New answers tagged

1

Having just heard this on BBC radio 4 I'm a little stumped, as the main presenter would pronunciate it as /ˈɪs.juː/ and second one, covering the particular topic, as /ˈɪʃuː/. I can't say if one of them wasn't British, but, additionally, during the same news, it occurred once more, this time regarding breast cancer tissue. Youtube gives me conflicting ...


2

No, there is no distinction between 'mail and 'post' in British English. 'Post' is used wherever 'mail' would be used in American English. 'Mail' is going to be understood by almost everyone, but 'post' is the common usage. Post boxes are never referred to as 'posts'. Posts are tall thin things stuck in the ground


0

Go to sleep -> It means I am in bed now (already started the same work) and someone is asking me to sleep( take a good night rest) Go and sleep -> I am doing some work and someone is asking me to stop that work and get some sleep


3

Not really, although the problem is with your overall sentence construction more than the use. "Per se" means "of or in itself", so is really used for reflexive emphasis, e.g. "Religion, while not necessarily advocating violence per se, can be a significant contributory factor." as in "Religion does not specifically call for violent behaviour, but can ...


1

I don't think it's an anachronism - I think it's relatively new. This is an example of an omission-gap conflation and a retro-intrusion parallelization followed by a pronomial generalization. (No, ha-ha, not really - I just made that up because I can't remember the real name for what that process is called, but it happens all the time in language.) The ...


-1

It wouldn't surprise me if this is accurate English because it reminds me of the French, "Chez moi ou chez toi", considering the influence French has on British English.


1

On it's own, with no context, it could mean either, and this ambiguity may make it attractive as a slogan: some people reading it would understand that it was ambiguous but that both meanings were desirable and it was therefore a clever play on words. That said, if people had to pick one meaning, I think most people would think of "the act of winning ...


0

Pita in English with a British Accent is pronounced like Bitter. we don't pronounce words with one (I) like they have 2 (ee) in the word, we pronounce as it is spelt. We pronounce QUEEN that way as it has 2 (ee) in. I hope this helps.


1

In this context dodgy means dishonest or ethically questionable. This is considered unparliamentary language. In particular, accusations of being dishonest or dishonourable are taboo, as in this BBC list. MPs should not: call another member a liar suggest another MP has false motives describe another member as "drunk" misrepresent ...


1

Dodgy is not generally used to refer to a person; in the expression "dodgy Dave" was probably that "Dave" did dodgy things: There should be no shame in incorporating expressive informal Britishisms into American usage. Dodgy (pronounced DAHJ-ee) is a particularly useful one in its range of possibilities. It derived in the mid-nineteenth century, ...


1

I agree that "brothel worker" would be a specific term for someone performing work in an actual brothel, but so much of sex industry business is conducted on the street. "Streetwalker" is a term that I've heard used, as well as "escort" depending on context. Here's an excerpt from an informational PDF that's upload-able at "www.safersexwrok.ca": Who ...


2

No discussion of "pukka" is complete without mention of Only Fools and Horses. I can't vouch for the definitions on the page, but "pukka", "lovely jubbly" and "cushty" all have Del's voice in my head because of their prominence in the show. Even Jamie Oliver hasn't changed that.


1

Consider, grind A person who works or studies too much. M-W


1

"Sex worker" is the term, but "brothel worker" is also used, not as broadly as sex worker, though. The brothel worker: 'I regret not working in the sex trade as soon as I got here' [Source: theguardian.com] Missing Love Ranch brothel worker found safe; friends said she disappeared after Lamar Odom's hospitalization [Source: nydailynews.com] ...


8

"Sex workers" is the term used by licensed Social Workers, the medical community, women's (and men's) support groups, and the media when referring in an unbiased way to those who "sell their bodies for pleasure." From Wikipedia: "A sex worker is a person who is employed in the sex industry.[1][2] The term is used in reference to all those in all areas ...


1

There is a common backronym for bog-standard: "British Or German Standard" - but as the answers above make clear that is very much post hoc. The phrase caused political controversy in 2001 when the UK Prime Minister's spokesman referred to "bog-standard comprehensive" schools - which was taken to be insulting by some (an interpretation strongly denied by ...


