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I think that the difference is simply that "time" is not specific, whereas "hour", "day" or "month" refer to fixed amounts of time. So time of day/month/year is a more general expression and "day of the year" or "hour of the day" are more specific, despite being sometimes used interchangeably as in "time of day" and "hour of the day". Example : This ...


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It's more complex than you may suspect. Specificity is different from definiteness, and must be distinguished from it. An indefinite article can mark either a non-specific, descriptive NP, as in I'm looking for a policeman, but I can't find one. (a policeman here means 'anyone fitting the description of a policeman') or it can mark a specific individual ...


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(1) The referent of the NP be either familiar within the discourse ... --- Why does it have to be 'within the discourse'? Can't it be familiar outside the discourse? I mean, what are the authors saying here? I'm confused. Does it matter whether it is familiar within the discourse or anywhere? Based on the articles that they cite as references, I think ...


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Here are the ways one can say this, be grammatical in English and sound like this is actual professional writing, either creative or not:1) The Apple: A Tasty Fruit [One moves from /the/ to /a/ in the title. The apple (a singular object) is a tasty fruit. That is, there are other tasty fruits. 2) Apples: Tasty Fruit. [One moves from the plural and one ...


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The following are acceptable: I play drums. I play the drums. I play the drum set. I play the drum kit. I drum. The following are unacceptable: I play drum set. I play drum kit. I play drum. If you have only one drum, the following is appropriate: I play the drum. The comment posted by @Inazuma is correct, in ...



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