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28

Nigel Rees actually published a book titled More Tea Vicar? An Embarrassment of Domestic Catchphrases (2009), but its entry for that phrase is disappointingly vague: more tea, Vicar? A correspondent who, understandably, wished to remain anonymous advanced the family phrase, 'for after a fart, or to cover any kind of embarrassment'. Paul Beale has ...


26

According to The Concise New Patridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English the humorous expression dates back to 1985: More tea, vicar? used humourously to acknowledge a fart or a belch, UK 1985. From The virtual linguist: I noticed in the kitchen department of John Lewis china teapots with the phrase "More tea, vicar?" written ...


21

Teachers sometimes refer to this kind of question as a trap: From The Pragmatics of Mathematics Education by Tim Rowland: One common perception is that the questions teachers ask their pupils are not searchlights focused to reveal truth, but traps set to expose ignorance. Rowland was quoted in Teacher-student Interaction by Alandeom Wanderlei de ...


15

Teachers and politicians sometimes call these "gotcha questions." Here's an excerpt from a discussion of gotcha questions in a Daily Caller article: The infamous “gotcha” question is something politicians always rail >against. But what exactly defines a “gotcha”? “I suppose a gotcha question is one that’s fundamentally unfair because it has a ...


15

If you are trying to educate, instead of expose, the answerer, I would say Socratic.


12

I believe your initial guess is correct, and it was originally a catch phrase used by the comedian Dick Emery. Google helpfully shows a picture in character on a cursory search for 'more tea vicar'. His show ran on the BBC from 1963-1981. In 1970 he released an comedy album with one of the tracks titled 'The Vicar Of Belching-By-The-Sea'.


9

Merriam-Webster and my own personal experience with American English suggest pronouncing it ˈeg-zə-mə Cambridge Dictionary Online lists the pronunciation as ˈek.sɪ.mə and provides audio of English and American pronunciation.


6

First we must set aside oar, board etc. (i.e. where the oa is followed by r). Then there are no rhymes for broad in my Penguin rhyming dictionary that are spelt --oad and aren't derived from broad (/brɔːd/ according to Collins) itself. So there aren't any reasonably common words with that spelling and pronunciation in the last syllable. Because that only ...


5

I just took an unscientific poll of North American professional actors (read: searched the web for eczema commercial), and "egzema" /ˈɛɡzɪmə/ was the most common, followed by the similar "eksema" /ˈɛksɪmə/. I hadn't heard "egzeema" /ɪɡˈzi:mə/ until today. A TV ad for Elidel (pimecrolimus) cream 1% calls it a prescription drug to treat "egzema". Another ...


5

This is the first result for googling "grammar in vs on for dates": http://5minuteenglish.com/mar18.htm You use on for dates. You use at for times. You would use in for months or years. So in your case, the tester is correct. "I am leaving on March 25, 2015." "I am leaving at 12:00." "I am coming back in April."


4

No you can't. Take for example this set of numbers: {1, 545, 42, 2640} In that set there are ten digits, but only four numbers. 545 is a number with three digits. However, if the digits were separated, i.e. 5, 4, 5, then you will have three digits and three numbers.


4

The OED has some examples of humans being offloaded e.g.: 1968 M. Woodhouse Rock Baby v. 43 A Director who has to offload one of his staff and is embarrassed. and, 2001 FourFourTwo Sept. 104/3 Lazio were prepared to offload Juan Sebastian Veron because they had secured the services of Italian playmaker Stefano Fiore. But the OED doesn't have any ...


4

We use the pronoun on when saying that something happens on individual days: on Monday on 4th January on Independence day on her birthday on Valentine's day on that day We also use at for points of time in the day: at 5 pm at midnight at noon at dawn at lunchtime at zero hundred hours The original poster need on here, because the given time is a day: ...


4

It is sense 4 of the verb fiddle per the OED. It has been around since at least 1630 and Daniel Defoe was using it in 1703. Interestingly the nounal use is said by the OED to be of US origin, and dates from more recently. Verb trans. and intr. To cheat, swindle; to ‘wangle’, intrigue; (see also quot. 1850). Also with into, out of. Now only slang. 1630 ...


