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Although a constructive obligation is not created solely by a management decision, The later statement that contrasts this is an obligation may result from other earlier events together with such a decision. The first statement is saying that management decisions (without anything else) do not create an obligation. The second statement is saying ...


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The following is a list of poems that most speakers of American English know very well, primarily because of their historic, cultural, and linguistic (i.e. many well-known expressions in common use today originated therefrom) importance: “No Man is an Island,” which is the penultimate paragraph of “Meditation #17”/Meditation XVII from Devotions upon ...


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One can be feather-brained, meaning 'easily distracted or frivolous', with the possible additional implication that one is not very bright. The term might sound slightly old-fashioned today, but it is still in use.


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The idiom is explicitly "three cheers and a tiger", for special occasions when the normal 'three cheers' was or is not exuberant enough. Wordreference seems to think it originated in the American Civil War, as a low growl reaching a crescendo; Straight Dope accords more with the British experience, of a fourth cheer becoming an enthusiastic babble.


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Interesting! I'd not come across this before. According to the OED, it is (or was): U.S. slang. A shriek or howl (often the word ‘tiger’) terminating a prolonged and enthusiastic cheer; a prolongation, finishing touch, final burst. 1845 onwards. "tiger, n." OED Online. Oxford University Press, September 2014. Web. 21 November 2014.


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And more specifically for the second part of OP's question: but in what sense is the hide in hiding contributing the meaning of the idiom? Here, "hiding" is a noun used as a colloquial near synonym for "a beating". According to the OED, it goes back to activities involved in tanning a hide, related to the verb hide2, "2. To beat the hide or skin of; ...


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Some people probably consider it a little bit primary-school-ish, but I'd say classmate.


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I think it is "Top-ten player." it's literally that simple. "means that if he would suddenly lose his/her position and get ranked 11 or lower, he/she could no longer be called that way" ... so, top-ten player. It's that simple.


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The word "finalist" means someone who has survived earlier challenges and is now competing for the top prize. In your example, there would be ten finalists.


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"Top Ranked" while not one word would usually suffice. adjective: considered to be the best or among the best ⇒ "the top-ranked amateur in France" http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/top-ranked


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"Games that I'm highly ranked in" comes to mind.


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The Wikipedia article on American and British English notes: Differences in grammar are relatively minor. In The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language (2003.311) , David Crystal limits his comment on the lack of difference to the 'educated' language: There are relatively few grammatical differences between educated BrE and AmE. Among ...


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Introductions among young people tend to be fairly informal, simply "Ken, this is Alan*, or even "Ken ... Alan". The normal assumption at a university would be that anybody you introduced would be a fellow student, so there would be no need to mention this. If you thought it might be interesting, you might add some information such as "He's in my Shakespeare ...


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How about the word colleague? Dictionary.com defines colleague as an associate. While the word is normally used in the context of the workplace, I have heard it used applied to schooling.


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The only thing I see wrong with the introduction you propose if Alan is more than a fellow student, in which case you might use a different appellation: "friend", perhaps.


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No one has yet discussed the derivation of the word toff (the source of toffee-nosed)—presumably because medica didn't ask. But in case anyone is interested, I offer the explanation that appears in Eric Partridge, Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, Fifth Edition (1961): toff. A 'swell' ; a 'nob' (well-to-do person) : proletarian : from ...


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And why is this illustration of a man with a pineapple (ananas) on his chest found with the definition of toffee-nosed? Does it imply anything about language? I believe I have found the connection between the pineapple on the man's shirt and toffee-nosed, in the end, the easiest explanation was the most logical. In Victorian England, and elsewhere ...


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You are correct that it is archaic. An interest in archaic language could in itself be an indication of middle-class status, although not an infallible one. See Kate Fox's very well-observed book "Watching the English" for more class indicators. Oh, and I have no idea about the pineapple. That's just weird.


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Regarding the illustration. It does look rather like a pineapple but I suspect it is just the clipart creator's idea of a jabot. These were worn by upper-class men at various times in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries and are still sometimes worn with formal Scottish attire. (illustations) At various times either a stand-up collar or a jabot was in ...


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Is the word itself still understood as being used by the lower class, or does it's use connote something about the user other than disdain for the upper class? (Rephrased, is someone who uses the word toffee-nosed today, actually "toffee-nosed", that is, pretentious?) I'd say it's mainly used by people who wouldn't be considered toffee-nosed, usually ...


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Wikipedia suggests that kip is derived from kipper a smoked herring fish. The English philologist and ethnographer Walter William Skeat derives the word from the Old English kippian, to spawn. The origin of the word has various parallels, such as Icelandic kippa which means "to pull, snatch" and the German word kippen which means "to tilt, to ...


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The meanings are the same. You can also use dialogue balloons or word balloons. Just make sure you're not mixing up speech bubbles with thought bubbles.


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According to John Ayto & John Simpson, The Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang (1992), both journo and muso originated in Australia. Here the dictionary's entries for the two terms: journo noun orig Austral A journalist, esp. a newspaper journalist. 1967—. TIMES Journos who work with the written word are seldom at ease with spoken English (1985). ...


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http://www.rhymezone.com/r/rhyme.cgi?&typeofrhyme=perfect&loc=moreideas&Word=sorry They should ryme due to the spelling but don't because the sound that the words make differs slightly. They, almost rhyme


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Since nobody's answered but rather only commented … apparently it's: "pitta", rhyming with German bitte


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I was on my way home on Saturday afternoon when an announcer of the recorded message on the Piccadilly line clearly asked passangers to 'move down inside the cars please'. Car as a term is clearly still in use on the tube....


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Is it pejorative to use “old girl” to refer to a woman? I think it cannot be used pejoratively: because if you call someone an "old boy" or "old girl", you simultaneously mean to to say that you yourself are, that everyone is, also an old boy or old girl. It's "familiar", i.e. you can use it to someone if they are family. The term "old boy" is normally ...


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Yes, it is. And if you don't believe me, just try it with any woman on the street. Also, see if the slap you receive is mitigated by saying what you think it means and see if you get anything like an apology.


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There are essentially two distinct and different uses. Former pupils of schools are sometimes known as 'Old Boys' and 'Old Girls'. David Cameron, the present Prime Minister is an Old Boy of Eton College. Princess Anne is an Old Girl of Benenden School in Kent. The use may be becoming dated, with more and more schools converting to co-ed, and the increasing ...


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According to ODO, the expression 'old girl' is used in different situations, and the age group of reference may be different according to context. It is not generally considered pejorative: (British) a former female student of a school or college: one of the college’s most famous old girls A former female member of a sports team or company: ...


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I think there may be a certain propensity for using the hyphenated form as an adjective, but not as a noun.


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Here is my quite different reading, based on different glosses of wot and breeches. The first English translations of the Old Testament appeared in the 1530's providing the first full translations of the Old and New Testaments. The very influential Geneva Bible was published in 1560, and is known as the Breeches Bible because of a translation in Genesis ...


1

I don't think it matters as long as you specify. Being English though it does annoy me when I hear English people in my own Country speaking American English words, such as 'Gotten' also 'Skedule' instead of schedule. American English is basically (2 LL's) a 300 year old version of English.


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Drink = experience, endure, pay the penalty. (OED drink, verb, #16). I took this proverb to mean that a furious master will beat the pupil's hindquarters with a switch (or a cane) in any case, whether he catches the fly or not, and no matter what kind of (fancy) reply the student might give when questioned. The student has not been paying attention to the ...


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I'll try to flesh this out further when I have the time (others are welcome to run with it as well), but I found this explanation of Ezekiel 23:32 wherein Matthew Poole's commentary explains that "thou shalt drink," in the context of that verse, means "thou shalt not put it by, and shift it off." So a quick interpretation of the passage would be as follows: ...


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As FumbleFingers noted, keep is acceptable. As to which is 'more right', if it is possible to have degrees of correctness, that is a question of style rather than grammar. In the antediluvian days of my youth, "I insisted that he kept..." could mean only that he kept ... at some past time, and at some later time I insisted on the truth of this. "I ...


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It can go either way in different contexts. If the court had insisted that everyone keep a straight face, the meaning of it is what you're supposing: that the court is, in the time frame referenced, insisting that portrait subjects remain serious in their portraits. If the court really had insisted that everyone kept a straight face, the object of the ...


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Who is the subject of a sentence: Who shot the sheriff? The person who shot the sheriff must be arrested! Who are you? Whom is an object in a sentence: To whom should I address this letter? With whom should I attend the ball? To whom does this belong? More on this here: http://web.ku.edu/~edit/whom.html Colloquially, who is often used instead of whom. ...


1

I am from the UK, and I would just to clarify the reasoning why I would always use "One hundred and fifty". The "and" splits the 2 numbers to avoid confusion that the "one hundred" may affect the "fifty" as in meaning "one hundred fifties" or in other words 100 * 50. (This may be similar to the way I and other people from the UK pronounce "can't" as carnt ...


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This depends a bit on how one defines "correct". Various dictionaries might accept either or both uses. If you go by the scientific literature, both seem to be widely used. On the other hand, if you are looking for a spelling that is suggestive of the correct meaning, then you should go with "parametrize" (or "parametrise"). You are not transforming the ...


0

The '-o' ending is very common in English usage, even when it doesn't necessarily shorten the word (yobbos instead of yobs, for example). I can't be sure why this is, but for some reason I'm thinking it's something to do with the kind of slang used in upper class prep schools and public (by which they really mean private/exclusive/fee-paying) schools like ...


1

The Collins online dictionary (definition 3)says that it is mainly used in England, Australia and New Zealand. As a native speaker of BrE, my impression is that it was more commonly used in England in the 1950s than it is now. I have rarely heard it used by what we might snobbishly call 'educated' people of my generation (over sixty), though my son and his ...


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I was wondering where the term, "mate," is most popular? Only among the English and Aussies, as far as I'm aware. Incidentally, the term mate in this context came into the English lexicon via sailors in the 18th century. Presumably that's why it's commonly associated with pirates. I hope that answers your question.


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This is another instance where looking at it as a BrEng versus AmEng issue simply confuses the matter. You bath by dumping yourself in a bath of some sort specifically to get clean, as in the two dictionary entries provided by the OP. There is naturally a grey area on deciding what is or isn't a bath. You bathe by cleaning yourself someother way. At a ...


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As you've discovered, it is a valid British usage. I would like to confirm that "to bath" is never used in any American dialect I've heard. If you're preparing students to speak American English, they can safely ignore that usage :)


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Just some observations and Ngrams. The results on the American English corpus indicate that the verb to bath is rarely used if at all. Whereas the expression to wash the baby seems to be overtaking its counterpart to bathe Meanwhile the British English corpus shows the slow upward trend for to bathe the baby which has been picking up momentum since the ...


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Those are not typos. Native speakers of British English do use bath as a transitive verb. Bathe on its own suggests swimming, and probably specifically seaside swimming — not even in swimming baths (which are swimming pools these days anyway). Bathe is almost poetic: something might be bathed in light. Apart from bathe a wound, to hear it used ...


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No, those are just typos. I have never heard a native speaker of American English use bath as a verb. It is bathe or take/give a bath. (Indian English, at least, and so British English I guess, they do use bath as a verb.)


1

Here is an Ngram chart that matches targetting (blue line) and targetted (red line) against targeting (green line) and targetted (yellow line) in British English publications over the years 1950 through 2000: The most striking thing about the chart (aside from the low frequency of all of these forms as late as 1970) is the continued low frequency of ...


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target's accent is on the first syllable, hence targeting is correct, as per OED. Compare with omitted in which the accent is on the final syllable.



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