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J.S. Farmer & W.E. Henley, Slang and Its Analogues, volume 1 (1890), has an entry for "turn out no bottle," which it says comes from "sporting": BOTTLE. To TURN OUT NO BOTTLE, phr. (sporting).—Not to turn out well ; to fail. Given that John C. Hotten, A Dictionary of Modern Slang, Cant, and Vulgar Words, second edition (1860) has an entry for ...


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Possibly not rhyming slang or other more complex suggestions, maybe related to early advertising. John Courage, who produced and still produce vast quantities of bottled beers had the slogan/tag line "take Courage" associating their bottled beers with bravery.


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My mother always used the expression when referring to someone who was somewhat less than sane, i.e., slightly doolally.


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I'm from Pakistan and I called all small toy cars 'dinky cars' when I was growing up - just like Americans call tissue Kleenex, or Xerox for photo copies, etc. I'm not sure whether I even owned any Dinky cars, of the brand, but it was just what you called them! Having read the above comments, where dinky cars are predominantly known as such in Britain, then ...


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What your teacher told you is close, but he or she was a bit confused. The problem is not so much that the reasoning is obviously wrong, it's that the example would then be ambiguous. Ambiguous? Yes. The sentence could also mean that big girls (collectively) have a single, common heart, and when it is breaking, they (collectively) cry. In addition to ...


3

Actually this is not a bad question. When you make a statement and the reply comes back "Noted," you can assume that you have been over-sharing, discussing topics the other person finds objectionable or uncomfortable, or violating some other social taboo. It is a one-word way of saying, "I don't wish to discuss this and I wish you would stop talking about ...


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Addressing the exception(al) situations and focussing on rooms or accommodation: Would you hire or rent a banquet hall? I'd hire it even if it were available for rent! As in all things English there are pernickety exceptions wherever you turn. The lease said the better


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I think the word roots fits this context. I'll be going to Greece this summer, because that's where my parent's roots are. Roots 6. a. often roots The condition of being settled and of belonging to a particular place or society: Our roots in this town go back a long way. b. roots The state of having or establishing an indigenous ...


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Just say I am going to visit your grandparents' country also native land homeland


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I'll be visiting the land of your ancestors ?


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Think of "chance" as a stand in for probability. And then add "low" if you like to make the meaning abundantly clear. "The low probability of winning the lottery makes it unlikely to happen, but I would be one happy camper if I did win it." Maybe it all started with the following exchange. "Want to go in on a lottery ticket together? What do you recon ...


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Noted is slang for, "I have taken note." Its meaning in context would depend on the speaker's tone of voice.


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I believe your initial guess is correct, and it was originally a catch phrase used by the comedian Dick Emery. Google helpfully shows a picture in character on a cursory search for 'more tea vicar'. His show ran on the BBC from 1963-1981. In 1970 he released an comedy album with one of the tracks titled 'The Vicar Of Belching-By-The-Sea'.


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Nigel Rees actually published a book titled More Tea Vicar? An Embarrassment of Domestic Catchphrases (2009), but its entry for that phrase is disappointingly vague: more tea, Vicar? A correspondent who, understandably, wished to remain anonymous advanced the family phrase, 'for after a fart, or to cover any kind of embarrassment'. Paul Beale has ...


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According to The Concise New Patridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English the humorous expression dates back to 1985: More tea, vicar? used humourously to acknowledge a fart or a belch, UK 1985. From The virtual linguist: I noticed in the kitchen department of John Lewis china teapots with the phrase "More tea, vicar?" written ...


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What you're hearing as "ham" should actually sound to an American more like "mum". The actual word being spoken, however, is truly just "ma'am". The proper etiquette, as it were, is to first address the Queen as "Your Majesty" and then, thereafter, as "ma'am". This isn't especially unique to the Queen, by the by. The word "madam" has been historically used ...


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As a speaker of AusEng I would understand all of these quotes as referring to a crash into an object at a bend, most commonly a guardrail. This would be the same for the bicycles. For example 10, where the car crashed into the tree, I would expect that there would be more than a single solitary tree marking the bend in the road - maybe there would be a ...


