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The Chicago Manual of Style, fifteenth edition (2003) agrees with Microsoft Word's punctuation checker. Here is the relevant paragraph in Chicago: 6.40 Repeated adjective. When an adjective is repeated before a noun, a comma normally appears between the pair. "You're a bad, bad dog!" Many, many people have enjoyed the book. To ...


3

I don't think the parenthesis idea works at all. Let's remove "we suddenly see": Are a dozen or more sailing in the clear blue sky? Ok. (I'd love to know what are sailing in the blue sky). So, what did we take out? we suddenly see Either this means "see" literally; in which case we can count "them" Or "see" means to be aware of - Merriam ...


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I would punctuate it like this: Should this discussion result in a definite need for additional funding, I will submit a request for additional dollars at that time.


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Yes, the quotation from Bachelard would be better with a comma before the "and", rather than after. However, it would be even better with a semicolon replacing the "and": ". . .the same tonality as home; by recalling these memories, . . . " It would not be good punctuation to leave out all commas. One would not say this sentence aloud with no pause, so ...


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A comma would be considered correct usage. If starting the sentence with a prepositional phrase, then a comma should separate the phrase from the rest of the sentence. In this regard, it is submitted that the assessment took place before the amendment of the said legal provisions. This page has some good examples of how to use prepositions and ...


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As Robusto points out in comments beneath the question, there is no universally acknowledged rule governing whether to include or omit a comma after a conjunction at the beginning of a sentence. Robusto reports preferring to include such commas in academic documents, but many other writers and editors would not include them. In my experience copyediting ...


1

I'd use semicolons for this; you can use commas for subdivisions. I'd also change the order a bit, to stick the list at the end. I've used a variety of punctuation marks, which I think gives greater clarity (hope no-one disagrees). The principal constituents of carbonate rocks (the base of the classification model of common carbonate minerals) are ...


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You have a compound infinitive describing your job: "to extract and to calculate." You also have a predicate complement "lethal" in the relative clause "that could be lethal." You have to decide whether leaving out the comma will momentarily mislead your reader into thinking that the complement might turn out to be compound, as in "that could be lethal ...


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I will back my statement up based on the fact that I have a bachelor's degree with a minor in English, and that I have a few grey hairs. We must keep in mind that there is no official sanctioning body that dictates how to use commas in a salutation that includes the word "Hello." In my years, I have come across many different interpretations on how to ...


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The comma may be present or absent in this case.


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The teacher is mistaken, though they are equivalent in your first two sample sentences. "I can't see you -- are you here?" is grammatical, but "I can't see you, are you here?" is a comma splice. "What the --" isn't a complete phrase, but it's acceptable in dialog. "What the," would not be. Similarly, "What the -- oh, there you are" would be acceptable in ...


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I don't think the problem is with however. These rules will make my point clear. You can also use however near the beginning of a sentence to mean ‘but’, ‘nevertheless’ or ‘regardless of the fact’. It is often used this way for emphasis. The 2010–2011 Federal Budget was no fiscal revolution. It did, however, mark the first ‘real’ step towards ...


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If the platform uses HTML, CSS, and Bootstrap to connect people and systems, I can't see any advantage to introducing a pause before "using"—and you certainly wouldn't gain anything by putting a comma after "Bootstrap." That is, the minimally punctuated sentence Develop the front end of a platform using HTML, CSS, and Bootstrap to connect people and ...


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Start by abandoning the notion that these adverbs are in any sense "conjunctive". They define the semantic relationship between two clauses, but they do not conjoin them in the grammatical sense of fusing them into a single syntactic unit. (In all of the examples in your comments that is accomplished by an actual conjunction, and.) That is why ...



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