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The correct answer may be simpler than any given. In the world of BDSM, it is your Master or Mistress who determines all your rules of capitalization, not the grammar books. (Using the male gender for simplicity), he may want you to capitalize He and You when writing to Him. He may want you to write Master with a capital no matter what the context, and he ...


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Please, please allow yourself, and all the users of English, the dignity of personal and cultural interpretation and application of any rules associated with proper usage: the RULE is that language reflects the expression of the people who create and use it: language is infinite. Many languages are dissimilar to English in the way that first person ...


1

However, the question is not about formal correctness. The question is whether it's appropriate for me to justify my, ehm, linguistic relationships with "I" with my cultural identity? If you want to use lower-case "i" for cultural reasons, you should come up with a better anecdote than that bit about everyone being a special snowflake. I don't know ...


1

'I' is always capitalized in standard English. In Internet chat, it isn't always capitalized.


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Most scientific organizations have a style guide. The American Medical Association has one, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers has one, the Council of Science Editors has one, most scientific journals have one or recommend the use of a particular one. There is no right or wrong here--it is a matter of choice, but that choice is often dictated by ...


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Although commonly misstated, that is, stated in a simplified form such as "capitalize the first word of a sentence", the "rule" that applies in the circumstance you've described was originally a printing convention termed 'sentence case'. That convention has in modern times transferred, for the most part silently, to typographical media other than printing, ...


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If it's the name then it should be capitalised. If you are describing the geography it would be lower case e.g walking in a wooded valley, as apposed to visiting the Phoenix Valley.


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In this case, you're dropping the H from a pronoun. I think the answer to this question lies in the way we treat proper nouns. When H-dropping a proper noun we never capitalize the letter following the H: In My Fair Lady, Eliza Doolittle described the weather in three English counties: 'in 'artford, 'ereford and 'ampshire, 'urricanes 'ardly ever 'appen' ...


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Here are some style recommendations from various more-or-less influential style guides. From The American Heritage Guide to Contemporary Usage and Style (2005): centuries Centuries may be expressed in words or numerals. [Examples:] words for the twenty-first {or 21st} century; seventeenth-century {or 17th-century} English literature From The Associated ...


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Google ngram shows "twentieth century" - all lower case - is the most common, which is not, of course, the same as saying it is the best or most grammaritally correct.


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"Richard the Second" (your number 2) is perfectly correct. Have a look at this: http://www.sirbacon.org/graphics/richard2.gif


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Generally, no, "fire department" wouldn't be capitalised unless it's part of the full name of the fire department in question. Then it would be treated as a proper noun and so would be capitalised. But although what I've said is consistent with every style guide I've ever read (and I've read a few), some people do insist on capitalising words they feel are ...


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It is called Title Casing or what is called Headline style. First character in all words are capitalised, except for certain subsets defined by rules that are not universally standardised. The standardisation is only at the level of house styles and individual style manuals. More help here


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It seems to me that not only is the capitalisation strange, but also the language and terminology. I agree with the comments by both Charl E & Hot Licks as possibilities for these oddities, but it doesn't make the overall result correct, appropriate, nor fully intelligible. Confirmation of Registration to <...> Your registration to <...> has been ...


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Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) offers a mixed answer to the broader question of whether viking should be capitalized or lowercased. In the specific case of the raiders who sacked Lindisfarne, Viking would be capitalized: Viking n {O[ld] N[orse] vīkingr} (1807) 1 a : one of the pirate Norsemen plundering the coasts of Europe in ...


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A term such as "Vikings", which is primarily a reference to a particular race, nationality, religion, or culture, should be capitalized. Only when the word becomes so commonly used and generic that it loses it's association with the race or culture does it lose this "right" to capitalization ... sometimes. For instance, though you might say that "vandals" ...


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Yes, because 'Vikings' is a proper noun, referring to a Norse seafaring people.


2

As far as I know, you are not supposed to capitalize a word after the slash until and unless both are proper nouns.Check this link out for more info: http://www.really-learn-english.com/slash-punctuation.html check the 5th point.


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Depends on what you want to stress, the fact that either word could start the sentence or that either clicking or tapping gets you the menu. The very fact that you didn't choose or suggests the former. However, Clicking/tapping on the icons... Is perfectly acceptable. It simply suggests that your offering alternatives without ever explicitly using ...


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If I were writing about disease stages and I wanted to find a relevant style guide to help me with decisions such as whether to capitalize stage in a term like "Stage I," and whether to capitalize descriptive stage names such as "Clinical Latency," I would obtain and consult the American Medical Association's AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and ...



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