Hot answers tagged

95

A milkshake usually contains only milk and ice cream. However, sometimes strawberries or bananas can be added. If the beverage is mostly fruit and ice, then I would call it a smoothie. If you add some milk, nuts, or ice cream to it I would still call it a smoothie. The key ingredients determine the name. So if it is mostly ice cream and milk, it's a ...


51

For most Americans, a milkshake is served as dessert (usually at the end of the meal), although it may also replace the main beverage for the meal if one is feeling indulgent. Milkshakes are generally not associated with breakfast. Smoothies, however, are generally viewed as a meal-replacement, most often for breakfast (when one is in a hurry to get to ...


22

The critical thing I would go with is to make it clear that the smoothies contain milk and nuts. It's not a given that a smoothie will contain either (in the UK, most contain yoghurt as the base ingredient, or are pure fruit), and if someone is lactose intolerant or allergic, it can range from embarrassing to catastrophic to get that wrong. For preference ...


19

The corpora I checked indicate that both forms are used on both sides of the Atlantic. The BYU-BNC British National Corpus has 32 instances of chaperon and 32 of chaperone from the 1980s to 1993. The Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA) has 277 instances of chaperone and 60 instances of chaperon from 1990 to 2015. (I excluded the spoken sections.) ...


12

If it's a lassi (which I know commonly are fruit, and sometimes use the pistachio nut or almonds) call it a lassi An American going on an assignment in India should understand "lassi" as a dairy-and-fruit beverage at a baseline and may be pleased by menu verisimilitude as a recipe of Indian origin.


12

It depends on what is in the drink and how thick the drink is. From Honeybell's Cookery: The main difference between smoothies and milk shakes is that fruit is the principal ingredient of the smoothie and ice cream is the primary ingredient of the milkshake. The link contains quite a bit more information, but that is the main point. There is also ...


9

The variant "chaperone" appears to be from a mistake: Chaperon: 1720, "woman accompanying a younger, unmarried lady in public," from French chaperon "protector," especially "female companion to a young woman," earlier "head covering, hood" (c. 1400), from Old French chaperon "hood, cowl" (12c.), diminutive of chape "cape" (see cap (n.)). "... ...


8

I went to tea with Stella once. Milk in first and Indian. English tea is served in a cup, of course, and usually with added milk. When Stella served the tea she put the milk in the cup first, not the tea. And the variety of tea she served was Indian (vs the default which I would presume to be Chinese).


5

According to Ngram the expression "oxbow lake" is used both in AmE and BrE. The expression was originally an AmE one: Oxbow: also ox-bow, mid-14c., "wooden collar for an ox," from ox + bow (n.1). Meaning "semicircular bend in a river" is from 1797, American English (New England); meaning "curved lake left after an oxbow meander has been cut off ...


5

equivalent to <thing> when two things may be substituted for one another Is there any British/American equivalent to the French phrase "broyer du noir"? equivalent for <field> when a thing is like something in another field "Mare" is the word for a female horse. What is the equivalent for dogs equivalent of <thing> is the same as ...


4

I have many Brits as friends here in Canada and what they call a smoothie, we also call a smoothie. A smoothie is fresh fruits and even veggies (carrots, broccoli, kale, etc) blended with juice or milk or with protein powder. You can also add nuts. You can add just about anything and it's still a "smoothie." But some of the commenters are correct, people do ...


3

It means the woman looked like she was between the ages of 20 and 30. As @jera notes, it doesn't disclose her true age.


3

It appears to be a common mistake that has become a variant of the more common, correct spelling fine-tooth comb: Fine Toothcomb - Fine-tooth Comb: Brush your teeth, but don’t comb them. Although the spelling “fine toothcomb” is common enough to be listed as a variant in dictionaries, it looks pretty silly to people who prefer the traditional ...


3

The earliest use I could uncover was in the June, 1883 volume of The Indian Forester: OED Online attests the use in forestry with this 1895 quote: W. Schlich Man. Forestry III. i. 36 Under ‘form factor’ is understood the proportion which exists between the volume of a tree and that of a regularly shaped body which has the same base and height as ...