2

In the negative sense, a swot. swot British informal; derogatory A person who studies very hard. The unloved school swots of the 20th century have blossomed into the alpha group of the 21st. Oxford Dictionaries Swotting up is really just like revising for exams but being a bit of a swot has the connotation of being always in a book, ...


4

Probably most British speakers of English would be familiar with the phrase; I have often heard it in the London area, and never thought about its origin. OED mentions the theories about the origin of the phrase given above, then says "The most commonly held view is that the transition from box to bog resulted from a mishearing or misunderstanding of ...


16

From Tony Thorne, The Dictionary of Contemporary Slang (1990): bog-standard adj British totally unexceptional, normal and unremarkable. Bog here is used as an otherwise meaningless intensifier. From Paul Beal, Partridge's Concise Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English (1989): bog-standard. Standard, straight from a factory, with no ...


0

British English [slang] usage: regular, not fancy or unusual, commonplace. See: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/bog-standard.html


1

"Bog-standard" means ordinary. Here's a link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/radio/specials/1728_uptodate/page25.shtml "Bog" is not a verb that means "to form"--"bog standard" is an adjective. There is no verb in the phrase "bog standard scoops of ice cream."


2

In Australia at least, direct questions are polite, provided basic manners ("excuse me", "please", "thank you") are used as well. To reiterate what deadrat said above, as long as this is phrased as a question (usually with "could" or "would") and not as a demand, it would be fine. Indirect questions are also used. Neither would seem out of place, regardless ...


6

There may be some confusion here between language and behavior. Politeness is a combination of the two, and care with the former cannot forgive lapses in the latter. If you were to interrupt two strangers having a semi-private conversation, perhaps by physically inserting yourself between the two so that you address one party while turning your back on the ...


0

Being French-speaking I can tell you the second pronunciation is the French one. When anglophone people say French words they always elongate the non-native vowels or even introduce diphthongs. That's quite understandable obviously. French from France tend to shorten vowels and eliminate diphthongs, but not French from Québec. We might even add them too! I ...


1

The original genre is 'family conversation,' 'childhood.' The normal context for the phrase is where a badminton set, jig-saw puzzle, board-game coming from a car-boot sale (garage sale, rummage sale) or received second-hand from cousins, or older siblings, or vague adopted aunts and uncles, is a disappointment. Or your Porsche has missing lambda sensors. ...


1

It's got bits missing: A contraction The contracted form of: It has got bits missing. translation into standard AmE: It has missing parts or It has parts missing. The Brits often use bits for parts. Example: I didn't like the violent bits (of the film). AmE: I didn't like the violent parts of the movie. Quick review of present tense of have: It can be: ...


3

As a young Brit (early twenties), I have never used pukka to mean anything unless it was making fun of or doing an impersonation of Jamie Oliver, or telling someone the name of a pie.


0

formal or humorous (Of a person) ruined by a disastrous or devastating setback or reverse: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/undone


0

I'm from the North East of England, so a Geordie, not a Brummie, that's the West Midlands of England. The first is a typo, it should be a few streets away. Not an attempt to write in dialect. Stephen


2

First off, in the US a bathroom is a place with a toilet and sink. The actual tub/shower is optional. (When selling homes the toilet-only room is called a "half bath" while the one with tub is a "full bath", and it's a "three-quarters bath" if it's got toilet and shower but no tub.) However, in businesses and other public buildings the toilet room is more ...


1

Surely your screen shots answer the question for you: Deference : "polite submission and respect" - also, it can refer to wishes or age. Reverence : "deep respect" - also would normally refer to a person, or possibly a temple, idol, or the like. You might need to treat your teacher / boss / superiors with deference (polite respect) - but you are unlikely ...


-1

One of the differences between American and British English is the usage of the words round and around. Americans use around in contexts in which most British speakers prefer round.


