Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

This is a style question. Some style guides specifically recommend lowercasing the plural form rivers in exactly the situation that the OP raises. For example, Chicago Manual of Style, Fifteenth Edition (2003) has this: 8.57 Mountains, rivers, and the like. Names of mountains, rivers, oceans, islands, and so forth are capitalized. The generic term ...


0

It should be capitalized because "River" is part of the name of that particular body of water. There are two reasons why this is so- first, naming the type of a water feature can be arbitrary, e.g. creek or river, so calling that feature by a certain name is part of the naming process. Also, different bodies of water can share the same "first name", e.g. ...


2

Generally, offering two options, of which only one is meant to be chosen, takes a form like this: Do you prefer "A" or "B"? In your example, A = "Eggs, butter and milk are dairy", and B = "Eggs, butter, and milk are dairy", so we'd get: Do you prefer "Eggs, butter and milk are dairy" or "Eggs, butter, and milk are dairy"? which is closer to your ...


1

Historically, all nouns were capitalized in English, even in mere sentences (check some Benjamin Franklin, or Shakespeare from the original Folios), and this remains true even today in German, as the Wörter cited above demonstrate. In titles, capitalization increases with the size and formality of the publication; in journalism downstyle--i.e. only the first ...


2

Style guides may differ on this point—because it is strictly a matter of stylistic preference, not logical superiority—but most of the ones I checked don't address the question at all. The exception is R. M. Ritter, The Oxford Style Manual (2003), which discusses the issue in at least two places. First, in the context of main-text occurrences (at 4.1.8 ...


2

If I understand your question correctly, you want to know whether the fact that the initialisms "BOD" and "OD" are spelled in all caps has a carryover effect requiring the spelled-out terms to be initial-capped (that is, to be rendered in the middle of regular text as "Biochemical Oxygen Demand" and "Dissolved Oxygen"). I have never seen a style guide that ...


-2

Midwest is definetly a proper noun. At first I thought it was a common noun but I looked in my book and I found that Midwest is used a lot for terms like "I live in the Midwest" or something like that. It is used to tell where something is in the Midwest. What I am trying to say is, Midwest is a region, not a direction.


0

Besides my current occupation as computer programmer (where acronyms and initialisms seem to be capitalized with no discernible convention), I have been an electronics technician and am a Ham Radio licensee. I would never write "dc" for direct current. This would be DC, always. But let me give a really big caveat to this. It may be that there is an ...


0

I did a quick Google survey (ie searching for 'letters from the queen' etc in Google images and looking at the scanned letters that are generally the result). -The Queen seems to use a comma and capital Dear Mr Subject, Thank you for... -The President seems to use a colon and capital Dear Mr Fellow American: Thank you for.. -The Pope ...


0

Following John Lawler's recommendation (in the comments above) to hyphenate "Spanish-language" would help readers grasp the intended meaning of the rather disjointed, noun-heavy string of words "Spanish language TV spend." Adding the hyphen might also weaken your impulse to (needlessly) capitalize language, since it tightens the visual connection of Spanish ...


0

A couple of years ago, the technology magazine where I worked wrote a lengthy feature article on the Bitcoin phenomenon, and we took great pains in the story to distinguish between Bitcoin as a currency or concept on the one hand and individual (imaginary) bitcoins—that is, units of currency in the Bitcoin system—on the other. Unfortunately, many ...


1

According to en.bitcoin.it both forms are acceptable depending on context: Capitalization / Nomenclature Since Bitcoin is both a currency and a protocol, capitalization can be confusing. Accepted practice is to use Bitcoin (singular with an upper case letter B) to label the protocol, software, and community, while bitcoins (with a lower case b) to ...


2

Not, according to the note under Wikipedia article on 'Bitcoin.' There is no uniform convention for bitcoin capitalization. Some sources use Bitcoin, capitalized, to refer to the technology and network and bitcoin, lowercase, to refer to the unit of account.[7] The WSJ[8] and The Chronicle of Higher Education[9] advocate use of lowercase bitcoin in all ...


0

Concept and network, capitalised: Bitcoin as in the Bitcoin Foundation or Should the banks allow Bitcoin to ... Currency, lower case: bitcoin as in I paid a bitcoin for this Currency symbol, all capitals: BTC as in Price: 1BTC Bitcoin.org uses capitalised Bitcoin to refer to the concept and lowercase for the actual currency. Wikipedia Production 25 ...


3

Many years ago I attended classes (sporadically) at a tiny college in Maryland whose staff and students consistently referred to it in internal correspondence as "The College." The college's quarterly magazine was even named The College. Then I attended classes in graduate school (even more sporadically) at a gigantic state university that so dominated its ...



Top 50 recent answers are included