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8

Merriam-Webster and my own personal experience with American English suggest pronouncing it ˈeg-zə-mə Cambridge Dictionary Online lists the pronunciation as ˈek.sɪ.mə and provides audio of English and American pronunciation.


5

Bruv can be a friendly, jocular way to greet a close friend or indeed a brother. In London, I wouldn't hear it being used among strangers unlike the female expression luv which means love or its male version mate. A London black cab driver might ask a female passenger: "Where are you going, luv?" But to a male customer he is more likely to say: ...


5

Alternatively, you can tell someone he has nothing between the ears. (TFD) If you say someone has nothing between their ears, you are saying they are stupid, that they have no brain. With most idioms you cannot alter any of the words, but with this one there are a few variations: She has nothing between the ears He has nothing between ...


5

This is the first result for googling "grammar in vs on for dates": http://5minuteenglish.com/mar18.htm You use on for dates. You use at for times. You would use in for months or years. So in your case, the tester is correct. "I am leaving on March 25, 2015." "I am leaving at 12:00." "I am coming back in April."


4

We use the pronoun on when saying that something happens on individual days: on Monday on 4th January on Independence day on her birthday on Valentine's day on that day We also use at for points of time in the day: at 5 pm at midnight at noon at dawn at lunchtime at zero hundred hours The original poster need on here, because the given time is a day: ...


4

No you can't. Take for example this set of numbers: {1, 545, 42, 2640} In that set there are ten digits, but only four numbers. 545 is a number with three digits. However, if the digits were separated, i.e. 5, 4, 5, then you will have three digits and three numbers.


4

The OED has some examples of humans being offloaded e.g.: 1968 M. Woodhouse Rock Baby v. 43 A Director who has to offload one of his staff and is embarrassed. and, 2001 FourFourTwo Sept. 104/3 Lazio were prepared to offload Juan Sebastian Veron because they had secured the services of Italian playmaker Stefano Fiore. But the OED doesn't have any ...


4

[He] ain’t got the brains God gave a squirrel or ain’t got the sense God gave geese. It seems your friends may be struggling with idiom overload: "Ain't" is a very informal replacement for "doesn't". "Got" is an informal expression for "have". "Brains" is idiomatic for intelligence. Here is a simpler version to start with: His brain is smaller ...


4

Bruv is a word used by mainly South Londoners. It's the shorter version of 'bruvva' which is a slang variation of 'brother'. Urban Dictionary Bruv is shortened from bruvver: (UK, slang) brother, mate, friend. Wiktionary


3

Driving right to the point, the top ten hits from the Corpus in the last 60 years were He's as stupid as a: Sheep Donkey Fish Man (LOL!) Cow Goose Horse Pig Stone White Man The list for British English is slightly different: Fish Donkey Pig Goose Mule Stone Giant Post And in American English: Man ...


3

Vulgar has a lot of shades of meaning, some depending on the user and some on the hearer. Originally, your birth decided whether you were a lady/gentleman or you were "base, common and popular" as Falstaff says in Henry V. Clearly (as is obvious to the non-working class) the labouring people cannot be expected to have the same refined sensibilities as the ...


3

It's not so much that set is American and that lay is British - rather, that Brits use both forms more or less equally often... ...whereas Americans almost exclusively stick with set... Personally, I find set slightly more "formal, dated" - but I suppose that's just because half a century ago, my mother always instructed one of us kids to lay the ...


3

It has that meaning in the US, although it's a bit jargon-y. Most people will say "plates", but most will understand "tags" at least in context. When you buy a car at the dealer you pay a "tag and title" fee through the dealer to have the car registered and receive a license plate, and the shops that exist in some states to handle registration paperwork ...


2

Copied and pasted from user Leelogs at Yahoo Answers: The condom in fact derives from the Roman Empire and was indeed made of sheep gut, but it was not much used (the legion was laid low with herpes when the Goths invaded). The French aristocracy used them widely, however, as early as the 17th century. Madame de Sevigne, writing in 1671, ...


2

I have always thought the "bag" part to be an abbreviation of "baggage", which has long been a pejorative term for a woman, and still is in many parts of the UK and particularly (in my experience) Ireland. Grose's Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (1823) confirms this sense of "baggage" BAGGAGE. Heavy baggage; women and children. Also a ...


2

I can't speak definititely for other countries, but certainly in Canada and the US, referring to a car's "plates and tags" indicates their license plate, which generally lasts for multiple years (my state replaces my license plates every 7 years) and their registration renewal tag, which is a smallish sticker (about 3cm x 5cm) affixed to one corner of the ...


2

The online OED says it comes from the Russian word mamant (now mamont). Their first citation is: 1618 R. James Dictionariolum Russico-Anglicum ... Maimanto, as they say a sea elephant, which is never seene, but accordinge to the Samγites he workes himself under grownde and so they finde his teeth or hornes or bones in Pechore and Nova Zemla. This ...


2

Using other brain metaphors: [He's] a bird-brain. a stupid person [He's] a feather-brain. a stupid person [He's] a brack-brain. a stupid person [He's] a lamebrain. a fool [He's] got shit for brains. to be very stupid Cambridge Idioms Dictionary, 2nd ed. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2006. Reproduced ...


2

Offload is used in the cases you mention to distinguish the action taken from the more commonly used disembark. Disembark is the normal word used for people getting off a conveyance (originally ships, but extended to airplanes, trains, buses etc.) but using disembark is a little bit ambiguous. Jane Doe was disembarked from the 9am flight this morning ...


2

The short answer is no; there is no contraction such as the're. I am sure it is a misunderstanding.


2

Broke is not a technical nor legal term. It is idiomatic, but rarely in the form of he was made broke. It would be more usual to say He went broke, or 'As a result of the project's failure, he was left broke'. But in any formal sense the word (in the UK) would be bankrupt. One can either use bankrupt as an adjective, as in he went bankrupt, or as a ...


1

No, we cannot substitute digit with number. The difference between a digit and a number is similar to the difference between an alphabet and a word which will always remain the way it has been. Just like alphabetics make words, digits make numbers.


1

Digit: One of the ten Arabic number symbols, 0 through 9. Number: A member of any of the following sets of mathematical objects: integers, rational numbers, real numbers, and complex numbers. These sets can be derived from the positive integers through various algebraic and analytic constructions. 1: is both a digit and a number (a ...


1

It's perfectly fine the way you have it. This sounds unusual because it wouldn't be used often. Consider this to be what's known as a turn of phrase, meaning an expression which is worded in a distinctive way, especially one which is particularly memorable or artful. (Wiktionary) Of course, many people enjoy the art of using a turn of phrase, and many ...


1

My sense of it always has been that "rude" is a word that was used either by nobles or, more likely, the rising bourgeoisie to differentiate their social position from that of the peasant, yeoman farmer, shepherd, etc. If your manners and speech are "rude", it's because you lack refinement (and therefore presumably weren't educated well). A "rude hut" would ...


1

As for your 1b., I am greeted cheerfully by them every morning, it is the best of the four. Your option "a." is good, too, as long as you changed the tense from past to present, as in Every morning, I am greeted by them cheerfully. As for your 2a., James Watt discovered the energy of steam, it is the best of the four. And for a ...


1

I am British and I sometimes call people "boss" in a very informal way, e.g. "Cheers, boss!" as an alternative to "Thanks, mate!" Thinking about situations where I would say that, it does tend to be with someone I don't know very well, like a shop employee, and most often when they have been useful or helpful. A typical conversation might be: "Can you ...


1

Specifically with regards to how 'vulgar' relates to language, a key commonality between the old meaning and the new is the notion of a standard. Before the spread of the printed word, Latin was the lingua franca for the high-born and educated in Europe. As the scholarly, administrative, and clerical language across the continent, Latin was the standard ...


1

The simple and honest answer is no, it is not correct. In England only those who have been poorly educated use the word "them" in this way.


1

You are wrong. Americans say one hundred and fifty as well. When we would say 100.50, we say "one hundred point five". Never make claims about which you are not sure.



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