Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I wonder whether it relates to the notion of 'sparing' one's patience, consequently losing one's temper (or rag - another odd one). Now i've written it I don't see it. last chance saloon - how about an odd bastardisation of going 'Spartan'...'spare'? No? ok I give up.


0

While it will always remain a mystery, I think that this goes back to the OF pronunciation of "lieu" to sound like "lyeuch". Then "lieutenant" would have the pronunciation of "lyeuchtenant". Later, when the drive by the English to rid the language of french words began, they modified the word to try to match their pronunciation and made it "leftenant". Even ...


0

You use "your" before a noun, only "yours" can stand alone (without a noun): my father and your father. The repetition of "father" is boring, so you say more elegantly: my father and yours "your" is an adjective indicating possession or a possessive adjective and it needs a noun. "yours"is called a possessive pronoun. You find a list of these two sorts ...


-1

*Yours*is a possessive pronoun; Your is an adjective.


2

One way is to search first for the letters that make up common word endings – -ing, -ed, -er, etc. – and once one (or more) has been found, look to the remaining letters for a verb or noun onto which the ending might be placed. If there's an "s" remaining, stick it on the end! As a crossword solver for several decades, this is certainly my approach to ...


0

The construction of bridging A to B sounds, looks and feels weird. Although it is clear what the tag-line is supposed to mean, it does not seem to convey its message in a natural way. As Edwin Ashworth mentioned, the usage of bridge may be creeping, mirroring verbs like connect and join, but I have not seen it used in that way. (And I happen to work in IT ...


0

*to bridge: *vb (tr) to connect or reduce the distance between: let us bridge our differences. Source: Collins Dictionary Yes it is correct and very effective in the idea it conveys.


1

hole in the wall maybe - or drinking hole according to: http://www.dict.cc/deutsch-englisch/Spelunke.html The German word for this is Spelunke by the way.


1

I’m pretty sure English lacks a single word that connotes both “dirty” and “old-fashioned.” “Saloon” is the word for the bars of the American frontier, as commonly seen in westerns. A saloon can be fancy and upscale, or cheap and dirty. “Dive” is a word (one among many, but the one I feel is most ...


3

The term "hole in the wall" also comes to mind. I think this is regional though, and different places have different terms for this. I've been told that in Puerto Rico they call it a "bad dead bar", which I kinda like...


5

Consider "dump," "roadhouse", and 'juke (house/joint)." roadhouse: a tavern located on a road outside of a town or city. juke house: Southern US: a cheap roadhouse.


2

The most common term used in Arizona would be "dive" bar. Some have sawdust or peanut shells on the ground, others do not. In general a dive bar tends to be low key, less pricey, and dark. You can use the slang version, as "dive" to be a noun or you can simply refer to it as a "dive" (adjective) "bar" (noun). Another relevant term related to dive bar is a ...


2

Groggery is a low-class tavern (not necessarily dirty) but an informal, albeit archaic term: groggery /grog"euh ree/, n., pl. groggeries. a slightly disreputable barroom.


2

Greasy spoon a term which according to Wikipedia has also been adopted in the US. It was originally used to describe those cheap, nasty-looking cafès that were often present on high streets in working class areas or dotted along motorways, frequented mainly by tramps, and lorry/truck drivers. These cafès usually served traditional English breakfast and ...


16

The usual term for no-frills bars or pubs in America is dive bar. Many people simply call such a bar a dive. They are not all shabby or run-down, but many are.


9

I think the most common term in America for this is saloon. In westerns the cowboys would be drinking at the saloon. Surely its floors weren't better than sawdust. Saloon usage can vary between Old Western to your corner pub that is a little old fashioned, to a retro microbrewery. It is still very common in the Midwest US to open a bar with the name ...


0

Because we are on different continents and speak as our countrymen speak. Whilst they (in UK) say whilst, we say while. At one time all of the Roman Empire spoke Latin. As centralized government broke down, and mixing was less frequent, every part of the Roman Empire developed its own language. Italian developed from Latin, as did French, Romanian, Spanish, ...


