New answers tagged

-1

Group 1&2 are correct. Because in first group have is a helping verb and sentence is in present perfect tense.... in second group have is a verb and sentence is in simple present tense.... so 1&2 are right


0

Both are idiomatic but "I will be killed" is the more widely used phrase: Google Ngrams American English Google Ngrams British English


1

Patch to mean an area where one operates (especially for police officers, criminals or salesmen) is common in informal BrE. It could sometimes equate to a hometown but not always. 3.1 British informal An area for which someone is responsible or in which they operate : we didn’t want any secret organizations on our patch More example sentences ...


0

One meaning of patch is a small plot of land, one often used for gardening. The word is often used with some particular cultivation, notably melons. For a brief discussion of a watermelon patch and its role in your survival after armageddon, go here. Earlier references are more likely about the literal meaning. Thus from Poultry, Garden and Home, Volume 3 (...


0

"A leads to B" generally means "A is the cause of B". A talent crunch is a shortage of qualified candidates. A shortage is caused by growing demand, not the other way around. Thus the first option is correct. a growing demand that leads to a talent crunch I have no clue what "key challenge" means in this context or how it relates to the question at ...


1

I had a welsh friend in primary school who would say this often. We live in New Zealand, so I don't know many people who speak with other British dialects, I couldn't compare them.


0

I typed the following word pairs, and spell-check balks at "convolve." evolve --> evolution; devolve --> devolution; revolve --> revolution; convolve --> convolution; Nonetheless, in my experience, for the mathematical operation of combining two functions, "convolve" is preferred. I found the following web site, which (of course) includes the first ...


2

The one place where I encountered qua over and over and over was in the Random House translations of Aristotle that we used in college when studying the Greek philosophers (or more specifically, "the philosopher," as a number of medieval scholars referred to Aristotle). A brief but not altogether enlightening explanation of qua as used in translations of ...


2

Qua (not to be confused with the ablative feminine form of qui) is a Latin adverb meaning "where; by which route". Read it as "as" when you read it. Use it in scholarly or legal writing to refer to a specific role or conceptual category for an entity that could have more than one role/conceptual category. E.g., All that is necessary is, that the arbiter, ...


1

Unless you are using a Latin phrase such as "sine qua non," you should not use "qua" in any English sentences. If you do, no one will know what you mean. "Sine qua non," by the way, means "the without which not." For example: "Bork's book is the sine qua non on judicial philosophy--if you do not understand his book, you do not understand judicial ...


0

The correct answer, from a Canadian, is British English. We spell a lot of words, such as colour, with a "u". In America they don't. We also spell centre not center


1

Both versions would be well understood, but "Take your hands out of your pockets" is idiomatic based on Ngram's corpus. Regarding plurality, if the hands were initially in a single pocket, use the singular, pocket. If they were in separate pockets, use the plural, pockets.


0

I think the saying you are looking for is "Mannàggia Gesù!" or "Mannàggia! Mannàggia!" which translates literally to "dammit Jesus! "dammit! dammit!" being a polite swear if you like: it is predominantly used as an interjection, not so common other than the south of Italy or with non southern-families. It has been in dictionaries since late 1800s I ...


3

In British English we tend to always spell with the letter "s" as opposed to the letter "z". Much of American and British English shares this pattern. In fact there is an interesting piece on this subject which can be found here http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2011/03/ize-or-ise/ It seems to be that it is acceptable to use both forms. As a British ...


21

Oink oink might be closest in form in American English. This is the English word for the sound a pig makes, and can be used to mean "greedy" (similarly to the trough idiom, I think). "Oink out", for example, equates to "pig out", meaning overeat or binge (see, for example, The Free Dictionary), and I might say "oink oink" as a humorous admonition to my child ...


4

In American English, that would probably be "Lining his own pockets" if you mean he's making sure he gets some kind of money at the end. To be more like just stealing from the position, you could say he "has his hand in the till [cash register]".


0

On the lines of a food or eating analogy: To have your cake and eat it too It doesn't make much literal sense but it's generally used to imply greed, since one can't eat a cake and still have it later. It's not necessarily used for politics or corruption in my experience of New Zealand English (where hasn't been a huge issue). I don't think this ...


