New answers tagged

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Beneath an article reporting on an air pact with Ceylon (The Argus, Melbourne, 14 January 1950), a short column-filler adds to the mystery of the meaning of 'snog', and perhaps lifts a corner of the veil concealing the word's origins: "Snog" popular A Sinhalese woman ' recently returned gave a great tourist boost by saying Australia was extremely ...


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Garbage collection is like the process of recycling plastic for example. Once the bottle of pop has been consumed, the plastic bottle it came in is (temporarily) redundant. The garbage collector comes along, picks the bottle up, cleans it and makes a brand new plastic bottle from it. HTH:)


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You wanted it simplified? Between passes of the garbage collector, fragments of free space accumulate. On the next pass of the garbage collector, it consolidates these fragments. Only then does the free space become usable.


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Memory allocated to program objects which are now out of scope does not become available until that space is reclaimed by periodic garbage collection. The total free memory area is fragmented by these sections of memory which are candidates for garbage collection, but not yet returned to the free area. build up = accumulate, grow in number fragmentation ...


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I would say: You were bored, weren't you? OR You got bored, didn't you? Combining were and got in the same clause isn't gramatically correct. Of course, using the verbs in the past tense sounds perfectly correct.


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An "inaugural" speech is not a maiden speech. That said, there's no politically correct substitute for "maiden speech" that I know of yet. One could do with "debut speech," perhaps, which again suffers from the same problem as inaugural speech. (c-span August 13, 2015) Bernie Sanders' debut speech to congress: Topics covered in his first speech as a ...


-1

As a native BrE speaker, I would have to say that it doesn't sound at all British to me, and I would never say anything like that except as a joke. Cheerio is a little used term now, which is perhaps not an issue in the context of Downton Abbey. Using it as a noun and modifying with 'proper' is really quite bizarre. So much so that Ngram draws a blank. It ...


1

Short answer: Yes. Though I agree that it sounds clumsy. From context, it's clear that the organisers are deliberately emphasising the Britishness of the event, and do so by using stereotypical British terminology. The two terms here are : cheerio - informal British slang for a friendly farewell. proper - correct, genuine or appropriate. In a British ...


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"Characteristic of the Tartars" is basically correct. The OED describes them as: 2. fig. Tartar-like; rough and violent, savage and 3. fig. a. A person supposed to resemble a Tartar in disposition; a rough and violent or irritable and intractable person. Another possible meaning, based on personal experience, is for tartar to mean stupid or mentally ...


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A Tartar in this context is someone who is domineering, bossy, overbearing. It's a Britishism and quite old. Technically and traditionally a Tartar (or Tatar) was one of the Mongolian hordes who overran Asia under Genghis Khan (although this may not be demographically correct).


1

Perhaps the word you are looking for is playboy, though in later years it has taken on a connotation of sexual promiscuity. "The Original Playboys relied upon a perfect storm of pleasurable circumstances: The world was at peace; airplanes began flying internationally; their parents were members of the 1920’s cafe society and raised progressive, ...


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Tourist "Travel exotic" tipped your hand here. There are many types of people who exhibit your other behaviors: Trust fund kid, hippy, retired, but if you're doing this while traveling you're a tourist.


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The corpora I checked indicate that both forms are used on both sides of the Atlantic. The BYU-BNC British National Corpus has 32 instances of chaperon and 32 of chaperone from the 1980s to 1993. The Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA) has 277 instances of chaperone and 60 instances of chaperon from 1990 to 2015. (I excluded the spoken sections.) ...


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The variant "chaperone" appears to be from a mistake: Chaperon: 1720, "woman accompanying a younger, unmarried lady in public," from French chaperon "protector," especially "female companion to a young woman," earlier "head covering, hood" (c. 1400), from Old French chaperon "hood, cowl" (12c.), diminutive of chape "cape" (see cap (n.)). "... ...


1

Jobsworth - (from Wikipedia) "Jobsworth" is a British colloquial word derived from the phrase "I can't do that, it's more than my job's worth", meaning taking the initiative and performing an action that is beyond what the person feels is in their job description. The Oxford English Dictionary defines it as "A person in authority (esp. a minor ...


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I first heard bath as a verb in Canada and assumed it was simply incorrect usage, since in the US we use the verb to bathe. While I have never heard someone from the UK use bath as a verb, it seems that it can be used as such there and in many commonwealth nations. I think it sounds stupid. As for the discussion of the use of bathe with respect to swimming ...


