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Since you ask about sentences that begin with a number, it seems relevant to note that many style guides advise against using a numeral at the beginning of a sentence. And if you spell out the opening number as a word, the question of whether the next word in the sentence should be capitalized doesn't come up. Here are some stylebook guidelines on this ...


3

In general, if you are directly addressing someone by his or her title, it is capitalized --in this case I would capitalize the entire phrase "Our Lord", since it's being used to directly address the subject (references: 1 2 3). You would also capitalize if the title was being used as a proper name, or if it was attached directly to a proper name (i.e. "Be ...


3

Verbed brands No, verbs are almost never capitalized (see Edwin Ashworth's comment for the rare cases when they are). I suggest a good article on verbing brand names on The Economist: So to google became to search on the web, to facebook meant to look up or contact someone on Facebook, and to skype covers calling someone by VoIP telephony. ...


2

Firstly, I would say that where you are using "isles of Scilly", it should definitely be "Isles of Scilly" as that is a specific place name. However, after that it is, I'll admit, a grey area. Personally, I think that you are correct with south coast, west country, north Norfolk coast and East Anglian heights. But I believe that western Isles would be ...


2

As StoneyB suggests in a comment above, the striking capitalization style that A.A. Milne used in his stories and poems about Christopher Robin and Winnie-the-Pooh (which appeared in four volumes across the years 1924, 1926, 1927, and 1928) was very likely the inspiration for a generation (or more) of children’s books to use initial caps for emphasis. A few ...


2

The capitalization or otherwise of 'sun' is a useful (but optional) device for distinguishing between our sun (i.e. the one at the centre of our own solar system) and suns somewhere else. 'The Sun' thus refers specifically to our sun, whereas 'sun' can mean both a sun (e.g. "That solar system has two suns"), our sun (e.g. "Remember not to look directly at ...


1

Suppose, for the moment, that the original wording of the piece from which you took the quoted fragments above was something like this: The next year will tell whether Joe regains control of the radio station or begins a long downward spiral into madness. Meanwhile, back in Smallville, his father, Elwood P. Dowd, continued to discuss philosophical ...


1

In English, the names of languages, regardless of where they appear, need to be capitalized. E.g. I also speak French, in which capitalization of language names is incorrect.


1

Wi-Fi WiFi Both can be used. I would avoid the lower case forms.


1

You should capitalize it. Stranger itself obviously isn't the name of the person, but you're using it as a replacement for his/her name, thus stranger should be capitalized. Additionally, you could say this is an issue of respect. Since you don't know them personally, it's better to show respect by capitalizing whatever word you're using (because no one on ...


1

This may by a joke copied (perhaps unconsciously) from the style of a very popular humorous book "1066 and All That: A Memorable History of England, comprising all the parts you can remember, including 103 Good Things, 5 Bad Kings and 2 Genuine Dates" by Sellars and Yateman, published in about 1930. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1066_and_All_That for more ...


1

It depends on whether you're using it as the name of an area of a description of an area. When it's used as a name, you capitalize it: I'm going to the East Coast this summer. There are lots of farms in the Midwest. When you're using it as a general description of a place, it's not capitalized: The east coast of the U.S. is a popular destination for ...


1

In good-old-days of typewriters - the only way of highlighting anything in the paper was "CAPITALIZING", or Underlining or some special characters. In the modern times, when it is given that you are going to use some word software - styling can be done in many ways. In general, excessive underlining or CAPITALIZING is really not seen as good formatting. ...


1

The most extensive discussion of footnote capitalization that I've found is in Words Into Type, third edition (1974): Capitalization. Footnotes ordinarily begin with a capital and end with a period, but occasionally, in a book in which capitals are used sparingly, footnotes may begin with a lowercase letter. [Examples:] 1 p. 63 ...


1

I have no sources for this, but it should either be capitalized, in which case the footnote is an incomplete sentence, because the subject (the word that Which refers to) is missing (In this case, the footnote number in the main sentence should come after the period: “[…] heterogeneous.1”, because the footnote is a sentence of its own, and having a full ...


1

Given enough time, I believe it's likely that the English word "you" will increasingly be superseded by lowercase "u" for the simple fact that it sounds identical, it intuitively and immediately carries the identical meaning, and does the work with 2/3 fewer letters. Glance through the etymology of the word "I," which historically "cost" the scribe at least ...



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