0

There are lots more of ways 'English' prevails in various parts of the world, there's Indian English for instance. People adapt a language to their geographical and cultural environment.


1

It is the difference between the affirmative, the negative and the interrogative forms. This is the simple present tense and do/does/don't/doesn't are the forms of the auxiliary. When the auxiliary is present, the main verb reverts to its root form, i.e. without 's'. We don't use an auxiliary in the affirmative: he works hard (except in the emphatic ...


1

It's because in your first example it's the verb "to have" that you're conjugating. In the second sentence your main verb, the one conjugated is "to do". You could rewrite the second sentence to read "She hasn't got to wear a uniform to school" if you wanted :)


2

Emphasis on the 'that' gives a negative tone, emphasis on the 'so' gives a curious tone. Same for oh really: emphasis on the 'really' is confronting, emphasis on the 'oh' is curious. This is only my experience with the terms in my culture, body language or general melody of the cultural language can change the desired effect of anything you say.


0

While it is obvious Turpin wore a mask to avoid being recognised, the buyer is suggesting a seller has a 'bare faced' cheek to ask a hefty price and is guilty of such blatant 'highway robbery' that Dick himself would be embarrassed to attempt it in person. It doesn't really work well in the written form.


2

Unlike other cases (eg theatre vs theater, and colour vs color), it is simply not true that -ize is American and -ise is British. The first part is true: American sources generally use only -ize (and Americans who have not encountered British writing may see -ise as a spelling error). It is also true that many, perhaps most, British writers use -ise. But ...


0

if the shoe were on the other foot


2

Firstly, the argument about one or other spelling "reflecting the origin of the pronunciation more closely" is essentially specious. The correspondence between pronunciation and written form is essentially arbitrary. For example, the letter 'z' is generally used to represent a voiced alveolar fricative when writing English, generally used to represent an ...


1

In my place you would have done the same thing.


8

You can say: If you were in my shoes, would you do the same thing?


3

It is certainly not Queen's English, more an impersonation of a Cockney accent. Accent impressions are a constant feature of conversational English where people will imitate a voice to convey an impression of the type of person to whom they are referring I agree with WS2 up to a point, The incorrect use of what in place of that is certainly not a ...


0

Native speakers of English (who take an interest in the language) tend to start getting the giggles when anyone proposes that the language needs to be controlled. I can't speak about the US, but in the UK the latest pronouncements of the Académie française form the basis of regular stock funny stories for newspapers when the news is a bit thin - for example ...


3

That usage of what would be considered a colloquialism in standard British English. It is often used for effect by speakers of standard British English when imitating a speaker of a supposed (but not necessarily specified) regional dialect - just as in the John Cleese example. You will sometimes see it spelt "wot", just to make the point, for example in the ...


0

In general, single quotation marks are only used to indicate a quote witihin a quote (at least in AmE). In the case of a term that would call for quotation marks, such as a nickname, the single version would only be used if the nickname refernece was part of a quote. Also, in US practice, once a term is defined, such as a nickname, the quotes are usually ...


0

It is proper to use regular quotation marks as opposed to singles for nicknames. Most sources seem to suggest as much when discussing nicknames directly. Regarding quotation marks in general, the single quotation mark is reserved primarily for the purpose of nested quotation, that is, quotation within quotation - apparently this is reversed for British ...


4

For the sake of completeness: al av ya mum ya larl cunt al = I will -> I'll -> ah'll av = have -> 'ave (in this case have has overtly sexual connotations as in "have sexual relations with") ya = your -> ya'r -> ya mum = mother (not really slang) ya = you -> ya larl = little -> lirle -> lahrl And the last word is so commonly used I feel I need ...


-3

LARL: laughing at really loudly A: two seals walk into a club B: larl Source: a Urban Dic.


1

I work for various educational institutions in Germany and, therefore, within the EU. I can confirm that British English is the preferred variety of English used within the 28 EU member states. When using the European Commission's website, http://ec.europa.eu/translation/english/english_en.htm, the translation information into English corresponds ...


