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3

First of all, none of those choices are particularly good, but some are better than others. This answer is more along the lines of general multiple-choice strategy than an explanation of grammar, but I'll try to explain why the best choice is B. Generally, cars tend to stop moving when they hit trees, and so the best way to combine the two sentences would ...


3

None of the answers is correct. "The car dashed the tree" is not correct English, and no variations on it are going to be correct. When used with an object, to "dash" something means to strike with it. So "I dashed the glass on the floor". If "the car dashed the tree", it means the car picked up the tree and hit something with it. That is obviously not ...


2

As Robusto points out in comments beneath the question, there is no universally acknowledged rule governing whether to include or omit a comma after a conjunction at the beginning of a sentence. Robusto reports preferring to include such commas in academic documents, but many other writers and editors would not include them. In my experience copyediting ...


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These are entertaining examples. They are all attempts at right node raising RNR constructions, but they all fail because they treat phrases as simply strings of words and ignore the structure of the phrases connected by "and". Almost all "and" constructions in English, including these, follow the same basic rule: Conjunction rule: Phrases of the same ...


1

There is no answer given that is surely correct. Answers A or B in some cases might be, but we do not know. Even if you would use "dash into" and left out "blue" in the answers there is no expression that is known to be correct. Definitely correct only a combination with and or before would be, because The car dashed the tree. It was going at over ...


1

"In his letter he explains how the book has a great plot and is generally enjoyable." If it is a mere statement/assertion we would join the clauses with 'that'. But when the speaker does not stop simply mentioning its greatness or enjoyability, but goes on to elaborating or detailing some aspects of the plot and its ways of providing enjoyment in his ...


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"Who" refers to people; "that" may refer to either people or things. Use "who" if doing so would help your reader identity the antecedent. That's not a problem with your text. "... the only way to do this was by taking control ...."


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You have a compound infinitive describing your job: "to extract and to calculate." You also have a predicate complement "lethal" in the relative clause "that could be lethal." You have to decide whether leaving out the comma will momentarily mislead your reader into thinking that the complement might turn out to be compound, as in "that could be lethal ...


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In both the sentences, 'as' is used as a conjunction. 'As' is generally used as a conjunction, a preposition, an adverb or as a pronoun as in 'such as'. For ex: As you can see from the graph, fuel prices are consistently increasing. (Clause 1: you can see from the graph Clause 2: fuel prices are consistently increasing) As you know, he is an author as ...


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Start by abandoning the notion that these adverbs are in any sense "conjunctive". They define the semantic relationship between two clauses, but they do not conjoin them in the grammatical sense of fusing them into a single syntactic unit. (In all of the examples in your comments that is accomplished by an actual conjunction, and.) That is why ...



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