New answers tagged

4

You'll find both initial caps and initial lower-case: From Handbook of Landscape Archaeology, B David and J Thomas (eds), ... the linkage between the Arabian Desert in the east and the Sinai and Saharan Deserts in the west,.... From Great Walls and Linear Barriers by P Spring, In the semi-arid northern borders of the Arabian and Saharan ...


0

While I learned that the use of multiple Xs requires a lower case x, (e.g., Mississippi and Missouri rivers), to my surprise I found a page that suggests just the opposite, too: "...Plurals: When two or more place-names share a common element, the common element is capped: the Thames and Avon Rivers." To me, that looks wrong, so it's likely a less ...


0

If the article is scientific, then creationism is not a proper noun in that genre. If the article were to be aimed at a religious audience, then capitalization might be warranted.


3

This is a style question, so there is no right answer unless it be that whatever style preference a publishing house insists on is the right answer. Still, there does seem to be a tendency in mainstream U.S. style guides to treat military units (companies, battalions, etc.) as part of a proper name when it appears with a particular identifying word, letter, ...


1

One would normally consider a Marine Corps style guide as authoritative for a military word or phrase over an editor. That said, is it really worth a fight with an editor even if they are wrong?


1

The term 'Generation X' was created from the title of the novel 'Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture'. Since the title was capitalized, the term when used to refer to the generation is capitalized, not because it is always referencing the book but out of habit starting with the title.


0

The term "baby boom" was first used in the lower case to describe the demographic phenomenon. Only later did it "cross over" to describe the generation that resulted from this phenomenon. Therefore, it retained its original case structure. The term "Generation X" was "born" as a descriptor of a generation. That's why it was capitalized. William Strauss and ...


3

Excellent question! If you're just talking about a math problem, "math" is not capitalized. But if you're referring to the field of mathematics in a very formal sense (a great thinker in Math)*, or the name of the class where mathematics is taught (Math III), or the school subject (Math, English, History), it's Math with a capital "M". It's the same for ...



Top 50 recent answers are included