4

I am working for an international organisation which includes most of Europe, but also some other major Anglophone countries (most notably the US). Although effectively all communication happens in English (and de facto in AmE), if one were to propose the actual adoption of English as a lingua franca within the organisation, countries like France and Germany ...


0

To me this decision is about whether I'm intending to call attention to the subject (having been affected by prior actions) or the action itself. To simplify a bit, "She has gone to a class" focuses on the state of the subject now. The reader is lead to imagine the person; having been to a class, perhaps she now knows something new. However, "She went to a ...


3

Apparently, Brits use the hyphenated and single-word versions about equally often... ...but Americans have more decisively abandoned the hyphen... In such usages the general trend is always two words -> hyphenated -> single word, so I've no doubt UK usage will catch up soon enough. As of right now I would say both forms are equally "valid" in BrE - but ...


2

There is no real trend. In my experience it depends upon the author of the document and upon the aims of the document. If a European business is preparing a document for use in a variety of English-speaking markets then they usually use American English. If a document is targeted at a specific market they use the form appropriate. If no specific target ...


2

Old Nick is slang with an interesting threap: "OldNick," the devil. Hotten says from the Scan- dinavian knickar, the destroying principle. Butler says in Hudibras: "Nick Macheivel had ne'er a trick. Though he gave name to our" OldNick." Probably the one explanation is as nearly correct as the other. The American slang dictionary, by James Maitland.


1

I am Irish-American and both sets of my grandparents (raised by Irish immigrants) and my parents referred to the ends of a loaf of bread as the humbo.


3

Born [out] of the desire = originated in the desire, which is what you want. Either of the first two are fine. In some constructions you could omit the but I wouldn't recommend it in this specific case. Borne means carried and does not fit the context.


-2

xyz was born out of the desire to... (correct) xyz was born of the desire to... (correct) xyz was borne out of the desire to... (correct) xyz was borne of the desire to... (correct) xyz was born of desire to... (incorrect) xyz was borne of desire to... (incorrect) In your specific case, xyz was born out of the desire to... is the best one to use. Still, ...


-1

Both borne and born are past participle forms of bear. borne is a general term intended to convey the idea of carrying something; born is specific to birth, as in literal or figurative childbirth. So (in contradiction to my earlier answer, which I now agree was incorrect): in your case, "born of the desire" is correct, in that the desire gave birth ...


-3

The usage of "them" as oppose to "those" for the English language comes from the same bastardization (bastardisation for the UK English) of replacing 'my' with 'me'. It is taken from the fact that over time words in the smaller English dialects have been intertwined with modern English to give some mixture of the two. As you can tell, I think it is abhorrent ...


0

This is from personal experience: "Them" takes the place of "those" in plain speech. Plain speech in America has very strong appeal. Nixon attributed most of Truman's charisma to his plain speech. Bear in mind that using "them" in the place of "those" will confuse ESL speakers nine times out of ten.


1

etymonline.com says "them" is related to Old Norse theim written with the special letter thorn, the th-sound as in "them". theim was the dative plural of "they". What I miss is a hint at German: Compare they die, them denen, their deren/derer. And compare one of them einer von denen, meaning one of those people there. In English them was used as object ...


0

There seems to be a natural tendency for English speakers in colloquial speech to use the objective case in place of the subjective in stock phrases, particularly for emphasis: "It's me", "That's him", and so forth. Over time this will might lead to a loss of the subjective forms altogether, as has already happened with you (objective form of the now archaic ...


1

The other two answers have addressed whether the construct is "grammatical" or not, so I wanted to tackle the other part of the question: Can we use it in daily speech? Can this usage go beyond a specific dialect and be used in other dialects, regions etc.? In my experience, within the American South and rural Appalachian dialects it is certainly used ...


12

In the succinctly named textbook: English Grammar in Familiar lectures. Embracing a new Systematick Order of Parsing. A New System of Punctuation, Exercises in false Syntax, and A System of Philosophical Grammar. Designed for the use of Schools and Private Learners by Samuel Kirkham, dated 1834 we have this example of usage pertaining to Pennsylvania The ...



Top 50 recent answers are included