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The Original Poster has found an enormous typo/display problem in the Cambridge Dictionary. The type of British English described in the Cambridge Dictionary is Southern Standard British English. This variety of English is non-rhotic, which means that we only pronounce R when it occurs directly before a vowel sound. The correct pronunciation is /ʃɔː/, not /...


3

No. Most (but not all) of England and Wales (but not Scotland) is non-rhotic, which means that a final /r/ is never pronounced unless the word is followed in the same breath-group by a vowel-initial sound.


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Words like "vowel" and "consonant" and "semivowel" properly refer to the sounds of English. Now, the way that English spelling works, there's some correlation between letters and sounds; there are five letters that are usually involved in representing vowel sounds, twenty letters that are usually involved in representing consonant sounds, and one letter ...


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In Stampean Natural Phonology, which mostly agrees with the traditional use of these terms in phonology, a lenition is a phonetic change functioning to make speech easier to articulate, and a fortition is a phonetic change functioning to make speech easier to perceive. The insertion of a vowel homorganic to the following glide in the [bj] cluster, for ...


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Lenition and fortition are names of sound changes usually occurring over many hundreds of years and show up when comparing words from different dialects or different eras (Irish is one of the few language where there are many context changes that are lenition). So there may not be many good examples residing entirely in modern English. The word 'maternal', ...


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An example of "lenition" which weaken a consonant sound into a vowel-like sound are words like: Herb(Brit)/Herb(American) In the former word the consonant is stressed and hence is pronounces as 'H-erb'. In the word the consonant is softened to the point of non-existence so the word is instead 'erb' with a marginally softer vowel sound. On the other hand, ...



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