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2

My answer comes so late that it is probably doomed to dwell at the bottom of the answer column, but the question remains a question about which I care, so my answer adds a point other answers have missed. "Which" instead of "that" is almost always used in sentences with nonrestrictive qualification, as The horse, which is in the paddock, is six years ...


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A vote for Not to mention A or B. It is certainly better logically, which computer scientists would appreciate. In formal logic, as in most computer languages, not   [mention A   or   mention B]   =   [not mention A]   and   [not mention B] (De Morgan's Law)


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The grammatical principle here is called parallelism (balance within one or more sentences of similar phrases or clauses that have the same grammatical structure). Thus... I would rather eat it than [I would] look at it ...where the contrast is between two actions represented by infinitive verb forms (eat, look at) either side of than (being half of ...


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Those are not negations. If you mean that there are no bacteria and no viruses then you use and (your first choice). If you mean that there are no bacteria or there are no viruses (and it is possible that there are neither) then you use or (your second choice. Likewise for your kicking and/or punching examples. And means both (both are prohibited, in this ...


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English is English. Not mathmatics or logic. However, some people allow mathmatics and logic to inform the way they use English. Others do not. English is all about usage. Adding negators (be they not or otherwise) can invert the meaning of and and or. In logic this is called Demorgan's law and can be expressed as: The negation of a conjunction is ...


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Furthermore, as is often the subtle case with languages, it is difficult for a foreign speaker to "feel" the slightly humorous/awkwardness of "on account of" versus the straightforward "because of" which more clearly designates causality and frankly, as such, sounds more professional in a formal context. I was trying to think of (or manufacture) --an example ...


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For target audience of computer-scientists, a snippet of psuedo-code not English sentences seems appropriate. Something like Boolean isAllowed := !(X|A|B) Also phrases like 'of course' and 'not to mention' in a technical document may not be appropriate; they risk sounding patronising. I suggest omit those phrases and stick to the facts and formulae.



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