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12

According to Etymonline expressions using the concept of holding the nose up in the air suggesting superiority or disdain are used from 1570. Probably other expressions like stick one's nose up in the air and stuck-up are derived from this usage: Nose: To turn up one's nose "show disdain" is from 1818 (earlier hold up one's nose, 1570s); similar ...


7

I think if you said 'shingled beach' it would carry an implication that the shingle had been put there by humankind. But if you say 'shingle beach' it does not carry that message. In Britain we do not usually say 'pebbly beach' but sometimes you hear 'stony beach'. Later edit I am veering back to 'pebble-beach', having read others'comments. I think I was ...


6

It has definitely crossed over to the UK. My 15 year old (a couple of years ago) daughter used it as expression of choice when faced with a gross situation. Sadly I have even used it myself but I like to think in a post-modern ironic sense ;) Like many Americanisms that cross the pond I imagine it is likely to have transferred through TV programmes, such as ...


5

A clot is a lumpy thing - most often heard of as a blood clot that clogs an artery or mud clots that you scrape off of your boot. While clot may have some deep meaning in 16th century England, the argument that it a typo for cloth is pretty compelling.


5

Anglia is the Medieval (Latin) name for England and has never been used in my earshot to refer to the country of England (I am English). If it were used now it would imply that the subject of the usage was ancient England. There is still an area of England known as "East Anglia" in common usage, but there is no common usage of North, West or South Anglia ...


4

Based on what Wikipedia and LDOCE suggest, the difference isn't between the American and British English (apart from the little bit of background on ditch). It's just the subtle difference in the type of hole that's dug/built. Ditch and trench are much closer in the meaning, while gutter is slightly different. A street gutter is a depression running ...


4

It means to identify or formulate a parable which can be used to make sense of what is wrong with America in 2014. It's just the same as see or spot.


4

This allusion is an example of “handwriting on the wall”, which warns of future events, usually calamitous. The related Biblical passage is from Daniel, chapter 5, a chapter that portends the end of King Belshazzar's reign. Verse 5 describes the event. From Biblegateway.com: Suddenly the fingers of a human hand appeared and wrote on the plaster of ...


4

I’m a 62 year old (U.S. Male); the term ew or eww, as described, is equivalent to yuck in a more tactile sense. You may react to a slimy frog being offered to you, to hold; with the opportunity to say no, with Yuck!, as a response. But if a crass person just says here, hold this, without description, or knowledge of what it is, and you hold out your hand as ...


4

At school in England around the turn of the millenium, "eww" was certainly in usage. I think (as mentioned in the comments) the huge popularity of US television shows may have had something to do with the frequent use of word. Other words that commonly replaced "eww" as expressions of disgust were "sick", "gross" and "vile". Another of the most frequently ...


4

There does not seem to be a definite answer here, but it seems that most people are generally satisfied that stuck up may have come from the idea of sticking one's nose up. However, I hope I can provide support for the idea that the phrase stuck up could easily have come from a meaning that has nothing to do with a person's nose. Possibly stuck up came ...


4

Past Definitions of Stuck-Up The earliest definition of stuck-up that I’ve been able to find is in John C. Hotten, A Dictionary of Modern Slang, Cant, and Vulgar Words, Second Edition (1860), published in London, which offers this very narrow meaning: STUCK-UP, “purse-proud”—a form of snobbishness very common in those who have risen in the world. Mr. ...


3

This has definitely crossed! I would still associate it with a: scatterbrained beautiful blonde girl when she sees or hears something disgusting often a reaction towards blood or something they object to - spiders and snakes (esp. when eating) often get an "eew". I live in East Anglia, in a more affluent area, and because of that I don't hear as much ...


3

I would make it slightly less passive: "An analysis performed by the insurance company ..." or other material to indicate who performed the analysis and where it was performed as well as the issue being analyzed. If you or your associates performed the analysis, you might phrase it: "An analysis performed by the authors into insurance company ...


2

Cockney rhyming slang originates in London and is spread across Britain by the London-based national media (most of it). There are many other local dialects and slang words used in different areas of Britain which aren't universally understood. These are less known across the whole country because of the London-based national media. "I'll mash the tea" ...


