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18

When it is their name, Mom and Dad would be capitalised: Dear Mom and Dad, I am just writing to let you know, that although everyone has a mom and a >dad, you are my special mom and dad. So, Mom, I just want to say ‘brava!’; and Dad, ‘bravo!’. I’ve just been telling Sis, that Mom’s new coat is so cool. XX Here's the commentary from an exercise ...


14

We should capitalize these words if they are being used as the name of the person. You can capitalize these when referring to your own relatives: Hello, Mother. When you use mom/dad in general meaning father/mother, it's a common noun. So do not capitalize them when they follow possessive pronouns such as her, his, my, our, your. (my mother ~ my ...


3

I'm an arts journalist, so I read (and write) a lot of material which is relevant to this question. I would say: no, the overwhelming majority of writers don't capitalise the names of genres. I admit that I do have an instinct to capitalise "blues" - I think that's because it's often referred to as "the blues", which makes it sound more like a proper noun ...


2

It depends on the context in which it is used. If it is the name of a subject (e.g. English, Maths, History), then, yes, capitalise it. Otherwise it should be in lowercase. 'Did you have Music today?' (Capitalised here because it is a subject/class and hence a proper noun) 'No, but I like listening to music.' (Lowercase here because it is not a ...


1

There's no firm rule. Consider looking at a style book for your own college. If you don't know what that is, ask someone at, eg., the college newspaper. Personally I would "A professional society for aerospace engineering" (or indeed aerospace industry) because I loathe excess capitals. Note that - very simply - there is absolutely no reason, at all, for ...


1

I think what you see is simply the effect of word-processing programs that aren't sophisticated enough to manage the shifting ways in which traditional guidelines for initial-capping titles work. Rather than trying to build a program that can determine the appropriateness of capitalization in specific instances—such as when a "the" immediately following a ...


1

You use the capitalized "Universe" when you're talking about THE Universe. For example, "I destroyed the whole Universe." You use the lowercase "universe" when you're talking about any old universe, that's a common noun. For example, "There might be many different universes," or "The video-game universe is 3D." ...


1

You would always use "Upper case letter" or "Lower case letter" Unless it is a name or unique thing, like a book title (Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, ect) or a place (Stonehenge, Statue of Liberty, ect), You only every capitalize the first letter of every sentence. Also, you may be interested in posting to English Language Learners, out sister site.


1

This question is very similar to the Capitalization of Artistic Trends on ELU. It seems there's no agreed answer, partly because we can equivocate over how to define artistic movements/styles/genres etc, particularly when many terms are also used more generally. I'd say... do what you want. If you need an authority, though, here's one. Don't ...



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