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0

The phrase used where I grew up in Wales, to describe someone having an extraordinary and possibly undeserved piece of luck, was "You jammy Arab!" which might tie in to the answer given by Stateleyhome.


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"Is this a British variation on the definition that is known in the United Kingdom but that hasn't entered dictionaries yet?" - No. As a native speaker of British English my interpretation of the example given is stating that the lack of open museums is rather dull and implying the available alternatives may not be as interesting. Whether or not that is ...


1

I think it only applies to words with a latin root where the plural is imported from latin too? There's no general plural rule for "*x" words, just a few that follow an exception to the expected "*xes". Some other exception I can think of are axis -> axes (pronounced "akzeez") matrix -> matrices (maitrisseez) there's no : boxes -> boces foxes -> ...


0

I would expect vernacular Irish to be rather more 'colourful' than its English counterpart. Maybe RTE would have resources? Censorship history might also be useful for evaluating contemporary texts.


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I am an Indian English speaker and I think it's safe to say we have influences from both British(from the colonial times) and American(more recent) English. Intuitively thinking about it, I'd say I would use the following to quieten - to make quiet - eg. "Indonesia seeks to quieten noisy mosques during Ramadan" to quiet - to be quiet - eg. "She told the ...


1

Per the Google Books ngram server, even in the British English corpus, quiet as a verb has long surpassed quieten in frequency. The preference for quiet as a verb is stronger in the American English corpus, but both forms are found in both corpora, and in both of them quiet as a verb is and has been the more frequent. The OED uses quieten as a synonym in ...


1

I can only speak for American English, and my observations are strictly based on personal experience. So: Telling time is undergoing a major change, due to the widespread use of digital clocks. When looking at an analog clock (with a dial face, hour and minute hands), the use of "past" and "til" come naturally. Furthermore, the use of approximate time, ...


0

I grew up in New Zealand and my family, who were from the south of England, always used possessive pronouns like this . In my opinion, saying " Let's go you yours" or " She's staying at mine" is no different from saying " I bought it at the grocer's" or " I have to go to the doctor's.


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Real Madrid competes very well. I believe that "competes" is the proper verb for the sentence mainly because of the subject verb agreement regardless of the adverb "very well"


1

Welsh accents have a lot of variety but there is a flow and musicality that is common to them and marks them out relative to other British accents. If you want to get a feeling for it quickly, you might look to one of the great names of 20th Century Welsh culture and explore some Dylan Thomas. In fact the ideal point might be to combine that with another of ...


0

As recommended by @JanusBahsJacquet in the comments to the question, I chose self-unaware as my word. For some reason when asking the question, I got stuck mentally, on having the negation prefix come first in the word.


2

First, could I just point out that the Welsh are British, just not English. "I know that a good lot of people in Wales are pretty fluent in English. But is their English similar to that spoken in the rest of the UK? " The great majority of Welsh people have English as their first language. In the last census in 2011, sad to say, three quarters of Welsh ...


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"Comfort" has a few narrow legal uses. In contract law, a "comfort letter" is an assurance from one party of that party's willingness to undertake some contractual obligation. Since that assurance is usually considered a moral obligation and not itself a contractual one, it seems to me that it doesn't provide much in the way of comfort. In US bankruptcy ...


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"Gain/acquire/obtain comfort" does not sound natural to me, as an American. I've never seen those variations in a legal context, and I've read a lot of legal as a proofreader. Not only that, but it just makes sense to give an object when talking about your comfort to avoid ambiguity. "This issue was looked at in depth in 2013, and we obtained comfort at ...


1

It might originally, but that is just an assumption, come from the german language where you can use the word 'jaein' which is the combination of 'ja' and 'nein'.(yeah and nah) Probably through immigration this concept were transferred into the the English language(not necessarily from the german language but it is just an example)


-1

Ahmed astonished why the watch had stopped. Ahmed astounded why the watch had stopped. Ahmed engrossed why the watch had stopped. Ahmed fascinated why the watch had stopped. Ahmed gaped why the watch had stopped. Ahmed bewildered why the watch had stopped.


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Expanding on @jlovegren's comment: It turns are there are similar idioms in American, Indian, South African and New Zealand English. This concept has popular culture references in How I Met Your Mother and Punch Drunk Love. There is a study on this by the University of Pennsylvania. In the Australian case - there is a study: [K. Burridge and M. ...


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Gully is a Hindi word which means street. What street football is to Brazil is gully cricket to India. Although hockey is the national game, Indians are passionate about cricket. They manage to play cricket in the lanes using stones for wickets and adjusting the rules. What started out as a local term, has gained more acceptance. Origin: Googly as a cricket ...


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Etymonline has an entry for toddy, noun. It is as Kristina Lopez said with her link a special alcoholic hot drink based on a Hindi word. If toddy is used with reference to a woman I assume it is a metaphor, seeing such a woman has about the same effect as the hot spicy alcoholic drink. ...


1

Debrett's recommends us to pronounce Ma'am to rhyme with Pam. In my variety of British English, that is /Pæ:m/. My dialect exhibits the bad-lad split and "mam" has a long vowel. I pronounce Pam, palm, cat, and mum with four different vowels. I've never used the word ma'am in any context and I've never heard it used by any British-English speaker (except in ...


