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20

There are essentially two distinct and different uses. Former pupils of schools are sometimes known as 'Old Boys' and 'Old Girls'. David Cameron, the present Prime Minister is an Old Boy of Eton College. Princess Anne is an Old Girl of Benenden School in Kent. The use may be becoming dated, with more and more schools converting to co-ed, and the increasing ...


16

Those are not typos. Native speakers of British English do use bath as a transitive verb. Bathe on its own suggests swimming, and probably specifically seaside swimming — not even in swimming baths (which are swimming pools these days anyway). Bathe is almost poetic: something might be bathed in light. Apart from bathe a wound, to hear it used ...


11

As FumbleFingers noted, keep is acceptable. As to which is 'more right', if it is possible to have degrees of correctness, that is a question of style rather than grammar. In the antediluvian days of my youth, "I insisted that he kept..." could mean only that he kept ... at some past time, and at some later time I insisted on the truth of this. "I ...


10

Just some observations and Ngrams. The results on the American English corpus indicate that the verb to bath is rarely used if at all. Whereas the expression to wash the baby seems to be overtaking its counterpart to bathe Meanwhile the British English corpus shows the slow upward trend for to bathe the baby which has been picking up momentum since the ...


10

Is the word itself still understood as being used by the lower class, or does it's use connote something about the user other than disdain for the upper class? (Rephrased, is someone who uses the word toffee-nosed today, actually "toffee-nosed", that is, pretentious?) I'd say it's mainly used by people who wouldn't be considered toffee-nosed, usually ...


8

Here, the meaning is, "The [vulture of the law] removed the barber from [the vulture's] plate." This is a formulation of the idiom off one's plate: No longer a matter of one's responsibility and concern (Compare with the related too much on one's plate.) In this idiomatic context, one's "plate" is the set of concerns one is trying to resolve. The ...


7

According to ODO, the expression 'old girl' is used in different situations, and the age group of reference may be different according to context. It is not generally considered pejorative: (British) a former female student of a school or college: one of the college’s most famous old girls A former female member of a sports team or company: ...


7

The verb corresponding to declension is decline. However, your example of day - daily is not an example of declension. It is an example of word formation (with the adverbial suffix -ly). Declension adds/changes inflections, not suffixes. And here's a little on-topic joke I came across recently: A verb walks up to a noun in a bar: -- Hey, babe, ...


6

REVISED A lesson in the dangers of relying too heavily on Google Ngram (aka mea culpa) Previously, I posted an Ngram chart illustrating my surprise that waffle used in its verb form seemed to not exist before the late 1950s. When using Ngrams I started with a much wider timescale: 1800 to 2008, I hadn't noticed the tiny bump that appeared sometime in the ...


6

Regarding the illustration. It does look rather like a pineapple but I suspect it is just the clipart creator's idea of a jabot. These were worn by upper-class men at various times in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries and are still sometimes worn with formal Scottish attire. (illustations) At various times either a stand-up collar or a jabot was in ...


5

As you've discovered, it is a valid British usage. I would like to confirm that "to bath" is never used in any American dialect I've heard. If you're preparing students to speak American English, they can safely ignore that usage :)


5

It can go either way in different contexts. If the court had insisted that everyone keep a straight face, the meaning of it is what you're supposing: that the court is, in the time frame referenced, insisting that portrait subjects remain serious in their portraits. If the court really had insisted that everyone kept a straight face, the object of the ...


5

Drink = experience, endure, pay the penalty. (OED drink, verb, #16). I took this proverb to mean that a furious master will beat the pupil's hindquarters with a switch (or a cane) in any case, whether he catches the fly or not, and no matter what kind of (fancy) reply the student might give when questioned. The student has not been paying attention to the ...


3

I'll try to flesh this out further when I have the time (others are welcome to run with it as well), but I found this explanation of Ezekiel 23:32 wherein Matthew Poole's commentary explains that "thou shalt drink," in the context of that verse, means "thou shalt not put it by, and shift it off." So a quick interpretation of the passage would be as follows: ...


3

Is it pejorative to use “old girl” to refer to a woman? I think it cannot be used pejoratively: because if you call someone an "old boy" or "old girl", you simultaneously mean to to say that you yourself are, that everyone is, also an old boy or old girl. It's "familiar", i.e. you can use it to someone if they are family. The term "old boy" is normally ...


3

No, those are just typos. I have never heard a native speaker of American English use bath as a verb. It is bathe or take/give a bath. (Indian English, at least, and so British English I guess, they do use bath as a verb.)


3

I was wondering where the term, "mate," is most popular? Only among the English and Aussies, as far as I'm aware. Incidentally, the term mate in this context came into the English lexicon via sailors in the 18th century. Presumably that's why it's commonly associated with pirates. I hope that answers your question.


3

No one has yet discussed the derivation of the word toff (the source of toffee-nosed)—presumably because medica didn't ask. But in case anyone is interested, I offer the explanation that appears in Eric Partridge, Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English, Fifth Edition (1961): toff. A 'swell' ; a 'nob' (well-to-do person) : proletarian : from ...


3

Introductions among young people tend to be fairly informal, simply "Ken, this is Alan*, or even "Ken ... Alan". The normal assumption at a university would be that anybody you introduced would be a fellow student, so there would be no need to mention this. If you thought it might be interesting, you might add some information such as "He's in my Shakespeare ...


2

This depends a bit on how one defines "correct". Various dictionaries might accept either or both uses. If you go by the scientific literature, both seem to be widely used. On the other hand, if you are looking for a spelling that is suggestive of the correct meaning, then you should go with "parametrize" (or "parametrise"). You are not transforming the ...


2

The reports were collected over a three-day period (1st-3rd October 2014), between 1.00 and 4.00 in the afternoon on each day.


2

Waffler The suggested US meaning is found in the glossary of "Westmoreland and Cumberland Dialects" by "Various Writers in the Westmoreland and Cumberland Dialects", published in 1839. Waffler, A waverer This is provided in reference to a poem of c.1803 called "Matthew Macree" in the following stanza: The he wad shek the bull-ring, and brag the heale ...


2

I think there may be a certain propensity for using the hyphenated form as an adjective, but not as a noun.


2

And why is this illustration of a man with a pineapple (ananas) on his chest found with the definition of toffee-nosed? Does it imply anything about language? I believe I have found the connection between the pineapple on the man's shirt and toffee-nosed, in the end, the easiest explanation was the most logical. In Victorian England, and elsewhere ...


2

"Top Ranked" while not one word would usually suffice. adjective: considered to be the best or among the best ⇒ "the top-ranked amateur in France" http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/top-ranked


2

Considering that it's a musical involving human meat pies, I think it's a metaphor insinuating that, to the "vulture of the law", people were just food on a platter. By removing Sweeney from his "plate," the girl was then left alone and desperate.


1

Since nobody's answered but rather only commented … apparently it's: "pitta", rhyming with German bitte


1

The meanings are the same. You can also use dialogue balloons or word balloons. Just make sure you're not mixing up speech bubbles with thought bubbles.


1

The Collins online dictionary (definition 3)says that it is mainly used in England, Australia and New Zealand. As a native speaker of BrE, my impression is that it was more commonly used in England in the 1950s than it is now. I have rarely heard it used by what we might snobbishly call 'educated' people of my generation (over sixty), though my son and his ...


1

According to John Ayto & John Simpson, The Oxford Dictionary of Modern Slang (1992), both journo and muso originated in Australia. Here the dictionary's entries for the two terms: journo noun orig Austral A journalist, esp. a newspaper journalist. 1967—. TIMES Journos who work with the written word are seldom at ease with spoken English (1985). ...



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