Hot answers tagged

6

Yes it does. 1)Since you are unemployed, why did you leave your last job? 2)Since you are innocent, why did you flee? 3)Since you are a Christian, why do you believe in a personal God like this? Now these all assert something to be true, where before they only assumed something might be true. 1) Does if here suggest a hypothesis, which means ...


4

The two NPs after "with" are from the absolute construction "with tiredness and underperformance being the result" reflecting the optional deletion of "being". Similar constructions are "with no one (being) the wiser", "with the election (being) still undecided", and "without time (being) a factor".


4

Because your theoretical sentence is a dependent (or subordinate) clause, the answer is no. However, as with many grammatical rules, if the context in which you are writing is informal (e.g., fiction), then it is perfectly fine and subject to your discretion; if the context is formal, you should more than likely not use a dependent clause as a standalone ...


3

I don't think the parenthesis idea works at all. Let's remove "we suddenly see": Are a dozen or more sailing in the clear blue sky? Ok. (I'd love to know what are sailing in the blue sky). So, what did we take out? we suddenly see Either this means "see" literally; in which case we can count "them" Or "see" means to be aware of - Merriam ...


3

If that and who were used as relative pronouns, you would be correct: that would be used as the restrictive relative pronoun for things, and who for humans, but those sentences require that as a conjunction. He was so angry that he didn't let me talk to him. In the sentences below that and who are used as relative pronouns. Katrina was the storm that ...


3

Philadelphia...was a true eighteenth-century metropolis, the largest, wealthiest city in British America, and the most beautiful. The phrase the largest, wealthiest city in British America is a noun group (a noun plus modifiers), and it functions as an apposition to the noun group a true eighteenth-century metropolis (it indirectly modifies it, as a ...


3

1 Relative clause (adjective clause): Fruit that is grown organically is expensive. 2 That-clause (noun-clause) as attribute of a noun: Your statement that you didn't take the money can't be believed. The structure of the that-clause in 1 and 2 is different. In 1 "that" has subject character; you could replace "that" by "it". In 2 you have a subject (you) ...


2

"A person acts recklessly within the meaning of section 1 of the Criminal Damage Act 1971 with respect to - (i) a circumstance when he is aware of a risk that it exists or will exist; (ii) a result when he is aware of a risk that it will occur; ... and it is, in the circumstances known to him, unreasonable to take the risk" It would be ...


2

According to Grammarist (all the quotes in this answer come from this linked document), ... the subjunctive mood is used to explore conditional or imaginary situations. There are several uses of the subjunctive mood, one of which is: It’s used to make statements of necessity: It’s essential that they be heard … [Alternet] This is of the same ...


2

Your sentence could be rephrased to the following when you put the dropped being back after each subject of the absolute construction: Will we be able to talk?” I asked, my eyes being red and swollen from crying, a balled up tissue being squeezed tightly between my sweaty palms. The full (longer) version before the construction will be Will we ...


2

It might or might not be grammatically correct (per Hot Licks' comment) but it seems clunky and redundant to me. This is because he was smart, and he worked hard, and so he was very rich. In this particular sentence, "This is because" should refer to some described "this" that comes before this sentence. For example, He is very rich. This is ...


2

You don't use a subject when creating an "imperative sentence". "You" is generally omitted, but sometimes it is used. You (pointing one among multiple people) go. This is an example of an imperative sentence. If there is only one person in front of you, there is no need to use "you".


2

"What" in your examples is usually considered a relative pronoun (not a subordinating conjunction). And if you classify it that way, it solves your problem. In your example, "what makes me sad" is indeed a clause, with a subject, just as one would expect -- the subject is "what". Ordinary relative clauses modify some noun, but here, there is no noun to ...


2

In the case of your sample fragment, I would say yes, it modifies the nearest noun phrase, virtualized hardware components. To make it refer to the earlier noun phrase a complete virtual system, you would need to add commas (or better yet, parentheses), like so: a complete virtual system, consisting of virtualized hardware components, onto which an ...


