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3

Most writers do in fact capitalise Camembert... ...but usage isn't consistent. I'm not an expert with NGrams, but I think this chart suggests people are less likely to capitalise strong Cheddar when it's followed by the word cheese (i.e. - if the word "Cheddar" in isolation is used as a noun, we tend to capitalise; if it's an "adjectival" usage modifying ...


3

As Edwin Ashworth says in his comment above, this is a tricky area. Since the two messages that are currently embedded in quotation marks in your example are complete thoughts, I would be inclined to retain the capital at Everybody and Do, regardless of whether I retained the quotation marks or switched to italics for the messages or simply removed the ...


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There is no standard used throughout mathematics. Not even throughout English-speaking mathematics. Some recommend "Pythagorean Theorem" and others recommend "Pythagorean theorem". Find your own comfortable conventions and use them. And when a journal or publisher has a different convention, follow it without objection. (There may be more important ...


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The various style guides that I'm familiar don't alter their guidelines for title capitalization depending on whether an included preposition (such as in) is part of an idiom or not. That's not to say that none of them ever alter their preferences in special instances—such as when the preposition is more closely associated with the verb than with the ...


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An instance of precisely this use is the common 18th- and 19th-century abbreviation by London financial traders of Exchange (referring to the Stock Exchange or the Royal Exchange) to ’Change , most often in the phrase on ’Change. A quick troll through Google Books suggests that in the 18th century both the apostrophe and the capital were used or omitted ...


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Inasmuch as "Ocean" is actually part of the names of these bodies of water -- both "Pacific" and "Atlantic" are at base, just adjectives -- your first alternative is correct. I says this even though one may use "Pacific" and "Atlantic" as stand-alones when their meaning as references to the particular oceans is clear from context. Similarly, if we were to ...


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Proper names are capitalized. That generally includes trademark and copyright names - so-called brand names. It also includes most "official" bodies, such as government institutions. It also includes names of people and animals. A company can also prefer to capitalize some name it uses that is not trademarked or copyrighted (this includes some brand ...


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It depends. Is the term aging reports in the parentheses the title of the documents attached or merely a description of those documents? If it is a title, capitalize. If not, don't.


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I agree with your assessment that it should be capitalized. To confirm, I looked up an article on AP about legislation. AP treats House and Senate as proper nouns: WASHINGTON (AP) -- Midterm elections that will decide control of the Senate are three months away, and the 2016 presidential campaign will start in earnest soon after. Yet the Republican Party ...


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'Proper names are capitalised' doesn't really help much here, as it merely pushes the question back a little: 'Is C/cheddar a proper noun/adjective in C/cheddar cheese? At all times?' The fact is that there is a process known as 'genericisation' (see this thread) in which once obviously proper nouns etc become assimilated into the general lexicon. Thus we ...



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