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-2

Both are mutually intelligible so learning one won't hamper your communications too much from communicating with the other. You just need to learn a few words that differ in the two languages. It's more of a cultural thing. Though I would say British English has its advantages in this respect, as if someone speaks British English in America they are likely ...


2

The sentence is grammatically correct. By using the definite article the operation, I assume it was a very specific operation which the listener will already know about. Otherwise the indefinite article would normally be used. And in Britain although we talk about a patient being in hospital, visitors usually go to the hospital. Saying you are going to ...


5

Just remote: (both BrE and AmE) A remote control device. Clicker but mainly in AmE: A remote control, as for a television or DVD player. (AHD) The Free Dictionary Here is a list of slang words for the remote control: What do you call your remote control remote control? Linguists have studied hundreds of newly ...


0

Your original q was whether gay/lesbian is culturally preferable to homosexual. The brief answer is yet (but...) British organisations who campaign for equality are now using a qwertyuiop to cover all the bases: LGTBQI (you can look it up). While this is considered cutting-edge by its users, it actually excludes those of us who for reasons of age or ...


0

Just another thought: Platitude -- A trite, meaningless, or prosaic statement, generally directed at quelling social, emotional, or cognitive unease. The word derives from plat, French word for "flat." Platitudes are geared towards presenting a shallow, unifying wisdom over a difficult topic. However, they are too overused and general to be anything more ...


0

To my British English ears, this sounds odd, though the meaning is clear. 'Can you take me to the station' is what I'd expect to hear, but some IRish people will say 'Will you bring me to the station' - which implies to me that I am already there, and being asked to come and collect them. I have more of a problem with train station; I won't pretend I've ...


1

I'm looking for a verb denoting the act of making a circle elliptic, i.e. making it oblate (or prolate for that matter). Is there a single word for it, or do I need to rewrite? No, there isn't! The great SOED dictionary records a 'rare' verb oblate but only with themeaning of 'offer as an oblation'. You'll have to say just 'make oblate'


0

DOSH = bangla for TEN that's where it comes from. It was picked up during the time when the The British East India Company was running the show out there, just like CHA was picked up for tea.


4

You can find this advice at Grammar Girl, and probably many other places on the internet. The rule (which seems to have been generally followed before the 20th century) is: use as if when it introduces a clause containing a verb, and like when it introduces a noun phrase. Consider one of Grammar Girl's examples. The first two are both correct, while the ...


0

The levels you name are somewhat arbitrary, since there is no agreement on when, for example, a pre-intermediate student enters the intermediate level. And to my knowledge there is no standard guideline for determining the order of difficulty of the various grammatical elements in English. In any case, difficulty will vary according to the native language of ...


4

That's definitely a very strange wording. I can't find anything that uses reach in the same way, but there are very close definitions from Oxford: reach (verb) 1.3 - (reach something down) Stretch upwards to pick something up and bring it to a lower level She reached down a plate from the cupboard. Using this definition, it is possible to make your ...


0

I think this is an example of drift, in the same way as past participles that are very commonly used in passive voice (worried, scared, amazed, etc.) have come to be considered adjectives in their own right. It would seem reasonable to suppose that as 'have/has got' when used for possessions adds nothing to the meaning of simply 'have/has' that at some point ...


0

Arguably both are correct: 'Have you got any ice-cream?' 'Yes, I have got ice-cream.' -OR- 'Yes, I do have ice-cream.' In Australia both "I do" and "I have" are used and essentially mean the same thing. It is the same for the negative forms: 'No, I have not got ice-cream.' -OR- 'No, I do not have ice-cream.'


0

Got as past participle is used also in AmE but with different connotations as shown below: In American and Canadian English, the past participle of the verb get is usually gotten. For example, we might say, “I have gotten behind on my work,” or, “The book was not gotten easily.” Got is the participle in some uses, though, such as where has got to ...


2

As StoneyB suggests in a comment above, the striking capitalization style that A.A. Milne used in his stories and poems about Christopher Robin and Winnie-the-Pooh (which appeared in four volumes across the years 1924, 1926, 1927, and 1928) was very likely the inspiration for a generation (or more) of children’s books to use initial caps for emphasis. A few ...


1

This may by a joke copied (perhaps unconsciously) from the style of a very popular humorous book "1066 and All That: A Memorable History of England, comprising all the parts you can remember, including 103 Good Things, 5 Bad Kings and 2 Genuine Dates" by Sellars and Yateman, published in about 1930. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1066_and_All_That for more ...


1

I always understood after living in Hackney in the 1970s that the rhyming slang for bottle and glass was class rather than arse. This provides an explanation for the use of the term losing his bottle or the positive version of having the bottle to do something. So if you have no bottle, you have no class which makes a lot more sense than having no arse. If ...


1

What the idiom dictionaries say There appears to be a clear split in preference between British English usage and U.S. English usage on this idiom. Christine Ammer, The American Heritage Dictionary of Idiom (1996) offers this discussion: in the cards Likely or certain to happen, as in I don't think Jim will win—it's just not in the cards. This term, ...


1

I suggest Put the rest of the water behind the door in the kitchen because for a door we think of behind or in front of rather than at the back of. I wondered if at the back of would be more common in US-English - but we would say in British-English at the back of the queue - or at the back of the cupboard - I suppose at the back of works for a ...