1

A Native American totem pole is a carved pole with figures stacked one atop the other: The presumption is that the more important figures are near the top. Being "low man on the totem pole" is a familiar American idiom, meaning being at the bottom of the organization's tier of importance. "Moving up a notch on the totem pole" thus signifies an increase ...


0

As defined by the Cambridge online dictionary, being the low man on the totem pole is "someone who has the least important position in an organization". In the example you show, the organization would probably be the social network surrounding the wimpy kid. The dictionary goes on to show an example of how someone can start from being a low man on the totem ...


1

'Must' is a modal auxiliary, and 'have to' contains an overloaded control verb and an infinitive marker (for the next verb). 'Have' is overloaded in that it can be a participle for the 'perfect' aspect, and it can mean possession, and (in this case) it can mean 'need'. Where this need comes from is not implied by either 'must' or 'have to', so they are ...


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Depending on the context, the verb must can be used performatively. The verb have (to) cannot very easily with third person Subjects. What I mean by performatively, is that the actual uttering of the sentence is not a description of the necessity, but a directive, whereby the speaker is exerting their authority over the Subject just by uttering the sentence. ...


0

The easy answer is that your answer is incorrect to my aged and experienced ear. Replacing "to" with "and" doesn't usually sound right. Your question goes on to raise the possibility that the expression exists in some regional or social dialect, and I have to agree that it's a reasonable notion. I'm not comfortable with blessing dialect as acceptable ...


2

I learned a simple trick a long, long time ago that still serves me to this day when dealing with prepositions, which admittedly, as a native speaker come naturally to me but I still found this useful. If you turn the sentence around to lead with the prepositional phrase, would it still make sense? Let's try it out... To the French phrase "broyer du ...


1

To, for, of or none of the above. None of the above (foregoing): Professionally trained translators don't talk about equivalents or equivalency. They talk about equivalent meanings or equivalency of meaning. Therefore, one would say it like this: Is there a British/American phrase that is equivalent in meaning to the French phrase "broyer du noir"? That ...


1

You could just as productively ask "why Gaelic culture" and "why Gaelic Languages?" if you find that you don't have the same hesitations with that usage... then your hesitation really is your own political perceptions and not Linguistic. But let's look at the linguistic effects here though. You're right, it's not the Romans. The Romans delineated the ...


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The second example ['How much did it cost?'] sounds more natural to me. I'd only use the perfect tense [paradoxically] for some on-going business, such as "Building this garage has already cost me £2000." [With the implication that it's going to cost me more,]


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The two phrases have different meanings. "Active winter holidays" are active holidays that take place in the winter. Mountain biking trips in January (N. hemisphere) would be one example, where the activity can take place all year round. Skiing and snowboarding are winter activities, and may be done on "winter activity holidays".


1

J. A. Fleming (mentioned in JEL's answer) is likely the person who coined the term form factor for the study of electromotive force. Mr. Fleming writes in his article "The Form Factor of Alternating-Current Curves" for The Electrical Journal (1896): In the design of alternators ..., we have frequently to consider the relation between the true mean ...


2

My impression of form factor in the sense of "size, shape, and design of an electronic product" is that it is what Wilson Follett, Modern American Usage (1966) calls a "popularized technicality": popularized technicalities. ... In our time what is technical and professional is in high repute; what comes from the amateur is regarded as amateurish. ...


3

The earliest use I could uncover was in the June, 1883 volume of The Indian Forester: OED Online attests the use in forestry with this 1895 quote: W. Schlich Man. Forestry III. i. 36 Under ‘form factor’ is understood the proportion which exists between the volume of a tree and that of a regularly shaped body which has the same base and height as ...


2

Taking the Mickey Tease or make fun of. It's a slang phrase, used primarily for jovial mockery, it's often light hearted. Source: Phrases.org.uk


0

a trove of things beautiful - poetic inversion sometimes works.... a trove of dazzling creations or works


1

i am us english and would say "one-sixty-nine" never "one hundred sixty-nine"" possibly "a hundred sixty-nine." i am struggling with same issue in a japanese to english translation, funnily the subject is also 169cm! in the text i am working on in japanese it is written out "1 meter 69 centimeters" but now i feel comfortable using "169 centimeters" - ...


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Mirabilia is often used to refer to a collection or show of beautiful or unusual things: wonders ⇒ ■ Such a portrait was a 'must' for a collection of mirabilia. (Collins Dictionary)


2

Originally, the words four and forty obviously have the same root, but they were actually pronounced with distinct vowel sounds in many past dialects of English, and still are in some present ones. These two vowel sounds are those of FORCE and NORTH (to use John Wells's lexical sets). If you pronounce these words with the same vowel sound, it means you have ...


