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26

You can say that somebody has a six pack. informal - A man’s set of visibly well-developed abdominal muscles. Or perhaps even an eight pack. You can also say that someone has washboard abs or a washboard stomach, although commentators on this answer suggest that this is used more in fitness circles to describe a flatter, less "ripped" set of abs than ...


19

The referent is just elided here. You can read this as meaning "sick [friends]" or "sick [relatives]." The reason it sounds odd to British ears is that the current British colloquial usage of "sick" as a euphemism for "vomit" is overpowering any other interpretation for you. Since that colloquial usage is relatively unheard of in America, you are ...


17

I believe that "longstop" is referring to the cricket position, and that makes sense in context: the job of the longstop is to act as backup for the wicket keeper. If everything goes according to plan, they will never have to do anything - the wicket keeper will stop the ball. But, sometimes, due to a mistake by the wicket keeper, or an unexpected ...


17

The Phrase Finder explores three different possible origins in the following extract: Grass up: In 2005, British newspapers picked up on a story about a burglar who had stolen cash, jewellery and an African Grey parrot from a house near Hungerford, Berkshire. David Carlile, widely described in the press as 'feather-brained', explained to the police ...


12

The Collins English Dictionary simply defines "gone" in this context as meaning "past". The two are essentially equivalent. The use of "gone" emphasises that the time is after the one specified, without saying how long after. How long after isn't really important, it's the being after that matters. It's not really possible to pin it down more than that ...


6

Their sick is a noun phrase without any noun and with an adjective functioning as Head of the phrase. These are referred to by The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language as fused Modifier-Head constructions. We most usually see these with a definite article: the good, the bad and the ugly the rich the poor the blind Occasionally, however, they can ...


6

It appears to come from a dialectal variation of the verb to lie: to idle or lie about: Ligger: ‘Hangers on’ such as ‘music groupies’ for LIGGERS is an example of what it can mean, but it’s not the whole story. The Oxford English Dictionary provided the following: LIGGER noun [from verb ‘lig,’ + ‘-er’]: One who gatecrashes parties, a ‘...


5

Gone is used to say, usually imprecisely, that a particular time is now in the past (usually by a matter of minutes/hours). "It's gone 8 o'clock" means simply that it is now after/past 8. If it is still a moment within a few minutes of 8 then you would say "It's just gone 8". It can easily be invested with an elegiac and regretful sense. Absurdly ...


4

Such omissions are a stylistic consideration, and as such, they are dictated by the governing manual of style. The Chicago Manual of Style recommends one of the following: 2-em1 dash, to indicate missing letters. Thus if the missing place was Berkshire, one could write ————shire. (You'll have to pretend that the length of each of ...


4

According to World Wide Words the origin of go west — meaning to die, perish, or disappear is related to the idea of the sunset, as a figurative image of death: Go west seems anciently to be connected with the direction of the setting sun, symbolising the end of the day and so figuratively the end of one’s life. Going west has been linked to dying ...


4

Try ripped abs MW having high muscle definition


4

It is an archaic but correct usage: Sick (n.) "those who are sick," Old English seoce, from sick (adj). sick (adj.) "unwell," Old English seoc "ill, diseased, feeble, weak; corrupt; sad, troubled, deeply affected," from Proto-Germanic *seukaz, of uncertain origin. (Etymonline)


4

To supplement Josh61's answer, here (in chronological order) are four discussions not mentioned in the body of his answer. From Jonathon Green, The Dictionary of Contemporary Slang (1984): ligger n. a hanger on; spec. in entertainment industry: a freeloader (qv). fr. least important guest (?) or linger: hang around N[ew] M[usical] E[xpress]. From Paule ...


3

The likely quote is a bit different: The thing that used to worry him most was the fact that people always used to ask him what he was looking so worried about. He worked in local radio which he always used to tell his friends was a lot more interesting than they probably thought. It was, too – most of his friends worked in advertising. - The Hitchhiker'...


