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1

Yes, because you are talking about the item. You wouldn't say the six unless there were more than one choice of six. You might take the floor six stairs to get to floor six.


0

Universals are always definite (because they are unique), so we don't need 'the'. 'All the' actually means 'all of the', where the set is not universal, but merely the totality of a mentioned subset. All cats are mammals. All [of] the cats at my house are hungry. 'All' is a logical quantifier, which is an inexact (non-cardinal) determiner.


1

"Can I use them as generic terms to mean 'the idea of ...'?" If you really mean to speak conceptually, as in poetry or very abstract terms of science, yes you could say "The jellyfish lives in the water" or "The grasshopper lives in the meadow." It will read better though to remove one of the articles from the sentence and change the verb to match. So ...


1

Wow, I thought this would be easy, but it's actually a little tricky. I think the answer to your question is "It's all over the map." Consider your first sentence, "The jellyfish lives in the water." It would sound much better if you said "The jellyfish lives in the sea." (Since there are many different kinds of jellyfish, it might sound even better like ...


1

"Media" is the plural of "medium," so technically, the question should read, "Do the media influence us?" However, "the media" have become something of a cultural monolith, so I reluctantly accept the singular use when described in this way. "Do media (television, radio, Internet, billboards, etc.) influence us?" Yes, they do. "Does the media influence ...


-1

Neither are correct."Influence" is a possessive noun, and works as a verb transitvely, when a preposition is conjugated between a pronoun such as the personal "us": "influence on/over us" works, but not for this question phrasing without "have/having", which indicates possession. So, instead we could say: "Does the media have influence on/over us?"


0

Media isn't a proper noun, so it's not capitalized unless it's in a special context. Such special cases could be it's defined, as in a legal document, to reference a specific group the capital M is being used to emphasize/deify the media in a rhetorical paper.


0

The definite article serves to specify a particular instance. It is used to mark an object as before mentioned or already known, or contextually particularised (OED). Abstract nouns are not, by definition, particular to a time or place.


2

Why do determiners seem implicit in English? Because the definite article the is mainly used to explicitly identify or specify nouns that are countable such as regular nouns; dog, face, heart which is beating in a body and boy, etc. and collective nouns; family, nation, people, etc. It doesn't mean that countable nouns take only the definite article. ...


1

X is in the control of Y means that Y is controlling X. X is in control of Y means that X is controlling Y. So in your examples, the terrorist is in the control of the government means that the government is controlling the terrorist, while the terrorist is in control of the government means that the terrorist is controlling the government.


1

You don't need the definite article with what are called modified names but you can use it if you want. Consider the analogous natural language sentences: Are you sure you want to slap professional boxer Mike Tyson? Are you sure you want to slap the professional boxer Mike Tyson? Both are acceptable and easily understood. The use of the demonstrative ...


0

Readability is important for code, and your end user should be able to understand the effects of their actions on the UI. Since this is referring to a specific instance of an object, the article I would use is "this", and yes, I think it should be used. For example: "Are you sure you want to delete this place (New York City)?"


2

The indefinite article is used when we don't know exactly which one is being referred to. So if more than one possibility exists for that second major assumption, use the indefinite article. If exactly one possibility exists for that second major assumption, use the definite article.


0

I agree with you (in the absence of additional context) that the sentence should read, "This is a popular song by Taylor Swift." However, if one asked, "What are you listening to on your headset?" the answer might be, "I'm listening to the popular song by Taylor Swift called, 'You Belong With Me.'" This example confirms your observations of ...



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