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The rule for use of that and which in relative clauses   (both words have many other uses -- this rule is for relative clauses only) is in restrictive relative clauses like the book that he read, or the book which he read, or the book he read either that or which may be used; or neither, if the relative pronoun isn't the subject. in ...


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The use or omission of that is often a matter of style, not grammar, so it isn't the stern application of a rule. For example, "I noticed that she was pregnant." and "I noticed she was pregnant." are both acceptable, though the first is probably preferred for formal writing. There are, of course, some instances in which leaving out the that can change the ...


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"It may not save you money, but it will surely save you endless agony," she said, encouraging her friend to pay a little more for a sharp razor rather than save a little on a dull one.


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If you are using that as a conjunction to link the two clauses, you cannot end the first clause with the preposition on. Read it by itself: I agree with the author on It is ungrammatical. You can either remove on or that, though you might have to do a little restructuring: I agree with the author that the structure of the poem is unusual. I agree ...


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It helps to have the full context of the words you quote: Knowing that a man is not justified by the works of the law, but by the faith of Jesus Christ, even we have believed in Jesus Christ, that we might be justified by the faith of Christ, and not by the works of the law. Knowing is a present participle, a verb form obtained by adding the suffix ...



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