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4

This construction is commonly known as a comma splice. It is frowned upon in present-day English, and it is almost universally held nowadays that the comma should be replaced by a semicolon, a dash, or a full stop. However, Bartleby the Scrivener is not written in present-day English. It’s from 1853, 162 years old. 162 years ago, rules and mores were ...


3

Ellipses can sometimes be confused as trailing off rather than an interruption in dialogue. The em dash is more clearly recognizable as an interruption. Also, it's a lot easier to see an interruption if it's in the middle of a word. I would use: "The owner, Carl, w--" If you're sure you want to use ellipses, and you want the comma, then put a space ...


3

I don't think the parenthesis idea works at all. Let's remove "we suddenly see": Are a dozen or more sailing in the clear blue sky? Ok. (I'd love to know what are sailing in the blue sky). So, what did we take out? we suddenly see Either this means "see" literally; in which case we can count "them" Or "see" means to be aware of - Merriam ...


3

The traditional explanation for when to use commas around Anne is as follows: If the unidentified he in the sentence has only one sister (Anne), then the word Anne is functioning as an appositive, and you would set it off with commas: His sister, Anne, was not feeling well. But if the he in the sentence has two or more sisters, the word Anne is ...


2

Non-restrictive (non-defining): Our mapping contains 2000 words, which map to more than one lemma. Our mapping contains exactly 2000 words, and those just happen to map to more than one lemma. Restrictive (defining): Our mapping contains 2000 words which map to more than one lemma. Our mapping contains at least 2000 words because there are 2000 ...


2

If you're writing this (as a work of fiction, particularly) you have some idea of how the sentence might have continued had it not been interrupted. But if a sentence really is interrupted no-one listening will know, at that point, how the sentence was intended to continue. The comma after Carl is only there to make sense of what comes after. But nothing ...


2

If the example is direct address (hint: his sister's name is not necessarily Anne), the commas are required. If the sentence is not direct address, whether or not the commas are required may depend on the stylistic context, among other things. For example, The Chicago Manual of Style, 14th Edition, says this: "Unless it is restrictive (see 5.50), a ...


2

Yes, it is absolutely necessary. The information set off in the commas are a parenthetical aside, which require being set off in someway from the text. This is usually done with commas (as you have), or m-dashes (—), or just parentheses. The rule of thumb I learned is this: If you can remove the phrase and still have a complete sentence, it is an ...


2

Punctuation is mostly a matter of style, and while there a few rules that all style guides agree upon (e.g, a period after a declarative sentence), you should consult your own style guide, either the one you've chosen or the one thrust upon you. I use The Chicago Manual of Style, which recommends semicolons in the following cases To replace a ...


1

Call, or e-mail for more information implies that the reader should "call" or "email for more information". That is to say, to get more information one should email rather than call. For example: call to buy the product; email to get a product info sheet. Call or e-mail for more information implies that either calling or emailing will yield ...


1

It's not appropriate to use a semicolon after a subordinate clause. I understand that you're thinking you have too many commas, but the correct sentence is "When they returned from the zoo, Charles, James, and Jane looked for new locations to visit." From Purdue OWL: 2. Use commas after introductory a) clauses, b) phrases, or c) words that come before ...


1

I would omit the comma if you are replacing it with a dash or ellipsis. Why? Because the comma and ellipsis both indicate pauses when speaking, and you don't typically double up punctuation of the same type. For example, the ellipsis represents a pause. But you don't keep adding dots to lengthen it (although that's a common mistake to see), and you don't ...


1

I, on the other hand from sooeithdk, regard the first as misleading, almost completely wrong. And why? Because Carl does not stand in any sort of equivalence to the clause that follows the comma. The sentence is not a parallel to the following type of constructions, where the single comma makes sense: After the death, Carl was trying to hire more workers. ...


1

Second one is definitely the correct one. You will understand it better once you see example sentences. The owner, Carl was trying to hire more workers. The owner, (who was) Carl, was trying to hire more workers. The second one is rather explaining who Carl is than interrupting the sentence to inform what the name of the owner is. The first one ...


1

Those sentence clauses you have mentioned in your sentences are called participial phrases. If a participial phrase comes at the end of a sentence, a comma usually precedes the phrase if it modifies an earlier word in the sentence but not if the phrase directly follows the word it modifies. The local residents often saw Ken wandering through the ...


1

I waited for two months, thinking that it would be bad time for him This is perfectly correct English. The meaning is not however what you guessed. The real meaning is "I waited for two months, because I was thinking that it would be bad time for him". The second clause is an explanation of the first, not a continuation. The second sentence is also ...


1

There is a strictly correct answer and a practical answer. The strictly correct answer is to leave out the commas (as @DanBron explained in his comment) and add this after the quote: [punctuation as in original] This follows a similar convention when your source material includes either emphasis (italic text) or misspellings. HOWEVER, this strictly ...


1

If you feel like it; style guides vary so both are right - see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comma#Separation_of_clauses.


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Here is a simple method that you can use to determine (in most cases) whether to include or omit a comma before which in sentences like the on in question here: If you replace which with that and the sentence still conveys the meaning you intend, you shouldn't use a comma before which; if the sentence doesn't retain the intended sense after the switch, you ...


1

I would consider the one without a comma as describing 2000 of the words in the mapping (which possibly contains more words). With a comma it sounds like the mapping contains only 2000 words and are described as mapping to more than one lemma. Since you said the mapping contains more than 2000 words, either omit the comma or say something like: Our ...


1

Dropping the preposition (on) is less formal, but still correct in this case. There is some discussion of this on a sister site, for what it's worth.


1

In our English grammar school fifty-odd years ago, the very idea of beginning a sentence with 'and' or 'but' was so strongly deprecated that discussion on how to punctuate a sentence beginning with a conjunction would not have arisen. However, not all authors were of the same opinion on the usage, even in those days, and nowadays one sees it everywhere. To ...


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I will back my statement up based on the fact that I have a bachelor's degree with a minor in English, and that I have a few grey hairs. We must keep in mind that there is no official sanctioning body that dictates how to use commas in a salutation that includes the word "Hello." In my years, I have come across many different interpretations on how to ...


1

When stating a polite request, using a period is absolutely correct. For example: "Could you pass me that piece of paper, please." Also, since no one else has mentioned this yet, the correct way to write "OK" is always "okay." Save the abbreviated form for text messages and informal writing only.



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