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In Stampean Natural Phonology, which mostly agrees with the traditional use of these terms in phonology, a lenition is a phonetic change functioning to make speech easier to articulate, and a fortition is a phonetic change functioning to make speech easier to perceive. The insertion of a vowel homorganic to the following glide in the [bj] cluster, for ...


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Lenition and fortition are names of sound changes usually occurring over many hundreds of years and show up when comparing words from different dialects or different eras (Irish is one of the few language where there are many context changes that are lenition). So there may not be many good examples residing entirely in modern English. The word 'maternal', ...


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An example of "lenition" which weaken a consonant sound into a vowel-like sound are words like: Herb(Brit)/Herb(American) In the former word the consonant is stressed and hence is pronounces as 'H-erb'. In the word the consonant is softened to the point of non-existence so the word is instead 'erb' with a marginally softer vowel sound. On the other hand, ...


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Classic homograph pairings like "record" and "record". Wreck-uhrd has stress on the first syllable and a weakened vowel in the second syllable. This version of 'record' is a noun. Ruh-chord has stress on the second syllable and a weakened vowel in the first syllable. This version of 'record' is a verb. This is almost a rule in (North American) English ...



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