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"What" in your examples is usually considered a relative pronoun (not a subordinating conjunction). And if you classify it that way, it solves your problem. In your example, "what makes me sad" is indeed a clause, with a subject, just as one would expect -- the subject is "what". Ordinary relative clauses modify some noun, but here, there is no noun to ...


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The where-clause is a separate clause. There is no rule of grammar that requires a comma there or forbids it. You can use one if you like. But sentence #1 has some grammatical errors that you should attend to. You write ...interested to work... An article would be idiomatic: "with an excellent reputation".


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If you insert the lacking "the place" you get: I want to visit | the place where my grandmother was born. The part after the vertical stroke is the direct object, consisting of the noun "the place" with a relative clause as attribut. If you drop "the place" you have an elliptic construction, not elegant, but possible, "where my grandmother was born" ...


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I don't think the parenthesis idea works at all. Let's remove "we suddenly see": Are a dozen or more sailing in the clear blue sky? Ok. (I'd love to know what are sailing in the blue sky). So, what did we take out? we suddenly see Either this means "see" literally; in which case we can count "them" Or "see" means to be aware of - Merriam ...


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"Are, we suddenly see, a dozen or more sailing in the clear blue sky?" - Incorrect. There're commas, which if used (and visible), can change the meaning of the sentence. They don't change anything in the above sentence. Nor do they make the sentence appear correct or easily comprehensible.


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We need to look at the context of the article. If this sentence stands alone, which it does in this post, then we really have no way of knowing which noun phrase the clause "that has touched off a devastating humanitarian crisis and threatened to ignite a broader regional conflict" refers to. I would assume it refers to Saudi Arabia's bombing campaign, but ...


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By going off the definition of interchangeable, putting emphasis on truly, no, they are not truly interchangeable. There are certain contexts when they can be, though, such as the shared example.


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The teacher is mistaken, though they are equivalent in your first two sample sentences. "I can't see you -- are you here?" is grammatical, but "I can't see you, are you here?" is a comma splice. "What the --" isn't a complete phrase, but it's acceptable in dialog. "What the," would not be. Similarly, "What the -- oh, there you are" would be acceptable in ...


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I would explain it in terms of parallelism, and warn my students that in English the relevant parallel structure isn't always visible. The sentence Saudi Arabia said Tuesday that it was halting a nearly month-old bombing campaign against a rebel group in neighboring Yemen that has touched off a devastating humanitarian crisis and threatened to ignite a ...


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"that you feel was suspicious" is a relative clause (the term is more systematic than adjective clause). "I consider something suspicious" can be transformed into "something that I consider suspicious". In the relative clause "I" is subject and relative "that" is object. In your sentence you have the construction "I feel it is suspicious". When changed ...


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Ok, I'm confused as it doesn't follow the formula which is explained on this website for example. https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammar/clause-phrase-and-sentence/verb-patterns/relative-clauses It mentions the relative pronoun replaces either the subject or object of a relative clause. If you replace "that" with anything and try and ...


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In the general case, there's some ambiguity. To resolve it, think about the capabilities of each candidate noun to be modified by the phrase. For example, is it a rebel group "that has touched off a devastating humanitarian crisis and threatened to ignite a broader regional conflict," or a bombing campaign that is more likely capable of "touching off a ...


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You have a compound infinitive describing your job: "to extract and to calculate." You also have a predicate complement "lethal" in the relative clause "that could be lethal." You have to decide whether leaving out the comma will momentarily mislead your reader into thinking that the complement might turn out to be compound, as in "that could be lethal ...


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"Where to go is the question." The obvious answer is that "where to go" is an embedded question. If other answerers said this, sorry, I missed it.


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I believe excusing and forgiving are vastly different to each other and are only used interchangeably because of our misunderstanding of their true meanings. To ask to be excused for an action is to say there is an excuse, a valid reason why this thing happened no wrong was committed but merely an action that although regretable doesnt need forgiveness. ...


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I would see the mentioned cases of missing subjects as simple ellipsis. Imperative - the "you" is understood as self-evident. Why look that way? - Shortening of Why should we look that way? A series of participle constructions: Put "I was" or "Imagine me" at the beginning of the sentence and it is complete. Ellipsis (omission) is not an invention of ...


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The paragraph is written in the present progressive with an implied subject [I] and implied helping verb [am]. [I am] Running through the hallways.... This is not standard English, but it functions similarly to an imperative [You] Leave the room. The listener or reader supplies the missing, but obvious, words. A fair amount of recent fiction is written in ...


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Effectively, the participial phrase modifies the sense of the entire clause. But technically, the participle phrase only modifies the word. In your example, "causing him to miss the flight" serves as an adjective modifying the noun John. As to your other question on positioning, putting it either in the beginning or end will result in correct construction. ...



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