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No, it is not, and it should not be capitalized.


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Names of languages are always capitalized in English, unlike in some other languages. This is true whether the name of the language is part of a compound or not.


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There are quite a few rules when dealing with cardinal directions. When they refer to a specific region, they will use an article and be capitalised. i.e. the North and the Southwest. If you are just specifying a direction, then there should be no capitalisation. When used as an adjective, there are three general scenarios:1. We are referring to a general ...


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Fortunately, The Chicago Manual of Style (16th edition) deals with this question on page 388: 8.5 Names with particles. Many names include particles such as de, d', de la, von, van, and ten. Practice with regard to capitalization and spacing the particles varies widely, and confirmation should be sought in a biographical dictionary or other ...


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Besides Elberich's excellent suggestions, you could consider: The questionnaires on English Language and English Usage are...


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The English Language and English Usage questionnaires are ... GOOD The English Language and English Usage Questionnaires are ... BAD The English Language Questionnaire and the English Usage Questionnaire are ... VERY GOOD That's all.


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Capitalise River because it is part of the name: thus, the River Nile, the River Euphrates, the River Rhine. I call this the 'generic' element of a geographical name; it specifies the kind of feature that we are talking about. Sure, we can say the Nile, the Euphrates and the Rhine, but these would be short versions of the full name. Consider street names ...


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When you name the river, you capitalise river, so it would be: River Jordan I swam in the River Jordan but without the name: I swam in the river. The presence of 'the' is less relevant than the presence of the name of the feature. There are similar conventions with other natural features, for example mountains, e.g. Mount Everest.


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Capitalisation implies that the name has been elevated to have meaning in its own right, not just as a literal description. For example, if the mezzanine between the 1st and what was the 2nd floor was converted to be the 2nd floor, what had been the 4th floor would become the 5th floor but might be referred to as "the 4th Floor". Similarly, say a company ...


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The children book section is on the 4th floor would be more correct since capitalization should be done only for nouns and first letter of sentence and a few more, and since floor is not among any of these so there is no need for writing it as Floor. Read more about capitalization rules here And for your second question: Why is "floor" plural? ...


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Are his title and name King Ravan and is he a demon, then: "demon King Ravan." Is Ravan een demon-king, then "demon-king Ravan". Is demon-king a title, the "Demon-king Ravan."


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I wouldn't capitalize "all". Collections aren't used as a proper noun. If you were to say, "Tell them to come here in 5 minutes.", you wouldn't capitalize "them". That being said, I really wouldn't start an email with "Hi, all". There's technically nothing wrong with it, but it feels odd.



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