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1

This question can lead to insomnia. I've written German and Mexican characters into a trilogy, which means that the odd bits of German and Spanish are bound to crop up -- sometimes very odd. (In German, finger, hand and arm are Finger, Hand and Arm. Direct cognates? Not usually the best choice. And Spanish is downright averse to capital letters!) My ...


0

No, 'On' shouldn't be capitalized unless it is used adjectivally or adverbially. 'Capitalize the first word of the title, the last word of the title, and all nouns, pronouns, verbs, adverbs, adjectives, subordinating conjunctions, and a few conjunctions. Prepositions are only capitalized if they are used adjectivally or adverbially.' Grammar Girl : ...


1

Suppose, for the moment, that the original wording of the piece from which you took the quoted fragments above was something like this: The next year will tell whether Joe regains control of the radio station or begins a long downward spiral into madness. Meanwhile, back in Smallville, his father, Elwood P. Dowd, continued to discuss philosophical ...


0

To me it sounds better the Sun because it somehow implies that is referring to sunlight, almost everything that is "all you need" can be changed to "you only need".


2

The capitalization or otherwise of 'sun' is a useful (but optional) device for distinguishing between our sun (i.e. the one at the centre of our own solar system) and suns somewhere else. 'The Sun' thus refers specifically to our sun, whereas 'sun' can mean both a sun (e.g. "That solar system has two suns"), our sun (e.g. "Remember not to look directly at ...


1

In English, the names of languages, regardless of where they appear, need to be capitalized. E.g. I also speak French, in which capitalization of language names is incorrect.


0

I find it more pragmatic to use single-quotes to demarcate words that are meant to be read as is, rather than interpreted within the context of the sentence in which they are contained. It's a kind of "poor man's italics". I would rewrite your example as follows: There is a part of the evaluation where the nurse goes through the words 'foot', 'blue', and ...


1

Wi-Fi WiFi Both can be used. I would avoid the lower case forms.


0

Yes, it is totally acceptable. As Robusto mentioned in a comment, the internet is where you can do what you want. From a grammatical point of view, it is my understanding that in British English news sites will often write titles in sentence form, e.g. English deemed more important than maths, whilst American English favours the more traditional "title" ...


1

You should capitalize it. Stranger itself obviously isn't the name of the person, but you're using it as a replacement for his/her name, thus stranger should be capitalized. Additionally, you could say this is an issue of respect. Since you don't know them personally, it's better to show respect by capitalizing whatever word you're using (because no one on ...


0

Since I received (and returned) 6 emails from 6 other mothers wishing me a Happy Mothers' Day, I prefer to include all of them (and all mothers) by using Mothers' (the plural possessive).


2

As StoneyB suggests in a comment above, the striking capitalization style that A.A. Milne used in his stories and poems about Christopher Robin and Winnie-the-Pooh (which appeared in four volumes across the years 1924, 1926, 1927, and 1928) was very likely the inspiration for a generation (or more) of children’s books to use initial caps for emphasis. A few ...


1

This may by a joke copied (perhaps unconsciously) from the style of a very popular humorous book "1066 and All That: A Memorable History of England, comprising all the parts you can remember, including 103 Good Things, 5 Bad Kings and 2 Genuine Dates" by Sellars and Yateman, published in about 1930. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1066_and_All_That for more ...


0

All are okay--I've seen English teachers use all three, so it must be fine. I think it just depends, maybe, on where you live. In the United States and other countries, people use lowercase more often, but in other countries they might use lower case or lower-case most often. I'm pretty sure that it doesn't matter. All ways of writing it are okay. Since ...


14

Since you ask about sentences that begin with a number, it seems relevant to note that many style guides advise against using a numeral at the beginning of a sentence. And if you spell out the opening number as a word, the question of whether the next word in the sentence should be capitalized doesn't come up. Here are some stylebook guidelines on this ...



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