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32

Perhaps in the trenches. In the context of medicine (but it can be applied to any field that has active practitioners as well as academics and commentators) it has been defined as A popular phrase derived from trench warfare of World War I, referring to the active practice of medicine—in the 'real' world—as opposed to the less practical philosophies of ...


24

The number of unfamiliar, archaic words collocated here makes it a challenge even to a native speaker. In order of appearance (all definitions taken from ODO except where otherwise indicated): Spindle-shanked means ‘having long, thin legs’. It’s rather a contemptuous term to use, whereby a person’s shanks (legs) are compared in shape to a spindle. Beaux ...


23

The context of this quotation is fisticuffs, and "Tottenham Court" refers to the school where James Figg taught boxing, fencing and quarterstaff. An 'orange wench' was a woman who sold oranges and other refreshments at a playhouse, and to 'close' with her means to engage her in conversation, probably with dishonorable intentions. A 'spindle-shanked beau' ...


23

If you drop the 'I' it becomes less one-on-one - 'Love You' suggests a generic love for a person - like a rock band or an actress - 'We love you Paul' isn't a personal love, or the hippy 'free love' of the 1960's - 'Luvin' You Man', would go from Brother to Brother, regardless of skin color or religion beliefs. One may love the Lord in a passive way, and the ...


22

You've got a range of choices; I haven't been on the front-lines I haven't been hands on I haven't been involved with the nuts and bolts I haven't been involved with the nitty-gritty I haven't been involved with the day-to-day operations (or even just "the day-to-day"). That said, 'at the coal-face' would be perfectly acceptable and explicable to most ...


15

I'd go with this: I haven't got/gotten my hands dirty in years.


15

I often tell friends both male and female that I love them; I don't think it's necessary to diminish the sentiment with flippant phrasing just because it's not romantic love. We don't do this for our family members, and they don't assume we mean we love them in a romantic way. I say trust in the existing context of your relationship; it isn't necessary to ...


11

Definitions from online dictionaries: a bolshy person often argues and makes difficulties: He's a bit bolshy these days. - [Cambridge] difficult to manage; rebellious - [TFD] difficult or rebellious - [Wiktionary] stubborn, argumentative - [Urbandictionary] deliberately creating problems and not willing to be helpful - [MacMillan] As in ...


10

The word immolation has this sense (among others): immolate tr.v. To kill (an animal, for instance) as a religious sacrifice. To kill, especially by fire: "[The soldiers] are crushed under rocks, pierced by bullets, immolated by flamethrowers" (A.O. Scott). immolation n. {AHDEL} [tidied]


10

My great-grandparents were of mining stock, but fortunately I don't have to work underground. I'm a software developer and often speak about 'working at the code-face'.


10

If you qualify the meaning further, you can use the "I love you" such as "You are decent person. I love you, bro". Also, if you are addressing to a group of friends you can say "I love you guys"


9

Over 50 years ago I was perfectly familiar with the "playground slang" term bolshie meaning uncooperative, recalcitrant, truculent (Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang, 2010). That was long before I knew anything about the political etymology - which later knowledge hasn't significantly affected how I've used and understood the word over the decades. There ...


7

Bolshie is short Bolshevik which means socialist. It has come to mean contrarian, uncooperative, or inclined to protest; probably stemming from derisive descriptions of left wing movements that lash out against the status quo.


6

Thinking back, I believe coloured was originally a euphemism, used to avoid the word black which British people thought, probably correctly at the time, was offensive. I believe the demise of coloured as an acceptable term dates from the emergence of black, mainly from the American black community, as a term of pride. With the growth in the use of black, I ...


6

A software development specific example would be: I haven't cut code in years.


5

English accents are commonly divided into two main groups: rhotic speakers pronounce a historical rhotic consonant (/r/) in all instances, whereas non-rhotic speakers pronounce /r/ only before or between vowels. For example, a rhotic speaker pronounces words like hard and butter approximately as /ˈhɑrd/ and /ˈbʌtər/, whereas a non-rhotic speaker "drops" or ...


