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This usage is not a universal in modern English. American dialects typically refer to a doctor's office as the building and/or room used for examination. The building may also be a clinic. The room itself may be called an examination room or, in most informal spoken English, an exam room. If the doctor is practicing within a hospital, they have an ...


8

Twopence, tuppence and threepence do still get said but are fading out of use. Thruppence was uncommon before decimalization and very rare now because there hasn't for a long time been a three pence piece. Pence are such a minor unit of currency now, people don't have so much need to refer to them. Ngram of all four words shows the decline (at least in ...


7

I have always heard the building as a whole called the "doctor's office", and the particular room where the doctor sees you the "examination room".


7

TL;DR This is like asking how many words are in the English language. Everyone is different, words are created everyday (and fade away slowly), so naming a specific number is misleading. But for a single idiom, you can compare it’s frequency of usage in the US vs UK using corpora (COA/BNC or Google NGrams) Details: First a general observation: for ...


5

Try: The phone call from him at the eleventh hour was the icing on the cake. Also, Kristina was magnanimous enough to let me use one from her post: The phone call from him in the nick of time was the icing on the cake. (Oxford)


4

"The phone call from him at the last minute was the icing on the cake" Last minute Noun - The time just preceding a deadline or when some decisive action must be taken. www.dictionary.com Although this phrase seems to be specifying the last minute before the deadline expires, it is actually understood to mean just before the deadline and ...


4

There is also the widely used "consultation room", although many dictionaries apparently have "consulting room" instead.


3

"threepence", "elevenpence" are fine for spoken English; 'threppence' is well understood too. Even if the correct form is 3p. 11p. Three pee. Thruppence will only work if you are talking to the elderly. And even they will be delighted but unable to do the maths if you mention florins (10p), Half-crowns (twelve and a half pence), crowns (25p) ...


3

I don't know if those idioms are usable outside the US. If in doubt don't use them. There are some examples that I am not sure about if they are common in UK? go belly-up give someone the ax sharp as a tack top dollar gung ho not give a hoot stand a chance All these sayings are very, very common in UK and Australia. ...


3

"Just under the wire" means that something occurred just prior to the deadline (in the case of your birthday, midnight of the next day). "The phone call from him just under the wire was the icing on the cake." under the wire: Horse racing: At the very last moment; in the nick of time; barely within some accepted parameters or limits. "The report ...


2

As a Brit I can only take the BBC as an example of correct pronunciation; they have departments for these things. Though the fin/fine thing does occur, it seems to me both versions of the word are generally pronounced "fiynancial".


2

First, could I just point out that the Welsh are British, just not English. "I know that a good lot of people in Wales are pretty fluent in English. But is their English similar to that spoken in the rest of the UK? " The great majority of Welsh people have English as their first language. In the last census in 2011, sad to say, three quarters of Welsh ...


2

You'll occasionally hear these old fashioned words for numbers of pence in an informal colloquial setting, but it's rare and confined to older people. Also, some idioms which refer to pre-decimal money are still sometimes heard, for example "twopenny-hal'penny" (pronounced "tuppenny hayp-ny") is a colloquial adjective meaning "cheap, shoddy, or valueless. ...


1

They are both correct and usable, but "to be graduating" is better here. "Graduate" is a more general term - I graduated, I will graduate, I graduate - is refers more to the fact of the graduation achievement. You can be proud of graduating from that university, but you can say something like "I graduated from this university two years ago" without ...


1

I do not know what you mean by "As per phonetics 'go' is pronounced as 'go-v'". I can think of no English accent in which "go" has a /v/ (voiced labiodental fricative) sound. However, in many accents the vowel in 'go' is a diphthong, in which the second element is a mid-high rounded approximant /ʊ/ (roughly, the vowel in 'look' or 'put'): is that what you ...


1

I think it only applies to words with a latin root where the plural is imported from latin too? There's no general plural rule for "*x" words, just a few that follow an exception to the expected "*xes". Some other exception I can think of are axis -> axes (pronounced "akzeez") matrix -> matrices (maitrisseez) there's no : boxes -> boces foxes -> ...


1

I was finally able to access the Oxford English Dictionary, and Def. #2 is as follows: Wearisome in general; annoying, irksome, troublesome, disagreeable, painful. Obs. exc. dial. This does confirm that this is a known meaning then, but is limited to dialects.


1

Per the Google Books ngram server, even in the British English corpus, quiet as a verb has long surpassed quieten in frequency. The preference for quiet as a verb is stronger in the American English corpus, but both forms are found in both corpora, and in both of them quiet as a verb is and has been the more frequent. The OED uses quieten as a synonym in ...


1

Welsh accents have a lot of variety but there is a flow and musicality that is common to them and marks them out relative to other British accents. If you want to get a feeling for it quickly, you might look to one of the great names of 20th Century Welsh culture and explore some Dylan Thomas. In fact the ideal point might be to combine that with another of ...


1

It might originally, but that is just an assumption, come from the german language where you can use the word 'jaein' which is the combination of 'ja' and 'nein'.(yeah and nah) Probably through immigration this concept were transferred into the the English language(not necessarily from the german language but it is just an example)


1

Expanding on @jlovegren's comment: It turns are there are similar idioms in American, Indian, South African and New Zealand English. This concept has popular culture references in How I Met Your Mother and Punch Drunk Love. There is a study on this by the University of Pennsylvania. In the Australian case - there is a study: [K. Burridge and M. ...


1

Looks like it's to do with the bookmaking definition of odds (from dictionary.com): this ratio used as the basis of a bet; the ratio by which the bet of one party to a wager exceeds that of the other, granted by one of two betting opponents to equalize the chances favoring one of them: The odds are two-to-one that it won't rain today. In this ...


1

The first sentence is correct, although I would personally choose a synonym for the second use of address. What's the difference? Brown is going to address (speak in front of) the convention in July. He plans to address (speak about) the issue of low-income housing in his speech. Brown had addressed (spoken in front of) the convention in July. As a ...


1

Doctors see their patients in: doctor's offices, outpatient facilities, hospitals and clinics. Surgery is Chiefly British (unless you are in the operating room, being operated on by a surgeon.) I heard some doctors still make house calls.


1

Debrett's recommends us to pronounce Ma'am to rhyme with Pam. In my variety of British English, that is /Pæ:m/. My dialect exhibits the bad-lad split and "mam" has a long vowel. I pronounce Pam, palm, cat, and mum with four different vowels. I've never used the word ma'am in any context and I've never heard it used by any British-English speaker (except in ...


1

I can only speak for American English, and my observations are strictly based on personal experience. So: Telling time is undergoing a major change, due to the widespread use of digital clocks. When looking at an analog clock (with a dial face, hour and minute hands), the use of "past" and "til" come naturally. Furthermore, the use of approximate time, ...



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