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52

Chemist, chemist's, chemist's shop or, sometimes, pharmacy. I've never heard "drugstore" in the UK, though one of the big chains is called Superdrug.


18

Technically a chemist's [shop] will contain a pharmacy, which is the counter where prescription drugs can be obtained. Because it may be necessary to get these when shops are closed, there is a rota (published in the local paper, for example) of out-of-hours pharmacies; some of these are in supermarkets or 24-hour shops.


11

It's a chemist's, though drugstore is starting to creep into standard UK usage too.


7

I think that the answer to this has changed over the last thirty years or so. When I was a kid, chemist's was invariably the term I heard, though pharmacy wouldn't have been incorrect. But recently, I don't think I've heard anyone say chemist's: it's always been pharmacy. I've never heard a Brit say drugstore. Although we have a chain called Superdrug, I ...


7

In The Transactions of the American Medical Association, Volume 9 from 1856, "mad cow" is used to refer to a cow with rabies (or hydrophobia). there were at least seven mad dogs, probably more, one mad cow, and two rabid human beings in that part of the country during that period, all of whom died The article is referring to the poverty and lack of ...


6

After reading the whole of Margaret Bertha Wright's article, I can confidently say that all the (now deleted) speculation here pertaining either to 'mad cow disease' (bovine spongiform encephalopathy / BSE), or to the dining facilities aboard Victorian-era English trains and what victuals might be served there, is misplaced. Margaret Wright's article makes ...


4

It is somewhat archaic. Today, certain archaic words are often used satirically, when someone is deliberately being too formal or polite (e.g., "Pray tell me, what can I do for you?" when someone is being a nuisance). Words like alas and daresay are examples of the same thing--they're usually used when the speaker wants to be satirical or overly dramatic. ...


3

There is a case that "lurry" is the original pronounciation. The Online Etymological Dictionary gives this origin: "a truck; a long, flat wagon," 1838, British railroad word, probably from verb lurry "to pull, tug"(1570s), of uncertain origin. Meaning "large motor vehicle for carrying goods" is first attested 1911." According to Wikipedia, meanwhile, ...


3

During the Irish potato famine 1845-1852 more than a million Irish emigrated to America. This influx probably affected pronunciation in the areas of America where immigrants were concentrated.


2

I am an American from the Midwest, and although I think it sounds "cool," the use of the noun "fellow" does sound a bit "affected" "a bit dated" and gives the sense of "being light in the loafers." That being said, if the friend with whom you are using it with is a good one, then none of this matters.


2

On time and tide, tiding and tidings The answer to the question of whether tidings is only ever used in the plural is yes when speaking of contemporary literature, but no when speaking of historical use. For tidings is an ancient word, spelled tídunge in Old English. It is related to tide in its original sense, the one regarding not waters but times, as ...


2

This indicates that the word "tiding" is much rarer in written works than "tidings". Whilst this proves nothing, when you take into consideration that 'tiding' is also the collective noun for magpies and a form of the verb "tide", the use of 'tiding' as the singular form of 'tidings' is likely to be negligible.


2

I would refer to this as scoffing, deriding, or belittling.


2

Perhaps to get on at someone is an AmE form. It doesn't sound good to me as a BrE speaker. We normally use one of... 1: He's always getting at her 2: He's always going on at her Semantically they're often effectively interchangeable (though #2 is somewhat more informal). But sometimes going on (which more specifically implies complaining) isn't ...


1

The OED has it dating back to 1863 in The Quarterly Review: It is said also, that the prisoners have been known to make an example of a warden who was not in their opinion sufficiently liberal with his V.G.'s (‘Very Good,’ as marked in the accounts).


1

No, you can not replace "all the unemployed" with "every unemployed" because "the unemployed" is an adjectival noun and thus itself actually means "unemployed people," i.e. in the plural. When understood that way, it becomes quite illogical to say "every unemployed" as that would refer to "every unemployed people." :)


1

It means "more than 70", or "70 or more". In informal speech it would be read as "seventy plus".


1

if you want to maintain separate versions for British and American, I recommend you find a native British English speaker and a native American English speaker to proofread and edit your content, If your audience is primarily British, or if you have no access to a native speaker of American English, just do the British version; if the contrary, just do an ...


1

Most times when I hear the term fellow, I think of the chant/song that people sing (raucously) on special occasions, for example when a person has achieved something quite exceptional; someone's birthday or at wedding receptions. For he's a jolly good fellow, for he's a jolly good fellow For he's a jolly good fellow (pause), and so say all of us And ...


1

Mobile or cell phone can be used in America and both are used, but yes cell is used more often in everyday conversation. But on TV commercial and radio commercials here in America the term mobile phone is probably used a little more often.



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