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5

In American English, there is no ambiguity. There is no issue with it being idiomatic; it is. Your sentence is in the indicative for us: They insisted that he left. That version always means that they are assuring you that he has indeed departed. It is a done deal. Had we meant the other thing, we would have said this, using an untensed verb in the ...


4

In Britain 'to knock off [work]' is a perfectly normal and innocent thing to say. It is informal so you might more often hear 'to finish work' or 'to leave work'. I've never heard it used to mean 'masturbate'. In Britain someone might say 'to knock one out' to mean masturbate but the addition of the words 'one' and 'out' makes the verb completely ...


4

From Sarah Woodbury's website: Romance and Fantasy in Medieval Wales On the use of the word ‘gotten’ Several UK readers have wondered about the use of the word ‘gotten’ in my medieval mysteries. Since the word is not in common usage in England right now, it seems odd to them to read it at all, and a glaring ‘Americanism’ in a book set in the ...


3

According to Middle English Dictionary, Volume 4 By Hans Kurath, gript was one of the spellings all those hundreds of years ago. Beyond that we can look at Google ngram: gript,gripped. From the graph we can see that the 'gripped' spelling took off from 1850 onwards.


3

In Australian English, which for the most part is similar to British English, I have never come across “gript”. “Gripped” is the only form of the word that I have ever come across. I suspect that the former is probably old English, and no longer in use, or looking at the usage example, possibly a “dialect spelling”.


3

"Wasn't I?" at the end of a statement can certainly can be read as indicating peevishness. Also though, and in my experience, many Londoners use phrases like "wasn't I?", "weren't I?", "didn't I" as narrative intensifiers. "So, I was going up the Elephant and Castle weren't I , when this geezer stops me with a question about English usage" (Slipping into ...


3

Yes, in British English it's a retort. I don't know if it is used in US English. What state of mind does it convey? ---> snappishness, irritation possibly with a touch of humour. Note that it can also be used when the asker should know the answer, e.g. "Where are you?" "Why are you asking? It's 11am on Monday." "So?" "So, I'm at work ...


3

Most varieties of American English are rhotic. This means that speakers pronounce orthographic (written) 'r' regardless of the sounds around it. In non-rhotic varieties of English - such as Southern Standard British English - orthographic 'r' is only pronounced if followed by a vowel. It doesn't matter if there is a double /r/ or not in the orthography: ...


2

I don't know of anything that would directly answer such questions, but maybe you could do it by process of elimination using as a resource the reference work Dictionary of American Regional English, a four-volume work that attempts to collect Americanisms.


2

Relationship between son, daughter and mother does not separate the relationships, because it talks about a single relationship between three parties. If you need to separate the two individual relationships I'm afraid you'll have to mention them separately. You can, however, make the title shorter by removing between; simply play around with word order: ...


2

You can use this phrase, for example, in talking about how a divorced parent should deal with his ex-spouse for the sake of the children: If you're divorced and have children, you should do right by them and maintain a good relationship with your ex-spouse. This means that by not fighting with the ex-spouse, you provide a benefit to the children. ...


2

(It's been bugging me for ages this "boink".) The earliest instance I found boink, used unequivocally as a verb, is in an electrical engineering volume called R & D Review, 1957. The analogous picture in a simple mechanical model is that of the bottom of anold-fashioned [sic] oil can just as it “boinks”: there are two stable states separated by an ...


2

At least in the central u.s. the "r" is very clearly pronounced.


2

Picking up Jimmy's reference to Googly as Australian slang, there are a couple of possibilities. Firstly to establish the early Australian usage: 1904 P.F.Warner How We recovered Ashes 106 Bosanquet.. can bowl as badly as anyone in the world,but, when gets a length, those slow 'googlies', as the Australian papers call them, are apt to paralyse the greatest ...


1

I agree with OP that whatever tickles your fancy is getting a bit "dated". The new kid on the block (AmE and BrE) is... whatever floats your boat - see whatever turns you on


1

English determiners can be tricky. For instance it's not OK to say "in specific situation." You need "in the following specific situation" or "in a specific situation." But to answer your question, it's fine to speak about a general meteorological truth without a determiner: Strong winds destroy homes. Or even Strong wind destroys homes. If ...


1

Adjure can imply some sort of appeal to God or a command dictated with holy authority, or at the very least a very strong and earnest appeal. I would consider enjoin to be a somewhat weaker word with no such religious connotation. The Oxford English Dictionary notes that enjoin "is more authoritative than direct, and less imperious than command" (citing ...


1

Single relationship between three parties is what I want: between son, daughter, and mother Since between only works between two parties, and among won't work here, I would suggest Mother-son-daughter relationship


1

Merriam-Webster, an American dictionary, also has a definition that would allow "knock off work". intransitive verb: to stop doing something transitive verb 2 : discontinue, stop <knocked off work at five> I am American, know this definition, and would definitely assume that someone meant "stop working" if he said "I usually knock off ...


1

Australian English follows British usage; i.e. it is common to say 'knock off from work'. There are other (Australian) meanings: to steal something ("I knocked it off"), a counterfeit product ("its just a cheap knock-off"), and to desist ("hey, knock it off, you two"). "They knocked him off" means they killed someone. I (native born Australian, and getting ...


1

Clearly "named after" means something along the lines of "These drawings are by Smith after those of Jones" where the "after" meaning "following as a consequence", so understood to mean "in honour of". The American "named for" is clearly in the sense that I do something "for" you, ie as a gift, so if I named something after someone, it would be as a gift ...


1

Also, I believe, I surmise, I suppose, it seems. However, if part of a long piece with many opinions, it's generally good writing policy to give a single indication or disclaimer somewhere early on, rather than continuously bombarding your readers with these phrases.


1

Our insatiable appetites for information, stimulation, validation will come with us. But when all those wants are met no sooner than they have been felt, the knowledge of what it is to be left unfulfilled may not. So, this sentence is not very well-written; I don't blame you for being confused by it. the noun "want" normally means a deficiency or a ...



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