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4

Google - verb is usually capitalised, but the lower case is also used, (see Ngram). The transitive verb to google (also spelled Google) means using the Google search engine to obtain information on something or somebody on the World Wide Web. However, in many dictionaries the verb refers to using any web search engine, such as Yahoo!. Ngram: ...


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Yes, having google or googling in lowercase is acceptable. See Merriam-Webster. Also, for internet, see this Wikipedia article. It has become a generic term and can safely be lowercased.


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While I have wondered this question for a long time, I sometimes see in books "tv" instead of TV. I have also sometimes seen this: "T.V." and I have no idea why. But most likely you would want to put TV if you are writing something. I feel like you wont get criticized for putting "tv", but if you still dont know what is the correct way why dont you just ...


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If I may I will suggest a cheaper alternative. U of Chicago publishes another book, authored by Charles Lipson, and its title is called, "Cite Right" and that book is all about citing the sources of your statements, claims, knowledge, information whatever you put in your paper. On page 144, Chapter seven of that book Council of Science Editors' (CSE) ...


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This varies considerably with the style standard you follow, or are required to follow by the target publication. Now, if you follow the guidelines set out by the Chicago Manual of Style , then parts of a book, including numbered chapters, should be lowercase when referenced (per CMOS). See CMOS 8.178 and 8.177. 8.178 Numbered chapters, parts, and so on ...


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There is "no such thing" as whether an expression is "grammatical or not". Almost any expression is "grammatical" as long as it conforms to any form of grammar. Even pidgin English is "grammatical" if it conforms to a particular set of published or unpublished grammatical pattern. The questions should be is the expression grammatically acceptable is the ...


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Whether it's a title or not, these two sentences are invariant: Come to this class so you can become a super helper. We have twenty-seven super helpers. To see this, if you decide it is a title, replace "super helper" with "doctor" and the correct capitalization will be clear. If it's not a title, while you might capitalize the "Super Helper ...


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This might be better answered on the User Experience SE site. The general rule is "consistency": capitalize everything consistently.


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Symbols of prefixes that mean a million or more are capitalized and those less than a million are lower case (M for mega (millions), m for milli (thousandths)). Also, the names of all units start with a lower case letter except, of course, at the beginning of the sentence. There is one exception: in "degree Celsius" (symbol °C) the unit "degree" is lower ...


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I'm fairly confident that the units are rarely capitalized when being placed after a value. Additionally, though, they are typically abbreviated when used in a scientific context. So, I would recommend "ms" for "milliseconds" in your table, like this article does. If you must spell it out, though, then I think the uncapitalized version would be preferred. ...


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In a short phrase like that, on a button [physical or not] I don't think there are rules. "Revert To Default" / "revert to default" / "REVERT TO DEFAULT" it's a matter of style.


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As a generalization, you spell God with an uppercase G if it's your God, and with a lowercase g if it's somebody else's god.


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A word or group of words {such as “Noah Webster,” “Kentucky,” or “U.S. Congress”} that is the name of a particular person, place, or thing and that usually begins with a capital letter is a proper noun. --Merriam-Webster Dictionary. That would include nicknames. Articles preceding such are not capitalized unless they begin a sentence, following the ...


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President is considered a noun cause President is a person so from my understanding it should be capitalize for such reasons.


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In general writing, capitalize both instances of state. For the media, do not capitalize either.


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The American Institute of Physics Style Guide (4th edition) has a table of common abbreviations. (http://kmh-lanl.hansonhub.com/AIP_Style_4thed.pdf) Alternating-current, direct-current and radio-frequency are all abbreviated in lower-case in this guide. I'll make one comment on all three of these abbreviations and their use. These terms are often used in ...



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