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5

Just remote: (both BrE and AmE) A remote control device. Clicker but mainly in AmE: A remote control, as for a television or DVD player. (AHD) The Free Dictionary Here is a list of slang words for the remote control: What do you call your remote control remote control? Linguists have studied hundreds of newly ...


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That's definitely a very strange wording. I can't find anything that uses reach in the same way, but there are very close definitions from Oxford: reach (verb) 1.3 - (reach something down) Stretch upwards to pick something up and bring it to a lower level She reached down a plate from the cupboard. Using this definition, it is possible to make your ...


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You can find this advice at Grammar Girl, and probably many other places on the internet. The rule (which seems to have been generally followed before the 20th century) is: use as if when it introduces a clause containing a verb, and like when it introduces a noun phrase. Consider one of Grammar Girl's examples. The first two are both correct, while the ...


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When I need to do this I call to rebook the appointment. That is the same as calling to reinstate the booking. Alternatively, you can revoke, reverse, or undo the cancellation.


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Finally your passport GOT ready for pickup Because you passport is not a person, it can't do anything of it's own accord. Finally they got your passport ready for pickup Here "got" applies to "they", being the people you processed your passport application and made the passport available for pickup. Using "got" is common in the UK but may seem ...


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You just say you reconfirm your appoinment, or you reverse your decision, your cancellation


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When used without irony/sarcasm, it means "I do not understand why this situation occurred. (And I'm somewhat surprised.)" When used ironically/sarcastically (which is perhaps slightly more common), it of course means the opposite: "The reason for this situation is glaringly obvious." (At least this is true in the US, where the expression is reasonably ...


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According to oxford, error isn't a verb. Err is, and here are its forms: Not to knock wiktionary, but I wouldn't consider errored a verb form. Note that the entry doesn't cite any examples for this sense. Its examples as an adjective seem passable, though, especially in a technical sense. The mean number of errored bits per errored symbol is ...


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Plenty of people do say "on the telly" Some languages do use the article before "nature" – Norwegians are forever going walks "in the nature". Anglophoness just don't, that's all, to us it's a condition not a place. (But two can play at this game – the French put an article before names of countries and we don't. Ditto abstractions: why do we not pursue the ...


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In practice, there is very little difference between short i and schwa. You could imagine a spectrum of pronunciations of the vowel sound in that syllable. You can say it either way and people will understand you just fine. To have a clear, understandable pronunciation, it is important to get the rhythm and the intonation right. Stressed syllables are ...


2

The sentence is grammatically correct. By using the definite article the operation, I assume it was a very specific operation which the listener will already know about. Otherwise the indefinite article would normally be used. And in Britain although we talk about a patient being in hospital, visitors usually go to the hospital. Saying you are going to ...


2

The spanner for the wheel lock gun looked like a wind-up key for a clockwork toy, with the major difference that the socket that fitted over the projecting axle of the wheel that was to be wound to tighten the inner spring was about three sixteenths of an inch square, and much more sturdy than the key for a clockwork train. The crossbow “spanner” was ...


2

This may by a joke copied (perhaps unconsciously) from the style of a very popular humorous book "1066 and All That: A Memorable History of England, comprising all the parts you can remember, including 103 Good Things, 5 Bad Kings and 2 Genuine Dates" by Sellars and Yateman, published in about 1930. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1066_and_All_That for more ...


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As StoneyB suggests in a comment above, the striking capitalization style that A.A. Milne used in his stories and poems about Christopher Robin and Winnie-the-Pooh (which appeared in four volumes across the years 1924, 1926, 1927, and 1928) was very likely the inspiration for a generation (or more) of children’s books to use initial caps for emphasis. A few ...


2

Both are correct in meaning, although different in structure the definition remains the same, but to clarify in no.2 the present continuous as well as being used to talk about the things taking place at the current moment can also be used to refer to future events that might be happening shortly or at some point in the future. Examples: "Are you going to ...


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Present Continuous is also used for arrangements, meetings, something on your schedule. Future Simple is a plan you say in a moment of speaking and it isn't something fixed, just a general future time. You can say I will go to the Mars but it's something you just decided on the spur of the moment. Both sentences are correct, except second example is more ...


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What the idiom dictionaries say There appears to be a clear split in preference between British English usage and U.S. English usage on this idiom. Christine Ammer, The American Heritage Dictionary of Idiom (1996) offers this discussion: in the cards Likely or certain to happen, as in I don't think Jim will win—it's just not in the cards. This term, ...


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In UK English as it was taught some years ago commas and conjunctions were used to divide adjectives - "He was young, dark and hansome". The same rule applied to long numbers - "Ten tousand, seven hundred and twenty-two." The commas are now often omitted and many writers are following US English in omitting the "and" as well.


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I always understood after living in Hackney in the 1970s that the rhyming slang for bottle and glass was class rather than arse. This provides an explanation for the use of the term losing his bottle or the positive version of having the bottle to do something. So if you have no bottle, you have no class which makes a lot more sense than having no arse. If ...


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I'm looking for a verb denoting the act of making a circle elliptic, i.e. making it oblate (or prolate for that matter). Is there a single word for it, or do I need to rewrite? No, there isn't! The great SOED dictionary records a 'rare' verb oblate but only with themeaning of 'offer as an oblation'. You'll have to say just 'make oblate'


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I suggest Put the rest of the water behind the door in the kitchen because for a door we think of behind or in front of rather than at the back of. I wondered if at the back of would be more common in US-English - but we would say in British-English at the back of the queue - or at the back of the cupboard - I suppose at the back of works for a ...


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It's two different meanings of get (past: got) Get + past participle is a colloquial form of the passive, fairly close in meaning to be + past participle, but with the added implication that the process is complete. So get eaten = be completely eaten; get processed = be processed (completely). Get + adjective of state (including a present participle) means ...



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