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3

Even is used for comparisons: 1.1 Used in comparisons for emphasis: oxforddictionaries.com All other stylistic considerations aside, if it is your intention to compare the "objectionable fairness" of adding a static type system in a dynamically typed programming language to the "objectionable fairness" of love and war, then even seems to be the ...


2

The reason both sentences seem somehow off is not so much a matter of punctuation as it is a problem of dangling modifiers. “The two initial boxes marked in red” do not need or wish to “sign and return the documents”; you, the presumed reader, need or wish to do that.


2

Your sentence needs at least a break: Your relationships change based on the decisions you make when talking with each crew member. In a few specific instances, these could be decisions you make on which mission to take or how to /implement/effect/ a particularly difficult decision during a mission. This offers both a break and some clarity, separating a ...


1

I think the last version is the best but you should correct it to "A confusion matrix shows the number of true positives (TP), false positives (FP), true negatives (TN), and false negatives (TN)."


1

My take: He said, "There is no in between," and I can't agree more! This is how usually dialogue is reported. Comma before "and" as those are independent clauses (different subjects).


1

Seeing the meaning you wish to achieve, the sentence should be - "All is fair in love and war, even adding a static type system in a dynamically typed programming language." And the comma is good enough here. You use semicolon to separate two clauses and each of the clause can be a sentence on its own. But in your case the second sentence depends on the ...


1

It looks to be a pretty long sentence, but inserting a couple of commas should be fine: Your relationships change based on the decisions you make when talking with each crewmember, and in a few specific instances with decisions you make on which mission to take, or how to resolve a particularly difficult decision during a mission.


1

I'd use another punctuation: This is a serious problem, which ranges from elementary school teachers to adjunct professors such as those here, and deserves far more attention than it receives. The bolded is the parenthetical part, the non-restrictive clause. Commas around it. The rest is the main. I've changed that -> which as this is what Bryan ...


1

With regard to to your question Does the meaning of a sentence ever change between these two alternatives of ', which' and 'that' or is this just a style choice? there is a famous instance from the 1984 Republican Party platform drafting debates that illustrates the significance that the choice between the two forms can have on sentence meaning. A ...


1

You don't need a comma anywhere in there. Everything is there, including the time and the date. There is no additional information, for example where it will be, which I assume you already know where it will be by context. It seems, though, like they can take out the "the" because grammatically speaking, you don't really need it.


1

The New Oxford Guide to Writing By Thomas S. Kane {1988} doesn't accept the mantra 'Never separate the subject from its verb with a comma' as being an inviolable edict: The main elements of a sentence – the subject, verb and object – are not separated by commas except under unusual conditions [bolding mine]. Very occasionally when the subject is not ...


1

The use of commas with coordinating conjunctions, For And Nor But Or Yet So, is only required when they are used to join complete Subject + Predicate pairings. That is, an English clause generally has two primary components: the Subject (the thing which is acting) and the Predicate (the action being taken by the Subject). So, the sentence I walked. ...


1

Both of these are correct. Because both of the words within commas (when the morning comes and in doing so) are separate clauses, they should be set off by commas. You don't need a commas before the conjunction for these particular sentences because the second half of both sentences are not complete thoughts. Since both sentences have the same structure, ...


1

I like the second one best, hands down. This choice comes up in non-mathematical contexts too: My brother Billy is coming with us. Yes, you could write My brother, Billy, is coming with us. But there's no need. In a more complex sentence, the commas can be helpful, but here, and in your sentence, they just drag us down.


1

I can see sometimes the more contrasting em-dash at work: “Some like it hot — others like it cold.” See I Married a Demon by Beverly Rae or “Some like it hot — others, cold.”


1

My suggestion would be to keep it simple and natural, like speech. “Some like it hot, others cold.” No need to add the words "like it" again, as they are understood in this construction; neither is there a need for the second comma.


1

This one is actually quite a difficult one to answer, but it seems more appropriate to use a semicolon where you put your first comma. Alternatively, you could change the statement to "Some like it hot, others like it cold," or "Some like it hot; others like it cold." However, if you require the statement to be "Some like it hot, others cold", then I would ...


1

The commas in this case are bookending a piece of additional information, which could just as easily be enclosed in brackets or a dash (depending on the relative importance of that additional information) or else omitted altogether. Compare: ...draining men and wealth from the island while failing, or not even trying, to defend it from Picts, Irish and ...


1

I think the sentence would flow better if no punctuation was used between "at ease" and "with me." "With me" is a prepositional phrase, and they usually aren't separated by a punctuation mark unless they come at the beginning of a sentence. My main priority as a tutor has always been to help the learner feel at ease with me, with themselves, and with ...


1

I'd go with an em-dash in this situation: My main priority as a tutor has always been to help the learner feel at ease--with me, with themselves and with their own abilities. (I've used two dashes here, but in MS Word I'd insert one long dash, aka the "em-dash".) Read more about the wonderful em-dash here: ...



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