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In practice there doesn't seem to be a consistent answer. Modernism and Postmodernism are capitalized by many writers, and by many they are not. Modernism, unlike modernity, represents a specific viewpoint regarding art even though it includes a variety of art movements such as Cubism, Futurism, and so on.


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Since a Queen is still a Queen in some nations even today as per their Constitution,it has to be capitalized. Since "My" is also an integral part of the formal address,it needs to be capitalized also. Abhilaaj.


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The website http://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2014/11/aunt-uncle.html says that the distinction is a matter of style, not grammar. In the article, it quotes the Chicago Manual of Style, which seems to support the notion that in the phrase "your uncle Jack," uncle is not capitalized. But many people find fault with the CMOS, so you are free not to heed its ...


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Yes, "on" is within the verb phrase. "Put" takes two complements, a direct object and a directional locative. In "put item on hold", "item" is the direct object and "on hold" is the locative. "On hold" is not an adverbial, but rather a verb complement. It is not clear that it has the sense of a locative here, since it is part of an idiom. "Item on ...


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The confusion arises from the origin of 'x-ray' (or X-ray). Wilhelm Röntgen, a German, discovered and named them. In German, however, all nouns are capitalized and other parts of speech are not. This is the origin of the capital 'X'. Ironically x-rays in German are now called Röntgenstrahlen, and the verb is 'röntgen', 'to x-ray'. Compare x-rays to other ...


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Agreed that this is a style issue. The Chicago Manual of Style recommends the use of a headline-style titles for signs with caps [Joe held a The End is Near sign at the rally] and mottoes, with caps [Joe is a The End is Near kind of guy. Personally, I prefer "the end is near" but whatever. Company slogans or titles usually follow the company's advertising ...


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In your example, the principle that determines whether to capitalize wild terrain should be whether a name or term is unique and perceived as a proper noun by the writer. There could be many wild terrains in anywhere in the word. We can't capitalize it just because the terrain is wild. If you contrast wild terrain with Death Valley, you could notice that ...



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