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5

Some sentences suffer from what is called syntactic ambiguity (see here). This means (roughly) that it is not clear which words go with which other words. The sentence "Johnny is not tall and fat" is syntactically ambiguous. It can mean either Johnny is not tall and not fat. Johnny is not tall, but he is fat. (There is even a third possible meaning; ...


3

No. A semicolon should be used in one of the following situations: To separate two linked sentences (note: as they are sentences, they must contain a verb) To separate list items that contain commas In your original sentence, the second part is not a sentence (it contains no verb) and it means nothing standing alone. It does not work to use a semicolon ...


3

Yeah it's fine because you're drawing a contrast between the event at which the addressee would be present (and thus would need to be available), and your uncertainty about the addressee's availability.


2

Stop smoking before it's too late. correct He won't stop smoking until he's been diagnosed with lung cancer and it's too late.


2

Yes, the grammar is off for all the sentences. It should say: Metal is used for energy. It represents speed. Metal is used for imaging. It represents recording. Metal is used for protection. It represents security. Metal is used for playing. It represents inspiration. It's good to use periods for every sentence, I think. The first two sentences still ...


2

Except for the unless in quotation marks, the word never appears at the end of a sentence in your example... But it could! In the paragraph you quote, the part that normally would follow unless has been left out. It's left to the reader's (listener's) imagination to fill it in. This is used quite a lot: Unless you study very hard, you will not ...


1

What you have are two examples of so-called garden paths, sentences that are arranged to mislead your reader into making the wrong parse. In the first sentence, your reader might expect a third crime instead of a consequence: He was convicted of murder and human trafficking and driving on an expired license. In the second sentence, your reader might ...


1

From the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 6th ed., p. 64, § 3.04: Within a paragraph or sentence, identify elements in a series by lowercase letters in parentheses. The participant’s three choices were (a) working with another participant, (b) working with a team, and (c) working alone. I personally ...


1

There should be punctuation added and an "and" inserted before the final factor, thus: There were a few factors to keep in mind when going about the benefit cost analysis: 1) technologies that were going to stay, 2) those that were going to stay but be upgraded, 3) things that were going to come to the new house, 4) technology that will be taken to the new ...


1

Instead of actual numbers, you could use "first of all", "secondly", etc. Fifthly (or any final thing in the list) would be interchangeable with Finally in the below example. You could use semicolons or comma-separated lists. The below example uses semicolons: There were a few factors to keep in mind when going about the benefit cost analysis: First of ...


1

I would likely write it as: We'll be creating a simple login screen with input boxes for an email address and a password as well as a sign in button. The use of two is redundant in my view.


1

We'll be creating a simple login screen with two input boxes for email address and password and a sign in button. This is right because we are stating two things to be added: 2 input boxes and a sign in button. Furthermore, we are stating the use of each input box.



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