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The word which when not used to form a question, is a substitutional pronoun. You use it, to avoid having to repeat the subject you are describing. For example, I have a cat. The cat is a Maine coon. = I have a cat, which is a Maine coon. I have a house. There is a roof over that house. = I have a house. Over that house is a roof. = I have a house, over ...


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Whilst who has a possessive, namely whose; which does not have one. So it is necessary to form the genetive using the form of which. If the subject is a person it is legitimate to use whose, but in the case of inanimate things like bungalows, since one would not normally use who but which, then whose is not strictly correct. Nonetheless, as you may have ...


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In this case the ordinary construction, use A as B, with as B following A, is inverted to avoid the ambiguity which is caused by the position of the relative clause. In your rewrite A common fault is to use a noun which expresses the entire action as the subject of a passive construction, leaving ... as the subject &c will almost certainly be ...


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Use active constructions, with the most action-oriented word as the verb. People commonly make the mistake of using a noun that carries the action as a subject, followed by a passive construction. "The removal of the rubble is underway." This is poor style. The action is conveyed by the subject, not the verb. "They are removing the rubble now." This ...


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In fact, the structure would be made up of the following: That awkward moment + when... Where 'when' is a relative pronoun, and "when..." is a relative clause. The first part is just a noun phrase. The completed "that awkward moment when blah blah blah" is just a noun phrase modified by a relative clause.



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