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3

Space has multiple meanings. One is the enormous dark near-vaccuum which exists outside our world, and this is never used with the definite article "the" or the indefinite article "a". It's used like a pronoun place name, except not capitalised, so you would say "I'm going to space" or "Space is very big" in the same way you would say "I'm going to London" ...


-1

Which of the following is correct? Is there anything on the television tonight? Is there anything on television tonight? The second sentence without the article THE is correct. Why? When we talk about television in the sense of television programs (UK = programmes) that are broadcast (= transmitted), we DO NOT use the article THE. Television became widely ...


0

I did my own research. Found this link. According "to Practical English Usage" "The" is sometimes dropped before superlative adverbs in an informal style. Who can run (the) fastest? This means that you can put "the" to "most densely", if I prefer.


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The word 'most' can act as a logical quantifier of a noun (most neurons), or an intensifier of an adjective or adverb (most dense or most densely). The determiner 'the' only applies to a noun (the (most dense) innervation).


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I think both A and B are awkward. If you replace innervate with either of its definitions: (A) These neurons supply with nerves most densely to the layer 1. (A) These neurons stimulate most densely to the layer 1. Also, "the layer 1" seems like an awkward way to address the first layer. How about: These neurons innervate layer 1 with the most density. ...


1

It's rare, but not unheard of. Sir Donald Bradman is sometimes referred to as "The Don".


1

I think it's because of the way the word entered the English language. In the earliest appearances of the word I could find (1785), it's used as if "Kraken" were a species of fish, in the same paragraph as "the Sturgeon" and "the Whale." It's even implied that there are many Kraken plying the seas: Whether the vanishing island, Lemair, of which Captain ...


1

You should use the same formulation as the company itself uses. Have a quick look at the "About Us" tab on their websites - for example, ExxonMobil refers to itself as ExxonMobil - no "the" or "Group" - and it's the same with General Motors. If "Group" is not an official part of the company's name but you want to reflect that the company has various ...


2

The first option is incorrect because of lack of properly placed articles. For the rest, explanation follows. Let there be file named "x." The option 3 means you are looking for files that are also named "x." You can rewrite the option 3 as "I'm searching only for files with the same name as x." Option 2 means you are searching a group of files that ...


1

It all hinges on how many names you're looking for. If you're searching a set of files for those that all share a common name, then it's: I'm searching for files with the same name ... because there're multiple files but only one name. However, if you're searching a set of files for duplicate names - perhaps a set of four or five names that you're ...


0

I don't have strong opinions on this question, but here are some reasons you might think that "the", as it occurs in "the which", is semantically empty (that is, meaningless). In prima facie support of this position, just consider that there are no plausible candidates for what 'the' could mean in these types of constructions (at least that I can think of). ...


3

At daylight means the moment in time when daylight begins. “At midnight, the vampire arose. At daylight, the vampire exploded.” In daylight means bathed in the light of day. “In artificial light, vampires look pale. In daylight, vampires explode.”


1

In most instances a play on words fits the bill as "a) memorable, b) meaningful, and c) distinctive." If you live say, near the Catskills, The Cakehills might be a very effective business name. Good Luck!


1

"The Cake Fairy" is decent, but not a great name. Marketing experts tell us a good name has to be a) memorable, b) meaningful, and c) distinctive. It's also good if it makes sense. "CakeHills" and "CakerHills" fail all three of these tests. "The Cake Fairy" is memorable and meaningful, but not particularly distinctive, unless you live in a small town ...



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