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6

As Bryan Garner puts it (in GMAU, 3e): "It is acceptable in casual English; it isn't yet in the category of unimpeachable English." In other words, don't write this way if you want to be considered educated. But, if you correct someone who speaks this way, you'll probably be considered a "grammar Nazi".


5

In law, v. is an abbreviation for versus and law case citations are generally written in this format. So it means the legal decision Stanley v. Georgia. The new system isn't indebted to Stanley nor Georgia, but rather the United States Supreme Court decision in that legal case.


3

Neither one of your sentences is correct: you are attempting to splice together two independent clauses using a comma alone, which is a big no-no. Try these instead: No gifts please. We don’t need any orchids and we already have a toaster. No gifts please; we don’t need any orchids and we already have a toaster. No gifts please: we don’t need any orchids ...


3

My observation would be that the usage you mention is common and acceptable in spoken/informal usage. But in formal or "careful" usage, it might sound a little out of place to some ears. One slight point to bear in mind is that "like" isn't always analogous to "as": it is also commonly used to mean "as though"/"as if" (the latter are essentially synonymous, ...


3

It is very common in American English to use "LIKE" instead of "as". However, it is generally considered informal to use it in this way. Then, the sentence is informally correct! And it would be more acceptable (formal) if we use : 'as' “I'm going to help you as promised.”


2

I had to read the sentence four times to make sense of it. It is far too convoluted—and quite needlessly so. Albeit is a conjunction, and as such, it should not be separated from the element (i.e., the word or the clause) that it sets off. It can be used either to start a finite clause (with a verb), or a non-finite clause (including single words)—most ...


2

Yes they are different "It was done so as to make it easier." could be expressed as: "It was done in order to make it easier." or as "It was done to make it easier." While "It was done so to make it easier." could be expressed as: "It was done in that manner to make it easier." You could combine both with "It was done so, so as to make it easier."


1

In Short (or tl;dr) These all say the same thing (well, or can say the same thing; see below): It has been done         so as to permit   air to circulate freely. It has been done         so      to permit   air to circulate freely. It has been done   in order to permit   air to circulate freely. It has been done                    to permit   air to ...



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