2

This can be called a thermal. In the context in which you asked it's very similar to updraught but there are ways that the words could be used differently. Regarding @RegDwight's comment, these are caused by a body of air becoming heated and rising; cooler air will be drawn into the vacuum created when this happens. If this occurs on a hill it can cause ...


2

I believe you're looking for Updraft. This fits almost exactly what you're describing and can be used for both indoor and outdoor settings. "Do you feel this updraft?" "Yes. Let me close the window." Note: Niall's answer gives the British-English form, updraught, which is likely a more correct word that you were after. It's worth mentioning that they both ...


2

Collected comments to avoid the possibility of deletion and if anyone can remember the TV show feel free to edit it in. When a' wert lad it was a common phrase to use to ask someone if something was wrong (not just in Yorkshire). I'm not sure but I think the phrase was 'overpopularised' by a 60/70's UK TV serialised drama (which I can't remember the name ...


2

Confirming StoneyB's answer in the comment above, here is the primary definition of side in Eric Partridge, A Dictionary of Slang and unconventional English, eighth edition (1984): side, n. Conceit, swagger, pretentiousness. Earliest and often put on side, to give oneself airs, to 'swank'. [citation from 1878 omitted]Ex side, proud, or more prob., as ...


2

What is going on here is not the addition of 'do', and has little to do with conditionals in particular. It presents a different prioritization of reduction rules. There is no added 'do'. The construction in your example is that 'would', for instance, takes another verb, and that in backward references the phrase would therefore properly end with 'would ...


2

Ngram AmE shows both usages are popular. Ngram BrE shows on the cards as the most used. In the cards also on the cards: very likely to happen I think winning the World Series this year is definitely in the cards for Boston. Some reports suggest that a tax cut is still on the cards. Etymology: based on the use of tarot cards (a set of cards with ...


2

The Cambridge Dictionary of American Idioms says both forms (in and on) are used, and that the origin is in Tarot: in the cards also on the cards based on the use of tarot cards (= a set of cards with pictures representing different parts of life) that are believed to be able to show what will happen in the future But, despite the mystical ...


1

Fulfillment is the other half of subscription. It means meeting of a requirement or condition. It doesn't necessarily have to do with sending on its own, but you might say delivery fulfillment (because it's a contractual obligation). It wouldn't be unusual if, in the industry, the department is any of delivery, delivery fulfillment, or fulfillment.


1

The date has already passed, or the past date. Past: Usage: The past participle of pass is sometimes wrongly spelt past: the time for recriminations has passed (not past) The word past has several meanings (usually related to time before the present or to indicate movement from one side of a reference point to the other side.) Past can be used as ...


1

Most commonly it would be called a Ticklist. It can also be sent as Tick list.


1

The simple answer is, you read out "hyphen". Generally not "dash" or other options. So, that's the answer! em-dash would be "E M Hyphen D A S H". No mystery! Anglo-Saxon would be "A, N, G, L, O, hyphen, S, A, X, O, N" For comparison, "it's" would be "I, T, apostrophe, S". (Just for your information, almost nobody knows what an "em-dash" is: it is a ...


1

It's a bit old-fashioned; a little toffish. As is typical with English understatement, its meaning is more emphatic that you think - it would synonymous with "yes, absolutely". Jeremy: "She's a fine specimen; graceful lines with a touch of elegance." Quentin: "Rather!" (Talking about a ship, obviously ;) )


1

In the UK, dates are normally the day, then the month, then the year. Your example would normally be "The event will take place from the 1st to the 10th of July, 2011"


1

For the first part, you could say either I wished I were king. or I wish I had been king. or I wished I had been king. depending on what you mean. For the second, the first statement, "I wish it stopped raining," is ungrammatical (to wish something is to acknowledge that it doesn't exist and that you hope it will come to exist in the ...


1

I feel the consensus opinion is that (1) it's possibly/probably true that "mail" is used more - in general - in the USA than in Britain. I really feel that's about all you can say about usage in bre/ame in this case. (2) the specific, clean 'reversal' you point out (mail/post on one side, post/mail on the other) is probably spurious; it does not exist. ...



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