1

Looks like it's to do with the bookmaking definition of odds (from dictionary.com): this ratio used as the basis of a bet; the ratio by which the bet of one party to a wager exceeds that of the other, granted by one of two betting opponents to equalize the chances favoring one of them: The odds are two-to-one that it won't rain today. In this ...


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As a non-native speaker, the word practice came to mind. From Wiktionary: A place where a professional service is provided, such as a general practice. She ran a thriving medical practice.


2

As a Brit I can only take the BBC as an example of correct pronunciation; they have departments for these things. Though the fin/fine thing does occur, it seems to me both versions of the word are generally pronounced "fiynancial".


1

The first sentence is correct, although I would personally choose a synonym for the second use of address. What's the difference? Brown is going to address (speak in front of) the convention in July. He plans to address (speak about) the issue of low-income housing in his speech. Brown had addressed (spoken in front of) the convention in July. As a ...


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There is also the widely used "consultation room", although many dictionaries apparently have "consulting room" instead.


1

Doctors see their patients in: doctor's offices, outpatient facilities, hospitals and clinics. Surgery is Chiefly British (unless you are in the operating room, being operated on by a surgeon.) I heard some doctors still make house calls.


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I have always heard the building as a whole called the "doctor's office", and the particular room where the doctor sees you the "examination room".


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This usage is not a universal in modern English. American dialects typically refer to a doctor's office as the building and/or room used for examination. The building may also be a clinic. The room itself may be called an examination room or, in most informal spoken English, an exam room. If the doctor is practicing within a hospital, they have an ...


0

For what it's worth, my maths teacher says cos like coz with a 'z' sound at the end, as opposed to cosine which he says co, long o, sine as in sign (s-i-y-n). N.B. tn is just as is sounds, with the 'a' short.


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In the early 1900's they had a big gun called a punt gun used for shooting ducks , looks like it would've taken anything out in the near vicinity without much precision https://twitter.com/oldpicsarchive/status/609042179831541760


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TL;DR This is like asking how many words are in the English language. Everyone is different, words are created everyday (and fade away slowly), so naming a specific number is misleading. But for a single idiom, you can compare it’s frequency of usage in the US vs UK using corpora (COA/BNC or Google NGrams) Details: First a general observation: for ...


5

Try: The phone call from him at the eleventh hour was the icing on the cake. Also, Kristina was magnanimous enough to let me use one from her post: The phone call from him in the nick of time was the icing on the cake. (Oxford)


3

"Just under the wire" means that something occurred just prior to the deadline (in the case of your birthday, midnight of the next day). "The phone call from him just under the wire was the icing on the cake." under the wire: Horse racing: At the very last moment; in the nick of time; barely within some accepted parameters or limits. "The report ...


4

"The phone call from him at the last minute was the icing on the cake" Last minute Noun - The time just preceding a deadline or when some decisive action must be taken. www.dictionary.com Although this phrase seems to be specifying the last minute before the deadline expires, it is actually understood to mean just before the deadline and ...


3

I don't know if those idioms are usable outside the US. If in doubt don't use them. There are some examples that I am not sure about if they are common in UK? go belly-up give someone the ax sharp as a tack top dollar gung ho not give a hoot stand a chance All these sayings are very, very common in UK and Australia. ...


-1

This doesn't seem to be what the author of the quotation has in mind, but according to several sources, Lemus lemus is the genus and species name of the Norway lemming. For example, from Journal of Raptor Research (1995) [combined snippets]: Abundance of local food supplies was previously shown to delay the need to disperse; Johnson (1981) noted tundra ...


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Since the Wall's Fursey books were fantasy (and fantasy/comedy at that), and the other creatures mentioned in the sentence are fantastic creatures, a lemus is almost certainly a creature of Wall's imagination. There is also a possibility that a lemus is a creature of folk tales local to Dublin during the early 1900's when Wall was a child. Since ...


4

It is probably just a typo for lemures.


0

The German word implies tension. "Spannend" for a novel means exciting as in tense. A Spanner is therefore a device for applying tension to something i.e. for doing something up. The American word Wrench to me implies a device for taking something apart, which OI find fascinating.


8

The rule of thumb is, I think, that the Brits are much more likely to be familiar with American idioms than the other way round. We have been relentlessly exposed to them since the war; Murricans have been exposed to ours only if they are fans of Monty Python, Blackadder and The Office, which not all of them are. For example, my own language is infiltrated ...


2

I personally think that 4 pm is late enough to use the word evening. "Enjoy the rest of your day!" is always a nice way to send people off if you don't know the time. There are no time rules for when the times of day start and end as they shift throughout the year. This said here is how I go for it. If you can't tell were the sun is it is night. Following ...


1

It depends on where you are. In India, where I live, we say "good morning" from the time people wake up to 12 noon. Then we switch over to "good afternoon" till about 5 pm, when we begin saying "good evening" which lasts until bedtime. For time-neutral goodbyes, you could use "Good day!" or one of your own suggestions. Sounds good! :)


4

Rabbit, Rabbit, Rabbit is a superstitious wishing game: a common British superstition which states that a person should say or repeat the word "rabbit" or "rabbits", or "white rabbits", or some combination of these elements, out loud upon waking (or first moment) on the first day of the month, because doing so will ensure good luck for the ...



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