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14

Actually, "defensible driving" does exist as a term, but it means exactly what you think it should: driving that can be defended in a court of law or public opinion. Ability to operate a motor vehicle and observe legal and defensible driving practices... (from a bus driving training site) Among the Australian women, safe and morally defensible ...


6

Consider: Take a trip aboard the West Highland Steam Train or Travel on the West Highland Steam Train.


4

Like many institutions in the UK, the BBC has published its entire style guide online. The style guide is massive and detailed and is the result of hundreds of combined years of writing and editorial experience. Like other major style guides, we can assume that each rule is well-considered, and since all style guides change, we know that rules are often ...


4

Tricky. In general usage, hosting=paying-for. But it could also refer to an organised fund-raising event -- a political dinner, say -- where the host is providing only the venue, or even just their name, and in which guests were expected to pay an attendance fee that covered the cost of event and also provided contributions to whatever cause the host was ...


4

There has in fact been some scholarly interest in the diary as literary genre in the last twenty years. A quick browse in papers, theses, &c suggests that there is no adjectival form in use; writers just prepend an attributive diary (diary genre, diary novel).


4

The estimated results from Google Books are remarkably similar... up the aisle to the altar - about 11,200 results down the aisle to the altar - about 11,800 results ...but I think there's evidence of a slight US/UK split here. Americans invariably use toward where Brits use towards, so I think these results for AmE usage are significant... up ...


3

I would use Tour the west coast of Scotland aboard the West Highland Line steam train.


3

Undertake the West Highland rail journey, in its entirety.


3

Jonathan Swift used journalish in 1712, but seems to have been the first and the last. He was apparently referring to the openness with which one will write when one does not expect readers: I never saw such a letter…so saucy, so journalish. If nobody else has found a use for it in the last 300 years, it's probably best left alone. Along the same ...


3

I assume it's the 'hospital corner' reference you are having a problem with. There's a useful explanation here, from which I have quoted the following excerpt: The bed-making technique of folding hospital corners originates back to the 19th century and the profession of nursing. Nursing is a profession with a long history that was built on war-time and ...


3

It's a REBUS PUZZLE. Compare: HEAD ---- HEELS "Head over heels". R R O A D A D "crossroads" Man Board "man overboard" ARREST YOU'RE "you're under arrest" ONCE 6PM ??? won I ............................................ I der ???


3

a pun, Yes, because it is literally "bang, out of order" (mention, rather than use of the word bang, in the wrong order) and he is claiming it is "bang out of order" (expression of disapproval), so there are two meanings applied to the one phrase, providing humour. an anagram, No, because the result isn't another word. If it was an anagram then ...


2

The traditional spelling was Ugh (or sometimes Eugh!) but this may be being supplanted by the American Eww! Since the word is near-onomatopeic, I would suggest you write it the way it sounds to you when your daughter says it.


2

Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) has this entry for diaristic: diaristic adj (1884) of, relating to, or characteristic of a diary A Google Books search for diaristic yields several hundred matches for the word, suggesting that the term is fairly well established. Here is the Ngram chart for diaristic for the period 1825–2006: ...


2

Well, there’s a venerable English proverb that warns, “The Devil is in the detail.” The idiom "the devil is in the detail" refers to a catch or mysterious element hidden in the details, and derives from the earlier phrase "God is in the detail" expressing the idea that whatever one does should be done thoroughly; i.e. details are important. ...


2

It is an allusion to Psalm 127: Behold, children are a heritage from the Lord, the fruit of the womb a reward. 4 Like arrows in the hand of a warrior are the children[a] of one's youth. 5 Blessed is the man who fills his quiver with them! Children are considered a blessing, and are compared to a quiver of arrows. Note, the ...


2

Generally speaking there's little difference between British and American use of dashes, at least as compared to hyphens. The use of a hyphen character (or technically hyphen-minus) made sense in legacy (pre-unicode) systems as the dashes weren't always available and were encoded at different code points in different systems. That hasn't been a good excuse ...


2

(You) wouldn't know (x) if (y)... is a relatively common way to express that the other person is unfamiliar with something. In this case it's a particular way to do up sheets on a bed. If something bites you in the arse, trips you, or hits you in the face, it's presumed you'd recognize it on sight or by feel (as in, a dog bite). Therefore: You ...


1

The "invincible" would be a general reference to anyone deemed invincible. The "invincible seven" would mean seven particular persons or entities who are described as invincible. The "invincibles" would be the appropriate proper name of a group, presumably of people, who wish to project themselves as being invincible. The "undateable" is a general ...


1

This has been covered here before. No, it is not typographically acceptable to use a hyphen for a dash, but you have mischaracterized the issue. Those are spaced en dashes, which is just fine. If you have only a typewriter, things get confused, but in properly typeset books, there is a world of difference. You have to judge these things based on what ...


1

According to Ngram, "down the aisle" passed "up the aisle" in frequency of usage in the 1890s. Since then, usage of "up the aisle" has actually increased somewhat, but usage of "down the aisle" has increased more than fourfold. Of course, I have no idea what proportion of these mentions had to do with brides, nor to what extent Google Books's corpus might ...


1

The Guardian says, "You'll travel the West Highland Line", though that omits the important element of steam.


1

Not a single word, but "Powerfully easy" would be good marketing. Or perhaps Superbly easy? How about Easy as 1-2-3. Powerful, yet easy as 1-2-3. You'd never imagine that powerful images could be made that easy!


1

American here. I've had people catch me using "mine" and "yours" rather than "my place" or "your place." I think I started saying it because it's faster to type. Maybe? Either way, I haven't run into anyone who didn't understand what I meant. However, my gf is a writer and studied english in school. When she brings it up that I say this, she mentions it's ...



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