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-1

The word 'both' is not a noun, so it cannot be preceded by 'the'. Obviously, there is no noun in the expression 'the both of you'.


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The distinction between them is that the definite article refers to specific waste and specific cost that have been previously identified. The lack of an article in the other sentences is really an implied indefinite article, which allows it to refers to any waste or cost.


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Although all four mean much the same thing, there are shades of meaning. The new procedure reduces the waste. -- There is a specific kind of waste in mind. That waste is being alluded to. The new procedure reduces waste. -- There is no specific kind of waste in mind.


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All four are correct. Consider you have waste, and costs. And then you define a category describing the amount of waste and costs for the last month. Then when you discuss the category of Waste, you say "The Waste". Similarly for Costs.


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The answer would depend on whether there was predefined value for "simulations". If the number of simulations is fixed then you would use "at the minimum number of simulations". However if the number of simulations is dependent upon the optimum VTs then the sentence would read "at a minimum number of simulations".


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I think most universities in the UK vary the inclusion of the article with its omission, depending on context. If you Google the University of London, for example, a layout will appear on the Google answers page, headed University of London alongside its arms. ...


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As one example, "the" is considered part of the name of the University of British Columbia: Below you will find some of the rules that can help you identify which proper nouns must take the article “the.” Rule #1: If the word of is part of the name, you need to use the. For example, we say: the University of British Columbia, but we say ...


2

Different schools do it differently. A good way to tell is to search for the school on Google. If the school's official website uses the article, use it. If not, skip it. It's pretty arbitrary otherwise. For example: The Ohio State University Ohio University The University of Akron University of Dayton There are a few dozen more conflicting examples all ...


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Generally speaking, it's the University of (for example) Durham or Durham University. If the University is named after a person, only the second style is used: John Moores University.


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The article serves a clarifying purpose. It's not necessary, but consider these contextual sentences: Exiting the application does not automatically save the form. This issue affects the quality of the software. In this example, the article on "the software" tells the reader that the sentence is referring to a specific example of software, i.e. the ...


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Good question, and, as regards the answer one at which I can only make a guess. Perhaps because Congress, whether one is speaking of the Houses of Congress, or the ruling body of any organisation, the word has an especially grand ring about it. Similarly if one is speaking of Parliament, meaning Westminster, one would not use the article. But if one were ...


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I know there are cases when we do not use the definite article before best (as an adjective) and it is not in headlines and the noun is not omitted: NerdWallet’s list of best 529 plans by state is available for those who live in these states. here are the examples, I am trying to figure out the general rule for this: ONE of best things about East 50's is ...


2

The books I owe you are on my table. I believe the sentence means All the books I owe you are on my table now. If you want to say that these are not all the books, you can say Some of the books I owe you are on my table. (And there's a couple that I haven't read yet in my backpack). Note that it would look a bit strange if you said the ...


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Thankfully there is a short and simple answer to your question. Proper nouns do not need determiners! So no matter which band, group, movie, show etc, you go to see you will never need to add 'the'. It just happens to be an idiosyncrasy that 'the' can be added before probably all pluralised proper nouns. The Artic Monkeys, The Dead Kennedys, The Dire ...



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