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Although your example is quite broken in terms of grammar but this depends upon where you want to use them. Infinitive: All we should do is to train our workers. Gerund: You and I should be training our workers! Bare infinitive doesn't fits in your example. The idea is 90% of the times we use Gerunds that is, adding an '-ing' and that sounds normal in ...


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You are confusing two very different English idioms using HAVE† + VERBinfinitive In the construction with the marked infinitive (to VERB), HAVE has a modal sense, approximately equivalent to must. My car has to be fixed. = My car must be fixed. Don has to fix my car. = Don must fix my car. My car has to be fixed. = My car must be fixed. ...


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Sometimes, the infinitive is 'to-less', meaning the 'to' is omitted. This is usual when the infinitive is used as an object complement to the previous verb. "Let's go to the mall and shop." In this sentence 'to the mall' is an adverbial prepositional phrase answering where to go, but 'shop' is a to-less infinitive. It's similar to how one would say, ...


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The bare infinitive is used because the construction used is: have [someone] do [something]. This is a special use of the verb have, which means something like "order or cause someone to do something". She had me copy the documents. They had her remove the lens cap. The verb recommend can be constructed with a noun as an object: I recommend ...


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Seem here is the infinitive. It, anyway, is an object, not a subject (consider: her hat makes her seem aloof, not makes she seem aloof). The infinitive, appearing without the preposition to, is called the bare infinitive. A discussion can be found here: http://www.grammaring.com/make-object-bare-infinitive



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