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12

Petting The act or practice of amorously embracing, kissing, and caressing one's partner. thefreedictionary.com The Oxford English Dictionary lists this word as having originated in 16th century England, so it would certainly have been around in the fifties. A Google Ngrams search reveals that snogging was very rarely used back then. Interestingly ...


10

It's quite likely that snogging would actually have been used in Fifties Britain. OED records written usage, which would lag behind spoken use. 1945 C. H. Ward-Jackson Piece of Cake (ed. 2) 56 Snogging, courting, running around with the opposite sex. Comes from India. Thus, ‘On my leave I'm going up to the hills for a bit of snogging.’ Also used as ...


8

Twopence, tuppence and threepence do still get said but are fading out of use. Thruppence was uncommon before decimalization and very rare now because there hasn't for a long time been a three pence piece. Pence are such a minor unit of currency now, people don't have so much need to refer to them. Ngram of all four words shows the decline (at least in ...


6

The king who is known to have had a speech impediment was King George VI, father to the present Queen, who reigned from 1936 to 1952. The matter of his speech impediment was dramatised in the film The King's Speech (2010) written by David Seidler, in which Colin Firth plays the part of the King. This clearly has nothing to do with the formation of the ...


5

The word most frequently used by far in American English by children to refer to other children is kid itself. I met this kid at the playground today. I'm sitting next to a new kid in class this week. After that, gender-specific terms to use by a boy would be girl (to refer to a girl) or boy by a girl to refer to a boy. This would be to ...


4

One needs to understand that a lot of this has to do with the advancing tide of universal public education in the US. Some public schools were developed in the mid to late 1700s (Benjamin Franklin had a hand in starting one), but the movement really gained steam in the early 1800s. (Horace Mann was a well-known advocate, and, as a result, has nearly as ...


4

I looked up my favorite canoodling in Ngrams and even though its initial peak was around the 30', when compared to snogging: in the year 1954, canoodling has 0.0000002822% whereas snogging has "only" 0.0000000415% - that is 6.8 times less.


3

This is from Lessing's play Emilia Galotti, IV.7 Prince Hettore Gonzaga, infatuated with the virtuous bourgeoise Emilia Galotti, has had his chamberlain Marinelli abduct Emilia and murder her fiancé, and has just given his mistress Countess Orsina the brush-off. Emilia's father Odoardo shows up trying to find out what's going on, and Marinelli tells him to ...


3

Just to confirm the surmise of stevesliva and aparente001, a Google Books search finds this quotation from by SamanthaBlackWhitlock, "The Potter Twins and the Goblet of Fire" on FanFiction.net: On the landing, Frank turned right, and saw at once where the intruders were: At the very end of the passage a door stood ajar, and a flickering light shone ...


3

When dismantling segregation was still casually status quo in the western hemisphere, as was the case in the 1970's, several words were used as substitutes for overtly racist adjectives and the word 'Coloured' was accepted as one of those substitutes to be used in/for/with polite company. In January of this year (this is being written July of 2015) a ...


3

"threepence", "elevenpence" are fine for spoken English; 'threppence' is well understood too. Even if the correct form is 3p. 11p. Three pee. Thruppence will only work if you are talking to the elderly. And even they will be delighted but unable to do the maths if you mention florins (10p), Half-crowns (twelve and a half pence), crowns (25p) ...


2

You'll occasionally hear these old fashioned words for numbers of pence in an informal colloquial setting, but it's rare and confined to older people. Also, some idioms which refer to pre-decimal money are still sometimes heard, for example "twopenny-hal'penny" (pronounced "tuppenny hayp-ny") is a colloquial adjective meaning "cheap, shoddy, or valueless. ...


2

I'm English and I learned Spanish with a Castilian (central Spanish) accent from a CD. The CD was specifically about pronunciation and not about vocabulary. Answer Even though my Spanish is not very good, people consistently remark on my Spanish (rather than Latin American) accent. It must be weird for native speakers. Because my accent is so good they ...