4

In answer to question 1, you can't crash 'into' a bend unless there is something to crash into... If there wasn't, one might say: 'came off (the road) at the bend and (then) crashed into a ___ (tree/house/giant grand piano)' As for your examples: 7) Reading the rest of the post, the person is not very literate, example can be discounted as poor ...


3

I think the best option would be a disingenuous question. Brainstorming some more ideas: Trick question. A question designed to show someone up. Insincere, testing question. A question designed to catch someone out or show their ignorance. Malicious question. Uncomfortable question.


3

test \ˈtest\ noun -MW 2,a : (2) something (as a series of questions or exercises) for measuring the skill, knowledge, intelligence, capacities, or aptitudes of an individual or group If (underlined) If you happen to be a troll, this question was a test of our gullibility; seeking the knowledge of if we're unbeknownst to your trollishness and how far ...


3

A pointed question; one that cannot be answered with a vague generalization, but only precisely. BTW "asking a rhetorical question" doesn't mean that you suspect the hearer(s) don't already know the answer. It means you are making a statement (perhaps of something that is obvious) more emphatic by expressing it as a question, for example "Do you want to be ...


3

While I am unable to offer a noun, there are a couple of adjectival descriptions which typify questions designed to achieve certain ends, which could prove useful, i.e., “tactical”, “calculated”. tactical adjective: of, relating to, or constituting actions carefully planned to gain a specific military end. • (of a person or their actions) showing ...


3

I think the closest term to what you're looking for is a trick question, defined by Wiktionary as: A complex question, whose wording hinders the ability to answer it correctly. Basically, these are questions designed to make the person answering fail. For example: - When did Elvis Presley die? - Is that a trick question? The King's not dead!


3

English is one of the two official languages of India, the second being Hindi. If any of your students want a job in any official government post, or a job where they have to deal with the government, speaking English will be a huge advantage to them. Being able to speak any other language is good for ones job prospects, and is in any case a fulfilling ...


3

Actually this is not a bad question. When you make a statement and the reply comes back "Noted," you can assume that you have been over-sharing, discussing topics the other person finds objectionable or uncomfortable, or violating some other social taboo. It is a one-word way of saying, "I don't wish to discuss this and I wish you would stop talking about ...


2

I have always thought the "bag" part to be an abbreviation of "baggage", which has long been a pejorative term for a woman, and still is in many parts of the UK and particularly (in my experience) Ireland. Grose's Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue (1823) confirms this sense of "baggage" BAGGAGE. Heavy baggage; women and children. Also a ...


2

Offload is used in the cases you mention to distinguish the action taken from the more commonly used disembark. Disembark is the normal word used for people getting off a conveyance (originally ships, but extended to airplanes, trains, buses etc.) but using disembark is a little bit ambiguous. Jane Doe was disembarked from the 9am flight this morning ...


2

How about a simple Hello? Or if the message is always in reply to some kind of request, you can start with Thank you for your request.. IMHO, you shouldn't waste time trying to make canned emails sound too natural or folksy. Everyone knows these are automated, and it will just seem disingenuous if you try to make it seem like it was written by a real ...


2

(I freely admit that my response better qualifies as a comment than an answer, but it won't fit in the space of a comment.) Yes, I think your explanation of how English became a lingua franca (or world language) is basically correct, though perhaps your explanation is an over-simplification. During the age of imperialism, Britain's empire spanned from ...


2

You may want to check here: http://howtopronounce.co/eczema The cons: it doesn’t indicate the location of the speakers. The pros: they are professional speakers.


2

I saw it wasn't listed so it took me an hour of googling to find this specific word for you. Depending on your intention of use this is a word that captures a different but similar meaning to what you said you are trying to find. Shibboleth A shibboleth (/ˈʃɪbəlɛθ/[1] or /ˈʃɪbələθ/[2]) is a word or custom whose variations in pronunciation or style can be ...


2

I proffer- Introducing the following concept is difficult but rewards/benefits will follow in the end.


2

This is certainly a timely question for readers in the United States: The final day for citizens to file their federal and state income tax returns without incurring a penalty for late filing is April 15. In the spirit of the impending dismal day, I'll focus on Mari-Lou A's third question: 3. Do Americans fiddle their taxes? What's the American English ...



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