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You're just asking about terminology, right? Can one call a phrase with a subject and a non-finite verb a "clause"? The answer is yes, that is an ordinary use of the term "clause". There are both finite clauses (i.e., tensed clauses) and non-finite clauses. And, as you say, your example has two clauses: a main finite clause whose verb is "let" and an ...


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Traditionally, a clause is indeed a finite verb and all its dependencies. The subject of the sentence is he, the (direct) object his daughter. The verb let is special in that it often has an object and an infinitive as a tertiary complement (third thingy that strongly depends on it, besides subject and object). You could analyse the infinitive after let as ...


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Rephrased as "He allowed his daughter to listen to the music." it might be taken as an implied infinitive phrase.


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The comma is a choice of style. Some style books say it depends on context, others recommend one option or the other. Those prepositions are simply prepositions. They aren't conjunctions in any way. Whether or not you can move a phrase is not directly related to whether it is a clause or not. I have to admit I don't understand your explanation of why you ...


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All the phrases following up here are commonly found as predicative complements. Here are some more examples of such predicative complements: Don't get her angry (AdjP) Get her here as soon as possible (PP) Get her into the taxi. (PP) I got her running errands for me. (V+ing) I am a nutter (NP - I don't think this sense of GET allows NP's as predicative ...


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I am partial to the analysis in The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, which treats up here as an intransitive preposition, analogous to an intransitive verb in that it does not take an object. The traditional account does not allow for a preposition without a complement, but within a framework where prepositions function as heads of phrases, ...


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In general, subordinating conjunctions become part of the subordinated clause they create, which means the position of the subordinated clause (including the conjunction) in the sentence relative to the other (main) clause can change. Coordinating conjunctions, however, must remain between the two clauses (or whatever elements). In the case of "for" and ...



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