4

In answer to question 1, you can't crash 'into' a bend unless there is something to crash into... If there wasn't, one might say: 'came off (the road) at the bend and (then) crashed into a ___ (tree/house/giant grand piano)' As for your examples: 7) Reading the rest of the post, the person is not very literate, example can be discounted as poor ...


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The British Department of Transport publishes a Traffic Signs Manual, Chapter 4 Warning Signs deals with signs related to hazards. Section 3 is dedicated to Deviation of Route and Sections 3.1-3.8 deal specifically with Bend Signs. 3.3 The sign should be used sparingly and only to indicate a bend hazard. It should not be used simply to allay local ...


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I don't know if this is exclusive to BrEng but you can say: crashed on a bend crashed [on + a bend] See Google Books link for more examples After a long time, he admitted to having stolen it. He said that he had been driving too fast, and had crashed on a bend. A Tragedy Waiting to Happen – The Chaotic Life of Brendan O’Donnell. By Tony Muggivan, ...


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The three most likely ways to express your example sentence are in the following word orders: Your loan has been approved in principle. Your loan, in principle, has been approved. In principle, your loan has been approved. In none of these cases would you hyphenate "in principle" because in each case it operates as a simple (two-word) ...


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It seems a easy path to me from the energetic movement of the hands and arms while playing a fiddle to energetic movement using the hands when fiddling with an object to energetic work on your taxes - and if you need work that hard, the odds are you are cheating somewhere.


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I have heard speculation about the saying "tut-tut" being attributed to the prudish Miss Fowler-Tutt. https://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storycode=308234


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This is certainly a timely question for readers in the United States: The final day for citizens to file their federal and state income tax returns without incurring a penalty for late filing is April 15. In the spirit of the impending dismal day, I'll focus on Mari-Lou A's third question: 3. Do Americans fiddle their taxes? What's the American English ...


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This is a yiddish expression that my mother uses whenever my brother asks her a question that he knows the answer to, just to see if she knows it. She always says, "I don't need you to farher me." A farher is an oral exam. Not an answer but related.


-1

Yes, this is mostly BrE. And it's not only in the OED: fiddle 2 [transitive] British English informal to give false information about something, in order to avoid paying money or to get extra money: Bert had been fiddling his income tax for years. fiddle the books (=give false figures in a company's financial records) ...


4

It is sense 4 of the verb fiddle per the OED. It has been around since at least 1630 and Daniel Defoe was using it in 1703. Interestingly the nounal use is said by the OED to be of US origin, and dates from more recently. Verb trans. and intr. To cheat, swindle; to ‘wangle’, intrigue; (see also quot. 1850). Also with into, out of. Now only slang. 1630 ...


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I proffer- Introducing the following concept is difficult but rewards/benefits will follow in the end.


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it will compensate it will be gratifying it will be profitable compensate (vb) "to provide something good as a balance against something bad or undesirable" MW gratifying (adj) "giving pleasure or satisfaction" MW profitable (adj) "producing good or helpful results or effects" TFD


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"rewarding approach" shows many examples at Google Books Strength and Conditioning for Young Athletes: Science and ... - Page 44 Rhodri S. Lloyd, ‎Jon L. Oliver - 2013 - ‎Preview - ‎More editions A multidisciplinary approach that considers physiological, psychological and sociological contributors to developing talent may be the most ...


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It's less obvious than in AmE, but it's there in some situations, see in this British Dictionary,where the "r" in the British pronunciation is raised. Also: Trends in phonological theory until 1975: a historical ... - Page 131 Eli Fischer-Jørgensen - 1995 An example of latency is final r in British English, e.g. in jar [fa:]. Before a vow'el ...


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The Indian students need to develop the skills of 'speaking English', 'writing English', and 'reading English' to qualify in any kind of Government jobs as well as in the private sector. There are many jobs which have the prime criteria of speaking fluent English, e.g. - in call centres, meeting foreign delegates, presenting projects to international or ...


3

English is one of the two official languages of India, the second being Hindi. If any of your students want a job in any official government post, or a job where they have to deal with the government, speaking English will be a huge advantage to them. Being able to speak any other language is good for ones job prospects, and is in any case a fulfilling ...