2

"About 50% of the small intestine can be removed with little interference to absorption-with one exception." Firstly there is a punctuation error. The hyphen should be replaced with an em dash. "About 50% of the small intestine can be removed with little interference to absorption—with one exception." Answer Here is a paraphrase that explains ...


1

It's not clear from the question how the requested word is to be used, but where a word doesn't really exist in English it may be appropriate to appropriate a related expression: The well-smoked man This is perhaps slightly humorous as it treats the man as a kipper. It wouldn't work in every situation. A better solution is simply to say that the man ...


1

1. Neither is correct. 2. Of the two, the second is preferable because it uses 'who'. 3. You say, I believe that the first sentence is correct, because before "that" we have "angry", not a human. Is that correct? Well, "angry" is not a thing. It is an adjective that relates to "he" (a person). 4. He was so angry who didn't let me talk to him. ...


1

Your question doesn't seem to be so much about what a clause modifies, but about how to determine the antecedent of a relative pronoun, (the noun referred to by that pronoun), in this case, "which." There are several considerations in making that determination. Proximity. The modifying clause has a strong attraction to the nearest preceding noun, which ...


1

"when I get my hair done" is not an adverbial clause in your example. It's a relative clause modifying "day". Similarly, in "My hairdresser's is the place where I get it done", "where I get it done" is a relative clause modifying "place". It is more obvious that these are relative clauses if you use "on which" in place of "when" in your example, or "at ...


1

I believe that would be a Dependent Relative Clause, also known as a Dependent Adjective Clause. We can know this because the clause can't stand alone (making it dependent) and it describes a noun (the undiscovered country, making it relative/adjective). A clear and concise link to understand the differences between dependent clauses can be found here.


1

A. Simon found it extremely difficult to compete with the bigger children. The first thing to do is to work out what 'it' refers to. In fact it refers to the clause, "to compete with the bigger children, even after gaining the uphill advantage" Here is a rewrite with that substitution made: B. Simon found to compete with the bigger children, even ...


1

They also serve who only stand and wait, is a line from a poem. Poets have the license to move clauses around so as to make their poems scan and rhyme. Don't be misled into thinking that this is a common or generally acceptable sentence structure; it's very unusual. As the comments say, the usual word order would be They who only stand and wait ...


1

I love to dance and sing, to laugh and play. The way you have punctuated this, I'd interpret it to mean that you frequently sing while you dance, and you frequently laugh while you play, and that you particularly enjoy these two kinds of frolicking. (That doesn't mean that you never dance without singing, or sing without dancing, or that you don't ...


1

How strange: I tried it in Word, and it found nothing to grumble about. It's not a comma splice. The non-finite participial clause "Striding forward with purpose" is a supplementary adjunct. Most non-finite clauses have no overt subject, and yours is no exception, but we understand them as having subjects. In your example, the subject is retrievable by ...


1

Punctuation is a matter of style, so of course, you may write the "3-year program Wizwoz" to emphasize that you're talking about an official name. Before you do, however, be aware that style manuals recommend quotation marks for two other purposes. 1) Direct quotation. So you may confuse a reader who is looking for the brochure from the University of ...


1

First of all comma (,) is used where you need to separate things like: She has blue, red, green and black dresses. or used where you need some halt in sentence not like period (.) but a shorter one like: Ginger Software announced today that Ginger Page, its new English writing enhancement app, is now available for download on several ...


1

It is a complex-compound sentence. There is only one main clause, but there are multiple subordinate clauses that are coordinated on their level: Along with every other devoted Aussie trackydack dagger, I beg the federal government to This is your core of your main clause. What follows are the subclauses: ban these abhorrent, foreign "cuffs" ...


1

In UK English I usually hear "too good a." In US English you will find both "too good a" and "too good of a." There is still a preponderance of the former. The expressions are equivalent. As for the history of the phrase, look here.


1

In American English, they're not equivalent in register; "too good a" is more formal and appropriate for writing, while "too good of a" is informal and less appropriate for writing. It's conversational. I found a comment on the inappropriateness of "too good of a" in an advice column, This Is Not Too Good 'of a' Usage, and evidently the Oxford Book of ...



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