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16

Here you're using however as an adverb, meaning no matter how or in whatever way. Since you said that your intention is "no matter how you analyze the data, the output would remain poor", however is the correct choice. When one uses how ever, "ever" usually takes the role of an intensifier -- it increases the strength of the statement being made with "how". ...


7

Your instincts are correct: "next to that" is not something a native speaker would use if they wanted to say "additionally". Given enough context, most native speakers would understand what was meant, mind you, but like Robusto said, it's an odd, foreign-sounding locution. (Also, it might be misinterpreted as an attempt to say "besides".) The phrase can be ...


4

The output remained consistently poor how ever the data was/were analysed". (i.e., how ever you analyze the data, the output ...poor) When ever is used for emphasis after how or why, it should be written as a separate word. Thus it is correct to write ‘how ever did you manage?’ rather than ‘however did you manage?’ (as distinct from other uses ...


4

Possible fixes: Blue data is better than red data. Standard algorithms, on the other hand, are all written with red data in mind and don't work on blue data. Violet algorithms handle blue data as well as red data, yet they are very slow. Blue-only algorithms can process blue data really fast, even though most blue data is mixed with a small percentage of ...


4

Any expectation of a comma in the examples of the OP has very little to do with the subordinate clauses' restrictiveness, but rather, as the OP suggested, with an interruption of their natural flow. When leading a sentence with a subordinate clause, the comma does not force a "parenthetical / non-restrictive" interpretation. Simply, compare the meaning of ...


2

According to the oxford dictionary, it's an acceptable use of the word: immediately [conjunction] (chiefly British) As soon as: let me know immediately she arrives


2

Although the noun phrase is the prototypical object of the preposition (any preposition), it is not the only possibility. See this article at Answers.com: What follows a preposition?. Quite a few prepositions can take what some call a *'gerund clause' in place of the prototypical noun phrase: He left before the end. / He left before looking at his ...


2

It's not wrong in English. You might say, for example, "Bob owns a car and a motorcycle. Next to that he also owns a boat." In a similar way we also say "in addition to that" and "besides that". "Next to that" can also be used literally, to mean that something is physically adjacent. Like, "On the desk is a pencil. Next to that is a pen." The pen is ...


2

I don't think either one works well here. I would simply say: This is just what would happen. . . (not would be happen) btw: Interesting imagery, the "cosmetic giant" (doing a gigantic face peel?) I wonder whether the author might have meant a cosmic giant. Also, that's not what would happen; at least not for long. A much-smaller sun would have ...


2

In many cases cases you use however improperly, and you refer to the wrong points. In addition to 'however' the formal writing connectors can be although whereas while whilst I rewrote your piece, with my suggestions in bold and unnecessary words in [brackets] Blue data is better than red data, although standard algorithms [, however,] are all ...


2

Yes, however is fine and extremely common in scientific writing. There's nothing wrong with but either, by the way. You can also use other alternatives. For example: Blue data is better than red data. Standard algorithms, however, are all written with red data in mind and don't work on blue data. Violet algorithms handle blue data as well as red data, ...


2

If you start the statement with "while" or "although" once in a while, you can cut out some of the "however's".


1

Periphrastic adj periphrasis n. : use of a longer phrasing in place of a possible shorter form of expression. MW


1

I don't have a name for it, but I know the phenomenon all too well from decades of translating. In that particular culture, they would take it further, and rather than the equivalent of "The East is red" they would write "The East is a colour that is red", or even, "With respect to its colour, the East is a colour that is red". As a critic of wordiness, ...



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