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4

From Sarah Woodbury's website: Romance and Fantasy in Medieval Wales On the use of the word ‘gotten’ Several UK readers have wondered about the use of the word ‘gotten’ in my medieval mysteries. Since the word is not in common usage in England right now, it seems odd to them to read it at all, and a glaring ‘Americanism’ in a book set in the ...


2

According to Middle English Dictionary, Volume 4 By Hans Kurath, gript was one of the spellings all those hundreds of years ago. Beyond that we can look at Google ngram: gript,gripped. From the graph we can see that the 'gripped' spelling took off from 1850 onwards.


2

In Australian English, which for the most part is similar to British English, I have never come across “gript”. “Gripped” is the only form of the word that I have ever come across. I suspect that the former is probably old English, and no longer in use, or looking at the usage example, possibly a “dialect spelling”.


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In the U.S., the time would be five oh three. (And the daughter would be five three.)


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(It's been bugging me for ages this "boink".) The earliest instance I found boink, used unequivocally as a verb, is in an electrical engineering volume called R & D Review, 1957. The analogous picture in a simple mechanical model is that of the bottom of anold-fashioned [sic] oil can just as it “boinks”: there are two stable states separated by an ...


2

Picking up Jimmy's reference to Googly as Australian slang, there are a couple of possibilities. Firstly to establish the early Australian usage: 1904 P.F.Warner How We recovered Ashes 106 Bosanquet.. can bowl as badly as anyone in the world,but, when gets a length, those slow 'googlies', as the Australian papers call them, are apt to paralyse the greatest ...


3

Most varieties of American English are rhotic. This means that speakers pronounce orthographic (written) 'r' regardless of the sounds around it. In non-rhotic varieties of English - such as Southern Standard British English - orthographic 'r' is only pronounced if followed by a vowel. It doesn't matter if there is a double /r/ or not in the orthography: ...


1

English determiners can be tricky. For instance it's not OK to say "in specific situation." You need "in the following specific situation" or "in a specific situation." But to answer your question, it's fine to speak about a general meteorological truth without a determiner: Strong winds destroy homes. Or even Strong wind destroys homes. If ...


2

At least in the central u.s. the "r" is very clearly pronounced.


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More formal; good morning or good evening. Less formal; Hi, hello. As the day progresses and you get more and more awkward, less talk and less eye contact.


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Adjure can imply some sort of appeal to God or a command dictated with holy authority, or at the very least a very strong and earnest appeal. I would consider enjoin to be a somewhat weaker word with no such religious connotation. The Oxford English Dictionary notes that enjoin "is more authoritative than direct, and less imperious than command" (citing ...


3

"Wasn't I?" at the end of a statement can certainly can be read as indicating peevishness. Also though, and in my experience, many Londoners use phrases like "wasn't I?", "weren't I?", "didn't I" as narrative intensifiers. "So, I was going up the Elephant and Castle weren't I , when this geezer stops me with a question about English usage" (Slipping into ...


3

Yes, in British English it's a retort. I don't know if it is used in US English. What state of mind does it convey? ---> snappishness, irritation possibly with a touch of humour. Note that it can also be used when the asker should know the answer, e.g. "Where are you?" "Why are you asking? It's 11am on Monday." "So?" "So, I'm at work ...


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Yes, "in the fridge" is part of the noun phrase in your example because it's dependent on "apple" in this case it's describing it.


1

Merriam-Webster, an American dictionary, also has a definition that would allow "knock off work". intransitive verb: to stop doing something transitive verb 2 : discontinue, stop <knocked off work at five> I am American, know this definition, and would definitely assume that someone meant "stop working" if he said "I usually knock off ...


1

Australian English follows British usage; i.e. it is common to say 'knock off from work'. There are other (Australian) meanings: to steal something ("I knocked it off"), a counterfeit product ("its just a cheap knock-off"), and to desist ("hey, knock it off, you two"). "They knocked him off" means they killed someone. I (native born Australian, and getting ...


1

Single relationship between three parties is what I want: between son, daughter, and mother Since between only works between two parties, and among won't work here, I would suggest Mother-son-daughter relationship


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The expression to knock off has many senses, all of them colloquial. Below is the OED entry. Sense 12 is the only one relating to sex. Its first example is from 1942, which suggests (from what the OP says about its use in America) it may have been introduced to Britain by American servicemen arriving about that time. No mention is made anywhere of its ...


4

In Britain 'to knock off [work]' is a perfectly normal and innocent thing to say. It is informal so you might more often hear 'to finish work' or 'to leave work'. I've never heard it used to mean 'masturbate'. In Britain someone might say 'to knock one out' to mean masturbate but the addition of the words 'one' and 'out' makes the verb completely ...


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"Message" can be used as a verb in similar contexts such as yours, if that's what you want to confirm.


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Furniture Store Lighting--A phrase used to desrcibe a room or interior of a building with garish overhead fluorescent lighting that permits no shadows. It refers, naturally to the type of lighting used in furniture stores--a harsh glaring light so the customer can't ignore the goods on display.


2

Relationship between son, daughter and mother does not separate the relationships, because it talks about a single relationship between three parties. If you need to separate the two individual relationships I'm afraid you'll have to mention them separately. You can, however, make the title shorter by removing between; simply play around with word order: ...


0

Noting that @tchrist assures us there can be no ambiguity in AmE, I feel I should post the contrary position. Which I can't substantiate as representing BrE in general, but it's certainly how I see it. There's no doubt the untensed "infinitive/subjunctive" They insisted [that] he leave only ever means that what they demanded (of him, or whoever controlled ...


