Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

No. And it has nothing to do with using an adverb. It also has nothing to do with using the word "also". Simply, if the word is not at the very beginning of the sentence (and is not a proper noun), it should not be capitalized. Since "it" is neither the first word in your sentence, nor a proper noun, "it" should be lowercase.


3

Blue book of grammar and punctuation: The following rules for capitalizing composition titles are universal. •Capitalize the title's first and last word. •Capitalize verbs, including all forms of the verb to be (is, are, was, etc.). •Capitalize all pronouns, including it, he, who, that, etc. •Capitalize the not. Do not capitalize a, an, or the unless it ...


2

Capitalizing Words in Titles From Basic Book Design- Wikibooks. These rules are adapted from The Chicago Manual of Style. The first and last words are always capitalized, even if fewer than five letters. Words over five letters are always capitalized. Verbs are always capitalized, even if fewer than five letters. Nouns are always capitalized, even if ...


2

'spirit' is not a proper noun, so it wouldn't be capitalized. If it was the title of a story, book, etc., then it would be capitalized


2

The capitalization is awkward only because of the misplacement of the qualifier "continuous" in front. Bulleted lists should indicate hierarchy by indentation, and also by keeping the most important word at left. If, as I suspect, this bullet is followed later by another contrasting or complementary bullet item—about, perhaps, "staged" or "intermittent" ...


1

Here's how I would write the sentence using American English: Statements such as "It's not a problem" and "It's no big deal" are unrealistic. All I've done is remove the comma and change or to and. I think or would be better if you said: A statement such as "It's not a problem" or "It's no big deal" is unrealistic. In British English, I believe ...


1

Dan Bron's comment is apropos, although this is a common problem when attaching a prefix to a phrase where the key word is not the first word, and often the users will be able to make sense from context. However, a reasonabe compromise would be to use Before Customer Inquiry After Customer Inquiry


1

The awkwardness arises not from the capitalization, but from the parentheses themselves. What do you intend to convey by them? Application deployment, where the continuous nature is implicit: Then just write either Continuous application deployment or Application deployment, and get rid of the confusing clutter. Both continuous and traditional application ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible