Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

There are certain mandatory rules of English grammar. If you want to indicate that someone was engaged in the game of soccer, you must follow the English grammar rules of word order and construction and say something along the lines of "He was playing soccer." If you say, "Playing will he being soccer," you haven't said something coherent. We can talk ...


5

There's nothing wrong with the original sentence, and it's not punctuated incorrectly. (And punctuation is not "cruft," as you call it. Properly used, punctuation exists to help a reader make sense of written symbols without the intonation or stress markers of speech.) Multi-word introductory adverbial phrases are correctly set off with a comma, to ...


3

Call, or e-mail for more information implies that the reader should "call" or "email for more information". That is to say, to get more information one should email rather than call. For example: call to buy the product; email to get a product info sheet. Call or e-mail for more information implies that either calling or emailing will yield ...


3

Once you've decided to include the state, and place a comma between city and state, the reason for the comma after is fairly simple: The tallest building in Portland, ME, is 16 stories tall. In this sentence "ME" is parenthetical, and meaning of the entire sentence is reasonably clear. The tallest building in Portland, ME is 16 stories tall. In ...


3

This is strictly a matter of style—and one on which (as is so often the case) preferences vary. The Chicago Manual of Style, fifteenth edition (2003) lays out consistent approaches to both a "primary system" for handling punctuation and font issues, and a "more traditional system": 6.3 Punctuation and font: primary system. All punctuation marks should ...


3

This construction is known as dislocation (specifically left dislocation): the noun phrase "Anyone who does this", which would normally be expected to be the subject of "will be punished severely", has instead been moved to the left, and a pronoun has taken its place. The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (CGEL) gives this (contrived) example that is ...


3

A run-on sentence is two or more sentences without any punctuation between them. E.g. "It is raining now we must hurry home" instead of "It is raining now. We must hurry home". So the example sentence is not a run-on sentence. The phrases "For the first time" and "on food rich in hydrogen peroxide" could be removed and the sentence would still be ...


3

There is no rule governing the use of commas. None. Not a single one. Some people (especially editors and publishers) invent mechanical rules for themselves, or adopt mechanical rules which other people have invented; some use commas and other points like gestures, to divide their sentences into smaller more coherent chunks; some write their sentences for ...


2

They reached the island with an airplane (,)and (,) realizing that no damage was done to them (,) were happy, since they had finished their journey. Your original is not entirely idiomatic. If we make a couple of vocabulary changes then the sentence becomes easier to read and punctuate. They reached the island by airplane and, realizing that no ...


2

The comments so far haven't answered your question. There's quite an extensive explanation of the ins and outs of the Oxford or serial comma here. You'll notice that the writer of the article says that "a serial comma or series comma (also called Oxford comma and Harvard comma) is a comma placed immediately before the coordinating conjunction (usually ...


2

You could interpret the state or province in Springfield, Calif. and Springfield, N.L. as a non-restrictive phrase, as an elliptical or parenthetical way of specifying the Springfield you want*: Springfield, [the Springfield in] New South Wales, is a suburb of Gosford. Springfield, [by which I do not mean the town in Nebraska but the Mennonite camp ...


1

Or even She realized that, because Paul took the money, he was an accessory to her crime. all three are accepted. The trend is towards lighter punctuation. And since there is no confusion in a short sentence like this, choose no comma. That is the current trend. The current principle is to read the sentence out loud and listen for the punctuation. ...


1

The original sentence has a compound predicate. A compound sentence, by contrast, is two sentences joined by punctuation. Most styles wouldn't use a comma to separate the parts of a compound predicate (or, put another way, to separate the subject of a sentence from any of its verbs). I would remove the comma, or else I'd keep it and then repeat the subject ...


1

I think your problem is with the logic. What the compound sentences rule you're talking about is really saying is: Rule 1: If a sentence is a compound sentence, then the conjunction should be accompanied by a comma (most of the time). But the sentence you gave as an example isn't a compound sentence, i.e. it doesn't have two independent clauses, so ...


1

In fact, the comma before and is not necessary. Boil it down: you wouldn't use a comma before and in this shorter sentence: I went to the store and bought some milk. So it also doesn't belong here: I went to the store and, realizing I was thirsty, bought some milk.


1

Your sentence: After conceding defeat to his rivals, James took it upon himself to practise harder, knowing it would increase his chances of a better outcome next time. The phrase "knowing it would increase his chances . . ." is not non-essential; that is, it's essential to the meaning of the sentence. Nor is the phrase parenthetical. I submit an ...


1

There needs to be a comma if there is a clause following it. I'm a copy editor, and in AP style, dialogue looks something like this: "I was excited to hear about Stack Overflow's 10 millionth question," Randall Flagg said. "I only wish I had started answering questions sooner." If the attribution precedes the quote, than a period (or other ...


1

This is a matter of style, so you should follow the recommendation of your style manual, either the one you've adopted or the one thrust upon you. I use The Chicago Manual of Style, which mandates that asides, nonessential interruptions, be set off with commas. This is also a kindness to your readers, who won't be tempted to look for a parse like ...


1

It may be that distinguishing the mechanics of punctuation from the functionality of various sentence elements will ease your confusion. Commas set off various constructs from the rest of the sentence: Exclamations ("Oh, damn it all!") Vocatives, i.e., direct address. ("Watson, come here.") Appositives, i.e., renamings. ("I live in Albany, the capital of ...


1

There aren't any obvious errors in this sentence. You have a compound sentence with two main clauses, and a nonessential adjectival phrase describing what happened at the "cafe": Clause One: "We had our nails done at a salon" Clause Two: "We went to the cafe" Relative (adjetctive) Clause: "where... pot of tea." Hope this helps.


1

To avoid this comma conundrum you might want to rewrite the sentence: "Whether you own a dog, cat, or fish, owning a pet provides many mental, physical and emotional benefits." I've removed "can allow" because it's not good English. Multitude is unnecessarily wordy, and mental emotional doesn't make sense. In the future, if you face these kinds of things, ...


1

This "from to" formulation is wrong, because the from-to construction indicates 2 extremes and can’t really be used to denote a list in this fashion. "From dogs and cats to fish" is more acceptable.


1

In both sentences, you have two-part parallel constructions. As a general rule, don't put a comma in the middle of a two-part structure: From Professor John Fleming at DeAnza College: B. Two of any parallel structures other than independent clauses are separated by a coordinating conjunction only: Fred and George want to see Mary. (nouns) Mary got in her ...


1

If this is for an online review, perhaps you should consider making the paragraph into a list: In this book I found a variety of grammatical and textual errors such as the following: irregular verb tense problems - especially lie/lay, sit/set and run lack of subjunctive mood - e.g. "He wished he was" instead of "He wished he were" repeated ...


1

There is no need to use a comma in this instance, because your list of options is two or less. If you were to add another option, then you would need to use a comma between the first two options.


1

There is a strictly correct answer and a practical answer. The strictly correct answer is to leave out the commas (as @DanBron explained in his comment) and add this after the quote: [punctuation as in original] This follows a similar convention when your source material includes either emphasis (italic text) or misspellings. HOWEVER, this strictly ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible