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1

For what it's worth, parameterize has 1,100,000 search results on Google, while parametrize has 500,000. I would take that as evidence that both are acceptable and in widespread usage.


4

The poem found by Andrew Leach as the earliest use in the OED, "A Change Is As Good As A Rest", is printed on page 270 of The Family Herald, Volume 15, 1857, published in London by George Biggs. Google Books finds it here, although the snippet view there is now so unreadable as to be useless. There is a note on the Family Herald here. I cannot find the date ...


1

As far as I can determine, Wise Old Sayings is right, if you're prepared to accept a moderate deviation from the wording of the proverb you are enquiring about. On this page at Answers.com, I found the following chronological list of citations (oldest first), which purports to be taken from the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations: Well, I gave my mind a ...


6

OED doesn't mention Conan Doyle. It does have a similar saying which it dates from 1825: 1825 Christian Gleaner Mar. 62 Change of work is as good as play. And it attributes the exact form to a rhyme in an American publication, again from before Conan Doyle was born: 1857 Defiance (Ohio) Democrat 26 Sept. 1/1 Ye votaries of sofas and beds—Ye ...


-2

In my opinion, if we use "Have" as an auxiliary verb in the question, in the answer we should use it. E.g. : Have you got a pencil ? Yes, I have. We should not use auxiliary verb "do" in the answer for this case. On the contrary, if we use : Do you have a pencil ? Then its answer will be : ...


0

To me the rule is that the verb in the tag question should be the same as the auxiliary verb in the first part of the sentence (affirmative or negative). This may also apply to auxiliary verbs that would be used in the emphatic form of the first part of the sentence, which may or may not appear in such part, and to verbs which can act as both substantive and ...


1

Also, American slang for a hospital gown is "Johnny", so English people in US hospitals should be aware that if a nurse asks you to put on a "Johnny", it's probably a mistake to slip on a condom.


1

The term 'fanny about' has nothing to do with female genitals but instead comes from naval slang. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fanny_Adams 'Sweet Fanny Adams' aka 'Sweet FA' and thus 'fanny about' means to do nothing. This is why on your scale of rudeness it is not anywhere near as vulgar as 'dicking about' because while fanny can refer to genitalia in ...


45

As Jo Bedard mentions in the comment to Sumit's answer, there are sexual overtones (they are too explicit to be called undertones indeed). The general meaning of all three expressions is that the speaker's reputation and / or career may depend on the outcome of the current project or undertaking and he urges the other person not to contribute to a failure. ...


0

It can only really be used in that context followed by about: fanny about fannying about Here's an example http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l63RSzqpwHQ


0

I think sight seeing is much better that sightsees. Becuase you can got to sighting when ever you want but sight sighs is like it is for aparticular momemnt.


1

According to Google NGrams people have been writing about sightseeing since the end of the 18th century, but have only used sightsee since the beginning of the 20th century: As can be seen, sightseeing is more popular. However in the context you mention, to sightsee is fairing better: While "to go sightseeing" is less popular in British English than ...


9

fanny is defined in Collins English Dictionary at CollinsDictionary.com as (taboo, British) the female genitals (mainly US & Canadian) the buttocks It is used frequently to describe someone in a not very polite manner You are a fanny! (often as complete and utter fanny) 'Taboo' seems a little strong for fanny as it can be used in a ...


7

The verb fannying (about) is intransitive. As such it is not used in a sentence like "Don't waste my time," where the verb is transitive. fanny on ODO: verb (fannies, fannying, fannied) [no object] (fanny about (or around)) British informal Mess around and waste time: they were fannying about in the street Compare, loafing, a similar ...


3

As a British English speaker, I would use "science block" to mean "the science labs and classrooms in a secondary school" rather than a college or university (those I'd be more likely to call the "science department"). In this context it definitely refers to secondary school (that's ages 11 - 16). Further, a "science block" has connotations of being in ...


2

The problem with this question is we're dealing with an orthographic representation of an "imitative/onomatopoeic" interjection. It's worth noting OED's two different pronunciations... Brit. /ˈiː(j)uː/ U.S. /ˈi(j)u/ OED list the alternative spellings euuw, euuww, euuwww, euw, euww, euwww, eww, ewww, and point out "forms with u occurring three or ...


