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5

This question, like all matters of punctuation, is a matter of style, and as such, you should be guided by your manual of style. There are two basic philosophies, close punctuation and open. Roughly speaking, the former advocates placing marks whenever there is an occasion to emphasize the syntax; the latter requires the marks only when unavoidable ...


4

Placing commas on either side of the nickname marks it clearly as a non-restrictive appositive. In short, it's clear that "darling" is a re-statement of "Rose" which does not limit or identify Rose in any further way. Omitting the first comma works, but it might tie the name and the nickname together, as if to suggest that "Rose" is really "Rose darling" ...


4

One could argue till the cows come home about something like this, because one is not dealing with a straightforward construction. What is undoubtedly both a question and an exclamation, which is in response to a real or hypothetical previous statement (e.g. I don't want any dinner thank-you). It implies that you may not have heard the person correctly. ...


3

What? Are you not hungry? is supported only in two clauses. First you ask someone: What? Then, for example you didn't understand it, you ask him/her again. Are you not hungry? In this way way we can write it. For the use of exclamation, you can write What! Are you not hungry? Example you are excited that you don't have to pay for bill because your ...


3

It is called a "parenthetical phrase." While you state that is not the name you are looking for, that is the grammatical term for it. More specifically, and within the subset of parenthetical phrases, it is called an "aside." Basically, you are more right than you imagined, more on the right path than you seem to have thought.


3

In spoken English, people say things like What was really amazing is that the house had a little balcony. and no one has any trouble understanding the idea that those speakers are trying to convey. In written English, the landscape is somewhat different: Since writers have the opportunity to edit their thoughts before sending them out into the world, ...


3

Whether to add a comma after viz.—or, for that matter, after e.g. or i.e.—is a style question that different style guides answer differently. For example, The Oxford Guide to Style (2002) has this: Do not confuse 'e.g.' (exempli gratia), meaning 'for example', with 'i.e.' (id est), meaning 'that is'. Compare hand tools, e.g. hammer and screwdriver with ...


2

In general, BrEng prefers putting the comma outside of the quotation marks, while AmerEng puts them inside. Because of this, neither is universally accepted as correct.


2

Should a comma go after a one-word answer to a question? Yes, put a comma afterwards when what ensues flows directly from it and sums up the answer. Should a comma go after a one-word answer to a question? No. Say the following sentence does not flow in direct response to the question. Say that it does not sum up the basis for that answer. In ...


1

Often in technical publishing, single quotes are reserved for literal references. Contextual punctuation in this usage is kept outside the single quotes. ‘A’,  ‘B’,  . . . means the following list:   A   B   . . . Whereas ‘A,?’,  ‘,,B,,’,  . . .   ...


1

Would you be happy with: '... a serious (and sometimes fatal) disease ...'? The comma is actually a tiny parenthesis. Since they are represented in speech by a pause, '(' and ')' sound the same (and aren't apparent at the beginning or end of a sentence).


1

There a couple of misconceptions here. The first is about reduced participial phrases. Generally this means transforming a clause, which has a finite verb, into a phrase with a non-finite verb. Thus I came to work today while I was wearing my new suit becomes I came to work today, wearing my new suit Secondly, I don't know what grammar is ...


1

What - are you not hungry? would be my preference.


1

/Take out the trash and move your bike/ is an imperative and a compound sentence. The implied subject is you. There are no dependent clauses in it. The two sentences have a parallel structure and the /and/ is the linking word. Ergo, the comma rule to be placed before indepedent clauses does not apply here. However, one could - if one wanted to - put in a ...



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