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3

I think it means that the person read somewhere about the room, like when someone says 'Do you know MJ' and someone else says 'I've heard of him'. I hope I helped. :)


2

The can be distributed as provided in the second sentence, so that it is used only once. A similar question on Stack Exchange can be found here.


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You can easily write those two examples with however at the beginning: However, for the rest, no remedy is to be found... However, it cannot be inferred that.. Putting however in the middle of the sentence creates an interruption and causes your reader to pause. I think this helps place emphasis on whatever you wrote before the however because it slows ...


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The comments so far haven't answered your question. There's quite an extensive explanation of the ins and outs of the Oxford or serial comma here. You'll notice that the writer of the article says that "a serial comma or series comma (also called Oxford comma and Harvard comma) is a comma placed immediately before the coordinating conjunction (usually ...


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Commas are usually not really about right and wrong, but about clarity and intent, and sometimes style. Your first sentence is one of those that is short enough that it needs no comma: Juanita is brilliant and Shalimar has a pleasant personality. However, it is also ok to use one there, especially since there is a full independent clause following ...


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The original sentence has a compound predicate. A compound sentence, by contrast, is two sentences joined by punctuation. Most styles wouldn't use a comma to separate the parts of a compound predicate (or, put another way, to separate the subject of a sentence from any of its verbs). I would remove the comma, or else I'd keep it and then repeat the subject ...


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I think your problem is with the logic. What the compound sentences rule you're talking about is really saying is: Rule 1: If a sentence is a compound sentence, then the conjunction should be accompanied by a comma (most of the time). But the sentence you gave as an example isn't a compound sentence, i.e. it doesn't have two independent clauses, so ...


1

Although still works OK in the first sentence; it's not impossible. Your example just happens to be capable of bearing the meaning "in spite of the fact that . . ". You could even use "but" in that particular sentence. "Although" fails as a subordinating conjunction when there is no reasonable expectation of one thing from the other. You wouldn't say ...


1

Because while is serving two different functions in both sentences, ie. Although or whereas. While can also mean 'occurring at the same time', like in the sentence "while my parents were cooking, I was watching TV". You can't substitute 'although' or 'whereas' for 'while' there either without changing the tone of the sentence. Sometimes words just have ...


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Most commonly, dependent clauses are subordinate clauses. Though your second clause here is a main clause, it is also a dependent clause. Here's why: The second clause is considered to be dependent because of the coordinating conjunction but. This conjunction may coordinately link clauses, but it implies contrast. Whenever you contrast something, you need ...


1

Mathematical logic speaks of an exclusive-OR and an inclusive-OR. Typically parents offer exclusive-OR choices to their children. ("You can have either cake or ice cream"; "...but not both" is implied.) You can say "Either a or b, but not both" to clarify an exclusive-OR, or "Either a or b, or both" to clarify an inclusive-OR. The "but not both" or "or both" ...


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H.W. Fowler, Modern English Usage, revised edition (1965) offers a concise and generally valid summary of the differences between though and although: Though, although. The definite differences between the two hardly need stating. They are: first that though can and although cannot be used an adverb, placed last (He said he would come; he didn't, ...



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