2

You can use this phrase, for example, in talking about how a divorced parent should deal with his ex-spouse for the sake of the children: If you're divorced and have children, you should do right by them and maintain a good relationship with your ex-spouse. This means that by not fighting with the ex-spouse, you provide a benefit to the children. ...


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In American English, there is no ambiguity. There is no issue with it being idiomatic; it is. Your sentence is in the indicative for us: They insisted that he left. That version always means that they are assuring you that he has indeed departed. It is a done deal. Had we meant the other thing, we would have said this, using an untensed verb in the ...


0

OP, be aware that "is much in the news at the moment.." is a completely common phrase in English. It's absolutely commonplace that commentators talk in a very messy manner, on TV and videos. In particularly, it's utterly common that they mess-up (often in ahumorous way) idiomatic phrases. IF the reader said it incorrectly (so, omitting or ...


2

I don't know of anything that would directly answer such questions, but maybe you could do it by process of elimination using as a resource the reference work Dictionary of American Regional English, a four-volume work that attempts to collect Americanisms.


0

Look a little deeper: boot in the sense of the storage compartment of a car comes from an older word sometimes spelled "bote", meaning "box". The "bote" or "boot" of an old horsedrawn coach was originally an extra seat or place to stand on the side or back of the coach for a footman or someone else riding on the outside. It was built like a box. By the time ...


1

Also, I believe, I surmise, I suppose, it seems. However, if part of a long piece with many opinions, it's generally good writing policy to give a single indication or disclaimer somewhere early on, rather than continuously bombarding your readers with these phrases.


1

Clearly "named after" means something along the lines of "These drawings are by Smith after those of Jones" where the "after" meaning "following as a consequence", so understood to mean "in honour of". The American "named for" is clearly in the sense that I do something "for" you, ie as a gift, so if I named something after someone, it would be as a gift ...


-2

"I'm done" sounds to me like you've been cooked. I don't like that usage at all.


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I would say lexemes are entries in a dictionary and morphemes are elements of word formation and grammatical endings. The theories about morphemes have become inflated in a way that one can write a book about it, but the problems of morphology don't affect normal grammar. Most things in my view are trivial hairsplitting.


1

Our insatiable appetites for information, stimulation, validation will come with us. But when all those wants are met no sooner than they have been felt, the knowledge of what it is to be left unfulfilled may not. So, this sentence is not very well-written; I don't blame you for being confused by it. the noun "want" normally means a deficiency or a ...


0

Instant gratification of all our needs will make us insensitive to the feeling of need. E.g. if you can eat at every moment of the day, you will probably do so every time you get"hungry", but what it feels to be really hungry (being without sustenance for days) will be lost.


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Heston Blumenthal, per comments. Just putting an answer so this shows up as answered in searches.


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I would suggest "hyperanalytic". The prefix "hyper-" is defined by Merriam-Webster as "excessively".


0

I'm a native Englishman working in IT, and most people I know (including myself) use normalise in written communication. I also use normalise() throughout vector libraries that I've written in the past. This is not uncommon in SDK's developed by UK companies. Very few people use normalize() in the UK, although it is now more common in people for whom ...


0

My suggestion would be either pedantic or overscrupulous . I hope this helps. :) Melissa CELTA certified & teacher administration for Learnship Networks


0

Guy and girl are standard in the U.S. Others for boys: dude, bro (preteen and older). Others for girl: chick (preteen and older, but used mostly by guys). Guy and girl are standard, however. (Boy is not used often except in certain expressions or contexts, it tends to sound very childish).


1

My son is the youngest in his daycare at 14 months. The other kids (less than 5) call him a baby.


0

In the U.S. there's a clearly related though gentler expression: "to toot." Mothers generally prefer children to say "toot" rather than "fart," as you can see on this Circle of Moms Question and answer page. There's also a children's rhyme, which you can read variations of on Wikipedia: Beans, beans, the magical fruit The more you eat the more you toot, ...


1

It appears to be mainly a BrE slang expression: To trump: Over the centuries, fart has not been without linguistic rivals. Since the early fifteenth century, for example, trump has served as a synonym for fart, or rather to denote an especially noisy fart. (A Dictionary of Culinary Curiosities) by Mark Morton Trump: Verb. To break ...


6

The word most frequently used by far in American English by children to refer to other children is kid itself. I met this kid at the playground today. I'm sitting next to a new kid in class this week. After that, gender-specific terms to use by a boy would be girl (to refer to a girl) or boy by a girl to refer to a boy. This would be to ...


2

The closest existing name I know is Melita, which sounds reminiscent of Spanish. The person I knew with this name came from the Phillipines. It's kind of like Carmelita. I will give you license to use as unrelated a nickname as you like. Each September, just let the child's teacher know what the nickname is, how to spell it and how to pronounce it.


6

The king who is known to have had a speech impediment was King George VI, father to the present Queen, who reigned from 1936 to 1952. The matter of his speech impediment was dramatised in the film The King's Speech (2010) written by David Seidler, in which Colin Firth plays the part of the King. This clearly has nothing to do with the formation of the ...


2

It strikes me as quite unlikely. American and British sounded much alike until and after 1783, from then on they may have branched away from each other. George III, on the throne between 1760 and 1820, suffered from a progressive mental condition but is not known to have had a speech impediment. The two sons that followed him on he throne, George IV and ...


0

I would always use 'draughty' myself for the currents of cold air definition - like you I've been wrong-footed by the spelling checker online many times! I think it's extraordinary that despite our region there is no option for an English language setting as opposed to American.


0

Answer It is incorrect in English and, speaking personally, I am uncertain what it means. In English the 'or' sounds like a threat*, e.g. "I have already asked you once not to do it, or [would you like me take some further and more drastic action to prevent you]?" I don't think any native English speaker would know what you meant. Notice that this ...



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