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20

Jeega's post has a number of features.  It shows Jeega's awareness of the usual convention.  It hints that Jeega used to follow that convention.  It mentions a reason to defy that convention and follow an alternate.  It alludes to but does not cite a source which would support that reason. There are also, of course, a number of ...


5

I'm not aware of any specific link with Indian English ("indian english"?) but I do have an addendum to your list: (4) - Stylistic reasons. One might disagree with it, but the lowercase "i" is often a deliberate stylistic choice, a flouting of convention for effect. It's particularly closely associated with poet e.e. cummings, who also rejected the ...


30

I'm Indian. And I assure you there's no such thing as the lowercase 'i'. No grammar teacher of mine -- and I've had quite a few good ones -- ever so much as mentioned it. In fact, this is the first I'm hearing of it. The tendency of Indians to write in textspeak is unfortunate, but 'i' is as erroneous as 'u' EDIT: I'd like to point out that almost all of ...


2

There is no universal rule for formatting the entries in individual cells of a table; capitalization of those entries is strictly a style issue. I checked three widely respected style guides (Chicago Manual of Style, Oxford Style Manual, and Words Into Type), and none of them has anything to say on this particular point. At the magazines where I've worked, ...


1

World Wide Web, or WWW is capitalized, as is Internet, so I capitalize the abbreviation, Web, since it is one of the three capitalized words in the proper compound noun, World Wide Web. I have had no complaints from my Navy customers. Even if someone prefers Web not being capitalized, I can support my choice with logic.


-1

Yes - "Christian Bible" should be capitalised. Because the Bible is the name of a book - i.e. its title - it is a proper noun. However, "bible" can, as you mentioned, be used as a noun. In that sort of a situation it is not the name of a book but rather a "description" of it, thus it not requiring a capital letter. "Bible" may also be capitalised as a sign ...


0

I think it's up to a matter of preference and style more than anything. I tend to capitalise "true" and "false" to remain consistent with the answer choices (which are usually capitalised).


0

This is primarily a style question. The wording "Answer True or False" often appears as a short form of the instruction Answer [each of the following questions by identifying the statement as] true or false: or of the instruction Answer [each of the following questions by appending the word] True or False [to the statement]: In the first ...


0

It should be yes or no and true or false. The only exception for the upper case would be proper nouns, proper acroymns, dates, and of course sentence starters. This being said, I can see why you would think Yes or No. I would recommend that if you are building a website or writing a poll.


1

Based on a quick Google search, convention seems to dictate that "kelly pool" be spelt without a capital K. This is interesting as, according to Wikipedia, kelly pool was indeed named after the inventor (his nickname was Kelly).


3

I'm very late to this party, but given the nature of the letter in which BLARINGNAMECORP's name was to appear—namely, a letter in which you seek acceptance into a university program—I think you made the right call in casting the company's name as Blaringnamecorp. In this regard, it's important to note that the all-cap treatment of company names in logos, ...


2

I would call it miscapitalization. You can say a sentence or word is miscapitalized, just as you can say that a sentence is mispunctuated, or that a word is misused.


0

If capital letters are used to emphasize a word or a concept it could be seen as a poetic license. The liberty taken by an artist or a writer in deviating from conventional form or fact to achieve a desired effect. (AHD) The Free Dictionary


-1

From my survey of numerous websites and print sources, it is clear that those parties interested in such questions as whether the names of the seasons should be capitalized do not agree, except perhaps on which usage is more common in practice.


3

From the Grammarphobia Blog: How to capitalize food names Q: I’m never sure about how food names are capitalized. Is it “Waldorf salad” or “waldorf salad”? “Swiss cheese” or “swiss cheese”? “French fries” or “french fries”? And so on. A: The one thing we can tell you for sure is that the generic noun in these dishes—the “salad,” the ...


0

An adjective is not a proper noun. Proper nouns are capitalized, while verbs and adjectives and other parts of speech are not. In religious circles, when referring to the Bible, it is a proper noun. Same for Scripture. If you are looking up biblical verses or scriptural texts and references, etc.the adjectives are not capitalized.


4

Google - verb is usually capitalised, but the lower case is also used, (see Ngram). The transitive verb to google (also spelled Google) means using the Google search engine to obtain information on something or somebody on the World Wide Web. However, in many dictionaries the verb refers to using any web search engine, such as Yahoo!. Ngram: ...


1

Yes, having google or googling in lowercase is acceptable. See Merriam-Webster. Also, for internet, see this Wikipedia article. It has become a generic term and can safely be lowercased.


-2

While I have wondered this question for a long time, I sometimes see in books "tv" instead of TV. I have also sometimes seen this: "T.V." and I have no idea why. But most likely you would want to put TV if you are writing something. I feel like you wont get criticized for putting "tv", but if you still dont know what is the correct way why dont you just ...


1

If I may I will suggest a cheaper alternative. U of Chicago publishes another book, authored by Charles Lipson, and its title is called, "Cite Right" and that book is all about citing the sources of your statements, claims, knowledge, information whatever you put in your paper. On page 144, Chapter seven of that book Council of Science Editors' (CSE) ...


1

This varies considerably with the style standard you follow, or are required to follow by the target publication. Now, if you follow the guidelines set out by the Chicago Manual of Style , then parts of a book, including numbered chapters, should be lowercase when referenced (per CMOS). See CMOS 8.178 and 8.177. 8.178 Numbered chapters, parts, and so on ...



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