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The Oxford Dictionary of American Usage and Style (2000) says: Other variant adjectives, though, are merely duplicative. Typical examples are extendable, extendible, and extensible. The first of these is now prevalent in AmE (though labeled obsolete in the OED). Extensible was, through the mid-20th century, the most common form, but today it trails ...


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It seems that the voiced dental fricative [ð] is not generally considered to have been the realization of Old English (OE) /d/. Instead, [ð] was the voiced allophone of the dental fricative /þ/, which was unspecified for voicing. And /d/ and /þ/ were distinct phonemes (contrastive sounds): for example, the word fæder "father" had the phoneme /d/, but the ...



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