1

CERFL, the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages, is a guideline for progress in the learning of languages. It specifies the level of mastery of language in 6 stages, A1, A2, B1, B2, C1, C2 from beginner to mastery. It doesn't specify expected vocabulary numbers for each stage but others have found them experimentally for different ...


0

Equivalent to is to the only working combination. The following sentence is correct, 1 dollar is equivalent to 2000 rubles. In this case, 'equivalent to' has been combined with the compound noun '20 rubles' to make a compound adjective. To is the only preposition that can be used with Equivalent in this sense. Equivalent in and equivalent for are not ...


5

equivalent to <thing> when two things may be substituted for one another Is there any British/American equivalent to the French phrase "broyer du noir"? equivalent for <field> when a thing is like something in another field "Mare" is the word for a female horse. What is the equivalent for dogs equivalent of <thing> is the same as ...


1

Native North American (OK, California) English speaker D. Margolies used whinge in stating that the Common Lisp compiler would "whinge" if certain syntax were not used. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCNhmcXF8nw&feature=youtu.be, ACL Level 2 Session 2, 10:35, published Oct. 7, 2013. This may be the first documented North American use of whinge in ...


3

It appears to be a common mistake that has become a variant of the more common, correct spelling fine-tooth comb: Fine Toothcomb - Fine-tooth Comb: Brush your teeth, but don’t comb them. Although the spelling “fine toothcomb” is common enough to be listed as a variant in dictionaries, it looks pretty silly to people who prefer the traditional ...


1

In D. H. Lawrence's short story "The Daughters of the Vicar, (1911)" Lawrence has one of his characters use the word "abortion" to describe a sickly and frail person. He describes this person in the prose as "a small, chetif man, scarcely larger than a boy of twelve." I believe that the common use of that time was to reference a disabled or severely ...


1

A milkshake is usually milk with artificial flavoring and lots of sugar. It it not a suitable drink for breakfast. In contrast, a smoothie is liquidised fruit. It is better for breakfast. So that is what you should say is being served.


4

I have many Brits as friends here in Canada and what they call a smoothie, we also call a smoothie. A smoothie is fresh fruits and even veggies (carrots, broccoli, kale, etc) blended with juice or milk or with protein powder. You can also add nuts. You can add just about anything and it's still a "smoothie." But some of the commenters are correct, people do ...


12

It depends on what is in the drink and how thick the drink is. From Honeybell's Cookery: The main difference between smoothies and milk shakes is that fruit is the principal ingredient of the smoothie and ice cream is the primary ingredient of the milkshake. The link contains quite a bit more information, but that is the main point. There is also ...


12

If it's a lassi (which I know commonly are fruit, and sometimes use the pistachio nut or almonds) call it a lassi An American going on an assignment in India should understand "lassi" as a dairy-and-fruit beverage at a baseline and may be pleased by menu verisimilitude as a recipe of Indian origin.


51

For most Americans, a milkshake is served as dessert (usually at the end of the meal), although it may also replace the main beverage for the meal if one is feeling indulgent. Milkshakes are generally not associated with breakfast. Smoothies, however, are generally viewed as a meal-replacement, most often for breakfast (when one is in a hurry to get to ...


22

The critical thing I would go with is to make it clear that the smoothies contain milk and nuts. It's not a given that a smoothie will contain either (in the UK, most contain yoghurt as the base ingredient, or are pure fruit), and if someone is lactose intolerant or allergic, it can range from embarrassing to catastrophic to get that wrong. For preference ...


3

Some personal observations that won't fit in a comment box. Firstly, as a rule of thumb it seems better to use such noun phrase Adjuncts of duration (i.e. those which occur with numbers, e.g. five minutes, three days, a year) with stative verbs, verbs that describe situations and not real actions: I've lived here three years. I've been in the marines five ...


1

Beware: in New England, a "milk shake" is pretty much unknown, so you'll likely get just that: shaken milk. If you want the ice cream version, ask for a "frappe". Smoothies pretty much require something allegedly healthy :-) to be included, which kinda rules out a milkshake/frappe's combo of icecream, syrups, and even more sugar in some cases (and no or ...


0

From her appearance, it could be guessed, though not correctly but presumably, that the woman was in the age bracket of 20–30 years.



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