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4

It seems to me that not only is the capitalisation strange, but also the language and terminology. I agree with the comments by both Charl E & Hot Licks as possibilities for these oddities, but it doesn't make the overall result correct, appropriate, nor fully intelligible. Confirmation of Registration to <...> Your registration to <...> has been ...


3

Although commonly misstated, that is, stated in a simplified form such as "capitalize the first word of a sentence", the "rule" that applies in the circumstance you've described was originally a printing convention termed 'sentence case'. That convention has in modern times transferred, for the most part silently, to typographical media other than printing, ...


3

"Richard the Second" (your number 2) is perfectly correct. Have a look at this: http://www.sirbacon.org/graphics/richard2.gif


3

Yeah, even though it's in a contraction, it's still proper to capitalize the I since it really expands to I will, where the I should definitely be capitalized.


2

If it begins a sentence, yes, it should be capitalized. Capitalization aids readability--it is a clear indication of where a sentence begins. Many people have many opinions about the so-called rules of grammar, but as far as I know, agreement that a sentence should begin with a capital letter is universal,* except perhaps in some poetic instances. Even ...


2

In this case, you're dropping the H from a pronoun. I think the answer to this question lies in the way we treat proper nouns. When H-dropping a proper noun we never capitalize the letter following the H: In My Fair Lady, Eliza Doolittle described the weather in three English counties: 'in 'artford, 'ereford and 'ampshire, 'urricanes 'ardly ever 'appen' ...


2

A term such as "Vikings", which is primarily a reference to a particular race, nationality, religion, or culture, should be capitalized. Only when the word becomes so commonly used and generic that it loses it's association with the race or culture does it lose this "right" to capitalization ... sometimes. For instance, though you might say that "vandals" ...


1

It is called Title Casing or what is called Headline style. First character in all words are capitalised, except for certain subsets defined by rules that are not universally standardised. The standardisation is only at the level of house styles and individual style manuals. More help here


1

If it's the name then it should be capitalised. If you are describing the geography it would be lower case e.g walking in a wooded valley, as apposed to visiting the Phoenix Valley.


1

Most scientific organizations have a style guide. The American Medical Association has one, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers has one, the Council of Science Editors has one, most scientific journals have one or recommend the use of a particular one. There is no right or wrong here--it is a matter of choice, but that choice is often dictated by ...


1

'I' is always capitalized in standard English. In Internet chat, it isn't always capitalized.


1

However, the question is not about formal correctness. The question is whether it's appropriate for me to justify my, ehm, linguistic relationships with "I" with my cultural identity? If you want to use lower-case "i" for cultural reasons, you should come up with a better anecdote than that bit about everyone being a special snowflake. I don't know ...



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