English: we don't say "the history" but we do say "the history of ...


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I think it's a matter of focus. Imagine you're watching a film in which the camera follows Toto running. It closes in on him, he almost fills the screen, and then he disappears under... well, you can only see one bed at this point... the bed. At this moment the rest of the room has been forgotten. It's a little dramatic device, making an image specific, ...


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They ran to the door of the cellar, but Toto was afraid, and he ran under the bed. This is due to the presence of the preposition under, which requires an article - definite or indefinite. Author chooses one based on the context. Looking at the sentence again, under a bed would also make sense to me, but I must admit I don't know the context.


1

You cling to a school rule that you say "a man" when the man is unknown and that you say "the man" when the man is known because he was mentioned before. But this is only one part of the reality. If you speak of a kitchen you can say the table, the cupboard, the kitchen sink. These words must not be introduced before as everybody knows there is a table, a ...


0

In a list of accomplishments, ordinal numbers are normally used to indicate rank. (Replace instance's of SCHOOLNAME with the correct college/university.) Second in 2015 National Ph.D. Entrance Exam First in SCHOOLNAME's M.A. Program (GPA: 18.69) Third in 2013 National M.A. Entrance Exam Third in SCHOOLNAME's B.A. Program (GPA: 17.53) Also, ...


0

Unless a particular bed was mentioned between Baum's description of the room and the time Toto ran under one, it is likely just a mistake on the part of the author. There are dozens of reasons to use the definite article even when something seems indefinite, but this is not one of those cases. The most likely scenario is that the author believed that there ...


0

To answer your question, no, it isn't grammatical or natural to omit the article in formal writing. If you're saying it, you'd say something like: I got the second rank in the National Ph.D. Entrance Exam 2015 That being said, it's not uncommon for resumes to have bullet points in what's called Headlinese, an abbreviated style of writing (like in ...


1

They are using Client as a nickname - if you come up with something better (From now on, the client application will be referred to as 'Sheila'), they'll use it.


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I would say it's the client application.


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In proper English one should use the article in all three cases since "circle", "function" and "edge" are all ordinary nouns. There are non-grammatical reasons why you often see mathematical writing omitting the "the", which is usually that it is cumbersome or takes up space. It occurs especially frequently with plurals such as: AB intersects lines l,m ...


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Only the second is correct, as the elements in the list are separate/individualized and not a compound. Your sentence is not clear as to what "which" refers to. Fix: The assets of the thesis are the parser library, the tag library [,] and the external database, all of which can be used in other applications. Also, an Oxford comma is required in AmE before ...



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