3

I always thought it was just short for "snake in the grass". Edit: I can't comment yet, and I'm not sure if it's acceptable to respond to comments below, so if not I guess it can be edited or removed. I disagree that the top sentence of this post was not an answer, when the question asks if there are "any other possibilities aside from the rhyming slang ...


3

For any colonial friends, it would sound very natural indeed, because of Bring me your tired, your poor, your ... huddled masses, et cetera. It is the same construction, omitting "persons," and implying group. Note too that "wounded" is also very commonly used in this way. "Bring me your wounded," "Bring the wounded here..." {Thanks to action movies ...


3

I may have a useful (and/or flawed) perspective on this, having been born English to American parents, then raised from the age of 2 through adulthood in the U.S. immersed in U.S. language and culture, but also watching lots of BBC and ITV imported television on PBS and reading Dick Francis and P.D. James novels; and then having moved back to England and ...


2

Sod this for a game of soldiers/bugger this for a game of soldiers: oath uttered when faced with a pointless or exasperating task popular expression dating back into the mid-1900s and possibly before this, of uncertain origin although it has been suggested to me (ack R Brookman) that the 'game of soldiers' referred to a darts game played (a ...


2

In my experience in the USA using 'please' can come across as overly formal/patronizing in some contexts, and absolutely necessary in others. Take into account the age and general manners of the other person. One phrase that you can use to avoid sounding patronizing that will typically still be considered polite/respectful: Excuse me, could you kindly ...


2

Actually, Merriam-Webster's Eleventh Collegiate Dictionary (2003) does have entries for both reoccur and reoccurrence—but it lists them under the entry for the prefix re-, which is where it puts words whose meanings differ from the root word(s) (in this case, occur and occurrence) only in adding "again" to each definition. The full-size Merriam-Webster's ...


2

The Collins Dictionnary agrees with The Grammarist: reoccur [ˌriːəˈkɜː] vb -curs, -curring, -curred (intr) to happen, take place, or come about again reoccurrence n Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003 recur [rɪˈkɜː] vb -curs, -curring, -curred (intr) 1. to happen again, ...


2

[Arthur Dent] was about thirty as well, dark haired and never quite at ease with himself. The thing that used to worry him most was the fact that people always used to ask him what he was looking so worried about. He worked in local radio which he always used to tell his friends was a lot more interesting than they probably thought. It was, too – most of his ...


2

The expression to have someone's guts for garters is very old, from a time when it might well have been derived from a literal usage. But there is no clear evidence about it as suggested by the Phrae Finder. Probably, as suggested by World Wide Words, the use of alliteration and the use of similar phrases helped the saying become more popular in recent ...


2

You could also say: shredded abs. shredded — ODO 2 informal Having well-defined or well-developed muscles; muscular Example: a step-by-step plan that will help you achieve shredded abs in as little as 76 workouts


2

It is common to tell children It's [gone] well past your bedtime This simply means the hour which the children should have gone to bed has gone. The expression well past strongly hints that it is significantly later. Consequently, I would not understand gone past eight as meaning, as suggested by the OP, 8.50 pm. Dancing well past midnight, they ...


2

This isn't strictly an "answer", but I thought you would be interested to see this pot-pourri of spellings of cipher/cypher from the 16th century onwards. It is from sense 5 of the word cipher/cypher in the Oxford English Dictionary. Of course the word began life from the French cuffre (modern French chiffre) with an entirely different meaning (the figure, ...


2

As well as the straight expert answers already provided, you also have the common corporate concept of a subject matter expert or SME (also domain expert in certain contexts). Wikiref: A subject-matter expert (SME) or domain expert is a person who is an authority in a particular area or topic. I know Wikipedia isn't the best of dictionary-style ...


1

Try "fallback" as another one word synonym. Above answer is correct as to definition, its a cricketing term.


1

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