2

Those are some very good questions. They are not always entirely clear, partly because you don't always define your terms, such as "participle adjective"; but I will answer as best I can. The definition of "clause" that I use is the traditional one: a finite verb and its dependencies. By that definition, a participle and its dependencies don't make up a ...


2

Frankl doesn't say and a perfunctory search doesn't find the source of Gotthold Lessing's quote. In the light of Frankl's experience in the Holocaust, it means that if you cannot be overwhelmed by the enormity of mankind's irrationality, overwhelmed to the point that you despair of finding a way to understand that irrationality, then you didn't have much ...


2

As far as I know (as an American who lived, very briefly in England), there is no word in the US for the British concept of "tea", "teatime" or "afternoon tea". In fact, the Wikipedia Article on it pretty clearly points out that it's a UK & Ireland concept: Tea refers to several different meals in countries formerly part of the British Empire. ...


2

Here's part of an answer given by Michael Foot to a question that he was asked during a Radio 4 programme that was broadcast on 10 June 1973 (which was within just a few months of the setting of the TV programme mentioned by the questioner), called Politics in the 70's. This programme was noteworthy because it placed Foot in conversation with Enoch Powell, ...


2

It strikes me as quite unlikely. American and British sounded much alike until and after 1783, from then on they may have branched away from each other. George III, on the throne between 1760 and 1820, suffered from a progressive mental condition but is not known to have had a speech impediment. The two sons that followed him on he throne, George IV and ...


2

The closest existing name I know is Melita, which sounds reminiscent of Spanish. The person I knew with this name came from the Phillipines. It's kind of like Carmelita. I will give you license to use as unrelated a nickname as you like. Each September, just let the child's teacher know what the nickname is, how to spell it and how to pronounce it.


1

Maybe there was in the Distant Past...- There may have been a difference a long time ago. My cursory research* for this answer made note that this is a particular category of irregular verb, which according to Oxford Dictionaries is any verb that does not follow the usual -s (third person, -ed (past tense), -ed (past participle) and -ing (present ...


1

I notice that in your example, 'learned' is followed by a consonant and 'learnt' is followed by a vowel. It is a very small sample but, examining my own speech patterns, that reflects the way I speak. I draw no deep conclusion from this because research would be needed to see if this is a real phenomenon.


1

There are things which must cause you to lose your reason or you have none to lose. My paraphrase There are things which will either drive you crazy or, if they don't, then you were crazy to begin with. Does this answer part of the question?


1

It looks like a typo. It probably should be cast a long sliver of gold.


1

Your understanding is correct. They have strong connections with England. (Canadians still have the queen's picture of some of their bank notes). Due to the proximity as well as the Media influence, the language is pretty much American. Lately, even the pronunciation of some words has been changing. For example, "schedule". Years ago, the tendency was to ...


1

"Should have done" expresses an obligation of doing some action (here a useful one) in the present perfect. That contemplates a time interval from some unspecified point in the past up to right now for a completed action. But "it is time" talks about the present, so the sentence presents a clash between what's going on right now and a completed action. If ...


1

I found a (very rough) transcription of this here: https://tokunboajewole.wordpress.com/2013/07/29/rivers-crisis-these-issues-are-bringing-calamitous-end-for-nigeria-obahiagbo-pt1-transcribed/ I have not edited it at all, which means that any grammar or spelling issues have been kept. I have a feeling this isn't a very good transcription, but it's decent. ...


1

Just speak or write in English...the differences are mainly in pronunciation, use of present perfect, and maybe a 100 word differences (lift as opposed to elevator and stuff like that) and the use of prepositions. To really answer this question, it would be useful to know why you think you need to choose and why you will be speaking English.


1

If I have no personal acquaintance with the teacher I would use Dear Miss/Mrs/Ms Lastname Of these I prefer the first two to the last, which has a feeling of political correctness about it that does not help person to person communication.


1

If your car were sitting dead at the side of the road, an American would probably say "My car has broken down." If your car were then towed to a mechanic, who told you that the motor needs replacement, you might say "My car is broken.", although there are other possibilities. Since you seem to be referring to your car being operable but not in good shape, ...



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