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198

Well with babies we often say 'to sleep(/be) in the bed with'. As in "our baby sleeps in the bed with us." This extends to adults. Warning... NOTE the use of THE, 'in the bed' is different than 'in bed'!!! Compare 'I was in bed with him' and 'I was in the bed with him'. Would any of the following examples imply sex....? I slept in the bed with him. ...


129

You can use "crash with someone". Example: I had no place to stay so I crashed with her. Although not foolproof, it implies less the act of having sex. Edit: As it's been pointed out, crashing with someone implies some sort of need. You might be too tired to go elsewhere or not have anywhere else to stay. Edit 2: Some variants I can think of are ...


64

The Naked and the Nude Robert Graves For me, the naked and the nude (By lexicographers construed As synonyms that should express The same deficiency of dress Or shelter) stand as wide apart As love from lies, or truth from art. Lovers without reproach will gaze On bodies naked and ablaze; The Hippocratic eye will see In nakedness, anatomy; And naked ...


63

Unfortunately, the act of sleeping in the same bed as someone is often taken to imply sex in English, at least in the States. I sometimes say "sleep next to" someone because it sounds more innocent, but even then it is mistaken to mean that more happened than sleep. There are several good suggestions, but I haven't found a 100% fool proof way to say "slept ...


57

The phrase means that everything went well until now, and you are not sure if things will carry on like this, or something bad will happen in the future, but it doesn't carry a negative connotation. It just means that so far everything is good, and you don't know what is going to happen next.


50

Nude is by and large used only to refer to the absence of clothing or any covering in general. Nude beaches Nude model Naked, on the other hand, has far wider connotations than nude. You can look them up here. Naked eye Naked truth Naked to one's enemies It's also worth noting that naked is a rather technical word in life sciences, which is not the ...


49

It's true that OED's first definition for so-called is just called or designated by that name, but the most recent citation for that "neutral" sense is 1863. So even though OED don't explicitly identify it as dated/out-of-fashion, that's what I would say. The "current" definition is... Called or designated by this name or term, but not properly entitled ...


45

The phrases below are often used when small children sleep with their parents in the same bed. To share the bed together (or) share the same bed To sleep in the same bed If you lack a spare room, and a guest needs to spend the night, you might offer to share your bed with him or her. This is often the case between close friends and relatives. I have ...


38

I think it indicates a cautious optimism.....the person doesn't want to imply that because things have gone fine so far that things will continue to go fine and that you can consider it all done, or it will be a slam-dunk....i.e. more barriers have to be overcome yet.


37

Best option is to not mention the word "bed" at all -- use "stayed at" or "crashed at" and include the word "overnight" if clarification is needed.


34

An article in The Guardian summarises Kenneth Clark's explanation of the difference between naked and nude: It was the art historian Kenneth Clark who claimed there is a difference. A naked human body is exposed, vulnerable, embarrassing, he wrote in his 1956 book The Nude. "The word 'nude', on the other hand, carries, in educated usage, no uncomfortable ...


32

The only way to do this is to be explicit. Yes, you can phrase it to reduce the connotation but you cannot eliminate it. The only exception is where societal context would strongly suggest you weren't having sex - i.e. "It was horrible, I had to share the bed with my mum" or "they're the kind of hippy household where the baby sleeps with them". If you want ...


30

demerits - Marks awarded against someone for a fault or offense (definition from google).


29

If you had meant either … spending the night as a guest at another's home or (being a)n overnight guest then you could use the word sleepover.


29

The answer by @Rhetorician failed to include the actual verb To bunk: To stay the night; sleep: bunk over at a friend's house. which does not exactly meet the requirements of sleeping in the same bed, but if you tell me you are going to bunk over at X's place and I know for a fact that he/she only has one bed, the picture coming to mind is you either ...


29

To answer the origin question: I'd presume it's simply because, in our relatively affluent American society, it's uncommon for folks above the age of puberty to share a bed with anyone they aren't romantically involved with. The main exception I can think of is when sharing a hotel room for economy's sake. So the phrase is rarely needed, hence rarely used, ...


28

I'd say it was neutral rather than negative. It means something like Everything's OK so far. Let's hope it stays that way.


25

I would definitely be niggardly in my vocabulary around this homo sapien. Otherwise, you might get into a niggling argument with him and end up jaculated out on your coccyx. Then you might have to switch careers. You could end up a thespian or a miner looking for cummingtonite. You might not even be able to find a job and resort to a life of crime. ...


25

Joys of going to an all-boy boarding school, field trips, etc. where hormonal kids were occasionally required to share beds at overnight sporting events, etc. The phrase we used then was very effective, and has not been mentioned in this question. I think it is ideal to express 'sharing a bed with no sexual activity'. In the context of a school boys having ...


25

On the quixotic — and the Quijote Is quixotic positive or negative, you ask. An easy enough question to ask, aye. But to answer? To answer is something else. For it is . . . complicated. That’s because a tale as rich as El ingenioso hidalgo don Quijote de la Mancha cannot be potted into a single sentence, nor sentiment. It does not admit a simple yes or ...


23

English = of England Great Britain = England + Scotland + Wales British = of Great Britain (usually, but may also mean "of the United Kingdom") United Kingdom = Great Britain + Northern Ireland From the Wikipedia article Terminology of the British Isles, see images of the British Isles, the United Kingdom, Great Britain, and England respectively. ...


21

There is a word "cosleeping" (or "co-sleeping", if you'd prefer) which generally applies to infants and their parents, but seems ripe for repurposing. Alternatively: Cosominating


20

Therefore is used in introducing a conclusion that follows from what has been said previously. You are drunk, and that makes you incapable of operating machinery. Therefore you shouldn't fly a plane. Thus means in this way. For example: He waved his arms around thus. (speaker waves arms around in demonstration) Extending that meaning, it can be ...


18

You can define something possible in mathematical terms as having a non null probability of being true. As for plausible, the concept does not draw on mathematics but rather on mere common sense. The etymology is the same as applause. Something is plausible it it's acceptable (loosely: if it deserves applause). That is to say if its probability is ...


18

The country of which I am a citizen is the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Great Britain is the largest of the British Isles and is home to England, Scotland and Wales. I was born in England and, apart from several extended periods abroad, have lived my life in England. That makes me ethnically English and politically British. Although ...


18

By the definitions that you provided above, and my own interpretation, "Living in squalor" does not directly imply poverty. It could just as easily be neglect. For example, if someone of moderate means is a hoarder, they could easily be living in squalor.


18

Your absence has resulted in a sense of loss. (Pretty impersonal and somewhat morbid. I can picture this being said by some distant relative at a funeral.) It would be nice if you were here. (Flirtatious.) I miss your friendship. (Suggests that they used to be friends, but no longer are.) How about: I miss hanging out together. It's boring here without ...


17

I will expound on the examples you provided and then give a few more of my own. forward: Forwardness is not usually considered a positive attribute, as someone who is [too] forward unduly volunteers their opinion or views in a rather annoying manner. straightforward: A straightfoward person does and says the right thing, regardless of the consequences. ...


17

Do you mean sleeping in the same bed, or just the same house? A colloquial (in the UK) for non-sexual sleeping in the same bed is "topping and tailing" where you sleep with heads at the opposite ends.



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