1

I think a "trick question" usually means what you are asking about. While it is a colloquial phrase, it usually means a question which offers a choice of answers none of which is the correct one. It forces the person answering the question to pick one of the answers thereby exposing the fact that he does not know the true answer.


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"Challenge" You ask someone a question that you know the answer to in order to expose them as ignorant. You are challenging their competence.


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I think the closest term to what you're looking for is a trick question, defined by Wiktionary as: A complex question, whose wording hinders the ability to answer it correctly. Basically, these are questions designed to make the person answering fail. For example: - When did Elvis Presley die? - Is that a trick question? The King's not dead!


1

Just as those who are sent on and attempt to accomplish “a fool’s errand” are doomed to failure and ridicule, for the errand's goal is impossible to obtain; those who are asked and attempt to answer “a fool’s question” suffer similar fates, for "there are no answers to a fool’s question."


2

I saw it wasn't listed so it took me an hour of googling to find this specific word for you. Depending on your intention of use this is a word that captures a different but similar meaning to what you said you are trying to find. Shibboleth A shibboleth (/ˈʃɪbəlɛθ/[1] or /ˈʃɪbələθ/[2]) is a word or custom whose variations in pronunciation or style can be ...


0

'In A cleft stick' - "In a difficult situation, unable to choose between unfavourable options; in a dilemma. " Source; Wiktionary http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/in_a_cleft_stick 'Caught between a rock and a hard place' - "Having the choice between two unpleasant or distasteful options; in a predicament or quandary." Source; Wiktionary ...


3

I think the best option would be a disingenuous question. Brainstorming some more ideas: Trick question. A question designed to show someone up. Insincere, testing question. A question designed to catch someone out or show their ignorance. Malicious question. Uncomfortable question.


0

My girlfriend uses the word interrogation every time I do this, and it seems to fit: synonyms: questioning, cross-questioning, cross-examination, quizzing.


3

test \ˈtest\ noun -MW 2,a : (2) something (as a series of questions or exercises) for measuring the skill, knowledge, intelligence, capacities, or aptitudes of an individual or group If (underlined) If you happen to be a troll, this question was a test of our gullibility; seeking the knowledge of if we're unbeknownst to your trollishness and how far ...


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Teachers and politicians sometimes call these "gotcha questions." Here's an excerpt from a discussion of gotcha questions in a Daily Caller article: The infamous “gotcha” question is something politicians always rail >against. But what exactly defines a “gotcha”? “I suppose a gotcha question is one that’s fundamentally unfair because it has a ...


3

A pointed question; one that cannot be answered with a vague generalization, but only precisely. BTW "asking a rhetorical question" doesn't mean that you suspect the hearer(s) don't already know the answer. It means you are making a statement (perhaps of something that is obvious) more emphatic by expressing it as a question, for example "Do you want to be ...


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If you are trying to educate, instead of expose, the answerer, I would say Socratic.


0

Wiles - The use of clever tricks by someone in order to get what they want or make someone behave in a particular manner. Artifice - The use of clever tricks to cheat somebody.


3

While I am unable to offer a noun, there are a couple of adjectival descriptions which typify questions designed to achieve certain ends, which could prove useful, i.e., “tactical”, “calculated”. tactical adjective: of, relating to, or constituting actions carefully planned to gain a specific military end. • (of a person or their actions) showing ...


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Teachers sometimes refer to this kind of question as a trap: From The Pragmatics of Mathematics Education by Tim Rowland: One common perception is that the questions teachers ask their pupils are not searchlights focused to reveal truth, but traps set to expose ignorance. Rowland was quoted in Teacher-student Interaction by Alandeom Wanderlei de ...


0

Perhaps probing or fathoming one's depth probing question probing adjective 1 : that investigates something in a tentative way : that tests or tries out something experimentally a probing procedure 2 : that penetrates deeply in an exploratory way to the essence of something : keen and to the point : sharply analytical : ...


0

I think, based on this, see 5.3.3, that the 2nd might be preferred in BrE/BE by some, but there's quite a variability from a speaker to another. See the 2nd para wrt lack of consistency.



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