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4

You can dispense with most of the commas in that sentence. You should keep the comma before which, as the usual style is to put a comma before a non-restrictive relative clause, and there is no reason to make an exception here. You could also put an (optional) comma after "cathedral", as when you're speaking there's a pause there, and style guides suggest ...


2

There's a subtle difference in meaning with and without the comma. There is certainly no rule to put a comma before every "because", because the same sentence can be correct both with and without comma, with different meaning. "This might be because another algorithm was chosen." The software was twice as fast as expected. We don't know exactly why this is ...


2

There is a difference in meaning... (A) means that you finally recommend something. (B) means that you finally explained something.


2

I agree that the generally-accepted correct comma usage is A. There've been some cases in my own writing where I find sentences that seem to work without the comma after the introductory word, but I've yet to find an exception to the general rule of the Purdue OWL. Introductory phrases also set the stage for the main action of the sentence, but they are ...


1

Unless finally is modifying having been..., then a comma is needed.


1

No, you don't need to put a comma before every instance of because. In the context of your question, a comma is used to separate two independent clauses joined by a co-ordinating conjunction (and, but, for, or, nor, so, yet) which may be where your corrector is getting the idea that because too should have a comma. Other uses for commas are to set off ...


1

Riggs (2011) argues that tuition prices can be explained by the basic principles of supply and demand and perceived quality. Riggs (2011) argues that tuition prices can be explained by the basic principles of supply and demand on the one hand and perceived quality on the other. Riggs (2011) argues that tuition prices can be explained by two factors: ...


1

If you see a comma after a conjunction, it is pretty close to always wrong. There is a normal use, but not usually. "and" can be used as a coordinating conjunction or as a list or to join two nouns. (This applies to all conjunctions, not just and.) Coordinating Conjunction: He went to the store and bought milk. (With the pronoun) He went to the store, ...


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(a)+(b)[1]: I like tea, especially chamomile tea; however, I prefer coffee. This is the most correct form. Another alternative is to move "especially chamomile tea" into parentheses: I like tea (especially chamomile); however, I prefer coffee. You can also move "however": I like tea (especially chamomile); I, however, prefer coffee. But the ...


1

"including but not limited to" is lawyer-speak, and comes from a lawyer's need to make sure that no one can ever, in any way, under any circumstances, think that "including" is all-inclusive. Merriam-Webster online says "including" means "to have (someone or something) as part of a group or total : to contain (someone or something) in a group or as a part of ...


1

About your question about comma between month/day and year: The 16th ed. of Chicago Manual of Style gives the following format: 1 January 2014 or January 1, 2014 What I understand is that the comma is used in the second example because you don't want a visual confusion between the two separate numbers—not to offset the year as such. Hence, it ...



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