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-1

According to the Encyclopédie, ou Dictionnaire raisonné des sciences,from 1750,the universe is a common noun,naming the idea,not specific in a way The Universe,described as"nom collectif",i guess,of the world and all stars of the sky above. My impression,is that the interess for the physical view of the Universe grow old in the years of the french ...


3

This is a style issue, and the appropriate style for you to use depends on which style guide you or your publisher or school generally follows and whether that guide specifies a rule for handling military (or other hierarchical) titles. The influential (in the United States) Chicago Manual of Style, fifteenth edition (2003), lays out one approach: Titles ...


-3

All titles are capitalized. Verbs aren't. When using captain in sentences, capitalize it when referring to an individual, even if not by name. As @Oldcat suggested, you would capitalize in a sentence starting with "The Captain..." because you're referring to one person, who has the title of Captain. But when you're using the word to refer to captains ...


-1

It is contextual. Here is a link to an article: Universe Or universe? It All Depends On The Multiverse, which helps to clarify. The reader can easily check, after glancing at a handful of books and articles, including here at 13.7, that the word "universe" sometimes is capitalized and sometimes not. How is that decided, exactly? And who decides ...


0

I think the correct is 'universe', not 'Universe' (except the word is placed as the first word of sentence, we must use 'Universe'). This word is like star and moon that doesn't use capitalization because universe is not scientific name like The Big Bang. I'm sorry if my answer is wrong.


3

Sometimes it is a matter distinguishing between two uses of the same word. For example: catholic - all-embracing Catholic - of the Roman Catholic church chair - a seat with a backrest Chair - person who runs the meeting (also chairperson, formerly chairman) conservative - averse to change, very traditional Conservative - right-wing political party ...


7

The wiki article on History of the Latin Alphabet seems to answer most of your questions. Capitalization is still used for readability, emphasis, and clarity of meaning, and is as much a part of the written language as emphasis and pronunciation is to the spoken word.


0

Normally it would be lowercase. But the fact that Wizardry is capitalized suggests that perhaps this is in (a late version of) Early Modern English in which case all 'important' nouns, including both Wizardry and University, would be capitalized.


0

It is not capitalized because it does not name an individual place or organization. If "Excellence in Wizardry" is the university's slogan, then excellence should be capitalized.


2

If a reader were to open an English book printed in the 17th century, one of the first things he'd notice would be the unconventional spellings, and how most nouns were capitalized. Just like the German today, it was customary during the late 17th century and the end of the 18th century to emphasize all the nouns (or nearly) with a capital letter, but there ...


2

I actually always capitalize as I think it helps distinguish the abbreviation.


1

The format without a capitalized initial is typically used for generic descriptors, e.g. monosodium glutamate --> MSG. The one where the initial is capitalized is conventionally used for proprietary or brand names, or for proper nouns (e.g. United States of America --> USA). The cases you are asking about, namely service-oriented architecture (SOA) and ...


0

It could easily be a matter of style. It's (unfortunately) common for companies to capitalise anything that's Deemed Important. Is there a house style document you could check?


1

I think that Management as a proper noun ie. as in the management team / the name of a department in a company would be capitalised eg. "have you asked Management about this?" or in a title of a book However I think the concept of management ie. management of people/ managing people would not be capitalised. ...


1

When a number starts a sentence it has to be spelled out. A basic problem is when to spell out a number and when to use figures for it. I think it would be acceptable if you follow the general reference on capitalization. Without the numbered list at the beginning- Pieces of such and such (4), pieces of this and that (10) and pieces of ...


2

Technically the (4) is the start of the sentence, so if it were spelled out, the "Four" would be capitalized. Therefore, the "p" in pieces does not need to be capitalized.


0

One reason is that company names are often registered in legal paperwork, before they generate a "wordmark" or logo. Even after the initial "wordmark" or logo is created, it is later updated, modernized, changed for changing social standards. Ask a graphic artist if they would accept a job with the limitation that a logo match the legal name of a company.


3

The company's official, legal name is the one by which it is registered with the government agency of the country in which the corporation is incorporated (e.g. here in the UK, Companies House). The company can have as as many logos as it likes and they can look like whatever it wants them to, but that doesn't change the legal name of the company (which ...


0

The comma looks correct to me, as the sentence needs a pause there. It is a single sentence of the form "After [doing something], I have [done another thing]". That said, it is a very long and wordy sentence and would be better split in two. I see no problem in the use of "surprising". Water is just a noun, rather than a "proper noun" and so doesn't need ...


0

I think most universities in the UK vary the inclusion of the article with its omission, depending on context. If you Google the University of London, for example, a layout will appear on the Google answers page, headed University of London alongside its arms. ...


0

As one example, "the" is considered part of the name of the University of British Columbia: Below you will find some of the rules that can help you identify which proper nouns must take the article “the.” Rule #1: If the word of is part of the name, you need to use the. For example, we say: the University of British Columbia, but we say ...


2

Different schools do it differently. A good way to tell is to search for the school on Google. If the school's official website uses the article, use it. If not, skip it. It's pretty arbitrary otherwise. For example: The Ohio State University Ohio University The University of Akron University of Dayton There are a few dozen more conflicting examples all ...


2

Generally speaking, it's the University of (for example) Durham or Durham University. If the University is named after a person, only the second style is used: John Moores University.


2

There is no need for initial capitals in 'public enquiry/inquiry'. It is a common-noun expression.


2

Capitalization (especially of titles) is a tricky business in English. There is no hard-and-fast rule about capitalization. In fact, many of the major style guides disagree on exactly what should or shouldn't be capitalized. However, I'll give some general guidelines and let you make up your own mind: Titles in direct address In all major style ...


0

You are right. The rule is that titles should be capitalised when used with the person's name or as a direct address, and not capitalized when used generally.


-1

I am wondering if the capitalization is correct in this case because the "T" in "Tilt" in the second line is continuation of the first line. This looks like "Instruction manual English", judging by the way the sentence is formed. The capitalisation of 'T' in Tilt is almost certainly an error. As is common in this kind of text, the author's style ...


14

This is a good question. Yes, there is a difference between truth and Truth, between nature and Nature, between fighting for a cause and fighting for the Cause. The proper nouns are definite, a unique instance of that thing admitting no others. It personifies it. See also the song "Ya Got Trouble" from The Music Man: Trouble. I’m talkin’ ’bout Trouble ...


8

"with a capital [initial letter]" is an idiom which refers to an absolute or universal version of the idea. Obviously, this is political hyperbole.


0

Also perhaps, religion played a part in that peak. People started to think that everything around them, including the stars, the universe, the planets, may have been created by God, and therefore also needed to be capitalized??? Just a thought...


1

When in doubt with software AND/OR error messages, just always take a new line. Every single time. For 1, it’s logging: “Houses In Use On That Day" but for 2, it’s logging a mixture of that and: “Something Came Up At The Last Minute." The problem could be related to the then statement,or possibly the ifels ...



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