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1

You need to understand that commas and hyphens are there for clarity. There is no sin in placing or omitting commas or hyphens, for emphasis or clarity, if they do not change the meaning of the phrase or sentence. I came, and I saw, and there he was standing on the ledge of the parapet à la I'm flying in The Titanic, looking down below was 500 feet of ...


-1

Change the sentence to "... and a forumla for..." and problem solved. You should provide a strategy that is based on the criteria specified in the document, and a formula for calculating the return.


2

"A person acts recklessly within the meaning of section 1 of the Criminal Damage Act 1971 with respect to - (i) a circumstance when he is aware of a risk that it exists or will exist; (ii) a result when he is aware of a risk that it will occur; ... and it is, in the circumstances known to him, unreasonable to take the risk" It would be ...


0

"A person acts recklessly within the meaning of section 1 of the Criminal Damage Act of 1971 with respect to a circumstance when that [or this] person is aware of a risk that exists or will exist." Nothing wrong with it now...Not difficult to fix at all.


0

Let's simplify the sentence a bit by by ignoring the phrase "with respect to a circumstance." With respect to may be considered a compound preposition meaning about, and its object is circumstance. The phrase makes no different either syntactically or semantically -- all actions concern some circumstance. The problem arises when we consider the ...


0

In TSPE McCawley argues that time adverbs can modify V' or can undergo a rule he calls "Raising" and come to modify S. So there is not necessarily a determinate answer to your question. I found an argument that the "while" clause need not modify the whole sentence, because its subject is commanded by the subject of the main clause. That is, the following ...


1

As @DavidGarner noted, using "being" in place of "is" would solve the problem. This is because "include" should be followed by a noun, and if it is a clause it should be one that at least acts like a noun. "Being" is the gerund of the verb "to be", and gerunds act like nouns, e.g. "Nagging doesn't help the situation." where "nagging" is the subject(and hence ...


1

I think 'includes' needs some sort of noun, not a clause, so if each is was replaced by being, it would make sense.


0

'Since' would be used when the condition is assumed to be surely true. The other would be used to even question the condition.


6

Yes it does. 1)Since you are unemployed, why did you leave your last job? 2)Since you are innocent, why did you flee? 3)Since you are a Christian, why do you believe in a personal God like this? Now these all assert something to be true, where before they only assumed something might be true. 1) Does if here suggest a hypothesis, which means ...


0

There is no problem with the adverbial "huffing along behind his beleaguered friend." It is what is called an absolute phrase. It is completely proper as written and needn't be preceded by a subordinating conjunction. It describes the manner in which the fellow stammered. As for "stammered" and "huffing," I'm not sure what you're driving at with "dense ...


1

How strange: I tried it in Word, and it found nothing to grumble about. It's not a comma splice. The non-finite participial clause "Striding forward with purpose" is a supplementary adjunct. Most non-finite clauses have no overt subject, and yours is no exception, but we understand them as having subjects. In your example, the subject is retrievable by ...



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