-1

"The Lounger" (1785) might be of interest to you: At a dancing-school ball, where I happened to be not long ago, I was struck with the solitary figure of Captain N. looking demure, and stuck up in a corner. "The Lounger" (1785)


1

In 1995/6 I was co-running an online MUD (a text-based adventure game), and was introduced to "ewww" by the multitude of American university students (largely West Coast) who played on our server. I liked it immediately and have been using it ever since. Slightly tangentially, I was also introduced to "kewl" as a deliberately phonetic mis-spelling of ...


1

There is an excellent web resource at www.surnamedb.com. It says about the surname Gray: Recorded as Gray, Graye, Grey, Greye, de Grey, MacGray, McGray, McGrah, McGreay, McGrey, and possibly others, this ancient Anglo-Scottish surname has at least two possible origins. The first was Old English and a nickname or personal name for a man with grey ...


-1

Imagine you're in the UK. "Grey" sounds like a common color, so you don't want to sound like a common color! You want to be different - "Gray". Now, imagine you're in the US. "Gray" sounds like a common color, so you don't want to sound like a common color! You want to be different - "Grey".


0

There is a long discussion of “grey” vs “gray” in the OED. Historically, greig goes back to Old English, while grae, grai does not show up until Middle English. “Grey” is the preferred spelling in modern British English, but people can spell their names anyway they like, and there is perhaps an attraction in spelling your name differently from a common ...


2

Scare quotes or shudder quotes are quotation marks placed around a word or phrase to imply that it may not signify its apparent meaning or that it is not necessarily the way the quoting person would express its concept. -- Wikipedia You could get rid of them if you wanted. What the author is saying is it "synergise"s with excellence, but are trying to ...


2

Perhaps the people OP hears using as of yesterday/today/tomorrow/now/etc. misunderstand the significance of the as of part. From Cambridge Dictionaries online... as of/from - starting from a particular time or date: As of next month, all the airline's fares will be going up. Anyone with access to a suitable dictionary definition (as is now the case ...


1

The copulation sense of shag certainly seems to have come first, so to speak. From Francis Grose, A Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, Third Edition (1796): TO SHAG. To copulate. He is but bad shag; he is no able woman's man. Eric Partridge, A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, Fifth Edition (1961) sees the same possible connection ...


2

If people often say it and people often do it, then it's not bad grammar. It might be a usage from a specific regional variety of English, in which case it will be regarded as non-standard, which in reality just means 'different'. This, does not constitute 'bad grammar'. [On the other hand, if was being made up by a writer doing an inaccurate impression of ...


0

I'll just go ahead and post an answer (same as Mari's) since I want to express it slightly differently. (Point 1) Note that "smash box office records" was a term used in the entertainment business to mean "break box office records". (Just TBC if you are a non-native English speaker, "smash" is a synonym of "break".) (Point 1B) Regarding the timing of ...


0

I believe that smashing stems from the slang term, smash, meaning a great success; perhaps first used in the world of showbusiness and soon after adopted by the world of pop music. A smash If a musical, play, or film is a smash, it means it is hugely successful. We often hear the exclamation, Breaks box office record! when the enthusiastic response and the ...


1

According to Etymonlime the term smashing has undergone the change in meaning like other terms such as: fabulous ( see below). smashing (adj.) 1833, "violently crushing to pieces," present participle adjective from smash (v.). Meaning "pleasing, sensational" is from 1911. Fabulous: Sense of "incredible" first recorded c.1600. Slang shortening ...


1

It substantially depends on which kings and in which century you are interested. On a visit I made to a Tudor house earlier this year, where they were trying to recreate an authentic 16th-century atmosphere, the staff, dressed in period costume and speaking the language of the Tudors, referred to the toilets formally as 'The house of easement', and ...


1

These imitative sounds serve to express emotion and are a product of the facial expression that expresses the emotion. Traditionally psychologists worked with six basic emotions including fear and surprise. Theres a pic of these at ...


11

Past Definitions of Stuck-Up The earliest definition of stuck-up that I’ve been able to find is in John C. Hotten, A Dictionary of Modern Slang, Cant, and Vulgar Words, Second Edition (1860), published in London, which offers this very narrow meaning: STUCK-UP, “purse-proud”—a form of snobbishness very common in those who have risen in the world. Mr. ...


6

There does not seem to be a definite answer here, but it seems that most people are generally satisfied that stuck up may have come from the idea of sticking one's nose up. However, I hope I can provide support for the idea that the phrase stuck up could easily have come from a meaning that has nothing to do with a person's nose. Possibly stuck up came ...


