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4

Coördinating conjunctions, such as and, or and but, can be used to begin a new sentence. This was already widely accepted in Fowler's time, and probably always. There is nothing wrong with the conjunctions in your examples. In general, though, you should apply this feature of our language judiciously: do not do it every other sentence. However, you should ...


2

I would say "More often than not, I work on teams wherein I share pools of work with other colleagues." I don't think many would fault your sentence as written, but I think the switch to the singular in "pool" is a bit ambiguous (presumably the different teams have different pools). I also think "wherein" is a better preposition for "teams," since a team is ...


2

In general, subordinating conjunctions become part of the subordinated clause they create, which means the position of the subordinated clause (including the conjunction) in the sentence relative to the other (main) clause can change. Coordinating conjunctions, however, must remain between the two clauses (or whatever elements). In the case of "for" and ...


2

I think the last version is the best but you should perhaps expand it to "A confusion matrix shows the number of true positives (TP), false positives (FP), true negatives (TN), and false negatives (FN)."


2

They are both okay. You can conjoin any two phrases of the same type to get another phrase of that same type. The structure is I am doing this [[to [get more attention]] and [to [seek for opportunities]]]. where "and" connects two to-infinitives and gives you a to-infinitive that goes with "doing this". But the two lower verb phrases could also be ...


1

Simpler: I am doing this to get more attention and seek opportunities. An American's Guide To Doing Business In China: ... - Page 113 Mike Saxon - 2006 - Many rural people, especially the young, go to a city to make money and seek opportunities for advancement. Also consider at Google Books (not vanilla Google): "and seek opportunities to" ...


1

I would argue that the second is more likely, because if you can't go out for any reason, then "You can not go out" would be sufficient. Alternately, "You can not go out or hang out with your friends" would emphasize that neither of those things are acceptable. Your other example should really be using "or" as well: "[Y]ou can not drink or smoke." ...


1

I, while accepting the idea of starting conjunctions, can't quite applaud your own sentences here. I'd say the suggested conjunctions are not optimal for the logical transitions at hand. Also, the first sentence needs a fix in terms of verb consistency. I'd suggest: "The organization should have taken the blame. /Otherwise/If not/, its leader should have ...


1

Listen to your programmer brain. You've given a very good analysis and shown that the original sentence is ungrammatical. There are several ways of expanding it, as you've said, but none of them leads to a plausible and grammatical English construction.


1

The construction is generally called a "right node-raising" construction, following Paul Postal. What things are grouped together in each conjunct is not of direct significance -- instead, what matters is that you start out with conjuncts having one constituent in common at the end of each conjunct, then this constituent is lost in every conjunct, but ...



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