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5

If we wand to be able to use a "both" phrase, I would say "Running the laptop from both the battery and the outlet." Even though you never explicitly state that what you're getting from these sources is power, it's easily inferred. Here in the US at least, the phrase "electrical socket" isn't colloquial in general, but outlet, or wall, or even electrical ...


5

This is archaic but poetic. It's an example of an anapaestic tetrameter (although it really needs another unstressed syllable right at the start) — four feet of "da da DUM": But although it is early, yet still I must rise. As @crisis said, it's redundant, but redundancy can be employed for particular effect, as here.


5

The important thing is that both coordinated tokens should coordinate to each other, and to the following expression which they are modifying. In this case, in singular form: often have a mass form often have a count form you can now use the construction both ... and ...: often have both a mass form and a count form or the better, avoiding ...


3

Between you and me is the correct usage. This is an English teacher's classic. Because the phrase occurs after the preposition between, you have to use the object pronoun me rather than the subject pronoun I. I even found a proper source to back me up. But, this one is a classic.


3

Sentence № 1 is punctuated correctly, and Trask’s advice is perfectly compatible with the advice of Harcourt Publishers. The question poses a false dilemma. You have read the advice you found in Writer’s Harbrace Handbook as a blanket prohibition of a comma after a coordinating connector. But that’s not so. The advice is that a comma is not necessary or ...


3

I would say: Running the computer on battery and connected to the electrical grid or using an external supply.


2

If you are in Europe, ANZ, Canada, or elsewhere in the British Commonwealth, then mains would be a perfect word for this: Running the laptop both on battery power and on mains power Running the laptop with power from both the battery and the mains External is also a good choice: Running the laptop both on battery power and on external power ...


2

Most of the time I would say 'plugged-in' rather than 'off the socket.' You could use this several ways, each of the following examples makes the separation of the two trials more explicit: I tried running the laptop both on battery power and plugged-in. I tried both running the laptop on battery power and plugged-in. I tried running the ...


2

How about "Running the laptop both from the battery and from AC."


2

Put a comma between dogs and but. If you feel that in the presence of polite company is a strong interruption to the sentence, you should set it off with a pair of commas. No others are needed. For more on this, and on punctuation more generally, see Larry Trask’s ‘Guide to Punctuation’.


2

You are right that for is a coordinating conjunction, the first of the so-called FANBOYS. But you cannot move a coordinated clause (starting with a FANBOY) to the front of a sentence: I was hungry, so I ate. *So I ate, I was hungry. It is the same in German: Ich habe gegessen, denn ich hatte Hunger. *Denn ich Hunger hatte, habe ich ...


2

It is perfectly fine to use multiple conjunctions in a sentence, and although it may produce something which seems a bit verbose, there are appropriate uses for it, and in literature in particular, it's commonly used to create a sense of continuity throughout a scene by forcing the reader to take in the entire paragraph without stopping, and Ernest Hemingway ...


2

First, I don't believe of is a dangling participle because I don't believe it to be a participle at all. Here is a quick guide on that. As to how to write this: I would add I to the second clause. … I did not make, nor was I aware of … As to why, it certainly flows better. And, I believe the second clause needs a subject here to make sense. (I ...


1

Just between you and I, the answer depends on whether or not you're in school, or writing for a boss, or writing for yourself: If you're in school, then your teachers probably want "between you and me". If you have an employer, then they probably have their own style guide and editors, and a preferred style. Most likely they too will usually prefer ...


1

To be formal, there are two ways to rephrase the statement. You could say "Please sign both the first and second pages" or "Please sign both the first page and the second page".


1

The action of omitting parts of a sentence because they are understood within the context is called Ellipsis. But this is not strictly ellipsis because you are actually changing what is left after omitting the second "the boy". The boy Sam and the boy Tom are nice. Here is it clear that both are boys because both Sam and Tom are individually described ...


1

Yes, your analysis is getting close. :) You're touching on many of the essential issues. Some of those issues have come up before, but usually they come up individually (and often they are given bad answers). Let me comment on this: You do this one more time and I'll slap you. That example seems to have the form of a clause-coordination where ...


1

In this sentence, is is the main verb in the first part, and is the auxiliary verb in the second part. This makes deleting the second is ungrammatical. So you have two options: It is available for every item and is used with … It is available for every item and it is used with … If is is the main verb in both parts, or the auxiliary verb in both ...


1

1.) "Nobody move and nobody gets hurt." 2.) "Nobody move and nobody get hurt." Both of your examples are sentences that, although each one has the appearance of an "and" coordination of two main clauses, each sentence is actually interpreted as if it was a conditional construction ("if P then Q"). In this type of construction, the first clause ...


1

The correct usage is: "Nobody gets whatever" nobody (=no one) is in third person singular form. So you have to add a 's' to root verb. It is similar to 'everyone' or 'everybody'. Eg: "Nobody has right to do 'whatever'." You're using 'has' not. 'Have' with nobody. "Everyone gets appreciation except me"


1

For, as a coordinating conjunction, is rarely used to begin a sentence, for its function is to introduce the reason for the preceding clause. Putting the reason before the preceding clause makes it awkward, unless you use one of its substitutes - because, or use and after the comma. For I was hungry, I ate lunch. For I was hungry, and I ate lunch. ...


1

I'd argue the problem with the sentence "Although it is early, yet still I must rise" is that "although" and "yet" are redundant. Both imply a contradiction, so only one should be necessary. Consequently, I'd use either "Although it is early, I must still rise", or "It is early, yet still I must rise".


1

I think the answer to your question lies under the usage of "a" - which is used as determiner in "have both a mass and a count form". Let me give a similar example first, so we can compare to see why the noun "form" is used as singular: They have a red and a green apple. They have red and green apples. They have a red and green apple. In first, ...



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