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5

The website http://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2014/11/aunt-uncle.html says that the distinction is a matter of style, not grammar. In the article, it quotes the Chicago Manual of Style, which seems to support the notion that in the phrase "your uncle Jack," uncle is not capitalized. But many people find fault with the CMOS, so you are free not to heed its ...


3

In your example, the principle that determines whether to capitalize wild terrain should be whether a name or term is unique and perceived as a proper noun by the writer. There could be many wild terrains in anywhere in the word. We can't capitalize it just because the terrain is wild. If you contrast wild terrain with Death Valley, you could notice that ...


1

Yes, "on" is within the verb phrase. "Put" takes two complements, a direct object and a directional locative. In "put item on hold", "item" is the direct object and "on hold" is the locative. "On hold" is not an adverbial, but rather a verb complement. It is not clear that it has the sense of a locative here, since it is part of an idiom. "Item on ...



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