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Or even She realized that, because Paul took the money, he was an accessory to her crime. all three are accepted. The trend is towards lighter punctuation. And since there is no confusion in a short sentence like this, choose no comma. That is the current trend. The current principle is to read the sentence out loud and listen for the punctuation. ...


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Although still works OK in the first sentence; it's not impossible. Your example just happens to be capable of bearing the meaning "in spite of the fact that . . ". You could even use "but" in that particular sentence. "Although" fails as a subordinating conjunction when there is no reasonable expectation of one thing from the other. You wouldn't say ...


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Because while is serving two different functions in both sentences, ie. Although or whereas. While can also mean 'occurring at the same time', like in the sentence "while my parents were cooking, I was watching TV". You can't substitute 'although' or 'whereas' for 'while' there either without changing the tone of the sentence. Sometimes words just have ...


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Most commonly, dependent clauses are subordinate clauses. Though your second clause here is a main clause, it is also a dependent clause. Here's why: The second clause is considered to be dependent because of the coordinating conjunction but. This conjunction may coordinately link clauses, but it implies contrast. Whenever you contrast something, you need ...


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Stylistically, "I want to visit the place where my grandmother was born," or "I want to visit Ireland, where my grandmother was born," are more felicitous than "I want to visit where my grandmother was born." As @rogermue said, it's not elegant.


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I agree with you completely. The sentence consists of two independent clauses, both with the subject "I". The subject is explicit in the first independent clause and implicit in the second. As an aside, I would describe a sentence with two imperative independent clauses as both clauses as both having the implied subject "you" rather than a null subject. ...


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In American English, they're not equivalent in register; "too good a" is more formal and appropriate for writing, while "too good of a" is informal and less appropriate for writing. It's conversational. I found a comment on the inappropriateness of "too good of a" in an advice column, This Is Not Too Good 'of a' Usage, and evidently the Oxford Book of ...


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It is a complex-compound sentence. There is only one main clause, but there are multiple subordinate clauses that are coordinated on their level: Along with every other devoted Aussie trackydack dagger, I beg the federal government to This is your core of your main clause. What follows are the subclauses: ban these abhorrent, foreign "cuffs" ...


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In UK English I usually hear "too good a." In US English you will find both "too good a" and "too good of a." There is still a preponderance of the former. The expressions are equivalent. As for the history of the phrase, look here.



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