0

I'm from the US (BosWash corridor) and I have never heard of a car referred to as "fully laden". However, laden or lade are used in the US in other contexts. A cargo ship would be referred to as fully laden. The Free Dictionary says of lade: to put a burden or load on or in; load: to lade a cargo ship. to put as a load: to lade coal on a barge. ...


4

The subject is "working" which is singular; thus "has" is correct. You're tempted by the "many years" or perhaps by the "academic and administration fields" to make the verb plural, but that just describes the work. This will be clearer if you boil the sentence down: Working ... has not only contributed to my professional growth, but also to...


1

The subject is not the first person, so "(implied 'I') has" does not apply. Instead, the subject is "(the experience of) working", and this is handled as third person singular. So the simple version of the sentence is "Working has contributed", rather than "Working have contributed".


2

From Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humpty_Dumpty at Origins "...According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the term "humpty dumpty" referred to a drink of brandy boiled with ale in the seventeenth century.[8] The riddle probably exploited, for misdirection, the fact that "humpty dumpty" was also eighteenth-century reduplicative slang for a ...


4

According to Collins Dictionary, since the early 2000s there has been a steady decrease in the usage of pukka in printed literature. Unfortunately, it's unknown if the data includes websites, online magazines and forums, but I suspect it doesn't. Taking at face value, it suggests that the term is falling out of favour particularly among British English ...


0

Maybe you're looking for a nitpicker: A person who is excessively concerned with or critical of inconsequential details, especially habitually. However this term is more colloquial.


0

I'll go with Judgemental, which means having or displaying an overly critical point of view. Hypercritical, Overcritical are synonyms of the word judgemental.


7

From A Comparative Dictionary of the Indo-Aryan Languages Pucca or pukka comes from Hindi pakka, "cooked, ripe," from Sanskrit pakva-, from pacati, "he cooks." Pukka therefore means cooked, ripe, matured etc. in that sense. Pukka may also mean solid, permanent, confirmed in Hindi just like concrete is used for that purpose in English, as in "I have ...


1

It is called Title Casing or what is called Headline style. First character in all words are capitalised, except for certain subsets defined by rules that are not universally standardised. The standardisation is only at the level of house styles and individual style manuals. More help here


0

I'm not sure this is entirely germane to your question - whether you're talking about the phonetics as it leaves your mouth or as it hits your ear - but I'll offer "mouthfeel" for the "as it leaves your mouth" part. It is typically used of foods to talk about how it feels in your mouth. (Think of pudding versus crackers versus steak.) I've never been ...


4

It seems to me that not only is the capitalisation strange, but also the language and terminology. I agree with the comments by both Charl E & Hot Licks as possibilities for these oddities, but it doesn't make the overall result correct, appropriate, nor fully intelligible. Confirmation of Registration to <...> Your registration to <...> has been ...


1

This is a well established procedure in computer science, and the files are called grandfather, father and son files. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backup_rotation_scheme


5

It's actually antepenultimate but this word is so uncommon that most people won't know what you mean. People tend to say something like "this one, the previous one, and the one before that". I would be delighted if more people used antepenultimate but I have been on the losing side of many linguistic battles and am not optimistic on this one.


3

You could describe the boss as harsh. ‘Robbins's disciplinarianism won him a reputation as a harsh and cruel taskmaster.’ source: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/harsh meaning #2.


2

A person who constantly scrutinizes the work of another person is called a control freak: a person who attempts to dictate how everything is done around them [Wikipedia] Or you could try back-seat driver as a sort of metaphor: a passenger in a vehicle who is not controlling the vehicle but who excessively comments on the driver's actions and ...


3

These people are often negatively characterized as punctilious. In particular, "punctilious implies minute, even excessive attention to fine points." Punctilious can be used as either a positive or negative word.


-1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3VQSzrn4IXc&ebc=ANyPxKpLdhzbYFOfxUwkHUB_waMUxO1Fa8nds4AB4Kz3UPpZ0kCzu_KY-IAls0n-JHpxeCiDcrGkTHPzfZPC6hpxsWbp-NLNVw If you look at 02:15 in this video you will hear the phrase being used. The comedian and a fair section of the audience immediately understood the phrase so it seems to be very current. It is also interesting ...



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