Hot answers tagged

3

"At the end" is an introductory clause (although it can be placed at the end of the sentence). An introductory clause, as such, requires a comma before the main clause. The tunnel is dark. At the end (of it), you will find some light. As for the preposition before "the end", if you are talking about the end of something previously mentioned or ...


2

The two excellent comments from Dan Bron and StoneyB have given you your answer: the famous quote from A Tale of Two Cities is an example of a skilled author making a stylistic choice, not an error. As Dan Bron noted: "Certainly it's deliberate, no question of that, but I'd opine that the primary device being employed is anaphora, rather than the comma ...


2

I would use a comma in this case. A semicolon should only be used when the clauses you're separating can stand on their own as complete sentences. In this case, "Find out on a new episode of Off Time Radio" is a complete sentence, but "if he ever texts me back" is a dependent clause and cannot stand by itself. Thus, it would be incorrect to use a semicolon ...


2

We can work forwards from ABC to DEF by knowing the history of biology, but that uses more than English usage. So let's work backwards, starting with DEF. No one will be surprised by the "slant" (i.e., a particular biased view) of an opponent of one's position. A surprising interpretation may arise from a supporter, though. This leaves out (D) subverting (...


1

No you do not. "I'm from Greenwich, London," is the standard way to say it if you want to include the district and the city. Only reason why another word would need to be in between the two is if your audience does not know Greenwich is in London, though it is implied. In that case you would say, "I'm from Greenwich, the one in London." or "I'm from ...


1

The first set is correct as written. The question of commas becomes necessary with direct quotation as opposed to indirect quotation. Indirect: He thought [that (implied)] it was hilarious. (No commas are called for.) Direct: He thought, "It was hilarious."


1

Typically commas indicate a pause in a sentence indicating another thought is starting. None of these are required. I would only tend to use commas in a case where you really wish to indicate an idea break. Here's an example. In short be careful with commas in these cases. Lack—or overuse—of punctuation (especially commas) can alter the meaning and/...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible