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5

These are not two independent clauses, so they don't get joined by a conjunction. everyone excited ... describes the nature and reason for the crowd on the dock. You could also view it as an elided preposition. It could be restated as something like: The wooden dock was crowded, with everyone excited for the show to start.


3

If you leave out the comma the sentence has a different meaning. "He wanted to go to the park, not the city for lunch" means that the choices are (a) go to the park and (b) go to the city for lunch. Lunch in the park is not implied. "He wanted to go to the park, not the city, for lunch" means that the choices are (a) go to the park for lunch and (b) go to ...


3

The example sentence isn't a simple comma splice situation: You can't replace the comma with a semicolon and be done with it, because the clause after the semicolon would be incomplete: The wooden dock was crowded; everyone excited for the show to start. To make it whole, you'd have to add a was between everyone and excited—but unfortunately the result ...


3

Sure, English is flexible enough to do this. Repetition is sometimes used for emphasis, and we can conjure some examples that would put the word yours twice in succession without breaking any grammatical rules. For example: All of what I have is yours – yours and yours alone. I think this should be yours, yours and not his. Everything I gave ...


3

When you're using parentheses, you put a comma after the parentheses only if you'd put a comma after the word preceding the parentheses. In this case, you wouldn't put a comma after Alexander the Great if you didn't include the dates in parentheses, so you shouldn't put a comma after the parentheses.


2

The caveat about different treatment for titles is a style issue. However, there are rules normally applicable to insertion of commas between adjacent adjectives, as this English Plus article [tidied and slightly modified] explains: Commas with Paired Adjectives Coordinate Adjectives If two adjectives modify a noun in the same way, place a ...


2

In your sentence you have two separate and independent "phrases" and they should be separated by a semicolon, dash or a period. The first one is the following affirmation: I am in the process of renewing my insurance policy. The second one is started with a introductory clause however, so a comma should come after it (as stated in 2 in the reference*): ...


2

On a warm August evening on a pier in Cherry Grove, New York, I watched a display of fireworks. The wooden dock was crowded, everyone excited for the show to start. Police boats and fire boats whizzed around on the water. This construction is perfectly grammatical, although it is often positioned at the beginning of the sentence, to stress its role of ...


2

The third one is correct. You may also bring deadlift before conventional or general to get across main point quicker, i.e.: The correct way to perform a deadlift (conventional or general), is to grip the bar on the outer rings with your index finger.


2

You should not use it. Generally, the rule of thumb is not to use a comma in sentences like yours when the second alternative is very short. Normally, this means that the sentence does not contain two subject/predicate combinations, such as: Should I watch this movie on TV, or should I get my homework done? You can wallow in self-pity, or you can stand ...


2

You're better off leaving it as-is. The commas are not needed, and would be inappropriate because they would create a false appositive, linking a plain noun (cat) with a possessive one (Luke's).


2

No: you should not place a comma before as well at the end of a sentence. You would normally put a comma before as if it introduces a further explanation of the function of something, and only then if it is an afterthought: he liked her, as a friend. And of course you would use a comma if as introduces a full clause that is not closely connected to the main ...


1

Looking up "true independent of" and "true independently of" in Google searches shows that though both occur, the former usage predominates. There is a similar picture with "valid independent/ly of", though these are not as common. The phrase following true/valid is certainly modifying [the statement in] the independent clause, A is true. This means that ...


1

Each statement is identical in meaning, needing no punctuation. It can be offered to one person (A) or more than one person (B): A: "George! We wish you all the best!" B: "Dear Programming Group! We wish you all the best!" You could write B like so: "Dear Programming Group! We wish you all, 'All the best!'" but it is a little awkward-looking and takes ...


1

I would write it: "I left the oven on. Rats", he said. "Rats! I left the oven on," he said. Or as @Erik Kowal suggested: "I left the oven on. Rats!" He said.


1

There should be a comma before the last "well." You're correct that it's an interjection.


1

(,,, like this,,,)-type writing style is not a proper English writing style.Moreover, we normally use dots for ellipses not comas.However, I have seen (,,, like this,,,)-type writing style in web media in other languages than English due to wrong usage of two-alphabets keyboard (one alphabet being English alphabet) where the key that has the sign for dot can ...


1

The snag here is that the parenthetical follows a coordinator, and coordinators usually may have or even prefer a comma before them, certainly for longish independent clauses. Here, I'd say that the parenthetical (which arguably then needs another name) is sufficiently set off by even the not-quite-adjacent comma: Mary asked John for the third time, ...


1

Your examples are more complex than just independent clause + and + independent clause. In those simple cases, the comma would go before the and. But your examples are complicated with parenthetical insertions, pertaining in each case to the second of the clauses, and directly following the and. In cases like that, since you are marking off your ...


1

The important fact is that the first part is an adverbial clause. This means a comma works well. I wouldn't go so far as to say it was wrong without it, but it seems to read with a more natural rhythm if you use the comma. If you had said "You run the program and then you use it to play the tones.", there is no adverbial clause (they are independent ...


1

As Edwin Ashworth points out, the four items form two pairs, based on internal contrast within each. It's somewhat elliptical, perhaps even poetic, in that it leaves out an "and" between the two pairs. Also it would sound awkward to say "I share many of the same hopes and fears, and dreams and disappointments." The more standard form "...hopes, fears, ...


1

The reason you are looking for is called "comma splice" -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comma_splice I'm with you. I don't see commas as being appropriate punctuation here. I'd go with either parens or em dashes, as in the following: "This research--see references [1] and [2]--has shown some success." The em dashes are more obtrusive, though. My first ...


1

In each of the OP's listed examples involving then or so— And then that's when you went to the store? Then at McDonald's you were only there for a year, year and a half? So, if we talk over each other, it won't be clear. So, the last seven years you worked for Dollar General, correct? —ElendilTheTall's comment (above) that including ...


1

If find the Oxford comma to give fair representation to how people speak. When listing items in speech, equal pause is given between each item. For me, the Oxford comma emphasizes that there is, indeed, a pause before the 'and' preceding the last item of the list. I think the Oxford comma also indicates the direction of the sentence -- it makes it clear ...


1

You would place a comma after the interruption if the first quotation was not a complete sentence, but dialogue doesn't have to use complete sentences. Using the period in sentence 1 amounts to deciding not to use complete sentences within the dialogue.


1

I was drawn to this question by edits that I made on other SE sites, constantly being re-edited and commas being added after an "e.g." that I had added, without the comma. After the umpeenth time, I decided to check whether I was wrong, and had been making the same mistake for 40 odd years. I was quite sure that the use of a comma was incorrect and had not ...



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