3

Mighty Fine Words and Smashing Expressions: Making Sense of Transatlantic English (2001) Summary of this book's section on BrE/AmE uncountable/countable nouns: Most vegetables that are uncountable in BrE are countable in AmE, with these exceptions: broccoli, spinach, lettuce, i.e. vegetables that already have different ways of distinguishing discrete ...


4

How about "money grab"? As in "That bridge-to-nowhere was a big money grab". It's not exactly the same meaning, but it's close.


2

I would suggest dog eat dog. From the Cambridge Idioms dictionary: if a situation is dog eat dog, people will do anything to be successful, even if what they do harms other people It is commonly used in the expression: "it's a dog-eat-dog world." I like this one as an equivalent because it expresses the disgust that I believe is implicit in the ...


29

Quite similar is have/get one's nose/snout in the trough British disapproving to be in or get into a situation in which one is getting or trying to get a lot of money {Merriam-Webster} 'He's got his nose in the trough' could be applied to any person over-eagerly procuring money, but is almost always used for illegal or at least dodgy ...


4

The answer to a "proper" expression for underground floors is that there is no standardized nomenclature, rather, there are multiple different designators depending on the place in question and the country: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Storey#Subterranean_floors The numbering of levels below ground is also quite varied, even within the same country. In ...


0

I think that most of the English speakers would not notice to much. Since most of our written communication is typed, if they did notice they most likely would be wondering why the spell check did not catch the "error".


1

No, generally "m'" is vocalised as a quick 'muh' sound. 'hon' is never pronounced /kər/. In the case of 'honey', /hʌn/ would be correct, in case of 'honourable' (hon. as an abbreviation), then /ˈɒn/ (somewhere between 'ahn', 'on') would be about right.


4

The most-recognized form of the quote is "There ain't no such thing as a free lunch", from The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Robert Heinlein. If you're going to use it you should probably quote it correctly, and cite the source. This version is of course even more informal than the one you write, but if you explicitly state it is a quote then that shouldn't be ...


2

Some points on the "I am loving it" usage from an article by Bonnie Mills / Mignon Fogarty: According to the rule, “I’m loving it” is not grammatically correct because it uses a stative verb—in this case, one that conveys emotion, love—in a progressive tense. But, now we come to some idiomatic uses of stative verbs. You can conjugate certain ...


0

Among the comments I've received, there was exact answer to my question. I was reading Mick Herron's "Slow Horses" series. So, "the Park" means MI5's headquarters.


0

From the Bank of Canada's latest monetary policy statement: Before turning to your questions, let me spend a few minutes highlighting the main points of discussion that took place within Governing Council. ... Governing Council carefully considered how best to incorporate the effects of the Brexit vote into the outlook. In both cases, the U.S....


0

The only place I've ever heard someone call a license plate a 'tag' is in Alabama when I visited a friend of the family there. I've never heard anyone use that in the Midwest or West. I think it's southern slang, but it's so very common there that no other word is used.


3

For the same reason that we do not say "He will not does it". 'Will' (including the archaic second person form 'wilt') is followed by the base form of the verb ('do') not an inflectted present tense form ('does', 'doth', 'dost')


0

Here is the best interpretation of BEEF: http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-bee2.htm We have to go back further to trace the verb to its beginnings. In the early eighteenth century there was a slang phrase to cry hot beef or give hot beef, which meant to raise the alarm, to start pursuit or to set up a hue and cry. This may have been based on a ...


4

Starting during Victorian times in Britain it became very popular for people to go to the seaside for holidays. Many seaside resorts built piers on which tourists could walk to take the sea air, which was said to be good for the health. Certainly better than the smoky city air of the time. Small theatres were typically built at the ends of piers to ...


3

In the strange British pastime of cryptic crosswords, words are often used in deliberately misleading ways, to create the puzzle. Nearly always if there is an apparently meaningless phrase in a crossword clue, it is indeed a completely meaningless phrase, and the words in it need to be taken in a different way (using different meanings of the original words, ...


2

According to a pronouncing dictionary that I've owned for 40+ years, it's perfectly-correct British English to drop the H, except after a pause or when particularly emphasized, in the word the pronouns 'he', 'him', 'her', and in the word 'have' when unstressed.


