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3

No, there isn't an implied verb. Rather, you're inferring a verb by imposing the conjunctive definition of "like" rather than the prepositional definition. As a preposition, "like" means: in like manner with; similarly to; in the manner characteristic of. Therefore, rather than inferring a "does" at the end of the two sentences you cite, you should ...


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I think it's appropriate to think of like as a preposition, but grammar girl's advice for recognizing a conjunction is a too quick and too dirty. As has several senses, and is only a conjunction in some. You are probably best off simply learning all of the main constructions that have as in them, and abandon any hopes of pinning down a "part of speech" for ...


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I think that it's intrinsically ambiguous, and remains ambiguous even when you add in some knowledge of the context. An "accounting designation" is an accounting qualification - it means they can call themselves a "chartered accountant" or something similar. This status needs to be earned, and awarded, like a degree, but only after a certain amount of real-...


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The comma splice is generally pretty clearly defined: A comma splice occurs when two independent clauses are connected with only a comma (Source: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/engagement/2/1/34/) In all of your examples, you have two independent clauses joined by a comma. You could either add a coordinating conjunction (not a subordinating ...


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Your examples are dialog. As such, it's "grammatical" to describe exactly what was said. If you are quoting an American, it's just fine to say "Jane wanted to go out, but I was tired, so...". The same is true for County Cork. Spoken language plays fast and loose with the rules of grammar people worry about for text, but if you are quoting dialog, I think ...


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Normally, when you use a single conjunction in at the end of the list, it's assumed to apply to the entire list. So A, B, or C typically means a choice between the 3 items, while A, B, and C means all the items are collected together. The comma by itself doesn't imply any specific way of joining the items around it, so the conjunction at the end supplies ...


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Reference: http://www.investorwords.com/16891/accounting_designation.html As you can see the link above, accounting designation means: A type of professional credential that will prove the holder has achieved a high level of understanding, knowledge, and/or skills in their specific given profession. Accounting designations include Certified Public ...



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