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Using Title Case (e.g. Export Data to Folder) rather than Sentence Case (e.g. Export data to folder) usually depends on the style of your organisation. There are many guides about when to use it e.g. MLA, APA, and AP. However, as it's a style thing, there may be no set rule for your app, so whichever you prefer will be perfectly acceptable.


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I think your translator is correct. Most app development guidelines state that Labels and the like should be capitalized. An example - OS X interface guideline. But since they are just guidelines, you are not forced to follow them, even though it would be a good idea to do so.


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Regardless of the fact that a location or other proper noun precedes it, you do capitalize a title if it precedes a name. Reference: Rule 3 Capitalize a person's title when it precedes the name. Do not capitalize when the title is acting as a description following the name. Examples: Chairperson Petrov Ms. Petrov, the chairperson of the company, will ...


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While I'm typing this in the Safari browser, I had a quick look at the menus, and everything is capitalised except the words "and", "as", "in" and "to". So while I can't say whether your translator is right or wrong, he or she is in good company. And what's good for a MacOS X application written by Apple is probably good for an iOS application. For Android, ...


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If you wanted to follow the State of Maryland's lead, you should say State of Maryland. Also, I would say if you're using the phrase as an honorific symbolizing deference (as is the case in law), use "State of Maryland." But really, unless this is to be used in financial, governmental, or official records, both are acceptable and used.


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This is a question of preference, without a real "answer." However, many websites follow the principle of using title case for buttons and links that serve as calls-to-action. This varies depending on language, application, and prominence of the CTA. Generally, if the call-to-action, button, or link is one–three words, title case is preferred. This website ...


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In longer documents, especially legal and other formal documents, it is common to used defined terms. These are single words or phrases that stand in for longer terms or phrases. The most common way to do this is to use the full name and follow it by the defined term in parentheses and quotes: This report about the Acme Company ("Company") will ... In ...


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Blackberry Best Practices specifically recommends Title Case for menu items. Android Best Practices doesn't have a specific recommendation, but the examples in their Menu guide use "Compose email" and "Reply all" which suggests a preference for Sentence Case. I cannot find a (relevant) best practices document or webpage for iOS or Windows Phone. (Most deal ...


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The choice between Title Case and Sentence case ought perhaps be driven by your intended audience. In general, Title Case is preferred in the US, Sentence case elsewhere. You just need to look at home-grown newspapers. Try UK's The Guardian versus US's The Wall Street Journal. The predominance of Title Case in some software applications may be attributed to ...


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The implied direction of your question is sound. As you say, "there is no part of Europe officially named "Northern Europe", but is instead just used as a general [...] list of countries roughly situated towards the north." There is no need to capitalize 'northern' in this case, for the reason you implied. Contrast this with North Dakota or North Carolina ...


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http://www.translegal.com/grammar-and-writing/capitalization According to this site, capitalize compass directions if they refer to a certain region or place. (Example 13) That place does not have to be an official name.


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M-dashes may be problematic in file names, it's best to avoid non-ascii characters, particularly if you're sharing them to other systems. As someone who does a lot of command line file munging, I wouldn't use spaces with the dashes between author and title. That way you can split the file name at the dash and get the separate bits without any trailing or ...


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It is usual to capitalise only the first part of a compound or hyphenated word in a title (though both parts in a headline) but there are common exceptions, so be guided by the relevant Style Manual if there is one. Specific organisations will have their own house rules regarding capitalisation. For example, The Chicago Manual of Style (section 7.128) ...


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If it's a "formal document", OP should probably be accurate, and write... This school is accredited by Maryland State Department of Education ...since they're presumably the relevant authority, and that's what they call themselves. The general principle being that the "referent" of any proper noun is the primary authority in such matters. But in ...


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You're finding out that English is not a 'rule-constrained' language. Whatever rules there are have lots of exceptions. There are only rules for when you must capitalize, but not for when you must not. Most people that use title casing (what you're describing) use it just because they think it looks better. I experienced the opposite. We were translating ...


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You would use the capitalized form in a legal document if you had initially given notice that that was the way the organization would be referred to from then on, but not in a business plan. CIA staff will refer to the Agency, rather than the agency, because "Agency" is a shortened form of the full name. Similarly the BBC will refer to "the Corporation". But ...



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