15

According to Etymonline expressions using the concept of holding the nose up in the air suggesting superiority or disdain are used from 1570. Probably other expressions like stick one's nose up in the air and stuck-up are derived from this usage: Nose: To turn up one's nose "show disdain" is from 1818 (earlier hold up one's nose, 1570s); similar ...


1

The first known recorded use of stuck-up is in 1829 (References: 1, 2). No one has definitive documentation on how its use started. The idea that it involves having the nose stuck up in the air is very likely. This is a word-of-mouth explanation that has come down through the years. Before we can accept such a word-of-mouth explanation, we need some ...


2

My Oxford English Dictionary gives this definition, dating it to the 19th century (UK): stuck-up /stʌkˈʌp/ adjective. colloq. E19 (= early nineteenth century = 1800-1829) [ORIGIN from stuck adjective + up adverb².] Affectedly superior, pretentious, snobbish. (Example) D. Madden: Stuck-up baggage…You're better off without her for a friend. It doesn't ...


4

This has definitely crossed! I would still associate it with a: scatterbrained beautiful blonde girl when she sees or hears something disgusting often a reaction towards blood or something they object to - spiders and snakes (esp. when eating) often get an "eew". I live in East Anglia, in a more affluent area, and because of that I don't hear as much ...


1

It could be @Barmar was right by asserting that the woman in the Judas Priest song is a tribute to the female spy known as Agent 99, in the American T.V. comedy show Get Smart. The show ran from September 18, 1965 to May 15, 1970 and Judas Priest's debut album was released in 1974, so the timeline fits. Unlike another user, Greycat, I could not find any ...


0

From Oxford Dictionary of English ■ (name someone/thing after or (N. Amer.) also for) call someone or something by the same name as: Nathaniel was named after his maternal grandfather. Oxford certainly seems to think that named for is American in usage. Which I guess is in the following sense: representing (the thing mentioned):


2

Cockney rhyming slang originates in London and is spread across Britain by the London-based national media (most of it). There are many other local dialects and slang words used in different areas of Britain which aren't universally understood. These are less known across the whole country because of the London-based national media. "I'll mash the tea" ...


5

Anglia is the Medieval (Latin) name for England and has never been used in my earshot to refer to the country of England (I am English). If it were used now it would imply that the subject of the usage was ancient England. There is still an area of England known as "East Anglia" in common usage, but there is no common usage of North, West or South Anglia ...


0

One note: Ourselves, as a pronoun has a counterpart in themselves when referring to an outside party. But a speaker may use one another for either "we" or singular "they". One another is a reciprocal pronoun, like each other. E.g. We've met one another, they've met one another. I know that's not an answer about use cases, per se, but its important ...


0

The first pronoun ourselves is used when the speaker thinks of himself as part of a single group of people and that group does something to that same group. This is like myself, when one person does something to the same person. We went inside to keep ourselves warm. My family knew no help was coming, so we had to help ourselves. This is also used for ...


2

What is going on here is not the addition of 'do', and has little to do with conditionals in particular. It presents a different prioritization of reduction rules. There is no added 'do'. The construction in your example is that 'would', for instance, takes another verb, and that in backward references the phrase would therefore properly end with 'would ...


0

Omitting the preposition is acceptable and commonplace in the US: I have worked here five years. and without a direct object: The tree has been growing five hundred years. EDIT#1 For very short sentences or durations without a specific value, it is more common to include the for I suffered for years. We tried for years to get pregnant. rather than: ...


1

I was led to believe 22 Acacia Avenue is based on the Cynthia Payne story from the late 70s and early 80s when she was acquitted of being a madam and running a brothel at 32 Ambleside Avenue, in Streatham, London, England. She got punters to pay for services with "Luncheon Voucher" coupons, so argued she never provided sex for money. Plus, it's rumoured 22 ...


1

It generally means "I did not realize you ever played chess". As 'Since when do you paint?" means that I am dubious that you paint. So it happens, but it is a strange idiom and not normal usage that follows the standard definitions.


0

Here it means 'science wing' or the part where they study 'science' in a college or university. A building or part of a complex used for a particular purpose. For example, a shower block More examples from Oxford Dictionaries: The completion of the science block is not the end of developments at the School. But the school burned down and many ...


-4

Use: The analysis that the company made says that ___.


3

I would make it slightly less passive: "An analysis performed by the insurance company ..." or other material to indicate who performed the analysis and where it was performed as well as the issue being analyzed. If you or your associates performed the analysis, you might phrase it: "An analysis performed by the authors into insurance company ...



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