2

In many cases the initial "h" will not be silent after a consonant in common US speech. This very morning I told my waiter that, "I will have green ham and eggs". I pronounced both "h" clearly. The gentleman showed no raised eyebrow at my manner, and indeed my ham and eggs arrived safe and sound, and tasty, and, of course, quite green. Note, however, that in ...


3

I feel a little uncomfortable posting this as an answer, because it involves the death of a young man, and I don't mean to belittle his demise. However, from purely a linguistic point of view, the headline is of some interest. The Mail Online, a British Newspaper tabloid, has the following sad title (Jul 10th 2016 2PM) Pictured: Wife who was sat in ...


1

"I'm sat" assumes that 'sat' is the passive participle of 'sit', which requires that 'sit' be a transitive verb. (In AmE, 'set' is transitive, but 'sit' is not.) Since "I'm sat" is passive, it means that someone put you in a sitting position, but that someone was not necessarily you, yourself; whereas "I'm sitting" means that you 'sat' yourself.


3

Ignoring the grammarian 'it is wrong' response, the 'standard' (for want of a better term) answer is that it is a quasi-passive. Fowler, for example, explains it as such in his Pocket Modern English Usage. The basic idea is that sentences such as "someone broke the car" and "the car needs fixing" are passive-like in function though not form as the actor is ...


8

Slip coaches on the railway are one or more coaches that are detached from the train while it is in motion. Having no locomotive they gradually slow to a halt, helped by a staff member operating the brake. An express train would 'slip' coaches at intermediate stations without having to stop there. With careful operation of points (switches) it is possible ...


22

The term was borrowed from railways. In railways, from what I could gather, a slip road is a short rail track connecting a main railway line to a siding or another railway line, which parallels the function of slip roads in motorways. This is clearest in Sessional Papers, Volume 89, Great Britain, House of Commons, 1902 (my emphasis): The train engine, ...


17

It might be derived from the word "slipway", which is a ramp or sloping bit of ground which you use to get a boat in and out of the water. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slipway The act of getting a boat into or out of the water via a sloping bit of road seems similar to the act of getting your car on or off the motorway via a (often sloping) bit of road, ...


1

To cut through the comment chaos and address the question: You can say "the" like "thee" or "thuh", interchangeably. This isn't a recent development and as far as I know it's not particularly associated with a particular region. A given individual might use both on seperate occasions. I believe that "thee" is favoured in "Received pronounciation", which ...


1

"Whereabouts" is usually used in place of "where". It is asking for a more general location - as in what general areas you interested in or would like to mention, it is deliberately nonspecific. It is usually used informally and conversationally, not so much used when someone is asking for an itinerary or specific location. I would not expect this to be ...


1

I lived in Los Angeles in the 70's-80's. Oh yes, a bit of traffic. Everyone there then used the expression 'rat run'. The name is obviously derived from the famous experiments of putting rodents in mazes and watching them learn the shortest way through.


0

This question was asked and answered quite a while ago, but I think there's another interesting facet to the story so I'm asking this answer. This is an old-fashioned AmE idiom, but with a slightly different meaning than the BrE idiom which would make it inappropriate in the given situation. Specifically, it is used between adults (often from someone in a ...


3

For any colonial friends, it would sound very natural indeed, because of Bring me your tired, your poor, your ... huddled masses, et cetera. It is the same construction, omitting "persons," and implying group. Note too that "wounded" is also very commonly used in this way. "Bring me your wounded," "Bring the wounded here..." {Thanks to action movies ...


6

Their sick is a noun phrase without any noun and with an adjective functioning as Head of the phrase. These are referred to by The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language as fused Modifier-Head constructions. We most usually see these with a definite article: the good, the bad and the ugly the rich the poor the blind Occasionally, however, they can ...


19

The referent is just elided here. You can read this as meaning "sick [friends]" or "sick [relatives]." The reason it sounds odd to British ears is that the current British colloquial usage of "sick" as a euphemism for "vomit" is overpowering any other interpretation for you. Since that colloquial usage is relatively unheard of in America, you are ...


4

It is an archaic but correct usage: Sick (n.) "those who are sick," Old English seoce, from sick (adj). sick (adj.) "unwell," Old English seoc "ill, diseased, feeble, weak; corrupt; sad, troubled, deeply affected," from Proto-Germanic *seukaz, of uncertain origin. (Etymonline)



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