5

The meaning is as much about context and delivery as it is about wording. A sing-songy "Love ya!" as you're saying goodbye for the day can't be taken romantically. On the other hand, being physically close, locking eyes, and saying "I love you." with gravitas is difficult to take any way other than as a romantic gesture. John Mark Perry's answer, suggesting ...


5

Bruv can be a friendly, jocular way to greet a close friend or indeed a brother. In London, I wouldn't hear it being used among strangers unlike the female expression luv which means love or its male version mate. A London black cab driver might ask a female passenger: "Where are you going, luv?" But to a male customer he is more likely to say: ...


4

If you can, go and live with a family in a primarily English-speaking country that includes young children, and whose members speak only English (perhaps as a paying guest or lodger). It will probably seem hard at first, because you will be throwing yourself in at the deep end (though you have clearly made a good start with your acquisition of English, ...


4

Consider: I am very fond of you Be aware that in some cultures (Britain, US for example) non-romantic expressions such as "I like you" and "I am fond of you" can be used as ways to flirt or make romantic overtures, while making rejection less embarrassing. I really like Jean's answer, and I also think your own translation of I care about you holds a ...


4

Bruv is a word used by mainly South Londoners. It's the shorter version of 'bruvva' which is a slang variation of 'brother'. Urban Dictionary Bruv is shortened from bruvver: (UK, slang) brother, mate, friend. Wiktionary


3

The usual term for this is immolation, derived from the verb immolate: VERB [WITH OBJECT] Kill or offer as a sacrifice, especially by burning EXAMPLE SENTENCES Chinese kings would immolate vast numbers of animals When her father - who did not accept Shiva, ever - publicly humiliated her beloved at the ritual, Sati immolated ...


3

withhold verb: withhold; 3rd person present: withholds; past tense: withheld; past participle: withheld; gerund or present participle: withholding refuse to give sacrifice noun: to offer, to offer up grudge verb: 3rd person present: grudges; past tense: grudged; past participle: grudged; gerund or present participle: grudging ...


3

The best way I've come across for this sort of thing is phrases in the form "You're a" or "You're" . For example: "You're a good friend." "You're awesome dude." "You're a great guy." "You're a real pal." There are a few reasons why phrases like this tend to work well as a good expression of friendship. Firstly in the phrase "I love you" there are ...


2

J. E. Lighter, Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1994) suggests that bash in the sense of "party" originated outside the United States, perhaps from the idiom "on the bash": bash n. ... 2.a. a celebration or feast, esp. a boisterous party. [The term seems to have entered U.S. slang via the armed forces during WWII.] [Examples:] ...


2

There is an idiomatic use of : Prune something of (off) something: to clear, clean, or groom something of something by pruning. Sally was out in the orchard pruning the apple trees of dead branches. They pruned the roses of their unneeded branches. a check with Ngram shows a good number of examples of prune from used in the way you are ...


2

I write as a linguist. There is something called compensatory lengthening in phonology and it's simply that when a sound is deleted, another sound is lengthened to fill up that empty space. This can be likened to sharing a small bed with your partner and then he has to leave for work as early as 3am. you spread out to fill the space he has left and enjoy the ...


2

I believe that "hands-on" would be the most commonly heard substitute for "at the coalface" that you will find although it has no sense of using advanced technology. It would be a shame if "at the coalface" dropped completely out of use since it evokes how down and dirty daily labor can be. I started coding using punched cards in 1976 and I have never heard ...


2

Your comment that the transmission overhead...is about 200K and (now)...is about 10K would seem to indicate that it has been reduced BY 95%.


2

Using another actor in a sentence with the word 'pinnacle' is not good usage. 'Something' either 'is' the pinnacle or 'represents' the pinnacle of 'something'. '...provides the pinnacle' is grammatically okay but it's not proper usage.



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