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3

Space has multiple meanings. One is the enormous dark near-vaccuum which exists outside our world, and this is never used with the definite article "the" or the indefinite article "a". It's used like a pronoun place name, except not capitalised, so you would say "I'm going to space" or "Space is very big" in the same way you would say "I'm going to London" ...


0

When you can add a surname to the sentence, it should be capitalised; Doctor Smith will see you now When it is a job description, (usually prefixed with 'a' or 'the') leave it out; The doctor will see you now. Think of 'Doctor' as becoming part of someone's actual name, and so when it's used to address a specific person, treat it like a proper ...


4

Typically, breeds are not capitalized in general-interest publications, like popular magazines and books and newspapers (see this from the NYT, for example). Common editorial practice follows the guidance of dictionaries like Merriam-Webster's and American Heritage. If you look up beagle or poodle in either of these sources, you will see that it is lower ...


1

Usually not, the one exception being "the Beagle" when referring to any given beagle, ie. the breed as a whole.


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The only way I could see this as being appropriate or consistent is if the document was officially titled as such. For example, if you had a book or periodical named "Principles of Design," I could see an abbreviated reference to the title ("...as we discussed in the first chapter of Principles ...") making sense from a style perspective. To use these ...


1

Sorry if this is a bad answer since I'm new here, I personally think that it's how much emphasis you put onto it, if it's like shouting like in AAAAAAAAAAAlllen! it would be like that, but if it's something like Ch-ch-ch-ch-ch , it would have lowercase letters. I don't really have any references though, just my opinion. Here's the difference between one ...


0

This is entirely a matter of preference. In official documents produced by government agencies, words like Federal, State, County, etc., are commonly capitalized. This was once widespread practice in mainstream media publications as well, and you will continue to see these words capitalized in various non-official documents. However, this is not nearly as ...


3

If it begins a sentence, yes, it should be capitalized. Capitalization aids readability--it is a clear indication of where a sentence begins. Many people have many opinions about the so-called rules of grammar, but as far as I know, agreement that a sentence should begin with a capital letter is universal,* except perhaps in some poetic instances. Even ...


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I think the simplest way to say this is "If it's part of a pronoun it's capitalized, otherwise it isn't". Eg "Washington State students are protesting on tuesday" "Students are protesting against the state government on tuesday" "Washington State is one of the more northerly states of the USA".


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Loan words, including proper names, inevitably succumb to the conventions of the language that borrows them. Hence the Serbo-Croat Stari most will inevitably (and quite reasonably) be rendered by most native speakers of English as Stari Most, because using the initial capital in all the important elements of a proper name is a critical marker of what is a ...


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If we do not translate the names (and more often than not we do not or should not translate them), I believe the original spelling & capitalization is more appropriate (maybe consider the use of italics for names that consist of two or more words).



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