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2

Neither of your examples hold water. People don't usually use pauses where you've placed the commas here, unless trying to overdramatize, and then a comma is still not the correct way to indicate it in writing. For a dramatic pause you would use an m-dash, or an ellipsis. There may be exceptions, but I can't think of any. In an email to tell your boss ...


2

The second example is grammatically incorrect, but the problem is not the number of commas. "I spend most days ... doing" is OK: I spend most days thinking about the future, hoping that I'm on the right path, and doing my best at everything I can. It means: "I spend time thinking, hoping, and doing" but "I spend most days .... I do" (as in your ...


2

I believe this is just a case of a prepositional phrase in which the preposition is implied, rather than stated outright: ...line of performance apparel is perfect for any race, [from] 5k to 50k. It's not incredibly formal, but I doubt it would be flagged as an error in most contexts.


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You will probably want to use an em dash: How I won – and lost – my first employee. Alternatively you could use an elipsis: How I won ... and lost ... my first employee. Further information on em dash and elipsis can be found here By the way it's a little awkward to refer to "winning" a person. "Won over" is a term that is commonly used, referring to ...


1

"How I won and lost my first employee" is correct, as atThoughtfleditor said. "How I won (and lost) my first employee" is also correct and may be more interesting to the reader. The parentheses add a subtle hint that perhaps the author made a mistake, did not intend to lose the employee, and gained a little humility and wisdom through the experience.


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No commas are required. A comma may not be used to separate the verbs in a compound predicate (two verbs with the same subject). See item 13 at this link: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/607/02/


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I would use parentheses rather than dashes: Only my coaches, my best friend (Alicia, who's also my cousin), and her parents. I don't think I've ever seen a comma immediately after a dash, but there's no problem with using it after a close parenthesis. I might also take Alicia's name out of the parenthese: Only my coaches, my best friend Alicia ...


1

Since I don't have enough reputation to comment, I would suggest a list: Only my coaches; My best friend; Alicia, who's also my cousin; and Her parents List entries start with a capital, and end with a comma, unless any element contains other punctuation (the comma after Alicia's name). In that case, use semi-colons. If you add more description to an ...


1

Here's the rule of thumb my eighth grade English teacher taught me, before I mastered when to use a comma. Read the sentence, out loud and multiple times, if necessary, and any place that you have a little pause while reading is a place where a comma is probably needed, or at least helpful. This should work most of the time, but it is not perfect. ...


1

I would not add the comma. It's just an inversion, instead of saying "[OK then] it is noon."


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The second example is correct: the first is ambiguous. It seems as though the speaker is asking his or her hat what it's laughing at. The two elements before and after the comma in the first example are self-contained questions (despite the second question being dependent on the first), and therefore should be split apart as in the second example.


1

Take your pick. They are both correct, and they mean the same thing. But the connotations can be a bit different. As others have noted, the commas can slow reading down. They can set apart (emphasize) at most, helping the reader to notice it. If that's important to you then you might want to add the commas here. If not, drop them. In the case of the simple ...


1

Use of the comma is not appropriate in your case. The serial comma is used only when there are three or more items in the series. It's appropriate to use a serial comma in: Chicago, London, and New York are major financial hubs. It's not appropriate to use a serial comma in: Chicago, and London are major financial hubs. In your case, you only ...


1

Your comma is a serial comma, also nicknamed "oxford comma". In this case it is more a stylistic issue if you use it or not. Sometimes it makes the sentences easier to parse (read).


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Yes. Use the basic date format- Monday, October 20,2014,....... Monday, October 20,........... The (AmE) full month-day-year date always requires commas before and after the year Monday, October 20,2014,....... Unless the date appears at the end of a sentence: e.g., “She will attend the meeting on ...



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