New answers tagged

1

The 'y' is 'of' in Welsh; and what follows describes the location or features of the cottage. Pent -y-groes, Pent-y-cwm, Pent-y-siliogogogoch. There are so many cottages, old summer farm-houses with names like this that it became a nick-name for the white cottages in the Welsh mountains. Pen Pent doesn't actually mean cottage . I means 'head,' or 'top;' the ...


2

As a tip, when you are looking for usage on Google, add quotes. It will ask Google to treat your search more or less literally instead of trying a whole bunch of linguistic parsing (like including synonyms, spelling variations, topic parsing, etc.): "Center of Excellence" - 47.8 million results "Center of Competence" - 356 thousand results Results are ...


5

Center of excellence is the more common expression. Center of competence or competence center is mainly a translation of the French "centre de competence". Within an organization, a center of excellence may refer to a group of people, a department or a shared facility. It may also be known as a competency center or a capability center. The term may ...


1

Both are valid, but they have slightly different connotations. Help whenever possible is, literally, requesting assistance as often as possible. Help wherever possible is more equivalent to Help however possible, which isn't asking for a specific amount or frequency of timing on the help, merely asking for help in whatever capacity the recipient can. ...


0

If the praise is genuine (not your question), I express gratitude, "Thanks! or "Thank you, I appreciate the kind words." This works well for me because I want everyone to realize that I am a very humble person. The way I handle the situation you described is with gentle humor. I don't want to "correct" or make a point that I know that their praise is ...


1

You don't have to be such a kiss-ass: A person who shows an obsequious eagerness to please. From Cambridge (mainly US, offensive): To be very nice to people in authority because you want them to help you.


3

It depends what you actually want to say in your reply. In UK English 'don't mention it' is a common reply to thanks which is fairly neutral in meaning but depending on tone and context can imply 'I did you a favour now shut up about it and leave me alone'. If you want to be a bit more explicit you might say something like 'well you caught me on a good ...


6

Flattery can be used here, it can be also said like :- I will do that for you, this sweet-talk is not required. or sarcastically - "Butter-up and get things done." I'll do that for you, without taking your blarney seriously.


2

"proceed" is different to "go to" because it means movement along a proscribed path, like moving to the next step in a N-step process. This makes it a better choice of word for when the user is moving through the process of registering, or buying an item, each of which is a multi-stage process. "Go to" suggests that you might leave this multi-stage process ...


1

In this instance, it's the verb form, and you would not use "with". If it was the noun form, you could use "with", like "I had an encounter with an old girlfriend on saturday". See http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/encounter


22

There are many ways, depending upon the situation. The direct answer would be "You don't need to flatter me." For a polite rejoinder you could use "Please, you are too kind. I will be glad to help." If you wish to be humorous you could say "Flattery will get you everywhere."


0

I was looking for the wrong combination of words. There's something called a summer hit: In the entertainment industry, a summer hit is a song that is released and peaks in its popularity during summer and often later quickly fades away.2 In some years, a single pop song will gain widespread international popularity during the summer holiday ...


1

The standard American pronunciation stresses the final syllable /kæˈfeɪ/, whereas many speakers of “Insular English” (that is, English from the British Isles) move the stress to the first syllable as is their wont in borrowings from Romance that are not normally stressed initially. This movement of the primary stress in the word also somewhat reduces and ...


1

One term for these is consumer staples What are 'Consumer Staples' Essential products such as food, beverages, tobacco and household items. Consumer staples are goods that people are unable or unwilling to cut out of their budgets regardless of their financial situation. Consumer staples stocks are considered non-cyclical, meaning that they ...


0

You would be using the word different as an adverb to modify the adjective colored. Thus, one from the States would say differently colored socks. It is consider sloppy to hyphenate adverbs as pointed out by @Drew.


-1

Your question is really two questions -- For the aspect of things used everyday, and especially based on the examples you gave (after all, we use some very durable things everyday too -- things very different from your examples): disposable: An item that can be disposed of after it has been used. -- WordWeb Online adjective: disposable 1. (of an article) ...


3

Necessities, Vocabulary.com When used in the plural, necessities are items required for a situation but nothing extra. You probably only bring the bare necessities to a sleepover — pajamas and a toothbrush The things the OP lists as examples are considered necessities in modern life, although they would have been luxuries 100 years ago.


3

The items you listed are on the list of fast-moving consumer goods.  The description also applies for household goods.


4

The Corpus for NOW Data that may help in discovering the answer to your question were recently released at corpus.byu.edu. Among other corpora, the NOW Corpus (News on the Web), with data from 2010-2016, can be used to analyze use of 'hysterical' in the sense of "funny" in the overall middling-formal English commonly found in online newspapers and journals. ...


0

Hysterical comes from the medical Latin word hystericus, which described a female neurotic condition, thought to be caused by a dysfunction of the uterus. Hysterical is still used today by psychiatrists, though in a broader way, to describe someone suffering from a psychological stress condition. Hysterical can also mean "extremely funny," even more so than ...


5

How common is the usage of the term hysterical meaning “funny” in BrE and AmE? It's fairly common in American English, less common than it used to be. Does hysterical actually carry a negative connotation as suggested in the above extract, or does it only convey a neutral meaning? Hysterical has never contained a negative connotation from my ...


1

A few examples right off the bat: The word spunk has a secondary offensive meaning in British English Pants are undergarments in British English and outer wear in American English Floor numbering is different. Brits have a ground floor, just like Germans, the Dutch and other European countries. In America, the first floor is on the ground. The C-word is a ...


0

I'd say it depends on the impact value wanted and the context of the site. Basically - "what are you trying to sell"? If wanting to promote and emphasise 'free' (click/link bait basically) then I would agree with the 'Five things to do for free' - if you're more a sophisticated travel guide informing about free things to do in a city, then I'd go with a ...


0

There is a clownish character who performs at the Oregon Country Fair every year and he uses the name, "Tom Noddy."


2

Ditch the last one; you need to start with the number. You wouldn't say "I can see black three cats" and the same goes for your sentence. Five things to do for free ...fits best with web parlance but be aware that "for free", although very common, is often frowned upon by some grammarists - and you did mention you wanted to go professional.


6

There are several interesting phonological and phonetic aspects of Adele's pronunciation of this line: Think of me in the depths of your despair Of course, the pronunciation of a sentence will never be the same twice. Here is the version I'm working from. It's from Youtube. This lyric begins at 1.26. Two of the things that make Adele's singing ...


11

Despite your tags, you asked how common the funny meaning in British English. Hysterical would normally mean very funny in the more common uses in British English, although it does depend on the context. In common speech, I doubt most people would understand it to mean anything else, despite its history. Affected by or deriving from wildly uncontrolled ...


4

In American English, either seductive or deceptive would be all right, depending on which attribute of the snake you wanted to highlight. I would use seductive if you want to focus on the appeal of the apple, but deceptive if you want to refer to the snake's dishnonesty. Deceptive: intended to make someone believe something that is not true likely ...


1

If you say "The shopping is sometimes is done by him", it's a simple statement of fact. Let's say that there's a "him" and a "her" in this situation. Sometimes he does it, sometimes she does it. Simple. However, if you say "The shopping sometimes is done by him" it moves the focus onto the word "is", which in turn implies that it has previously been ...


0

I grew up hearing "whinge" rather than "whine." This was in Brooklyn, NY, in the 1960s. (Born 1958.) It was commonly used by people of Irish/English descent in working class neighborhoods. It took me years to figure out that most Americans don't use the word, but my father's family did. His UK-born grandfather from Lancashire may have been the source of the ...


1

Despatch is still quite common in the UK. The manufacturing company I work for has a Despatch Team for example. In my view, in the UK despatch is traditionally used in preference to dispatch but that appears to be changing with younger people, who are more likely to use the American spelling.


0

This Sears page shows an assortment of US "spanner" wrenches. As can be seen they come in an assortment of shapes, all pretty odd looking compared to a standard US "wrench". If you look closely, the jaws all end with small pins or teeth which are designed to engage in holes or notches in the object being manipulated. I have no idea whether it's ...


0

I always thought that a spanner for tightening nuts was so called because the jaws of the spanner spanned the flat faces of the nut. c.f 'open-ended spanner'. Ring spanner. Also spanner sizes are 'AF' (Across flats) - true for metric spanners and 'AF' imperial. Whitworth imperial spanners are sized according to the bolt diameter and not its head diameter.


1

The decrease in usage of the expression "Christian name" may be a reflection of the cultural changes that happen through time. It, however, didn't necessarily refer to religion, according to the following extract: Traditionally, a christian name or baptismal name is a personal name given on the occasion of Christian baptism, with the ubiquity of ...


0

I'm a Brit in my late 40s, so heading towards that bah, in my day... old fogey demographic that you mention (perish the thought). I sometimes use "Christian name" out of sheer habit, but my (somewhat large) irreligious streak would prefer to use "forename" if my brain manages to engage quickly enough to overtake my mouth. "First name" is how it's ...


1

Phrasal verbs are definitely a huge help. I've noticed there are a few other spots in a sentence where I know a writer doesn't have English as their first language when I see them. I worked as an English tutor in college and these days do a lot of ghost writing and proofreading for my employer who is a native Spanish speaker. These things come up constantly. ...


2

The reason to have two different pronunciations is to better differentiate the words in normal speech, where there are no pauses between words. Try saying "the only" quickly a few times. If you use "thuh", then the sound of the two words runs into each other, and unless you introduce a pause, you get something like "thonly". Pardon what? If you use "thee ...


2

I've come across "femicide" with the "hate crime" meaning, but never "feminicide". If it was commonplace I probably would have seen it despite only reading a little on related subjects. Here in Britain, "homicide" isn't used as much as in the US, thus "murder" is the standard gender-neutral term. We only need a term for killing someone of a particular ...


0

To answer your question very clearly, no, there is absolutely no authority in English that is called an academy. There are however guides, manuels, institutions, authors, dictionaries, and publications that do their best to inform people on usage. The way they go about it determines what grammar they use. Most do not bother being over descriptive because ...


0

I would consider "feminicide" more likely to be the correct form, because the Latin word for "woman" is "femina," not "fem." "Femicide" may be in use, but in my opinion, the dropping of a significant syllable from the root word cannot be justified.


1

As a British English speaker* I would use neither, as I've never encountered either. My Collins dictionary (unlike my browser’s spelling dictionary) has heard of 'femicide', but just defines it as the killing of women. This makes sense by analogy to related structures, although as homicide refers to both men and women, the introduction of this word isn't ...


135

It's a word I made up! It's for someone who habitually electrically stimulates the brain's pleasure centres via an implanted electrode. (Like 'wirehead' in some stories by Larry Niven.)


1

The sentence is: Jordan took her elbow and ostentatiously steered her past a trodie who'd collapsed in the doorway of a Help the Waged charity shop. From the context, my only guess is a word built on the past form (trod) of tread, a person who walked along waiting for charity and just fell here. Side note: at first I though a letter was missing. ...


29

It isn't a word in normal use; clearly invented to add some 'local colour' to the book. If I had to guess, I would say that the unconscious down-and-outs in this (Scottish?) street have overdosed not on Special Brew but on electric current passed through their electrodes.


0

"as of now", simply means now, which still is redundant. Verbs have tenses to inform when: past; present; future. If the verb is present tense, the verb means "now" or "as of now"...neither needs to be said (or written). Example: The temperature is 57 degrees F. You don't need to say (or write) "As of now, the temperature is 57 degrees F." The verb tense ...


1

Having just heard this on BBC radio 4 I'm a little stumped, as the main presenter would pronunciate it as /ˈɪs.juː/ and second one, covering the particular topic, as /ˈɪʃuː/. I can't say if one of them wasn't British, but, additionally, during the same news, it occurred once more, this time regarding breast cancer tissue. Youtube gives me conflicting ...


2

No, there is no distinction between 'mail and 'post' in British English. 'Post' is used wherever 'mail' would be used in American English. 'Mail' is going to be understood by almost everyone, but 'post' is the common usage. Post boxes are never referred to as 'posts'. Posts are tall thin things stuck in the ground


0

Go to sleep -> It means I am in bed now (already started the same work) and someone is asking me to sleep( take a good night rest) Go and sleep -> I am doing some work and someone is asking me to stop that work and get some sleep


3

Not really, although the problem is with your overall sentence construction more than the use. "Per se" means "of or in itself", so is really used for reflexive emphasis, e.g. "Religion, while not necessarily advocating violence per se, can be a significant contributory factor." as in "Religion does not specifically call for violent behaviour, but can ...


1

I don't think it's an anachronism - I think it's relatively new. This is an example of an omission-gap conflation and a retro-intrusion parallelization followed by a pronomial generalization. (No, ha-ha, not really - I just made that up because I can't remember the real name for what that process is called, but it happens all the time in language.) The ...



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