3

So, for me (UK), the two words are quite distinct. Tidying involves put things back in their 'right place' whereas cleaning involves the removal of dust and dirt (often involving liquid 'cleaners').


3

Well put it this way. The verb 'to clean' is different to 'to tidy'. They can overlap in the context of say, 'cleaning/tidying your room' implying that a mess needs to be cleared. Another contextual situation where they don't overlap would be 'to clean the mud on floor' or to 'tidy the books on the shelf'. You wouldn't 'tidy the mud on the floor' nor ...


3

For the name Calvin, it's like the a sound in 'callous'. I've never heard any British person pronounce it the other way.


3

Some personal observations that won't fit in a comment box. Firstly, as a rule of thumb it seems better to use such noun phrase Adjuncts of duration (i.e. those which occur with numbers, e.g. five minutes, three days, a year) with stative verbs, verbs that describe situations and not real actions: I've lived here three years. I've been in the marines five ...


3

As for it's contemporary usage, I have nothing to add. But historically, the singular form of “tidings” is simply “tidings” (not “tiding”), per, for example, Shakespeare, and others since, but it doesn't seem to have been used this way for the last hundred years or so. See the following entry from Josephine Tucker Baker's Correct English, how to Use it: A ...


3

Depending on the context, the verb must can be used performatively. The verb have (to) cannot very easily with third person Subjects. What I mean by performatively, is that the actual uttering of the sentence is not a description of the necessity, but a directive, whereby the speaker is exerting their authority over the Subject just by uttering the sentence. ...


2

Originally, the words four and forty obviously have the same root, but they were actually pronounced with distinct vowel sounds in many past dialects of English, and still are in some present ones. These two vowel sounds are those of FORCE and NORTH (to use John Wells's lexical sets). If you pronounce these words with the same vowel sound, it means you have ...


2

Both forms appear to be used in AmE and BrE as shown below. Manyfold is used as an adverb while manifold is an adjective and a noun: (ODO) Ngram manyfold, Ngram manifold Manifold: Old English monigfald (Anglian), manigfeald (West Saxon), "various, varied in appearance, complicated; numerous, abundant," from manig (see many) + -feald (see ...


2

My impression of form factor in the sense of "size, shape, and design of an electronic product" is that it is what Wilson Follett, Modern American Usage (1966) calls a "popularized technicality": popularized technicalities. ... In our time what is technical and professional is in high repute; what comes from the amateur is regarded as amateurish. ...


2

Taking the Mickey Tease or make fun of. It's a slang phrase, used primarily for jovial mockery, it's often light hearted. Source: Phrases.org.uk


2

I learned a simple trick a long, long time ago that still serves me to this day when dealing with prepositions, which admittedly, as a native speaker come naturally to me but I still found this useful. If you turn the sentence around to lead with the prepositional phrase, would it still make sense? Let's try it out... To the French phrase "broyer du ...


1

CERFL, the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages, is a guideline for progress in the learning of languages. It specifies the level of mastery of language in 6 stages, A1, A2, B1, B2, C1, C2 from beginner to mastery. It doesn't specify expected vocabulary numbers for each stage but others have found them experimentally for different ...


1

J. A. Fleming (mentioned in JEL's answer) is likely the person who coined the term form factor for the study of electromotive force. Mr. Fleming writes in his article "The Form Factor of Alternating-Current Curves" for The Electrical Journal (1896): In the design of alternators ..., we have frequently to consider the relation between the true mean ...


1

You could just as productively ask "why Gaelic culture" and "why Gaelic Languages?" if you find that you don't have the same hesitations with that usage... then your hesitation really is your own political perceptions and not Linguistic. But let's look at the linguistic effects here though. You're right, it's not the Romans. The Romans delineated the ...


1

To, for, of or none of the above. None of the above (foregoing): Professionally trained translators don't talk about equivalents or equivalency. They talk about equivalent meanings or equivalency of meaning. Therefore, one would say it like this: Is there a British/American phrase that is equivalent in meaning to the French phrase "broyer du noir"? That ...


1

A milkshake is usually milk with artificial flavoring and lots of sugar. It it not a suitable drink for breakfast. In contrast, a smoothie is liquidised fruit. It is better for breakfast. So that is what you should say is being served.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible