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32

I'm Indian. And I assure you there's no such thing as the lowercase 'i'. No grammar teacher of mine -- and I've had quite a few good ones -- ever so much as mentioned it. In fact, this is the first I'm hearing of it. The tendency of Indians to write in textspeak is unfortunate, but 'i' is as erroneous as 'u' EDIT: I'd like to point out that almost all of ...


21

Jeega's post has a number of features.  It shows Jeega's awareness of the usual convention.  It hints that Jeega used to follow that convention.  It mentions a reason to defy that convention and follow an alternate.  It alludes to but does not cite a source which would support that reason. There are also, of course, a number of ...


5

I'm not aware of any specific link with Indian English ("indian english"?) but I do have an addendum to your list: (4) - Stylistic reasons. One might disagree with it, but the lowercase "i" is often a deliberate stylistic choice, a flouting of convention for effect. It's particularly closely associated with poet e.e. cummings, who also rejected the ...


4

Since you ask about sentences that begin with a number, it seems relevant to note that many style guides advise against using a numeral at the beginning of a sentence. And if you spell out the opening number as a word, the question of whether the next word in the sentence should be capitalized doesn't come up. Here are some stylebook guidelines on this ...


3

In general, if you are directly addressing someone by his or her title, it is capitalized --in this case I would capitalize the entire phrase "Our Lord", since it's being used to directly address the subject (references: 1 2 3). You would also capitalize if the title was being used as a proper name, or if it was attached directly to a proper name (i.e. "Be ...


3

Verbed brands No, verbs are almost never capitalized (see Edwin Ashworth's comment for the rare cases when they are). I suggest a good article on verbing brand names on The Economist: So to google became to search on the web, to facebook meant to look up or contact someone on Facebook, and to skype covers calling someone by VoIP telephony. ...


3

I'm very late to this party, but given the nature of the letter in which BLARINGNAMECORP's name was to appear—namely, a letter in which you seek acceptance into a university program—I think you made the right call in casting the company's name as Blaringnamecorp. In this regard, it's important to note that the all-cap treatment of company names in logos, ...


3

From the Grammarphobia Blog: How to capitalize food names Q: I’m never sure about how food names are capitalized. Is it “Waldorf salad” or “waldorf salad”? “Swiss cheese” or “swiss cheese”? “French fries” or “french fries”? And so on. A: The one thing we can tell you for sure is that the generic noun in these dishes—the “salad,” the ...


2

There is no universal rule for formatting the entries in individual cells of a table; capitalization of those entries is strictly a style issue. I checked three widely respected style guides (Chicago Manual of Style, Oxford Style Manual, and Words Into Type), and none of them has anything to say on this particular point. At the magazines where I've worked, ...


2

I would call it miscapitalization. You can say a sentence or word is miscapitalized, just as you can say that a sentence is mispunctuated, or that a word is misused.


2

Firstly, I would say that where you are using "isles of Scilly", it should definitely be "Isles of Scilly" as that is a specific place name. However, after that it is, I'll admit, a grey area. Personally, I think that you are correct with south coast, west country, north Norfolk coast and East Anglian heights. But I believe that western Isles would be ...


1

It depends on whether you're using it as the name of an area of a description of an area. When it's used as a name, you capitalize it: I'm going to the East Coast this summer. There are lots of farms in the Midwest. When you're using it as a general description of a place, it's not capitalized: The east coast of the U.S. is a popular destination for ...


1

In good-old-days of typewriters - the only way of highlighting anything in the paper was "CAPITALIZING", or Underlining or some special characters. In the modern times, when it is given that you are going to use some word software - styling can be done in many ways. In general, excessive underlining or CAPITALIZING is really not seen as good formatting. ...


1

The most extensive discussion of footnote capitalization that I've found is in Words Into Type, third edition (1974): Capitalization. Footnotes ordinarily begin with a capital and end with a period, but occasionally, in a book in which capitals are used sparingly, footnotes may begin with a lowercase letter. [Examples:] 1 p. 63 ...


1

I have no sources for this, but it should either be capitalized, in which case the footnote is an incomplete sentence, because the subject (the word that Which refers to) is missing (In this case, the footnote number in the main sentence should come after the period: “[…] heterogeneous.1”, because the footnote is a sentence of its own, and having a full ...


1

Given enough time, I believe it's likely that the English word "you" will increasingly be superseded by lowercase "u" for the simple fact that it sounds identical, it intuitively and immediately carries the identical meaning, and does the work with 2/3 fewer letters. Glance through the etymology of the word "I," which historically "cost" the scribe at least ...


1

Based on a quick Google search, convention seems to dictate that "kelly pool" be spelt without a capital K. This is interesting as, according to Wikipedia, kelly pool was indeed named after the inventor (his nickname was Kelly).


1

World Wide Web, or WWW is capitalized, as is Internet, so I capitalize the abbreviation, Web, since it is one of the three capitalized words in the proper compound noun, World Wide Web. I have had no complaints from my Navy customers. Even if someone prefers Web not being capitalized, I can support my choice with logic.



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