-2

According to Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, SLAP-UP means First Rate,Grand or Lavish. They Quote from Thackeray's "The Newcomes" - 'The more slap-up still have two shields painted on the panel with the coronet over'


-1

The entry for error (v) in OED has not been updated since 1891. As such, it's unlikely to include modern usages which arise from computing. Even the Oxford Dictionary of Computing is now six years old, which is rather a long time in the field. Error is used as a verb. It's jargon, and means "produce an error message" or "fail with an error condition" or ...


3

According to oxford, error isn't a verb. Err is, and here are its forms: Not to knock wiktionary, but I wouldn't consider errored a verb form. Note that the entry doesn't cite any examples for this sense. Its examples as an adjective seem passable, though, especially in a technical sense. The mean number of errored bits per errored symbol is ...


2

In practice, there is very little difference between short i and schwa. You could imagine a spectrum of pronunciations of the vowel sound in that syllable. You can say it either way and people will understand you just fine. To have a clear, understandable pronunciation, it is important to get the rhythm and the intonation right. Stressed syllables are ...


2

Plenty of people do say "on the telly" Some languages do use the article before "nature" – Norwegians are forever going walks "in the nature". Anglophoness just don't, that's all, to us it's a condition not a place. (But two can play at this game – the French put an article before names of countries and we don't. Ditto abstractions: why do we not pursue the ...


4

When I need to do this I call to rebook the appointment. That is the same as calling to reinstate the booking. Alternatively, you can revoke, reverse, or undo the cancellation.


3

You just say you reconfirm your appoinment, or you reverse your decision, your cancellation


-1

Will is also a modal denoting determination. Example: I will never give in to temptation


1

Present Continuous is also used for arrangements, meetings, something on your schedule. Future Simple is a plan you say in a moment of speaking and it isn't something fixed, just a general future time. You can say I will go to the Mars but it's something you just decided on the spur of the moment. Both sentences are correct, except second example is more ...


2

Both are correct in meaning, although different in structure the definition remains the same, but to clarify in no.2 the present continuous as well as being used to talk about the things taking place at the current moment can also be used to refer to future events that might be happening shortly or at some point in the future. Examples: "Are you going to ...


1

In UK English as it was taught some years ago commas and conjunctions were used to divide adjectives - "He was young, dark and hansome". The same rule applied to long numbers - "Ten tousand, seven hundred and twenty-two." The commas are now often omitted and many writers are following US English in omitting the "and" as well.


0

The addition of the word "up" in the sentence from The Lounger gave me a double-take and I broke out in guffaws.


0

"Hoist on one's own petard" (mentioned above) literally means thrown up into the air by the explosion of one's own bomb. Hochnaesig (high-nosed) is the German for stuck up, which bears no relationship to the ignominy of public embarrassment inherent in being hoist in such a manner. It is an attitude that the self-studied "superior" people adopt to separate ...


2

The spanner for the wheel lock gun looked like a wind-up key for a clockwork toy, with the major difference that the socket that fitted over the projecting axle of the wheel that was to be wound to tighten the inner spring was about three sixteenths of an inch square, and much more sturdy than the key for a clockwork train. The crossbow “spanner” was ...


3

On the origin (also this): Leghorn breed of fowl, 1869, from Leghorn, city in Italy (modern Livorno, 16c.-17c. Legorno), from Latin Liburnus, from the native people name Liburni, which is of unknown signification. [ Online Etymology Dictionary ] Ferdinando I de' Medici wrote "Liuorno" in 1593 (Document Inviting Jewish Merchants to Settle in ...


0

As someone from upstate NY, I consider my AmE to be pretty standard, and this is how I would use those phrases: In school: In the school building while it's in session. I wouldn't tend to use this one for other things that are at the school but not classes. At school: interchangeable with in school. At/in THE school: this would be more for parents, as ...


3

Verbed brands No, verbs are almost never capitalized (see Edwin Ashworth's comment for the rare cases when they are). I suggest a good article on verbing brand names on The Economist: So to google became to search on the web, to facebook meant to look up or contact someone on Facebook, and to skype covers calling someone by VoIP telephony. ...


3

He must have already gone to sleep/bed He must [already] be sleeping He must be asleep already Any of the above can express the idea of a person who is either in bed or sleeping at the moment of speaking. The modal verb must is used for speculating, and making deductions. It expresses the speaker's conviction or certainty. In other words ...


-1

[EDITED] Present (and recent) time: a. He must be asleep [already]. b. He must be sleeping [already]. c. [I think that] he must have [already] gone/went to sleep/bed. d. He must have been sleeping for the last eighteen hours [before now], if he has not heard that. However, I will contend that c and d in the above are rare, and that "must have" is much ...


3

There are bedspreads, - which are tailored coverings that are usually removed before using the bed. There are quilts, comforters, and blankets, - which are snuggled under. A duvet is a slip-cover for a down (feather) comforter, so the feathers don't poke you. The child's term for "blanket" is often "blankie", but, a "binkie", is a pacifier. No common ...


1

A mystically-inclined friend frequently mentions the opposite condition to being self-aware. He calls it "sleepwalking". But underlying this is the mystic's idea of what self-awareness is, which might not relate to what the OP had in mind.


2

See "The Africa Queen", (filmed in 1951) set in WW1 (ie 1914-18, and I think the book/film was actually set in late 1914). Charlie Allnut (Bogart) belches at the table in front of the Rev. Samuel Sayer, and Miss Rose Sayer politely enquires "more tea Mr. Allnut?" It's an expression that has been around for years and years, and the "Vicar" part of it was ...



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