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Azor's answer is thorough. I'll just add a few things: 1) There may be differences regionally. Saying "the Deep South" is a relatively obvious proper noun to an American and thus capitalized, but perhaps not other native English speakers would know this. There may also be differences within categories such as a pope versus the Pope. And yet some would ...


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"The Gulf" is usually capitalized, because it's functioning as a short form of the name "the Gulf of Mexico" rather than as an ordinary use of the common noun gulf. (Of course, the Gulf of Mexico is a gulf, so it's not wrong to write "the gulf" in a context where you've just referred to it. But it's also an "ocean basin", so an easy test is: in any given ...


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Since you asked for a linguistics answer, here goes. First of all, it's incorrect to assume that linguistics assumes that there are proper noun and common noun categories to begin with, that all languages contain and distinguish between. Lay ideas of grammar don't necessarily correspond to linguistic ones. A linguistic analysis of proper nouns proposes ...


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The confusion here stems from the fact that "Celsius" is not the name of the unit, rather it is a classifier for the unit "degree," of which there is also "Fahrenheit." Because "Celsius" and "Fahrenheit" are names (Anders Celsius and Daniel Fahrenheit), they remain capitalized. However, a "kelvin" is a unit just like "meter" or "gram," which, despite being ...


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Both are correct. I believe the difference is due to that fact that Celcius isn't the actual unit - the unit is called a "degree". Since we have two different ways of measuring temperature in units called "degrees", we distinguish between them with the name of the creator of the system - "Celcius" or "Fahrenheit". These are pronouns, and so are ...


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As TD noted, capitalization is a matter of style, and as such, different people will differ on which style to use. That said, when you're referring to the proper name of an entity, it's generally advisable to capitalize the components. If you abbreviate your reference by using only part of a name, it's still a proper name. In particular, you'll want to ...



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